Soca Warriors Online Discussion Forum

Sports => Football => Topic started by: Tallman on September 09, 2009, 05:28:18 AM

Title: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Tallman on September 09, 2009, 05:28:18 AM
Warriors must show character now
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian)


As the realistic options of qualifying for the World Cup finals in South Africa slip gradually away from our grasp, it is obvious that the task is an uphill one. We must now take a complete overview, void of all the fantasy frills and magical happenings, and settle into making a thorough analysis of the Honduras defeat with the hope of finding ways and means to rectify the vulnerability which caused the demise. It is true to say that the USA will have a different approach to the Central Americans, but the fundamental deficiencies which showed themselves will need correction before new tactics can be applied. The most appropriate remedy can be found on the videotape of the game, where facts do not change, and players can recognise what they have done as opposed to what they should have done at different times.

For coach Latapy, his job is more complex, as he may have to reassess the individual performances in order to create a new form of strategy gainst the Yanks. Personally, I do not think the USA’s type of game is based upon any highly artistic or creative formula. They are always fit, however. They carry the pace of the game as fast as they can, through all parts of the field, and have the tendency to become more intense and aggressive when they enter their opponent’s final third. Immediately, one thinks of a higher workrate from Kenwyne Jones and Cornell Glenn in order to pressure the heavy footed America defence and sometimes even rob them of the ball within the confines of their own goal. Like our own central defenders, the USA also have the problem of weak ground players and thrive on their capability of strong aerial play.

The concept of building all attacks along the ground and preferably through their central defence has often caused their wing defenders to retreat and contract laterally. This mode tends to reduce their regular flank attack, causing less service from the wings when they attack, and forcing the Yanks to try for their barging behaviour through centre field. One is always fearful to ask our players to practice the art and effectiveness of mobility in attack where the opposition will have a hard time against the skill and speed of Cornell Glenn, adding Kerry Baptiste and Hayden Tinto to their woes.

This calls for criss cross movement, and sometimes the return to defensive shape when the ball is lost, becomes a huge problem. A specific ball winning midfielder is high priority, possibly Clyde Leon, who could get some source of assistance from the versatile Kenwyne Jones, with instructions to fight for the ball in midfield and run at the opposing defenders from deep positions, a feature of his game which has not been well utilised, either here in T&T or in the Premier League in England.

Maybe we should view the next few matches as wanting to win through improved performance and not a desperate dilemma where kicking and rushing become the order of the day. Its difficult to define self expression to players in whom anxiety and nervousness tend to live and who are are often afraid to do some of the things which they have mastered better than their opponents.

It was refreshing to see Hayden Tinto, who was brought on as a substitute, immediately dance around the Honduran Esquire and discomfort Chavez within minutes of the commencement of the second half. The players owe their full-fledged commitment to us, the supporters of this great nation, and playing good football is as much of an option as getting the three points. Good luck.

(http://guardian.co.tt/files/imagecache/article_main_image/articles/images/practice_0.png)
Title: Re: Warriors must show character now
Post by: maxg on September 09, 2009, 07:15:41 AM
"who could get some source of assistance from the versatile Kenwyne Jones, with instructions to fight for the ball in midfield and run at the opposing defenders from deep positions, a feature of his game which has not been well utilised, either here in T&T or in the Premier League in England."


for 6 yrs ah begging for this....ppl say he wasn't ready then, maybe they ready now
Title: Re: Warriors must show character now
Post by: King Deese on September 09, 2009, 07:24:30 AM
The people of TnT have to stand up and show character by not going to this game or any other game hosted by the TTFF for that matter. That is character.

A coup is needed here. Don't misunderstand me, I am not talking about one of violence but an organised protest outside the stadium or inside the stadium for those of you who can't help yourselves because you feel that you must support the TTFF, let me tell you that your money may not go to the players or to the development of a program, right now Joe Public need some money to develop their program whatever that shit maybe, it is time to show your disgust.

Viva.............
Title: Re: Warriors must show character now
Post by: Jumbie on September 09, 2009, 07:36:31 AM
time for the warrior spirit to take center stage. good luck today fellas.
Title: Re: Warriors must show character now
Post by: maxg on September 09, 2009, 07:41:03 AM
The people of TnT have to stand up and show character by not going to this game or any other game hosted by the TTFF for that matter. That is character.

A coup is needed here. Don't misunderstand me, I am not talking about one of violence but an organised protest outside the stadium or inside the stadium for those of you who can't help yourselves because you feel that you must support the TTFF, let me tell you that your money may not go to the players or to the development of a program, right now Joe Public need some money to develop their program whatever that shit maybe, it is time to show your disgust.

Viva.............

corrected
Title: Re: Warriors must show character now
Post by: weary1969 on September 09, 2009, 08:09:39 AM
The people of TnT have to stand up and show character by not going to this game or any other game hosted by the TTFF for that matter. That is character.

A coup is needed here. Don't misunderstand me, I am not talking about one of violence but an organised protest outside the stadium or inside the stadium for those of you who can't help yourselves because you feel that you must support the TTFF, let me tell you that your money may not go to the players or to the development of a program, right now Joe Public need some money to develop their program whatever that shit maybe, it is time to show your disgust.

Viva.............


If by not goin it would change something I would stay home because is curtain season sure I could use d money elsewhere. But since dat eh changin 1 ting goin and support d boys
Title: Re: Warriors must show character now
Post by: Themanfriday on September 09, 2009, 08:50:43 AM
The people of TnT have to stand up and show character by not going to this game or any other game hosted by the TTFF for that matter. That is character.

A coup is needed here. Don't misunderstand me, I am not talking about one of violence but an organised protest outside the stadium or inside the stadium for those of you who can't help yourselves because you feel that you must support the TTFF, let me tell you that your money may not go to the players or to the development of a program, right now Joe Public need some money to develop their program whatever that shit maybe, it is time to show your disgust.

Viva.............

corrected

COSIGN

Right now is not the time to start protesting but rather to support the boys. They need us now more than ever.

Together we aspire
Together we achieve
We are all in this together
Yes, I still believe
Title: Re: Warriors must show character now
Post by: Sam on September 09, 2009, 10:49:08 AM
Not a bad write up, but I waiting for Alvin comment on T&T under 17 team in Mexico, when we go get that boy ?
Title: Re: Warriors must show character now
Post by: Coop's on September 09, 2009, 10:56:41 AM
Not a bad write up, but I waiting for Alvin comment on T&T under 17 team in Mexico, when we go get that boy ?
     Sam,where is Lasana?i have not heard a comment from him a while now,he lost his job or what. 
Title: Re: Warriors must show character now
Post by: E-man on September 09, 2009, 11:42:19 AM
Not a bad write up, but I waiting for Alvin comment on T&T under 17 team in Mexico, when we go get that boy ?
     Sam,where is Lasana?i have not heard a comment from him a while now,he lost his job or what. 

Hope he turns up at another outlet soon. (maybe he's undercover for A. Jennings)
http://www.socawarriors.net/forum/index.php?topic=44675.0
Title: Re: Warriors must show character now
Post by: weary1969 on September 09, 2009, 12:05:34 PM
Not a bad write up, but I waiting for Alvin comment on T&T under 17 team in Mexico, when we go get that boy ?

Doh hold yuh breath and I if u do as a foundation member pls include d sw.net and warrior nation in your will
Title: Re: Warriors must show character now
Post by: ZANDOLIE on September 09, 2009, 12:12:48 PM
alvin knows his football, apply it all national teams next time including the teams your son has coached.
Title: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Tallman on October 06, 2009, 04:40:24 AM
Egypt huge stepping stone
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian)


It was not the beauty of the ancient land of the Pharaohs, neither was it the bobbing and weaving of the world’s most adventurous motorists. It was more like the passion and resilience of the millions of Egyptians who invited the football world to experience the value of support, the ability to give and take a beating, and most importantly, to add some level of respect on and off the field by a people who understand what major confrontation can be, if not tempered by strong character and discipline in public places. To the young Soca warriors, the experience may have been very foreign to them, but the environment allowed for them to be part of an Egyptian society, which reflects rituals and behavioral patterns that are unfamiliar to what they are accustomed.

