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Offline palos

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #90 on: December 23, 2016, 11:34:27 AM »
Ah wonder if Marvin Olvier could get a bligh?

Hardest still playin in passa passa league?

What age was Latas when they call him back and he rescue us vs GUA?


Russell Latapy is a once in a generation (if yuh lucky) kind of footballer.

All due respect to Carlos Edwards  (who is one of my favorite T&T ballers) but eh eh anywhere near a Russell Latapy
Carlos "The Rolls Royce" Edwards

Offline Deeks

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #91 on: December 23, 2016, 12:04:40 PM »
Carlos was an offensive player who could play excellent Defence if called upon to do so. His performance iVS Sweden was one of the best by any TT player ever, given the situation we were in at the time of the game in the WC. Was Latas a great mid field player with superlative vision? ABSOLUTELY. But he was never required to play defense.

Offline palos

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #92 on: December 23, 2016, 12:17:44 PM »
Carlos was an offensive player who could play excellent Defence if called upon to do so. His performance iVS Sweden was one of the best by any TT player ever, given the situation we were in at the time of the game in the WC. Was Latas a great mid field player with superlative vision? ABSOLUTELY. But he was never required to play defense.

That game vs Sweden was in 2006

We're now in 2016

Do you think that 10 years later, Carlos Edwards can play that kind of defense?

If you truly believe so, I have an igloo in Sea Lots to sell you
Carlos "The Rolls Royce" Edwards

Offline Flex

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #93 on: December 23, 2016, 12:23:02 PM »
Carlos was an offensive player who could play excellent Defence if called upon to do so. His performance iVS Sweden was one of the best by any TT player ever, given the situation we were in at the time of the game in the WC. Was Latas a great mid field player with superlative vision? ABSOLUTELY. But he was never required to play defense.

That game vs Sweden was in 2006

We're now in 2016

Do you think that 10 years later, Carlos Edwards can play that kind of defense?

If you truly believe so, I have an igloo in Sea Lots to sell you

I taking Carlos over Cyrus on that right wing...

Hart told me a month ago that Carlos making players in the Pro League look like school boys...

 ;D

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline palos

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #94 on: December 23, 2016, 12:33:18 PM »
Hart told me a month ago that Carlos making players in the Pro League look like school boys...

 ;D


Interesting.

Yet these are the players the Federation and new coach are counting on to get us through the Hex and qualify for Russia 2018

Carlos Edwards....at 38 years old....who cannot be guaranteed a starting spot in an english 2nd division team....is making Pro League players look like school boys.

You interested in that igloo bruh?  ;D

Carlos "The Rolls Royce" Edwards

Offline Flex

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #95 on: December 23, 2016, 12:50:26 PM »
To be honest Palos...

Dwight was dropped in central midfield at 36 and did relatively good, in-fact our best player. Latapy was 38 too.

Calos is no Dwight or Latapy but could adapt the same role if he don't have the legs to run right wing back?

Just a thought, you never know.

At this point in time like always- don't matter who incharge we always in a quick-fix position.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline kounty

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #96 on: December 23, 2016, 12:59:57 PM »
I like the discussion. I take in a couple games with Carlos online and he was handling it (mainly just because of great football IQ). All them sh!t goals we (Cyrus mainly) gave up Carlos wouldna give up. But gosh boy he real slow down and might get beat for share pace...but I don't know...he was known for pace so maybe he could build it back up? (Merlene Ottey take olympic bronze @ 40). Either way this is the one thing they try i give them credit for.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #97 on: December 23, 2016, 04:50:36 PM »
Palos, things are bad at defense at this moment. Carlos is' or should be a short term project. If he was to go GC, then it shows how bad things are in the RB position. I or we had high hope on Cyrus, but he has not instilled confidence in lots of games. The other option is to play Cato. But we need speed and some skill up front. Unless there is a RW plenty better than Cato. Name somebody. Carlos is short term. Or should be short term. And I eh interested in an igloo unless Kim Kardashian in it by she self.

