April 26, 2019, 12:42:28 AM

Author Topic: DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa  (Read 3042 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21462
    • View Profile
DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa
« on: April 25, 2013, 12:51:21 PM »
DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa
cananewsonline.com


The history books have always indicated that the first inhabitants of the Caribbean were the Arawaks and Caribs.

But what those books have not indicated is that the indigenous people may have had strong ancestral links to Africa and to Native American Indians.

Recent work by the North American-based National Geographic Genographic Project on the Carib community in Trinidad, utilising Deoxyribo Nucleic Acid (DNA) has confirmed that members of the community in Arima, east of here, have very strong ancestral links to Africa and to Native American Indians.

The project involved testing 25 members of the 600-strong Santa Rosa First Peoples Community in July last year and according to Ricardo Bharath-Hernandez, who heads the community, the results will hopefully put to rest, the questions that have been raised regarding the community’s identity in the past.

The results of the project were released to Bharath-Hernandez late last month by Dr.Jada BennTorres from the University of Pennsylvania.

In her letter, she thanked the Santa Rosa Karina community for its participation adding, “we have completed preliminary analysis of the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome (NRY markers). These analyses will tell us about the maternal and paternal lineages of the community members.”

She said the findings of the genetic ancestry of community “indicate a complex ancestry that includes Africans, in addition to a very strong Native American ancestral component” and that all of the 25 individuals tested would receive their information at a later late.

She has also promised to release detailed findings of the analyses to the community.

Dr. BennTorres’s primary research area is the Anglophone Caribbean where she explores genetic ancestry and population history of African and Indigenous Caribbean peoples, according to her on-lin profile.

 A second area of her research “combines the tools and theories of molecular anthropology with molecular epidemiology in order to examine differences in the distribution of disease across human populations.  This work focuses primarily on women’s health, more specifically on the prevalence of uterine fibroids among African Americans.”

Bharath-Hernandez said not all members of the community were enthusiastic about the project and hence the reason why only 25 provided swabs for testing.

The results have coincided with the discovery of pottery artefacts and bone fragments by workers doing restoration works at the Parliament building last month. Officials believe that the discovery is a link to the Amerindian heritage dating back to AD 0-350.

Bharath-Hernandez who has already visited the site, says he is prepared to perform the necessary ancestral rituals once it is confirmed that the fragments are indeed Amerindian.
 
He said the community is also excited to participate in yet another Genographic Project in an effort to trace the paternal and maternal lineages of all of its 600 members.

Bharath-Hernandez said he is also seeking to construct a permanent home for his community on 25 acres of land.

“We plan to construct a modern Indigenous Amerindian Village, meaning we want to keep the village as authentic and traditional as possible but with all modern day amenities.

“It will comprise a main centre to be used as a meeting and cultural space which will be located in the centre of the village. Spiritual rituals will also be conducted there. There will also be an official residence for the Carib Queen, Jennifer Cassar.”

Bharath-Hernandez said there are also plans for a cassava processing plant to make farine, cassava flour, cassava bread and casaripe; a craft centre where the people will  be doing the indigenous craft, as well as an indigenous museum to display our artefacts.

The plans also call for the construction of a guest house to accommodate visitors and students who wish to do ethnographic studies.

“The plan is to have 10 to 12 families living there permanently and they would be responsible for the management of the place. We are also going to have an agricultural focus, consisting of wild life and crop farming.

“We intend to conduct eco-tours and nature trails, because the intention is to keep a major portion of land its natural form,” Bharath-Hernandez said, noting the need for a natural watercourse though the land, which he said would have been possible, had the State granted them the 200 acres they requested.

“There is one on adjacent lands, west of the village but that plot is privately owned and we may want to ask for that as well,” he said. Originally, he said the Amerindians were given 1300 acres of land.

 “We have evidence that the Mission of Arima was established and the land was lost to the British but with the UN Declaration and Rights of Indigenous Peoples, one of the articles states that governments should work with indigenous communities to redress some of those wrongs.”

But he is grateful for the 25 acres despite the long wait.

“The journey took 40 years to reach here, starting with (former prime minister) Dr. Eric Williams in the 1970’s, who, on a visit to Arima was approached by then Queen Edith Martinez for assistance for the Santa Rosa festival. He instructed the Arima Corporation to give a grant of TT$200 (One TT dollar = US$0.16 cents) which was used to register the community.