This may well have brought out the enthusiasm and commitment which we have been able to recognise from the players, rapidly turning them into true professional competitors, comparable to many of their opponents. To many, the absence of a victory in three matches may not be counted as more than moderate participation in a high quality football scenario where only the winners retain their place in the limelight. It is wise to define these performances as part of a successful journey towards the aims and objectives of a developing country where every positive image be seen as examples of an attempt to serve as a catalyst for those who wish to follow in the same path. The larger countries, whose main objectives are dictated by winning a trophy or medal, features which add to their already established moments of success, have been under pressure from the lesser recognized countries, T&T being one of them. Some may think that the draw for this tournament may have been kind to the Warriors, despite the fact that the host country Egypt was the first obstacle.

This guided the preparation of the squad with tours to England, Turkey and Cyprus. It was good thinking by the technical staff and TTFF advisor Jack Warner to choose these venues, simply because climate and field conditions bore similarity to the venues in Egypt. The six-hour time change which would have affected their eating, and sleeping habits, was dealt with by the decision to be in the same time zone for the better part of one month before the start of the tournament. Those who followed the friendlies which they played, may have reflected the quality of their preparation and although they were not all winners, the reports from the analysts who saw them, were satisfied that T&T was not out of their depth in this competition. The Egyptians created an atmosphere which consisted a new brand stadium, the likes of which, when filled to capacity and the presence of their president, will be the absolute recipe for them to drive a nervous opponent to a wall and start on a winning note. They had achieved their goal, but not without an assertive and strongly charactered effort from the soca warriors, who responded to a goal deficit, equalised and brought a deafening silence to the Egyptians present.

The inexperienced complacency emanating from the half time break, saw the host get two soft goals, before they faced a relentious and organised T&T which was orchestrated by the entry of Jamal Clarence and the former Mucurapo midfielder Molino. The styles of these youngsters brought about a more concerted cohesion in midfield and saw some glaring chances reach almost to the ultimate target of getting some goals. The appearance and performance of Jake Thomson, born of a Trini dad, set tongues afire, as he cruised up the right side with the professional efficiency of a teenaged Cafu. The kid can play and his services from the flank offered some challenging opportunities some of which may have been better dealt with by well directed headers. Count Glenroy Samuel as the man of the first match, because he worked diligently to keep the scorecard to a bare minimum with some outstanding saves in the first half and throughout the match. Italy never expected the twin Island state to make them fight for points, knowing the reputation of the current world cup champions.

Apart from two moments of dormancy, the Vranes Zoran coached squad took the opposition apart and had it not been for an indecisive referee’s judgment and two simple misses in the last part of this game, Italy may well have been having to fight for points in order to enter the second round. Paraguay had defeated the Warriors four to nothing some seven weeks ago in Venezuela, and to them, victory over T&T was inevitable. After 90 hard fought minutes, the South Americans failed to even appear to be superior, except when some of their artistic midfielders produce some brilliance and made some penetrative passes. Young Gonzales ensured that he was in full control while Kareem Hyland, Leston Paul and Cyrus showed their worth and forced the opposition to be dispossessed more often than not. Historically, the drawn result was special to our youth football, even more than the dogged, if not totally attractive play.

Some claim it was not a classic display. Correct! But who would wish to match a South American team with any effort to produce midfield chemistry through precise short passing. This game needed the long passes from defence to the two strikers, in order to eliminate the effectiveness of the midfield stars of Paraguay. It worked and simply because this unusual type of game forced Paraguay to adjust their inimitable style and find another pattern. It failed and the result did not send T&t to the next round, but it brought a great degree of satisfaction to a nation which need various types of achievements from the youth of our nation. Be proud of the team and the country. We are becoming more and more respected by the soccer world. Well done, T&T.

(http://guardian.co.tt/files/imagecache/article_main_image_stretched/articles/images/streaches.png)
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: dumpalewie on October 06, 2009, 05:35:20 AM
Well Said!
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: Brownsugar on October 06, 2009, 05:47:44 AM
I eh read the article as yet, but the first thought that came into my mind when I saw the title of the thread is that Germany was supposed to be a stepping stone as well.... ::)
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: injunchile on October 06, 2009, 06:07:34 AM
Well said Brown Sugar- The hype was that Germany was the stepping stone. So let us wait and see at least we are seeing some youth incorporated in this squad for the rest of the W/C campaign. A point some folks are missing is If we play well in the remaining two matches, Friendlies will be available from Teams already Qualified for the W/C in their preparations for S/A.
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: Sam on October 06, 2009, 06:18:22 AM
From the time I saw who was the writer, I wouldn't even waste my time reading it.

STEUPS !!!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: Socafan on October 06, 2009, 06:43:27 AM
This game needed the long passes from defence to the two strikers, in order to eliminate the effectiveness of the midfield stars of Paraguay.

As figured, is the technical staff does have them players playing so!! And Corneal here validating that bullshit. Possession, possession, possession, possession!!!!! Ah setta 50/50 passes from defence to forwards could never work in today's game against good opposition. Especially not when we doh have accurate passers. Wha' wrong with these people boy!!??
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: weary1969 on October 06, 2009, 07:32:57 AM
From the time I saw who was the writer, I wouldn't even waste my time reading it.

STEUPS !!!!!!!!!!

COSIGNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN I JUST STEUPSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS. Mexico was not a steppin stone.
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: weary1969 on October 06, 2009, 07:34:02 AM
I eh read the article as yet, but the first thought that came into my mind when I saw the title of the thread is that Germany was supposed to be a stepping stone as well.... ::)

COSIGNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN and we c how well dat went.
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: Observer on October 06, 2009, 08:55:37 AM
This game needed the long passes from defence to the two strikers, in order to eliminate the effectiveness of the midfield stars of Paraguay. It worked and simply because this unusual type of game forced Paraguay to adjust their inimitable style and find another pattern. It failed and the result did not send T&t to the next round

Not sure if I agree with Alvin on this. Again it begs the question what is the objective of youth football and how by playing in such a manner did it benefit these young players. Anyone who watched the game will debate that the only achievement attained from this tactic was to keep the ball far away from T&T's goal. One can even debate that if we continue to play in this manner, once we recognize that our opponents are superior, we as footballers and teams will never improve. Ok we may get a point, but more than likely we will not gain a result especially at the senior international level.
Playing devil's advocate I will throw out that if Anon was not part of the staff and most of these players coming from his previous U17, we would have seen a different analysis from Alvin. After all Alvin was the one who was very critical of several coaches in the past including Beenie upon arrival.
As a football lover I would have much rather seen the players play as they did against Italy. Ball on the ground and trying to play, with individual confidence.

Alvin is right about one thing, we are proud of these players
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: elan on October 06, 2009, 10:44:38 AM
This game needed the long passes from defence to the two strikers, in order to eliminate the effectiveness of the midfield stars of Paraguay.

As figured, is the technical staff does have them players playing so!! And Corneal here validating that bullshit. Possession, possession, possession, possession!!!!! Ah setta 50/50 passes from defence to forwards could never work in today's game against good opposition. Especially not when we doh have accurate passers. Wha' wrong with these people boy!!??

Alvin thinking at all?
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: weary1969 on October 06, 2009, 10:59:06 AM
This game needed the long passes from defence to the two strikers, in order to eliminate the effectiveness of the midfield stars of Paraguay.

As figured, is the technical staff does have them players playing so!! And Corneal here validating that bullshit. Possession, possession, possession, possession!!!!! Ah setta 50/50 passes from defence to forwards could never work in today's game against good opposition. Especially not when we doh have accurate passers. Wha' wrong with these people boy!!??

Alvin thinking at all?

Has he ever?
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: fishs on October 06, 2009, 11:49:25 AM


 Shocking from Corneal.
The only thing this team did that was different was fight hard and hold up a bit more because of fitness, technically they were as bad as we normally are.
I reading between the lines but obviously Corneal had some input through his son and this article is validation of that.
As I said shocking !!!
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: palos on October 06, 2009, 12:37:44 PM
Interesting that he write article after virtually every performance.....certainly after every national team competition seemingly regardless of age group.

EXCEPT

He still to produce a article bout de U17 team "performance" in Mexico earlier this year.

How come Alvin?
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: weary1969 on October 06, 2009, 12:49:39 PM
Interesting that he write article after virtually every performance.....certainly after every national team competition seemingly regardless of age group.

EXCEPT

He still to produce a article bout de U17 team "performance" in Mexico earlier this year.