Offline maxg

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #98 on: December 23, 2016, 07:28:33 PM »
Palos, things are bad at defense at this moment. Carlos is' or should be a short term project. If he was to go GC, then it shows how bad things are in the RB position. I or we had high hope on Cyrus, but he has not instilled confidence in lots of games. The other option is to play Cato. But we need speed and some skill up front. Unless there is a RW plenty better than Cato. Name somebody. Carlos is short term. Or should be short term. And I eh interested in an igloo(in Sea Lots) unless Kim Kardashian in it by she self.
:rotfl:
now that is what I call a (brain) dead body of water or ah river of (sad)dreams

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #99 on: January 01, 2017, 10:41:56 PM »
Carlos, yuh will FEEL de weight of that armband. It eh no free ride, iz ah rollercoaster. Strap een, soldier!

Cornell say he eh there to keep tabs on wayward conduct. Fair enough.

Note: you eh have that luxury.
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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #100 on: January 02, 2017, 10:52:05 AM »
< pissp00r% match fit

Offline Tallman

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Roker Report meets... Carlos Edwards! (part one)
« Reply #101 on: July 03, 2017, 04:53:25 PM »
Roker Report meets... Carlos Edwards! (part one)
By Graham MacMillan-Mason (rokerreport.sbnation.com)


RR: Alright Carlos! Thank you for taking time out to chat to us at Roker Report. We always start with a nice easy one. Who would be your SAFC XI from your time at the club?

CE: With me in the team?

RR: Yep! Of course.

CE: Wardy in goal, then it would have to be big Nyron at the back. I'll pair him with Jonny Evans. Danny Simpson and George McCartney. Me on the right, Liam Miller and my fellow countryman Dwight in the middle, Ross Wallace on the left. Upfront I would choose Daryl Murphy and David Connolly. I thought they were a good combination and I’ve got two Trinidadian’s already, so I’ll leave Kenwyne out for them!

RR: You played against us for Luton Town the previous December, setting up a goal in a 2-1 defeat. Shortly afterwards Roy Keane bid £1.5m for you and you were on your way to Sunderland. How did the move come about and what did you know about Sunderland?

CE: I knew about Sunderland because of Kevin Phillips and big Quinny. I used to look up to players like that as a young professional earlier in my career. I knew that Dwight had moved from Sydney that year. There had been some rumours Sunderland and West Brom were looking at me whilst I was at Wrexham actually, but I never paid it any mind - I was just a young boy enjoying playing in English football.

I remember it (the move) like it was yesterday: it was a Monday, Luton played Cardiff at on New Years Day at Kenilworth Road. I got a phone call from my agent on the way home and he said I had to travel up the next day to talk to Sunderland. I remember looking at the miles and thinking "Jesus Christ! Look at the distance!"

Dwight called me in December and asked if I would fancy the move too; said he’d put a good word in, but I never expected anything to come of it. The rest, as they say, is history.

RR: How was the first meeting with Roy Keane?

CE: You don’t know what to expect do you (laughs)? I did the medical and met Roy, I had watched him on TV for years, but when you meet the individual it's totally different to your expectations. In terms of physical stature I remember thinking "he’s just a scrawny little guy like myself!"

He was polite. He told me exactly what it is he wanted, what he wanted to build and how he wanted to push for promotion. We were twelfth or thirteenth at that time, but he spoke about promotion even then. He bought a few more alongside myself afterwards and sometimes it just clicks.

When we lost at Colchester 3-1, I was just thinking "oh no", but the experience he had an an individual across his time in football helped us, plus the experience we had in the squad helped. That's what helped us to go on such an amazing run in the first place.

RR: What was it about the club and your own performances at that time that worked so well?

CE: When you come to Sunderland, you have no choice but to perform because of the atmosphere at the Stadium of Light; even away from home - the amount of fans that always travel, it blows your mind!

As a player, you can’t help but embrace the Mackems, as they call us. They’re true fans, they’re real true supporters through thick and thin, they’ll back you to the hilt - and they did that. With that support behind you it pushes you on.

In regards to the team, the chemistry was a different class. The players we brought on board fitted into the puzzle. Having Niall around the place felt like a relief too.

