February 22, 2019, 11:05:59 PM

Author Topic: De Guardian headline ... How dat making any kind ah sense?  (Read 631 times)

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Offline asylumseeker

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De Guardian headline ... How dat making any kind ah sense?
« on: February 06, 2018, 07:32:16 AM »
« Last Edit: February 06, 2018, 07:34:02 AM by asylumseeker »

Offline Deeks

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Re: De Guardian headline ... How dat making any kind ah sense?
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2018, 07:44:47 AM »
It reminds me of Patrick Chokolingo and the Bomb. And what if she is a LESBIAN?

Offline Jah Gol

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Re: De Guardian headline ... How dat making any kind ah sense?
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2018, 07:50:15 AM »

Distasteful in the extreme.

Power was recognized, but dignity was allowed to no one . Every person of eminence was held to be crooked and contemptible. We lived in a society that denied itself heroes.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: De Guardian headline ... How dat making any kind ah sense?
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2018, 12:39:49 PM »
So I see they "out" Michelle.  Are they trying to say she is not a worthy role model?

Apparently the Guardian has taken a new editorial path while neglecting the fundamentals of proofreading and editing.

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Re: De Guardian headline ... How dat making any kind ah sense?
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2018, 06:23:12 AM »
Fear factor; the Guardian’s disturbing headline story on Michelle-Lee Ahye
Dr. Emir Crowne, Letter to the Editor, Wired868.


Earlier today, the Trinidad Guardian devoted its entire front page to Ms Michelle-Lee Ahye, a sprinter of international standing. The headline, front page and accompanying story, however, were not devoted to her sporting prowess. Rather, the story consisted of an entirely sensationalised account of Ms Ahye’s personal life.

The Guardian indicates that a photograph of Ms Ahye and her partner, in a “compromising position”, was “leaked online.” It was a thinly veiled attempt by the Guardian to trade off the recent, and intense, interest in LGBTQ issues and rights.

Well, the marketing ploy failed miserably.

Irrespective of where one stands on LGBTQ rights, the story was shameful. It demeaned one of our island’s greatest athletes for no countervailing journalistic purpose. Not only was the premise of the story flawed, the merits of it too.

First, the impugned photo appeared on either Ms Ahye’s Instagram account or on an account of someone close to her. I’m not sure how this qualifies as a “leak”—but such is the language one uses in the quest for sensationalism.

Next, the allegedly “compromising position” is also fairly benign. It simply shows Ms Ahye and her partner taking a photo in a mirror, with Ms Ahye’s hand in an amorous position. It could also be said that the photo was Ms Ahye’s way of indicating that once taboo aspects of their relationship are no longer so, owing to the recent ruling in Jones v. AG.

Either reason matters not. It was a photo of two people in a loving relationship. Nothing more.

In fact, it is safe to say that the only “compromising position” revealed in this story is the lack of responsible journalism on the Guardian’s part. By placing the personal life of a private citizen on the front page of a national, daily newspaper, you are implying that the story is—quite literally—the most pressing item of public interest in Trinidad and Tobago that day.

Nothing could be further from the truth. The headline, the front page and the accompanying “story” were all highly sensationalised and nothing more than an ill-conceived ploy to increase sales and/or readership.

The story is also a continuation of the sheer disrespect that we show our national athletes. Athletes devote their bodies and lives to the service of our country, often with little or nothing in return. They deserve our utmost respect and certainly not the level of contempt shown by the Guardian today.

Indeed, on a day filled with stories surrounding the Windrush Generation and counterfeit pharmaceuticals, the Guardian’s choice to sensationalise a ‘non-story’ about Ms Ahye must be condemned. Perhaps the silver lining in all of this is tomorrow’s unqualified apology that the Guardian should issue, given that their editorial policy appears to be based largely around social media outrage.


Offline pull stones

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Re: De Guardian headline ... How dat making any kind ah sense?ced
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2018, 03:17:17 PM »
Fear factor; the Guardian’s disturbing headline story on Michelle-Lee Ahye
Dr. Emir Crowne, Letter to the Editor, Wired868.


Earlier today, the Trinidad Guardian devoted its entire front page to Ms Michelle-Lee Ahye, a sprinter of international standing. The headline, front page and accompanying story, however, were not devoted to her sporting prowess. Rather, the story consisted of an entirely sensationalised account of Ms Ahye’s personal life.

The Guardian indicates that a photograph of Ms Ahye and her partner, in a “compromising position”, was “leaked online.” It was a thinly veiled attempt by the Guardian to trade off the recent, and intense, interest in LGBTQ issues and rights.

Well, the marketing ploy failed miserably.

Irrespective of where one stands on LGBTQ rights, the story was shameful. It demeaned one of our island’s greatest athletes for no countervailing journalistic purpose. Not only was the premise of the story flawed, the merits of it too.

First, the impugned photo appeared on either Ms Ahye’s Instagram account or on an account of someone close to her. I’m not sure how this qualifies as a “leak”—but such is the language one uses in the quest for sensationalism.

Next, the allegedly “compromising position” is also fairly benign. It simply shows Ms Ahye and her partner taking a photo in a mirror, with Ms Ahye’s hand in an amorous position. It could also be said that the photo was Ms Ahye’s way of indicating that once taboo aspects of their relationship are no longer so, owing to the recent ruling in Jones v. AG.

Either reason matters not. It was a photo of two people in a loving relationship. Nothing more.

In fact, it is safe to say that the only “compromising position” revealed in this story is the lack of responsible journalism on the Guardian’s part. By placing the personal life of a private citizen on the front page of a national, daily newspaper, you are implying that the story is—quite literally—the most pressing item of public interest in Trinidad and Tobago that day.

Nothing could be further from the truth. The headline, the front page and the accompanying “story” were all highly sensationalised and nothing more than an ill-conceived ploy to increase sales and/or readership.

The story is also a continuation of the sheer disrespect that we show our national athletes. Athletes devote their bodies and lives to the service of our country, often with little or nothing in return. They deserve our utmost respect and certainly not the level of contempt shown by the Guardian today.

Indeed, on a day filled with stories surrounding the Windrush Generation and counterfeit pharmaceuticals, the Guardian’s choice to sensationalise a ‘non-story’ about Ms Ahye must be condemned. Perhaps the silver lining in all of this is tomorrow’s unqualified apology that the Guardian should issue, given that their editorial policy appears to be based largely around social media outrage.
Are you really shocked by this tabloid? I refuse to read the trinidad guardian and they should even lose the name guardian for their terrible antics and political afilliation which makes for biases in news reporting giving the english media house a bad repot with their tasteless journalism from whence the name GUARDIAN emanated.

I used to read this paper online years ago but their editing left much to be desired, and never mind the editing, if that was all then fine, but the comment section with the amount of awful racist feed back by citizens had me scratching my head yet countless emails to the editor and nothing was done so i stopped all together. then the express was asking for a subcription fee and who needs to pay for bad journalism in Trinidad and tobago, not me.

bottom line with these media houses in Trinidad is that they need to move away from politics and their affiliates and concentrate on tasteful proper ethical journalism, that’s what is needed on that island in the worst way.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2018, 03:19:42 PM by pull stones »