How come Alvin?

Tings dat make yuh go  ???
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: kicker on October 06, 2009, 01:03:55 PM
It takes alot more than a desire to play the beautiful game to actually play the beautiful game...The movement, the chemistry, the communication, the imagination, the positional discipline, the focus, the technical ability, the fitness, the patience to get it wrong over and over and over again...etc....that's not stuff that just comes by wanting it, or wanting to coach it...That takes a long time (and often very special players) to develop.

 
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: King Deese on October 06, 2009, 02:09:23 PM
More like a froggy pad.
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: mwanasoka on October 06, 2009, 02:49:31 PM
Ah Huge Pyramidlike Steppin Stone Jess geh drop on Egypt head. :shameonyou:
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: nunu on October 07, 2009, 08:06:16 AM
Jamaica(2001 Argentina) once played to a 0-0 Tie with 3rd place finishers Egypt  with 1 point -5 GD ,.
TnT played to a 0-0 Tie (with Paraguay) 1 point -4 GD. Jamaica Mathematically have done
better , by virtue of tying with a third place finisher . :applause: 
we even won the best GK award for the Tournament and Argentina which gave us 5 nil in the
grouping stage , hammered paraguay 5 nil in the final . :P
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: Trinimassive on October 07, 2009, 08:32:32 AM
Jamaica(2001 Argentina) once played to a 0-0 Tie with 3rd place finishers Egypt  with 1 point -5 GD ,.
TnT played to a 0-0 Tie (with Paraguay) 1 point -4 GD. Jamaica Mathematically have done
better , by virtue of tying with a third place finisher . :applause: 
we even won the best GK award for the Tournament and Argentina which gave us 5 nil in the
grouping stage , hammered paraguay 5 nil in the final . :P

You have to try wayyyyyy better than that to get ah argument  :shameonyou:
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: nunu on October 07, 2009, 08:35:54 AM
Jamaica(2001 Argentina) once played to a 0-0 Tie with 3rd place finishers Egypt  with 1 point -5 GD ,.
TnT played to a 0-0 Tie (with Paraguay) 1 point -4 GD. Jamaica Mathematically have done
better , by virtue of tying with a third place finisher . :applause: 
we even won the best GK award for the Tournament and Argentina which gave us 5 nil in the
grouping stage , hammered paraguay 5 nil in the final . :P

You have to try wayyyyyy better than that to get ah argument  :shameonyou:
who looking argument with you donkey?  :rotfl:
Title: Re: Egypt huge stepping stone
Post by: Trinimassive on October 07, 2009, 08:47:10 AM
This game needed the long passes from defence to the two strikers, in order to eliminate the effectiveness of the midfield stars of Paraguay.

As figured, is the technical staff does have them players playing so!! And Corneal here validating that bullshit. Possession, possession, possession, possession!!!!! Ah setta 50/50 passes from defence to forwards could never work in today's game against good opposition. Especially not when we doh have accurate passers. Wha' wrong with these people boy!!??

I wish the odds were as good as 50/50 passes.  They just have absolutely no play if they sit there and just tell the players to do that.  

2 forwards up front with about 4-5 players around them and the plan is to pass long ball to them?  That is ridiculous. Then when you consider many of the passes are off, its just not worth it as a strategy.  Our senior team use that strategy and when ever I see that I just think....they did not plan or study their opponents to work on their weaknesses.

How hard is it for a coach to go to sleep and wake up the next morning and say "guys ah have the plan for this game, whenever you get the ball make ah long pass from defense to the forwards and see if yuh could score"

That is just giving back the ball to the opponents and it's another wave of attacks coming in we direction
Title: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Tallman on April 04, 2010, 07:58:05 PM
T&T Cup plays big part in development
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian)


To many of us, the future of our football seems to be based upon the recent past and the present state of affairs, vis-a-vis World Cup results and a presence of a new slate of technocrats at the helm who are attempting to improve the quality of the current stars. Both aspects of assessment are relevant to the future, the first being an analysis of what went wrong and how it should be corrected. The second is the positive move by the present coaching staff to look towards a number of youngsters for a better performance at the training sessions and matches leading up to the Digicel Gold Cup tournament in Martinique later this year. But we should not ignore that the development process must take place in the teenagers who are now being given the opportunity to express themselves and demonstrate how the large number of young coaches are working towards a better class of footballer for the next decade.

The T&T Cup, an age group tournament which was inaugurated in 2001 with a group of 64 clubs who were exposed to the use of the country’s prestigious stadiums, has been much of a success story in terms of the number of young football players getting a chance to be exposed to the national stage through an organised method. No doubt, the participation by the Pro League clubs, plus the large number of community teams, brought out an increased number of kids playing the game and by extension, offering more options for the selection process at the national level. It is interesting to note that more than 85 per cent of the selected national youth teams over the past seven years have been players from teams in the T&T Cup tournament.

Further to that, the actual squads which were chosen to represent this country in Korea in 2007 at the world Fifa U-17 finals, plus the U-20 Fifa finals in Egypt in 2009, consisted of more than half of the former T&T Cup participants. The T&T Football Federation, through its special advisor Jack Warner, had the foresight to give the green light for this project, which also benefitted by the recent embrace of this now fully-expanded tournament by the Ministry of Sport and Youth Affairs, through the honourable Minister Gary Hunt. What was created here is an exciting tournament which is organised free for all the age group clubs in T&T to play in the country’s stadiums, an honour which only the recognised clubs and national teams were able to enjoy in the past.

The management of the country’s top clubs, such as Joe Public FC, W Connection FC, Jabloteh FC and Super Star Rangers, led the way into showing the value of this type of competition being used as a catalyst for a better football program at the international level. Clearly, the feeder system has worked for the clubs across the land and if one is to judge by the increasing number of teams for the year 2010, we should not be surprised if this country is engaged in youth football activity in every town, village and city within the next few years. Thankfully, the fans of the clubs have given support to the project over the years, but the sports lovers should be encouraged to show appreciation to the youngsters who may one day make the people of this country proud. The tournament begins tomorrow at seven venues across T&T and runs toward the finals on April 11 at the Hasely Crawford Stadium.

(http://guardian.co.tt/files/imagecache/article_main_image_stretched/articles/images/tt%20cup%202009.png)
Sports Minister Gary Hunt presenting the 2009 championship trophy.

Title: T&T Cup ??
Post by: Rastaman on April 06, 2010, 10:39:50 AM
Ok so I see that this T&T cup is taking place this week at venues all accross Trinidad and Tobago. My question is....how do you get invited to participate in this and similar tournament ?? or is it open to any team who i willing to paricipate ??

Imagine my great surprise when on Friday I am being told that players from our team are being asked to play for amother team in this competition....
How come I or the coach were not made aware of this tournament....and given the opportunity to participate....


Well i am not going to whine about it I am going to call the cell phone no. on the application form(that i was able to get my hands on) and speak to Alvin Corneal himself and ensure that I our team is a part of this competition...and any others that might come up in the future.



And we wonder why football is going nowhere under the Warners and Corneals of today.
Title: Re: T&T Cup plays big part in development
Post by: E-man on April 06, 2010, 10:45:05 AM
http://ttcup.com/
Title: Re: T&T Cup plays big part in development
Post by: Rastaman on April 06, 2010, 10:55:19 AM
http://ttcup.com/

Thanks E-Man...a pitty that I had no one to give me this information before I had to ask fir it. It really is who know you.


Long Live Soca Warriors.net
Title: Re: T&T Cup plays big part in development
Post by: elan on April 06, 2010, 12:38:51 PM
20 players per team minimum?  :o
Title: Re: T&T Cup plays big part in development
Post by: weary1969 on April 06, 2010, 12:53:49 PM
http://ttcup.com/

Thanks E-Man...a pitty that I had no one to give me this information before I had to ask fir it. It really is who know you.