RR: You say 'we' when you refer to Sunderland....

CE: I still say ‘we’ when I talk about Sunderland because I feel I am still part of Sunderland.

RR: Is it the best you've played in your career?

CE: Yeah, I think so. It was the best time of my career in English football. I always talk to my missus about that. It was really enjoyable.

I still reminisce about that time. Me and my missus still talk about the time at the area. It’s what a player lives for. It's special to have been part of those times I had at the club and builds an affinity between us both. I'm proud to have played for Sunderland.

RR: What are your memories of that Burnley game and THAT goal?

CE: (Laughs) Yeah, that goal! The manager always used to say "hit the target" because even if the keeper saves it could be palmed out and go to the striker to tap in.

It all happened so quick; it was a great counter attack. As soon as I received the ball from Daryl I thought I could shimmy a little or something, but what made my mind up was my first touch; it was as perfect as I could have hoped. I had a little glance, got my head down - I don’t think I’ve ever hit a ball so well. Straight into the top bin.

I did a little shimmy celebration with my shoulders; it was to show I was over my injury I sustained against West Brom. To be honest I didn’t even know how to celebrate though! I was thinking to myself "Jesus Christ!"

That game was typical us though wasn’t it? We always make it hard. We’re cruising the in the game, we miss chance after chance, miss a penalty and all of a sudden Burnley are in the lead. I couldn’t let Wade Elliott get the best goal of the night though! You can’t go beating my goalkeeper from there, so I thought I had to beat him.

I still watch it on YouTube.

I like to watch it back and get goosebumps and watch the fans go crazy. In fact I went to do some training with a local team (in Trinidad) and one of the guys - he’s from Antigua - called me over and was telling me he was watching the goal on YouTube! People are still watching it ten years on - myself included!
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Offline Tallman

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #102 on: July 04, 2017, 11:52:33 AM »
Roker Report Meets... Carlos Edwards! (part two)
By Graham MacMillan-Mason (rokerreport.sbnation.com)


RR: The season after we got promoted, you pulled up with injury against Birmingham and spent months out. You returned against Derby only to suffer a broken leg. You were out for six months in total. How frustrating was that season for you?

CE: They gave me a timescale to come back from the first injury and in my first training session I pulled up. I think Roy started getting frustrated too. He sent me to a specialist in Finland. The specialist said it would of done more harm than good if they operated on it.

Eventually I got back and then broke my leg. It just felt like I never really got started that year. It was really hard because I was really looking forward to the season.

As a player you can’t dwell on it though, you just have to keep working hard - but I don’t think I came back the same player as before. Thing didn’t work out the way I wanted them to that year. It was a real kick in the face to be honest with you.

RR: Why do you think it went wrong the season after? Was it the players we brought in?

CE: I think at the time, in my opinion, the club didn’t seem in the best state as we hadn’t really had such a good season the year before, although we had stayed up.

Roy brought in some players but they were bad eggs. Their attitude, their approach to the game, training - everything. There were too many egos in the dressing room at once. Roy brought in players he thought he could mould into better players, better individuals - but he couldn’t control them. It went tits up and he had enough.

Northampton in the cup game he kicked over the tactics board. He went absolutely mental. He was really angry! I don’t think Jet Li would have done a better kung fu kick than that! Yorkie put that in his biography as you know.

RR: What was Djibril Cisse like then?

CE: We all liked Djibril, he was a good guy. He was like a French Roy Keane. You never knew what you were going to get with him. We used to take the mick out of him because of his hair; but he didn’t care - he was just being himself and that’s why we liked him.

Others players were just too arrogant though, too self absorbed and not right for that football club. It felt sometimes more like a fashion show than bloody footie!

RR: You got back into the side under Ricky Sbragia and played in the derby game at St. James. What was your personal experience of playing in a derby?

CE: It was my first time at St. James. It’s one of the better derbies I’ve played in, the whole atmosphere and the fans getting at each other. It’s a game that is special.

When Cisse scored we did that celebration together. You’ve just scored against the Geordies, you go mad. You just enjoy it!