“That grant moved to TT$500 and now stands at $5000 a grant. Successive government over the years provided some assistance by way of small grants but the idea of 200 acres of land was first discussed with the Basdeo Panday administration in 1995.”

Bharath-Hernandez recalled that in 1990, the then government approved a $30,000 yearly grant, but it was in 1995 when the community met with Panday to discuss a request for 200 acres.

“The idea is that most of the land would remain in its natural formation, because of importance of forest to the indigenous community, it would not be cleared for commercial use,” he said, indicating that while the 25 acres were awarded in December last year, the community does not have any official document in its possession.

 “We have also not yet discussed under what terms the lands would be given, we are hoping it is not a lease arrangement  but a grant in light of the fact that the community once owned 1300 acres.

“It has been a long process, about 40 plus years, we are beginning to see some light at the end of the tunnel. It may not be finished in my lifetime but a major part would be established, “he said.

The community will on October 14 observes a Day of Recognition and the Carib Chief is hoping that with a permanent and spacious home, the community can do more to mark its heritage.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 16789
    • View Profile
Re: DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2013, 06:42:31 AM »
Should we be surprised by this DNA results. I would suspect that many people of Ameridian descendent in TT will have African DNA because of the history of the island. After their encounter with the Europeans, the little remaining Carib/Arawaks will have interacted with the freed African and Slave Africans, especially in that area of the country. There was no one else until the Brits brought East Indians. And then in a couple decades they were interacting with the mixed Afro/Amerindian population. Not surprised, but good to see it scientifically reseached.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2013, 11:01:26 AM by Deeks »

Offline D.H.W

  • Forever Man Utd
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 17935
  • "Luck Favours The Prepared"
    • View Profile
Re: DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2013, 09:26:40 AM »
No kidding.
"Evil is powerless if the good are unafraid."
Youtube Channel


Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 16789
    • View Profile
Re: DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2013, 11:02:08 AM »

Offline Controversial

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 6416
    • View Profile
    • Goldove Entertainment
Re: DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2013, 02:28:49 PM »
everyone's ancestry dates back to africa, not a surprise.
Down with "The HERD" aka "The Sorority Row"

Offline asylumseeker

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 14697
    • View Profile
Re: DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2013, 06:14:00 AM »
everyone's ancestry dates back to africa, not a surprise.

... I wondered when this would enter the discussion.

Offline Mr Fix-it

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3073
  • I Love 5 things,my 3 Babies/ManU/Wife in dat order
    • View Profile
Re: DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2013, 01:12:58 PM »
I'm african......
"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy

Offline Sando prince

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 8626
    • View Profile
Re: DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2014, 08:40:11 PM »
everyone's ancestry dates back to africa, not a surprise.


Bro apply some critical thinking nah

Offline Controversial

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 6416
    • View Profile
    • Goldove Entertainment
Re: DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2017, 01:17:44 AM »
everyone's ancestry dates back to africa, not a surprise.


Bro apply some critical thinking nah

What would you prefer me to say?

Humanity and its ancient migration patterns start in Africa, the First Nations came about in I believe the third wave of migrations, the first was to India

West African tribes traded with the First Nations in the Western Hemisphere long before Columbus sailed to NA, in fact certain west African kingdoms were sea faring and sailed, some of the earliest evidence can be found with mummies in Egypt and Sudan that have coca leaves in their tombs which indicates interaction and trading

So when someone brings up this article I choose to summarize, which I apologize if it comes across in the wrong way
« Last Edit: July 10, 2017, 01:20:07 AM by Controversial »
Down with "The HERD" aka "The Sorority Row"

Offline Controversial

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 6416
    • View Profile
    • Goldove Entertainment
Re: DNA links Trinidad Carib population to Africa
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2017, 01:28:29 AM »
Should we be surprised by this DNA results. I would suspect that many people of Ameridian descendent in TT will have African DNA because of the history of the island. After their encounter with the Europeans, the little remaining Carib/Arawaks will have interacted with the freed African and Slave Africans, especially in that area of the country. There was no one else until the Brits brought East Indians. And then in a couple decades they were interacting with the mixed Afro/Amerindian population. Not surprised, but good to see it scientifically reseached.

My great grandfathers family are from arima and he was half Carib... so I assume the article would apply to my family as well, but it doesn't surprise me
Down with "The HERD" aka "The Sorority Row"