Long Live Soca Warriors.net

 :beermug: Cosignnnnnn
Title: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: Tallman on August 25, 2010, 05:45:15 AM
Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian)


I wonder how many people in this country are aware that we are hosting the Fifa Women’s World Cup tournament in T&T from September 5-25? It will not surprise me if the majority does not know of this extremely important opportunity which was handed to our country, especially remembering that we were host to a similar competition only nine years ago. But unlike the previous occasion, this event has not been given the publicity which events of this magnitude have enjoyed when they are hosted elsewhere. Having attended at least 25 of these events across the world and experienced the level of marketing and advertising which was done by the host countries during that period, it is almost painful to understand why the same process was not utilised here. We have heard about the tournament through a couple press conferences, then the draw for the Championships, all of which was preceded by the employment of a Norwegian coach Even Pellerud, whose duty was to turn the quality of our football “water into wine,” and little snippets of TV adverts and newspaper clipping about the progress of our national team through the preparatory period. One member of the local organising committee, when asked about the reason for the absence of information which should have been shared with the public, the response was tantamount to the belief that it was sufficient.

Maybe we have viewed this event solely in the context of our national team being prepared to win three or four matches, as opposed to our country making an impression to the sporting world. This is an opportunity to show that we are capable of turning this huge international competition into the most impacting feature address made by the government and people of this country to the entire universe. A means by which to show off our maturity, our ability to organise, our country’s impressive economy, the friendliness of our people, added to the numerous reasons why members of the business sector and tourists from every corner of earth, can visit with us and participate in any way which suits their fancies.Because of the fact that we have taken responsibility to host this event, which was done more than two years ago, we must now understand that thousands of visitors will attend this tournament. They will be here, to not only support their own national U-17 women squads but to enjoy the ambience of an attractive city with its skyscrapers hanging over the heads of all as we hustle and bustle through the narrow, but comfortable streets to shop, to eat, to take pictures and most of all to understand the culture of this multi-racial society.

The fact that we boast of our seaside resorts, will take them to our beaches, especially on the sister isle of Tobago, the adventure and novelties of riding waves, eating coconuts, shark and bake, and getting a close up view of the underwater reefs of Buccoo. Some will wish to rent a car and drive through the country in search of our species of birds, our rainforest, our pitch lake, and so many other things for which we are famous. Those are some of the reasons why they visit the country. The football tournament is only the catalyst to expose our beautiful country to an unsuspecting, but inquisitive world. However, not a single billboard across the highways, the street corners, on the sides of our transport vehicles, on the “T” shirts with the tournament logo which should already be on sale at the sides of the major street corners, in the department stores, and especially at the airports. What of the memorabilia such as symbolic caps with the colours of the T&T flag with one of our innovative catch phrases for which we are famous. Where can the visitors find a road map which has the clarity needed to take them wherever they wish to go, including the stadia, the country’s areas of attraction, the major hotels, and even the use of clean toilets in each city, town and village?

What is probably the most essential responsibility undertaken by our government will be security, particularly when there will be approximately three hundred and fifty young ladies under seventeen who will spend three weeks in different parts of the country? I do not need to reiterate the absolute need for special attention to be paid to our guests, whose parents may or may not be with them, and knowing what has been an unusual and unacceptable type of behavior in recent times, we must treat this aspect of our commitment as priority. I am consoled by the recent announcement that our stadia will be ready, so we no longer have to worry about the venues for the matches. We are particularly weak in our maintenance habits, hence the reason why the stadium fields and overall facilities are not always in good shape. It is my sincere hope that everything will fall into place before the end of the month. Our government must take responsibility for each aspect of this auspicious event. We are proud to host it, but we must be even more proud to ensure that the professional management of the event will send the message to the world that we are a growing, matured society with visions of being first world sometime in the future.

(http://guardian.co.tt/files/imagecache/article_main_image_stretched/articles/images/Camps%20Warner%20Roberts_1.jpg)
Title: Fifa officials arrive for Under 17 World Cup
Post by: Tallman on August 25, 2010, 05:46:09 AM
Fifa officials arrive for Under 17 World Cup
T&T Guardian


With the Fifa U-17 Women’s World Cup less than two weeks away, several Fifa officials are expected to arrive in T&T between today and tomorrow to lend support to the Local Organising Committee (LOC). The World Cup kicks off on September 5, with an opening match between T&T and Chile. Following concerns expressed by Minister of Sports and Youth Affairs Anil Roberts on Monday, deputy CEO of the LOC, Nataki Kerr, said work was taking place assiduously to ensure the facilities are world class.

Kerr said one year of preparations all comes down to what takes place during the event. “We will not fail the fans of the beautiful game and the nation.” Over the next week, the officials will be touring the five venues and are expected to work in collaboration with the Ministry and the LOC. Chairman of the LOC, Oliver Camps, said the infrastructure work has been almost completed.

“Our stadia will be ready to host the fans and teams and our airports will be ready to welcome the influx of visitors.” Sixteen teams will be participating in the event, which will feature matches at the Hasely Crawford Stadium; the Larry Gomes Stadium in Arima; the Manny Ramjohn Stadium in Marabella; the Ato Boldon Stadium in Couva and the Dwight Yorke Stadium in Bacolet. For Tickets: Call 800-fans.
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: Sando prince on August 25, 2010, 08:17:27 PM
Hope this tournament turn out to be a successful...best of luck to our Soca Princesses
Title: 'C' grade for T&T World Cup grounds
Post by: Tallman on August 26, 2010, 04:36:21 AM
Not up to standard
By Ian Prescott  (T&T Express)


THE pitches at the five local stadia which will host the 2010 FIFA Under-17 World Cup have been given only a Grade C rating by FIFA pitch consultant John Lockyer.

Lockyer has been in Trinidad and Tobago for the last eight days, overseeing pitch improvement ahead of the start of the football tournament which is being hosted here from September 5-25.

Englishman Lockyer was the expert in charge of the 2010 FIFA World Cup's pitch management programme, where he was responsible for the surfaces at all 10 World Cup stadia in South Africa. He successfully performed a similar rescue exercise when unusually cold winter conditions left the South African pitches in an unprepared state for the tournament.

In Trinidad and Tobago, major work has to be done on the playing surface at the Hasely Crawford Stadium, where the Soca Princesses will play the opening match against Chile on September 5. And even though the surfaces at the Manny Ramjohn, Larry Gomes, Ato Boldon and Dwight Yorke stadia are fairly good, they are not up to the standard which FIFA, the governing body for world football, require for a World Cup. Lockyer is here offering consulting services to the Local Organising Committee (LOC) free of charge.

"We are at this stage, 65 per cent ready and we are working to finish the other 35 per cent between Wednesday and Thursday of next week. It 's a close finish. It's a challenge for all of us, but we will make our country proud," declared Felix "Baldy" Hernandez, the LOC chairman of facilities. "We are working at a pace, and despite all the rumours, the World Cup will come off successfully."

Hernandez said further: "We started very late, mainly due to the approval of funding. Contracts were awarded over the weekend and all contractors are working 24-seven to make sure that we are ready for the World Cup."

The venues needing the most work currently are the Dwight Yorke Stadium in Tobago, which recently had part of the roof blown off, and also the Hasely Crawford Stadium in Port of Spain, where the opening and closing matches will be played.

Hernandez stated that a lot of work also had to be done on almost all of the training venues which include those at St Mary's ground, Queen's Royal College ground, the University of the West Indies and other venues. There was major concern about the state of dressing rooms as well.

At the stadiums, Hernandez said that major work will be done on bringing flood lighting up to international standard. Major remedial work will have to be done to dressing rooms and international media facilities, while the Ministry of Health require certain stipulations concerning medical infrastructure, and have also demanded the upgrade of food serving areas because of poor maintenance over the years.

"The maintenance and remedial work at the stadia will cost about $15 million," Hernandez said. "The ground preparation costs in the region of six million dollars, and we will also need to bring in specialist equipment which will cost another two million dollars.

"Painting of the stadiums is also a major task , we will have to paint the venue, including dress rooms and so on and that will cost approximately $3.5 million."