I remember getting booed and I just smiled at them; like I always do! I kill people with kindness! You use more muscle to frown than you do to smile!

RR: You ended the season in the team but when Steve Bruce came in he seemed to allow you to go quite easily - were there issues with Bruce or was he completely honest? Any regrets about leaving?

CE: He didn’t give me a chance.

It was down to Niall who had to convince me to go, because I was going to stay and frustrate him - but that wasn’t me, I wasn’t that type of person or player but I just felt I wasn’t given the script fairly. Be honest with me from day one, I would prefer that. I felt I was told one thing, and when the time comes it’s something completely different. If I’m not going to be part of sometime plans, just tell me.

In the end I had to do what was right for me and my family. I had to move to remain sane and my time had come to end with Sunderland. I would never regret those two and half years at Sunderland though, never.

RR: Do you still speak to the likes of Kenwyne, Dwight and Stern John? How handy was it to have a fellow Trinidadian at the club?

CE: It was good. I had never had any Trinidadian’s around for me so long at the other clubs; it was refreshing. We all really got along well. I could talk to them in my Trinidad accent! We all had a good relationship before we were at the club.

Stern John is one of the assistant coaches for one of the clubs I’m associated with here in Trinidad, Kenwyne and I still meet with the national team. We’ve all got a good relationship still.

RR: What are your thoughts on Sunderland currently? With the appointment of Simon Grayson what are you hopes for the club?

CE: I’m optimistic. I always remain positive. I don’t think anyone expected us to win the league in 2006/2007 with the way we started. This could be the start of something special. You never know.

I don’t know which players are going to be there. I know that some big players have left and it’s going to take a little while. We all know the Championship is hardcore: you can spank a team by five or lose by five a week later. You have to be positive though.

Simon Grayson is going to have a full pre-season and I’m sure he’ll identify players to bring in and go for promotion. I know more than anything that the fans will show the support like they always do.

RR: Thanks so much Carlos for taking the time to answer our questions, you're a gentleman. Good luck in the future!
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline 100% Barataria

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #103 on: July 04, 2017, 04:32:12 PM »
Up to Friday gone I watch that Burnley laser, was special.  Rolls Royce!!
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Offline Tallman

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SSFL Graduates – Carlos Edwards: Intercol was the real deal
« Reply #104 on: October 19, 2017, 05:42:59 AM »
SSFL Graduates – Carlos Edwards: Intercol was the real deal
SSFL Media


Carlos Edwards first entered the spotlight on the local football stage during his playing days as a member of the St Anthony’s College team in the Secondary Schools Football League.

His first taste of success came at the 1997 Intercol when he helped the Westmoorings “Tigers” to the National title in a 1-0 victory over then favourites St Benedict’s College before a packed crowd at the Queen’s Park Oval. Edwards and former national team striker Nigel “Pistol” Pierre were both members of the team coached by Nigel Grosvenor.

In this edition of SSFL Graduates, Edwards tells us how playing in the SSFL helped prepare him for his life as a professional footballer.

“Some of my best days of playing the game at home here in Trinidad and Tobago came during the Intercol or the SSFL seasons when I played for St Anthony’s College.

“I always had a love for the game but during my time at St Anthony’s was when I really began to take the game seriously and there was a real love that developed. When you realise how popular the league was, we were pulling bigger crowds than regular senior men football and every week we were playing in front of hundred and sometimes thousands of people even in the regular league matches. And once Intercol came around well that was a whole different story,” Edwards said.

“I remember when we played the Final of the Intercol it was a the biggest thing happening in the country that day. There were thousands of people coming from south to support St Benedict’s and we were the underdogs but people came out. I remember the Oval was packed out because there were people all on the track at the time and the Carib stand was full of supporters. After we won that game I think I can safely say that was the memorable final I ever played in this country,” said the 38-year-old  Edwards  whhas made 97 appearances for Trinidad and Tobago.

