April 19, 2019, 08:39:58 PM

Author Topic: Why the World Cup is bad for South Africa  (Read 601 times)

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Offline Zeppo

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Why the World Cup is bad for South Africa
« on: May 04, 2010, 07:48:32 AM »
Why the World Cup won't make money

In South Africa, a third of the population lives on $2 or less a day.

In rural Nelspruit, where many of the locals live without electricity or running water, four World Cup games will be played in a state-of-the-art, 46,000-seat structure that was built at a cost of $137 million.

The South African government has spent an estimated $6 billion on World Cup-related infrastructure, from new stadiums to transportation improvements.

The justification for the monumental cost of hosting this summer's World Cup: an economic bonanza; a watershed moment for the African continent; an investment that will reap handsome rewards; an opportunity to attract foreign investors.

All these arguments are tenuous at best.

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"Donovan was excellent. We knew he was a good player, but he really didn't do anything wrong in the whole game and made it difficult for us."
- Xavi

Offline Zeppo

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Re: Why the World Cup is bad for South Africa
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2010, 08:39:47 AM »
This South African fan disagrees and lists 9 reasons why the tournament will be great:

What the World Cup means to a South African
"Donovan was excellent. We knew he was a good player, but he really didn't do anything wrong in the whole game and made it difficult for us."
- Xavi

Offline Zeppo

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Re: Why the World Cup is bad for South Africa
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2010, 04:34:45 PM »
World Cup 2010: The coming out party that will make a mint for Fifa

As flags sprout from doorways and cars, the organisers' vision of the World Cup as the ultimate "nation building" event, helping write a new chapter in the country's post-apartheid history, appears justified. "It's about bringing a country and society that had been virtually at war for many years together in a new democratic, non-sexist South Africa," Jordaan declared in a speech at Stamford Bridge in March.

And yet. The South African media has loudly questioned whether the World Cup will do more for Fifa, which has banked a record $3.2bn (2.2bn) in media and marketing revenues, and its sponsors than the host country and its people. The global governing body argues that those revenues fund its development work around the world and everything it does in the four years between World Cups. Under its profitable model, costs are borne by the host nation and all marketing and media revenues retained by Fifa.

(continue)
"Donovan was excellent. We knew he was a good player, but he really didn't do anything wrong in the whole game and made it difficult for us."
- Xavi