Finally, Hernandez said that while problems associated with the venues cannot be tackled in two weeks, the LOC will be concentrating on the major ones, and are confident of doing a more than adequate job.
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: D.H.W on August 26, 2010, 05:36:41 AM
this hustle down thing again. dem stadium should have been fixed long time, everybody know them pitch need laying over again, and d stadia fallin apart. d larry gomes aint even finish since last WC                             
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: davidephraim on August 26, 2010, 06:26:50 AM
and this should serve as a testament to those that live abroad. We have a WC in about 2 weeks and trust me nobody knows about it, de stadia not finished and everyone seems lost at the 23rd hour. With this in mind I give you just how exactly shit is run in TNT. Yes I am in Trinidad so I get to talk. Anyone that think things are different please correct me. The national senior team also falls prey to our slow buildup climatic mentality where we only really get hold of an idea after it has begun. Waggonism.  Is like yuh want de country to become more americanised to get past certain of these unattractive characteristics that we have but at the same time why become america when everyone wants to leave there and come back to paradise in de sun... what an oxymoron.
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: weary1969 on August 26, 2010, 06:55:26 AM
I know I ready 2 keep my money in my pocket.
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: Deeks on August 26, 2010, 03:56:10 PM
This is real crap. It just goes to show where the TTFF/Jack's priorities lay. All this last minute hustling for this tournament is because of the election. Wherever Jack goes so does the TTFF. Because of the empahasis on the election, the tournament take second place. Now the facilities not up to tournament standards. There is no excitement for this tournament. This is our young women playing a WC and TT is totally disinterested. Why?
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: Touches on August 26, 2010, 04:16:48 PM
Listen...I would agree that the exposure is not where it should be but I have a quick fix.

All they want is a full stadium so we will look good on TV.

School starting next week....have them girls make one pass in a few schools under pappy show ting.

Hype it up as a big lime/tour.

Bam...children want to go and parents have to take them.

Serious question here.....will alcho be sold at these games? Cause if not, you eliminating a certain section of the population ( the few football fans who looking for lime but who not on watching lil girls play)

Football is an experience, entertainment, a lime, not a observation exercise.

I kinda worried about the turnout, but I feel people will get excited when they see the other nations arrive and put on performances.


Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: sammy on August 26, 2010, 04:21:51 PM
doh worry, i going and start work in the DY stadium sat or sun morning depending when we get the boat.

BTW the pitch looking nice - took a walk on it wednesday
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: Deeks on August 26, 2010, 04:27:30 PM
Sammy,
            Are you the official SWN reporter in Bago :devil:?????
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: E-man on August 26, 2010, 04:27:44 PM
When JW is in other countries leading the FIFA inspection committees who says he is more stringent or less stringent with the standards than when at home and TTFF is the host federation.

The fellah doing the pitch upgrades for free. Wonder how many kickbacks he got doing the work for FIFA in other countries and now JW's calling in a favor. Who says I'm too cynical.
Title: Re: 'C' grade for T&T World Cup grounds
Post by: makaveli on August 26, 2010, 05:49:29 PM
Not up to standard
By Ian Prescott  (T&T Express)


Hernandez stated that a lot of work also had to be done on almost all of the training venues which include those at St Mary's ground, Queen's Royal College ground, the University of the West Indies and other venues. There was major concern about the state of dressing rooms as well.

At the stadiums, Hernandez said that major work will be done on bringing flood lighting up to international standard. Major remedial work will have to be done to dressing rooms and international media facilities, while the Ministry of Health require certain stipulations concerning medical infrastructure, and have also demanded the upgrade of food serving areas because of poor maintenance over the years.

"The maintenance and remedial work at the stadia will cost about $15 million," Hernandez said. "The ground preparation costs in the region of six million dollars, and we will also need to bring in specialist equipment which will cost another two million dollars.

"Painting of the stadiums is also a major task , we will have to paint the venue, including dress rooms and so on and that will cost approximately $3.5 million."

Finally, Hernandez said that while problems associated with the venues cannot be tackled in two weeks, the LOC will be concentrating on the major ones, and are confident of doing a more than adequate job.


The washroom facilities and food stalls at these stadiums are disgusting. The fact that we have to wait until a major tournament comes along to do repair work is utter non sense. How much yuh willing to bet after the tourney these same facilities fall back into the state they were in before hand.
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: Babalawo on August 26, 2010, 05:57:35 PM
was on the flight with the u17 girls and the coach to Miami yesterday.  They must be having a training camp in Ft. Lauderdale area to prepare for the world cup
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: E-man on August 26, 2010, 06:09:44 PM
was on the flight with the u17 girls and the coach to Miami yesterday.  They must be having a training camp in Ft. Lauderdale area to prepare for the world cup

Yes you can catch them playing Ireland on Saturday

Central Broward Regional Park, Lauderhill, FL
T&T Women's U-17 vs Ireland
Sat, August 28, 5:30pm – 7:30pm
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: davidephraim on August 26, 2010, 07:26:48 PM
This is real crap. It just goes to show where the TTFF/Jack's priorities lay. All this last minute hustling for this tournament is because of the election. Wherever Jack goes so does the TTFF. Because of the empahasis on the election, the tournament take second place. Now the facilities not up to tournament standards. There is no excitement for this tournament. This is our young women playing a WC and TT is totally disinterested. Why?

I stand corrected. I can clearly see this being very plausible.
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: sammy on August 26, 2010, 08:08:38 PM
stadiums in a reeeealllll mess.

I gather DY real good compare to the rest as the HSC officer was telling me the state of those in Trini. (i've only been to DY, she have only been to those in trini)

the stadia was allowed to become dilapidated, and now is real pressure to fix them up for the WC.


Anyhow, is plenty work, and is 24 hr operations to get them back up. i think we can make it though.... - we have too  :-\

the good news is that after the games, the refurbishment and maintenance of the stadia will continue.

On a side note, i dunno how Brown Sugar and the rest of bagonians does deal with sea blast nah. if u see corrosion going on in that place.........pressure.
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: Bourbon on August 26, 2010, 08:21:11 PM
Arhmmm...i skim through all de articles and ting..so I dunno if i miss it ....buh....


De money for dese upgrades coming from where?

And....didnt the HCS get a massive upgrade before the England game? How much of a state could it have gotten since den?
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: che on August 26, 2010, 08:29:34 PM
This is real  :bs:
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: Touches on August 26, 2010, 08:42:33 PM
HCS toilet forever stink forever not working.

they move from antiquated toilet to cheap substandard rusty urinal.

Good move on the upgraded toilets and concessions.....remember for the england game they said water used to leak from the ice melting in the concession area, flowing into the dressing rooms.



 
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: D.H.W on August 26, 2010, 08:48:20 PM
HCS toilet forever stink forever not working.

they move from antiquated toilet to cheap substandard rusty urinal.

Good move on the upgraded toilets and concessions.....remember for the england game they said water used to leak from the ice melting in the concession area, flowing into the dressing rooms.


not to mention , d buller men that like to peek over , when u using the toilet / urinal . because of how low the d boarder is between each toilet
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: sammy on August 27, 2010, 02:00:45 AM
HCS toilet forever stink forever not working.

they move from antiquated toilet to cheap substandard rusty urinal.

Good move on the upgraded toilets and concessions.....remember for the england game they said water used to leak from the ice melting in the concession area, flowing into the dressing rooms.



 
u sure it wasn't toilet leaking down in the dressing rooms?  :rotfl: no wonder we does play soo much shit
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: jai john on August 27, 2010, 07:28:45 AM
this hustle down thing again. dem stadium should have been fixed long time, everybody know them pitch need laying over again, and d stadia fallin apart. d larry gomes aint even finish since last WC                             


stay cool pards ....this explains why the contract for stadia refurbishment will be ( was )  given out to a company with previous experience from the last WC staged in T&T ! A certain company comes to mind because on the last occassion it was argued that this company knew FIFA requirements beter than the competition ...so with such little time to go ... " we cannot follow normal tendering procedures ...you understand ? "  :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

Who is the line minister for such decisions ?? remember this one folks ...where the same man was police and magistrate in a small town ??
" Well this one is class ..police charge ah magistrate for driving too fast .....
...well de crowd flock up de place ..to see de magistrate try he own case ..
himself tell himself you are charged for speeding
himself tell himself de policeman lying .... :rotfl: :rotfl:
I doh take a single cent from my Employer ..... :devil:
Title: Camps: T&T will be ready for Sunday
Post by: Tallman on August 31, 2010, 04:38:11 AM
Camps: T&T will be ready for Sunday
T&T Guardian


With only five days before this country plays host to the second Fifa Under-17 Women’s World Cup featuring 16-countries, Chairman of the Local Organising Committee and president of the T&T Football Federation, Oliver Camps is confident that all preparations works will be completed in time. During the last couple of weeks, concerns have been raised over the readiness of the stadia for the hosting of the matches, however Camps’ speaking to Fifa.com said: “We remain confident that this tournament will be a success. We have been working with the Ministry of Sport and Fifa to ensure that this tournament will be one the country can be proud off.”