The former 2006 T&T World Cup player played professionally for Defence Force before moving on to play for Sunderland in the English Premiership as well as other clubs such as Wrexham where he lined up alongside current T&T head coach Dennis Lawrence, a former player with Malick Senior Comprehensive; Luton Town, Ipswich Town, Millwall and Wolverhampton Wanderers. His career in England and Wales spanned just under fifteen years. In 2011, he was named Ipswich Town captain and was later named the Players’ “Player of the Year” for the 2011/2012 season. While at Wrexham, he was named in the PFA’s Third Division “Team of the Year” on two occasions. in 2007, his 80th minute winner against Burnley confirmed Sunderland’s promotion to the Premiership.

His first club after coming out of St Anthony’s was Queen’s Park Cricket Club before he joined the Defence Force, going on to win the Pro League title in 1999.

“I will encourage any player who is seeing football as a career to give it a go at the Secondary Schools Football League. Things have changed a lot since my time but I still think the Colleges league plays a significant part in a player in terms of his love for the game and his early development. If you look at a lot of the players who have gone on to do great things such as Russell Latapy, Stern John, Shaka Hislop, Dwight Yorke and more and then players in the spotlight today such as Kevin Molino and Kenwyne Jones, they all passed through the SSFL.

“Of course more can be done in terms of development and that is there the football powers have to bridge the gap with the SSFL to ensure we have the right system in place to go places. We have to ensure we do not miss players who may fall through the cracks after the schools season comes to end But like I said, the SSFL was a big avenue for me and it helped me to develop an appetite for the game and prepare me for my career that followed.
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Offline kounty

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #105 on: October 19, 2017, 01:23:14 PM »
Carlos was the real deal in SSFL. He consistently had (opposing) men going (the wrong way)!

Offline Tallman

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Former Ipswich Town captain Carlos Edwards joins Woodbridge Town
« Reply #106 on: December 21, 2017, 08:59:35 PM »
Former Ipswich Town captain Carlos Edwards joins Thurlow Nunn side Woodbridge Town
By Mike Bacon (East Anglian Daily Times)


Former Ipswich Town star Carlos Edwards has signed for Woodbridge Town.

The 39-year-old, who played almost 180 times for the Blues and was club captain, is just waiting for international clearance – Woodbridge manager Jamie Scales is hoping Edwards can go straight into the squad for the game at Whitton on December 27.

Woodbridge, flying high in Division One of the Thurlow Nunn league, are looking to get promoted back to the Premier Division – Edwards’ input will only help.

“I’m absolutely ecstatic,” Scales said.

“Carlos is a friend of one of our main sponsors. I spoke to Carlos in the last 24 hours and he has said he wants to help us get promoted.

“He’s already on the team group chat and the rest of the boys couldn’t be happier.”

Woodbridge entertain March Town this weekend and Edwards will be in attendance.

As well as Edwards, Woodbridge have also signed Aaran Shepherd and James Hubbard - two former ‘Peckers players.

“I feel as a club we are making a statement with these signings,” Scales said.

“There has been so much hard work going on at the club over the past four years or so. We want to get back into the Premier Division and I think this says much about the ambitions of the club.

“In the last few games, we have not been at our best and we have had a few matches called off recently and it has allowed us to reflect on a few things.

“Now hopefully we can get our momentum back.”

Edwards has recently been playing for Central Football Club – a Trinidad and Tobago professional football club, based in Chaguanas, that plays in the T&T Pro League.

His last English club was Millwall, where he was still playing in 2016 on a short-term deal.

Popular with Ipswich Town fans, Edwards played as a right winger under Roy Keane but switched to right-back when Paul Jewell became manager.

He became Ipswich captain in March 2012 and was voted the Players’ Player of the Year for the 2011–12 season.

His experience is sure to be of great use to what is primarily a young Woodbridge side.
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Offline Tallman

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Former Ipswich Town skipper Carlos Edwards: I’ll be giving my all at Woodbridge
By Mike Bacon (East Anglian Daily Times)


Former Ipswich Town captain Carlos Edwards is looking forward to bringing his experience to Woodbridge Town, and says he still takes every game ‘very seriously’.