A positive sign for the host is that the Fifa headquarters for the tournament is now fully operational at the Hyatt Regency Hotel while the offices for the LOC have also been relocated to the Hyatt for the duration of the tournament. Over the past two days Fifa Officials and a number of teams have been arriving in this country as the kick off date for the tournament date draws near. On Sunday, officials conducted a number of tours of the various stadia and training facilities across the country. Meanwhile, the national coaches of the 16 qualifiers for the Fifa Under-17 Women’s World Cup T&T 2010 have finally named their squads for the big event.

Having put their players through months of hard work and rigorous preparations, coaches have announced the list of 336 players taking part in the three-week competition, which gets underway on Sunday at the Hasely Crawford Stadium, Mucurapo with T&T meeting Chile in the opening match. Nigeria and defending champions Korea DPR will also do battle in Port of Spain this Sunday. The tournament will feature a few familiar names, including 11 players who represented their countries at New Zealand 2008, the first time the tournament was held.

Among the veterans of two years ago are the Brazilians Beatriz and Thai, Canada’s Diamond Simpson, Nigeria’s Ngozi Okobi and the Japanese duo of Yoko Tanaka and Haruka Hamada, who hit a brace in her side’s 7-2 defeat of Paraguay in the group phase. Not surprisingly, most of the coaches have gone with the players who helped their teams negotiate the qualifying phase, although, as Canada coach Bryan Rosenfeld explains, there are always contingencies that need to be planned for: “The team that won the Concacaf tournament has remained virtually intact, although unfortunately Katherine Caverly and Sabrina Hemond will both be missing out through injury. We have every confidence in the players taking their places though.”
Title: Re: Is T&T ready to host the women’s U-17 World Cup?
Post by: Deeks on August 31, 2010, 08:31:31 AM
So the LOC has been relocated to the Hyatt. I thought the Hyatt was a waste of tax payers money.
Title: Alvin Corneal: Jabloteh has folded Who’s next?
Post by: Flex on July 06, 2012, 05:32:02 AM
Jabloteh has folded Who’s next?
By: Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


The writing seemed to have appeared on the wall a long time ago, and if the stakeholders had taken notice, they may have been able to redirect their original plan towards a more realistic formula to promote professional football in this country.

There have been many situations where some fast-shooting entrepeneurs misjudged the professional franchise factor, and believed that there was quite a lot of money to be made in the process. Once upon a time, the Americans decided to use the retired superstars of the sixties and seventies, such as Pele, Franz Beckenbauer, George Best, Georgio Chinaglia, to teach America the game, and at the same time, fill the large stadia with fans whose thirst for excitement made them gullible.

Together with some self-made American stars, plus a few from the Caribbean, the game seemed to have taken hold of the Yanks. The league was called the North American Soccer League (NASL), and brought out these high profile players to expose the game in their country through their presence on the fields. Sadly enough, the former stars were rapidly losing the quality of their craft, well in advance of any young American players rising to a level which was needed to keep the turnstiles ticking.

It eventually sputtered and failed financially and the game at professional level became dormant for a while, a factor which made way for the universities to increase their desire and placed the scholarship system, similar to the other major sports.

The US followed a module which worked for basketball, American football, baseball, tennis and others. It was not long before the Yanks were attracting many young international players from football-loving countries, many of whom had embarked upon professionalism in their slow, methodical fashion. Eastern Europe, Africa and the Caribbean were ideal targets for the scholarship system and US soccer started its ascendency once more.

Being more careful about rushing to judge the quality of their local players, they strengthened their resolve, using the American graduates who pushed aside all other sports and went deeply into soccer. This marginal success spiralled the stakeholders towards the start of Major League Soccer, by spending enormous sums of money into franchises which were carefully located, mainly to encourage loyalties and enticed fanaticism.

The marketing strategy was supported by the major television networks, but there was a huge roller coaster ride for the franchise owners. They may even display optimism and claim that the clubs are now financially strong and the game is growing rapidly. Even if their optimism is exaggerated, the cautious approach which was used following the failure of the NASL, is evidence that serious professional planning is the only way to financial success.

In T&T, there was a solid basic structure which the then local administrators, most of whom were astute businessmen from private and public service organisations, handled with great caution and placed the emphasis for success upon the well-constituted clubs across the country.

By pure and unconditional amateurism, players joined these clubs, dedicated their time to enjoying the game, practiced hard and long hours weekly, and turned out some extraordinary players whose presence on the field, whether it be in front of the grand stand or the president’s ground, was attractive enough to fill the stands wherever available.

Some adventurous, but ambitious citizens carefully planned to change the structure of an interleague system, very workable, into a series of different formats, none of which could have matched the original, and to this day, have failed to reconstruct anything that resembled the good old days. They dismantled a structure which has always produced some attractive national teams filled with players who were as clever as they were artistic and exciting.

Arthur Suite’s ASL was a welcome sight for the clubs whose enthusiasm were raised, especially as the crowds filled the stands at the PSA ground. Some folks enviously saw this as too good a project and forced a foreclosure onto what appeared an attractive alternate to what previously existed. With finances floating around the pockets and purses of some wealthy citizens, who may have had a love for the game, these wise investors decided that a Pro-League was the way to go.

When the pockets were found to be incapable of financing the players and the upkeep of a pro team, they made a hugh drive to get into the public purse, forcing the hands of the politicians to supply handouts to private clubs to pay salaries to players.

The gate receipts of the Proleague never gave evidence of any franchise making enough money to pay their bills for a long time, and certainly no profit was gained by any club.

What they all forgot was the fact that people spend money to see good entertainment and high quality stuff, features which were nonexistent with any consistency in  the league. Some of the present clubs are literally “scrunting” to pay wages, and they pray to win a trophy for a nice payday.

The signals of TTEC, Jabloteh, Joe Public, Petrotrin, and others were clear and I humbly suggest that we look into history for a solution which would bring the game to a level it once was, using players who would work hard to play well, and not place their emphasis upon the mighty dollar.

It is not there, and there is little likelihood that the quality of play will bring the much needed funds the sport and the clubs crave to earn. Now we must do like Julie Andrews and start from the very beginning.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal: Jabloteh has folded Who’s next?
Post by: injunchile on July 06, 2012, 06:12:13 AM
I am always amazed at how some folks pontificate after the fact.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal: Jabloteh has folded Who’s next?
Post by: Sam on July 06, 2012, 07:05:32 AM
Alvin is the biggest talker I know and he never writes when his son fails...

I would like to hear his view on the Olympic team and senior team failure.....

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal: Jabloteh has folded Who’s next?
Post by: fitzinho on July 06, 2012, 10:02:38 AM
Alvin Corneal aside, the man has a very valid point, our pro- league is in bad need of restructuring and proper planning. Left up to me I would scrap the league for at least a year and start the planning process in building a better league from the ground up.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal: Jabloteh has folded Who’s next?
Post by: King Deese on July 07, 2012, 10:16:40 PM
I hope and pray that it is your son and the friggin ttff. I am serious like a heart attack.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal: Jabloteh has folded Who’s next?
Post by: elan on July 07, 2012, 11:16:16 PM
All these old farts always talking about ASL and Malvern and Maple and Eddie Hart and when we was and savannah football. Give it up already, people have more distractions now, a better model needs to be put in place that will make the league much more viable. Savannah football cannot save we football, it is only an introductory means, the nexts level needs real organization.

Jokers   :clown:
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal: Jabloteh has folded Who’s next?
Post by: davidephraim on July 08, 2012, 02:04:02 AM
All these old farts always talking about ASL and Malvern and Maple and Eddie Hart and when we was and savannah football. Give it up already, people have more distractions now, a better model needs to be put in place that will make the league much more viable. Savannah football cannot save we football, it is only an introductory means, the nexts level needs real organization.

Jokers   :clown:

niceness. You said it all so i'll just add another full-stop.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal: Jabloteh has folded Who’s next?
Post by: Deeks on July 08, 2012, 09:06:37 AM
Alvin Corneal aside, the man has a very valid point, our pro- league is in bad need of restructuring and proper planning. Left up to me I would scrap the league for at least a year and start the planning process in building a better league from the ground up.

Fitzy, scrap the ttff? we want a new beginning.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal: Jabloteh has folded Who’s next?
Post by: Sam on July 09, 2012, 04:51:58 AM
Thats the problem with T&T football today, is de ASL, Malvern, Maple, Eddie Hart, de Corneals etc etc...

They know everything and them league was de best and them had better players etc etc...

You hear all kinda shit and yet them eh gone no where.

Furthermore, to much of these ole heads still involved in T&T football today and they still stuck in de 70s.

Time for change, new blood young is needed. Jack Warner already bite these ole head an suck them already, time for new bllod.

Alvin, shut yuh cunny for once nah, please..

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal: Jabloteh has folded Who’s next?
Post by: fitzinho on July 09, 2012, 07:01:09 PM
Alvin Corneal aside, the man has a very valid point, our pro- league is in bad need of restructuring and proper planning. Left up to me I would scrap the league for at least a year and start the planning process in building a better league from the ground up.

Fitzy, scrap the ttff? we want a new beginning.
Deeks we need to do that too lol  :beermug:
Title: Alvin Corneal - Fifty years of wonderful memories
Post by: Flex on August 31, 2012, 06:33:15 AM
Fifty years of wonderful memories.
By: Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


I am not among those who saw doom and gloom over the past 50 years. Those who were too young to have experienced some of the great events of the past five decades, may never know how joyful life could be when some of the greatest exponents of various sporting activities were producing some levels of excellence in a manner that brought joy to the hearts of many.

I happened to have witnessed some moments of brilliance by a number of persons whose ability to perform their skills would hardly ever be forgotten.

Even if I cared to throw my mind back to the early sixties when there seemed nothing more important than sporting events, the joy that these pleasant thoughts bring to me could hardly be mastered in similar fields.

The days when Roger Gibbon and Daniel Morelon the French Champion cyclist would have the huge crowds on their toes as they entered the final round of the one thousand metres sprint at Guaracara Park.

The atmosphere was electrifying at the southern games and those who have not seen the extraordinary ability of Gibbon, Compton Gonzalves, Leslie King, Fitzroy Hoyte, Hylton Mitchell, Gene Samuel, and Ian Atherley, will never understand why this great country did not have time to be recklessly doing unwanted things, when enjoyment was just around the corner.

Even when you were not around the actual playing field, the joy would have come to you through the voices of people like Raffie Knowles, Tony Williams and Ken Laughlin, each with a style of his own, but none with the flambuoyance and excitement of Raffie.

After having had a good look at the famous five Malvern forwards of the fifties, whose scoring of five goals in a second half of a North encounter against South, why would the fans ever think of not wanting to be present for any further occurrences of a similar quality?

Some guys were excellent dribblers on the football field, but Matthew Nunes was magical in his rhythmic and totally deceptive slalom type movement as he danced over and around some fierce tackles with a smile on his face. There was no winner when Matthew played.

He stole the show at all times and even when one was on the field with him, it was difficult not to admire the genius of a ball artist. And for those who preferred to see our track stars in those days, we produced a bunch of quatermilers who took our country’s national flag to the Olympic games.

Wendell Mottley, Kent Bernard, Edwin Roberts, Edwin Skinner, and Len Yearwood may have been more recognised by our people if television pictures could have brought these superb athletes to our living rooms regularly.

It is seriously unfair for our young athletes not to have heard of the likes of Charlie Joseph, Ainsley Armstrong, Ben Cayenne, all of whom were in the same era with our gold medallist Haseley Crawford. Independence seemed to have been a signal for this twin Island state to show the world that our love for what we were doing, was not motivated by money, but by the pride of dedication and commitment to family, club and country.

And if you wanted to know our ability to fight, just follow the crowd to see the world champions, Leslie Stewart, and Claude Noel. Unlike today, winning a world title was a result of meeting and beating the best in their weight class, whether it be in Indianapolis, or Puerto Rico or even here at the Jean Pierre Complex, the joy of success ran like a vine among our people.

I shed a tear for some of the persons who have passed before they were given their due of recognition in their fields. My mind runs immediately to Joey Carew, a master batsman, a master of strategy as a captain and my childhood friend out of our alma mater Fatima College. Richard Desouza and Aldric Son Baptiste were also superb exponents of the sports they played and unfortunately got lost in father time.

If you are under 40 years old, the name of Carlton Franco will hardly be known to you, unless your father or grandfather expressed the joy he received from ‘The General,’ who led his club, Malvern, by example and wore this country’s colours well.
 
And while we have produced some great ones at almost every decade, the one I respect and regard most was Willie Rodriguez, arguably the best allround footballer that I have played with and against. And if you challenged him in the other major sport of cricket, he will leave you guessing with his superb leg spinners.

Willie happens to be and will probably always be the only player to have represented the West Indies in both cricket and football. My era of Mapleites led by the dynamic Sedley joseph and a cadre of quality players like the Aleong brothers Andy and Eddie, Tyrone Delabastide, Ellis Sadaphal, Bobby Sookram, Lincoln Phillips and Jean Mouttet, brought joy to the hearts of their supporters and were actually the first local team to play in the Concacaf champions league.

But in the midst of our wonderful days of sport, a transition, unwanted in my opinion, stepped in and railroaded the concept and blueprint which our sportsmen had brought to our young people.

Since that time, we are in search of yesterday’s sporting image. Surely, we have had efforts from the likes of Brian Lara, Everard Cummings, Steve David, and the young hockey star Kwandwayne Browne, while the female input of dames like the late Jean Pierre, Cheryl Peters, Marjorie John, and others threw in their contributions with honour and dignity.

Nevertheless, the structural fabric of club life had disappeared from the scene and were replaced by arbitrary street corner teams.

Professionalism entered the fray without the participants understanding the meaning of the word. The process was horribly flawed and we had an influx of sportsmen who received money without giving in return the necessities which could have taken us way past one gold, and three bronze in London. That was my memories of my past fifty years. What is yours?

(http://www.guardian.co.tt/sites/default/files/field/image/first%20cup.png)
T&T’s first World Cup team of 1965:
Left to right, back row, Eric James, Conrad Brathwaite, Andy Aleong, Jeffery Gellineau, Alvin Corneal, Ken Galt, Sir Solomon Hochoy, Cyril Austin, Sedley Joseph, Pat Small, Clem Clarke and Sonny Thompson.
Front row: Tyrone de la Bastide, Kenny Furlonge, Lincoln Phillips, Doyle Griffith and Aldwyn Ferguson

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal - Fifty years of wonderful memories
Post by: Cocorite on August 31, 2012, 07:50:35 AM
Awrite Alvin.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal - Fifty years of wonderful memories
Post by: Observer on August 31, 2012, 08:06:12 AM
No mention of Yorke, Latapy &/or 2006 squad. Amazing!
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal - Fifty years of wonderful memories
Post by: Cocorite on August 31, 2012, 09:06:35 AM
No mention of Yorke, Latapy &/or 2006 squad. Amazing!

Yuh like ting eh? Stoke D fire man  ;D
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal - Fifty years of wonderful memories
Post by: Football supporter on August 31, 2012, 09:13:14 AM
To be fair, I think he's really just talking about his contempories. The good old days. And, there is merit to the argument that sport without the money was better. As we in England fondly recall the days of "jumpers for goalposts"
I think the key difference is how football evolved, or maybe devolved in T&T. The money in other countries bought celebrity status and star players, virtual 24/7 tv coverage, new stadiums and bigger crowds, and youth development (albeit for financial gain).

It seems that, for reasons I can't fathom, all of this passed by the Caribbean. Even USA, the land of self invented sports, caught the football soccer bug.

The answer could be that the Caribbean islands are just too small in population to develop an individual football market. Maybe we should follow cricket and have a West Indies 11, a Caribbean league. Instead of Chelsea vs Man U, we have Rangers vs Tivoli Gardens? That should certainly develop some national pride.
Title: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Dumplingdinho on June 09, 2013, 10:39:53 AM
http://www.newsday.co.tt/sport/0,178910.html


Corneal not optimistic of current ‘Warriors’
By STEPHON NICHOLAS Sunday, June 9 2013

FORMER national coach, Alvin Corneal, believes the current group of national footballers are not the ones that can take local football forward.

The Soca Warriors were beaten 1-0 by Estonia yesterday in a friendly international at the A Le Cog Arena in Tallinn, Estonia.