The Trinidad & Tobago international, 39, who played almost 100 times for the Caribbean island, including in the 2006 World Cup Finals, as well as more than 170 times for the Blues, is back living in Ipswich after a spell in his homeland.

He’s looking forward to getting involved in coaching, as well playing for the Woodpeckers.

It’s a new challenge, but the amiable Edwards – a big crowd favourite with Town fans during his time in Suffolk – can’t wait to get going.

“I’m looking forward to it,” Edwards said.

“I’m glad to be part of it, as a team they (Woodbridge) are doing well, long may it continue. I just hope I don’t jinx it!

“I am going to be playing with the intention to help these guys. I’m not here to put pressure on them, some may feel a little intimidated by me, being an ex-pro. You can see it. But the more I speak to them, the more they know me.

“The way I see it, it would be unfair that having had such a long career I can’t give something back. It would be a bit selfish on my part.”

Edwards is still awaiting international clearance from Trinidad before he can make his debut for the Notcutts-based team, who are flying high in Thurlow One and look set for promotion back to Step 5.

The former Sunderland, Luton and Wrexham right-sided player has been impressed with what he has seen among the Woodbridge group.

“I took the warm-up the other day and I have trained with the team,” Edwards said.

“Even though they are in a low division to what I have ever played, these guys are passionate and have the talent. Like so many, these guys are taking time out from work and college to train and play and, from what I’ve seen, I don’t see why they can’t step up a division or two.

“They can do something with their careers if they are passionate enough to want it. I can’t wait to play and I take every game very seriously.

“If you get too cocky things can switch very quickly.

“If I don’t get my finger out and play seriously, I know, I’ll be battered. I always go on the pitch with a winning attitude.”
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline maxg

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #108 on: January 11, 2018, 05:32:39 PM »
“Even though they are in a low division to what I have ever played, these guys are passionate and have the talent. Like so many, these guys are taking time out from work and college to train and play and, from what I’ve seen, I don’t see why they can’t step up a division or two."

We want to go straight from High-School in a dot on the map to pro, Premier League and World Cup , because we have talent, and 200 ppl(if so much) come to see the boys play. ::)

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #109 on: August 08, 2018, 08:05:10 AM »
Luton v Sunderland: Carlos Edwards talks turbulent pasts at both clubs
By Alex Brodie (Sky Sports)


Few league clubs can claim a more volatile recent history than Sunderland, but their opponents on Saturday, Luton Town, have a strong case.

Between them, the League One clubs have accumulated five relegations, 16 managers and multiple changes of ownership and player sales since they were last in the same division 11 years ago.

Sunderland clinched the 2006/07 Championship title at Luton’s Kenilworth Road before the Hatters began a descent through the divisions, including financial problems, points deductions and a spell in non-league.

Despite appointing some big-name managers, Sunderland finished above 13th only once in their subsequent 10-year Premier League stay and dropped back to the Championship in 2017 before a successive relegation of their own last season.

Winger Carlos Edwards moved mid-season from Luton to Sunderland in 2006/07, so is in a good position to assess the various calamities that struck both clubs.

“At Luton, Mike Newell was a good manager. He did the best he could have done,” Edwards tells Sky Sports.

“We had a really good squad. But the board killed him in a way because he didn’t have the backing from them.”

Player sales
Under Newell, Luton were fifth 13 games into the 2006/07 season, but after complaining openly about player sales being the reason behind a drop in form, he was sacked in March.

“Players just started to go,” Edwards says. “Once one left, players were thinking: ‘I need to go as well.’ It was like they were standing in front of a gun waiting for the trigger to be pulled.

“That season, the team just went on a serious nosedive. Every time a club came in for one of the better players, it was the easy way out, they just sold them.

“Players moved on, things moved on then the club didn’t really recover until a few years ago.”

Edwards’ switch to Sunderland came over the festive period and was influenced by fellow Trinidad and Tobago player Dwight Yorke, who was playing for his former Manchester United team-mate and Sunderland manager Roy Keane.

Swapping relegation for promotion
By leaving mid-season, Edwards collected a title-winners’ medal rather than adding a relegation to his CV. Plus, he got to work with two legends of the game.

“Dwight phoned me after Luton played up at the Stadium of Light and asked if I was interested in moving. I saw it as a step up, no disrespect to Luton. I had the opportunity to play for one of the great former players in Roy Keane - and I look up to Dwight. He’s a hero and put Trinidad on the map. It was special.

“Luton told me I could go and have a chat and they had accepted a bid so I went for my medical and met Roy Keane.”

Keane, Yorke & the Premier League
Keane would later sign Edwards a second time when in charge at Ipswich, but Edwards was surprised on his first meeting with the famously intimidating Irishman.

“You’re expecting this big guy, but when you see him, he’s a very hard guy but actually quite small,” says Edwards.

“But I didn’t tell him that! I was so nervous. Imagine if I’d gone in and said that - he’d have told me to go back to Luton!”

After Keane signed Edwards in January 2007, Sunderland won 15 of their final 19 league games, losing only once. Having started the season losing nine of their first 16 leagues games, it was quite a turnaround to go up as champions at Kenilworth Road in May.

“The way Roy rotated the team worked well. He gave players their chance and then if things needed to be adjusted, he would do it.

“It was a great team chemistry that led us to become champions.

“I had mixed feelings winning the title at Kenilworth Road. I did feel for Luton, but I had a job to do. They had already been relegated but I think the 5-1 scoreline rubbed salt into the wounds!

“Some fans booed me but I think more in frustration than at me leaving. At the end of the day, Luton bought me for nothing and got a few quid, they made a profit.”

Change of ownership
Keane, Yorke and Edwards won promotion to the Premier League, where Sunderland would stay until May 2017, but none of those three would last long as the club began to change.

American Ellis Short gained a controlling stake in September 2008 and Keane left shortly after to be replaced by Ricky Sbragia and, eventually, Steve Bruce. Short then bought the club outright in May 2009. For Edwards, this was a difficult time at the club.

“When a new manager comes in, they want a fresh start and bring in their own players because at the time, they feel the players can’t do it for them,” Edwards says.

“I had a word with Steve Bruce. I wanted to stay, but I didn’t want to be hard-balled, just sitting around, waiting and hoping. I wanted to play, I didn’t want to just sit on the bench and collect wages.”

Players' commitment
The difference is stark between the ethos installed by Keane and displayed by Edwards and stories of changing room disintegration at Sunderland in recent years, most obviously displayed in Jack Rodwell remaining at the club on high wages despite not playing.

“When I was there,” Edwards explains, “we had a cohesion and die-hard mentality. We knew, for the fans, we had to roll our sleeves up and do the work. And we did. We knew we had to be on our A-game every week.

“I think in the past two years, the players have not had a perspective that they would go out and do that.

“You can get away with driving along one or two players in a game, but if you are driving along three, four, five players then you have walking wounded. You need everyone on their game.

“Everyone was a bit lackadaisical, maybe just going through the motions and hoping because they're Sunderland, that it, it’s a guaranteed three points. No, it’s never a guaranteed three points. You have to earn, to work for it.”

Improving outlook
Edwards, 39, is still playing at Woodbridge Town in Suffolk, while completing his UEFA B licence at Ipswich’s academy and has spent time coaching the Trinidad U17s.

He feels Sunderland have turned a corner - Short sold the club last season after going through nine managers in as many years - and can stop the rot following successive demotions, but he warns that they will not find it easy in League One.

“They seem more settled now, a few have gone, they’ve been revamped. But they have to realise they are a big scalp in League One,” he says.

“Clubs going to the Stadium of Light are going to be in awe. A lot of players will never have played in stadiums like that. Clubs will want bragging rights and to be able to say: We won at Sunderland.”

Kenilworth Road may not offer the grandeur of the Stadium of Light, but Sunderland fans will be hoping on Saturday it can prove as fruitful a venue as it did on their last league visit to Bedfordshire.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Cocorite

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Re: Carlos Edwards Thread
« Reply #110 on: August 08, 2018, 02:31:27 PM »
Yes I remember the days. Add Kenwyn Jones and Stern John to that team.
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