It was the sixth straight game the national team has not scored a goal and includes one draw and five defeats.

Asked whether this poor streak reflects more on the strikers or the lack of input from the midfielders, Corneal expressed serious scepticism about the ability of the current midfielders to create chances for the forwards.

“I’m not sure that the midfielders we have are the best. We do not know if guys like (English-born) Andre Boucard and others are playing well for their overseas teams or if they are on the bench. I’m not impressed with (Chris) Birchall right now and no one knows if he’s playing frequently. The fact that they are playing abroad does not make them better than the local guys. We don’t have a midfielder that is creative. Hughton Hector is creative but he’s injured,” Corneal explained.

He believes the co-head coaches, Jamaal Shabazz and Hutson “Barber” Charles, need to do a better job scouring the Pro League to identify players that may be really able to assist them.

“We need to search around and look carefully for players. We need to pay more attention to the local leagues to know what they can do or can’t do. We don’t have the right group of players yet,” Corneal declared.

The FIFA technical analyst believes the coaches need to utilise players that have come through the junior ranks especially those that represented this country at the 2007 Under-17 World Cup and 2009 Under-20 World Cup.

“Where is little Kevin Molino? These guys who came through the Under-17 and Under-20 teams should be key players now. We need to start thinking seriously about the Under-23s. Leston Paul was a captain of the Under-17 and Under-20 teams that went to World Cups, you can’t ignore that!” Corneal exclaimed.

“I don’t think we’re in as bad a position right now because we’ve set a base over a six-year period that we can build on,” he added.

Corneal also advised the national coaches to be more flexible in their approach to training to maximise the amount of sessions with the team.

He believes the team should double their training and work around the schedule of clubs to get in as much sessions as possible while playing friendlies against the various local clubs.

“These guys were never regularly in training. With guys having to play for their clubs, it is difficult to prepare a team that way. You have to be flexible with the training sessions. It’s not as simple as watching W Connection versus Caledonia (and picking the best players). The whole concept needs to change,” he continued.

Looking towards the 2013 CONCACAF Gold Cup which gets underway next month, Corneal, although acknowledging the string of poor results of the team, is still optimistic of seeing the team play well at the regional tournament. TT are in Group B alongside Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.

“Honduras are a world class team right now with almost the entire team local-based. El Salvador is another strong team. Haiti is the team we need to beat. I am hopeful we can get a point out of El Salvador and (with a win against Haiti), maybe we can get out of the group,” he hoped.

Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Dumplingdinho on June 09, 2013, 10:46:20 AM
this man could talk dotishness......he is ah effing dunce.

here are a few examples:

"We do not know if guys like (English-born) Andre Boucard and others are playing well for their overseas teams or if they are on the bench. I’m not impressed with (Chris) Birchall right now and no one knows if he’s playing frequently."......so we dont have scouts to watch these guys?  we dont have internet to know who playing and who warming bench?

"playing friendlies against the various local clubs."....yeah real top level competition while haiti playing spain.




Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Deeks on June 09, 2013, 10:47:14 AM
I am not sure if this current TT team can handle the current Haitian team. The current proleague teams are not producing the skilled players we need to play international football.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Dynamite Warrior on June 09, 2013, 11:06:45 AM
I agree Nightmare how could he say Birchall not playing, then call for Leston Paul. I dont even know if Leston Paul is on a professional roster right now let alone on a bench or getting minutes.  These guys so badly want to push the Pro League that hey are willing to talk pure crap.

Has he even looked at Honduras to make his statement, in the last WC Qualifier vs Costa Rica Honduras had only 3 locally based players in their lineup including the GK, and all three subs were also foreign based. That doesnt sound like almost "entire team local-based".

BTW Haiti might turn out to be the strongest team in this group. I think the only team we can even dream about getting 3 points from is El Salvador.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: D.H.W on June 09, 2013, 12:10:39 PM
Stueps and they pick man who wasn't even playing ball before? Now he not sure who playing regularly. Idiot
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: toonmili on June 09, 2013, 12:42:52 PM
This is why am saying we need a foreign coach to come and do his own scouting. Too much favoritism going on. The coaches here probably go liming with these players...
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Dinner Mints on June 09, 2013, 01:08:45 PM
We do not know if guys like (English-born) Andre Boucard and others are playing well for their overseas teams or if they are on the bench. I’m not impressed with (Chris) Birchall right now and no one knows if he’s playing frequently.
Somebody link him to Google or 'Trinis in Action'. Since he doh know how to follow somebody career unless he in de stands.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: coache on June 09, 2013, 01:42:53 PM
Despite the fact that I don't particularly care for Mr Corneal he has made some valid points. He pointed out that not because a player is playing in a foreign league means that the player is automatically better than the local. I am in full agreement.
He also pointed out that the current selection process is flawed.
He said that players from the younger National teams should be looked at. I couldn't agree more.
Lastly training sessions should be implemented with locally based players so as to lay the groundwork for consistency.
These are all excellent points. I thought the heading was a bit misleading but I agree with him.
 I have laid out the process needed to solve these issues in full detail in a previous post entitled 'If I was the National Coach"
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Coop's on June 09, 2013, 01:56:24 PM
It seems some people just want to see Corneal name and they gone nuts,if we could just take our time to read and understand what people saying it will not have so much contention on the forum,thanks Coache for highlighting some of the important points Corneal made.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Jah Gol on June 09, 2013, 02:02:36 PM
When you have a population of 1.3 million people you don't have the luxury of having the foreign v local debate. It's simply play the best 11 with a T&T passport. That rationale is difficult for us to accept because of the politics, greed and fight down culture we have here.

Watch how Jamaica playing Daniel Gordon and others.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Coop's on June 09, 2013, 02:52:53 PM
I can't understand why we does still have these foreign v local debates,is years now we have foreign based players and up to now we don't have a system in place where we can track or keep contact with them to know what's going on,every country does keep track of their athletes why can't we.

If we look at the time when Lincoln,Gomaldo,Gery Brown,Moraldo etc etc left on contracts abroad,how many of them ever represented T&T after that?how many foreign based players we had on the team that went Haiti?how many foreign based players the strike squad had?as Ja Gol said we have to select our best players and stop this foreign vs local crap.

I saw a list of foreign based Footballers posted on this sight,i could not beleive we have so many players abroad and we struggleing for players.Guys what going on with Football in T&T is not encourageing to the Footballer,as fans the kind of things being said on this forum about our Football and Footballers will discourage anyone,these guys come here to read what their fans have to say,it's good to critique but lets be constructive.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Controversial on June 09, 2013, 03:05:18 PM
corneal makes some valid points and anyone who knows me, knows i'm not a fan of corneal in the slightest.. in saying that, we need a strong core of locals playing regularly in order to compete with these other teams.

however, corneal is another biased selector of players, so he should be the last one to speak and if you have a good system in place, foreign players can fit into that system once it is organized and well structured
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Trini _2026 on June 09, 2013, 03:33:47 PM
When you have a population of 1.3 million people you do have the luxury of having the foreign v local debate. It's simply play the best 11 with a T&T passport. That rationale is difficult for us to accept because of the politics, greed and fight down culture we have here.

Watch how Jamaica playing Daniel Gordon and others.

actually now its not foreign based vs local based  is foreign born vs local born .... corneal is not in favour of passport players he  stated that in an article when players were being   scouted  for the  under 17 team womens world cup.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: D.H.W on June 09, 2013, 04:02:05 PM
Corneal aint say nothing that we aint  know already. Im waiting for less talk and more action
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: ANC2 on June 09, 2013, 04:20:49 PM
Alvin Alvin Alvin Are you saying that players should get picked simply because they were on an U17 team 5 years ago?
Alvin where is Leston Paul playing? Please Tell me.
Am I missing something, Molino played in the Digi and came on versus Estonia.
Cyrus started
Primus?
Joevin?
Moses?
David?
Gay?

Add  Mitchell, Hyland, Peltier, Winchester , David to that list & the average age will be U23 or 24.

Local based players. We saw them in the Digicel & they looked way below International level, versus Dominica Republic & Cuba.
Lets be fair most of the local based are not even close to the physical levels necessary to play for T&T.  As aconsequence they play very slow and are prone to errors. Unless T&T shut down the Pro League & allow National staff to train the team for 5-6 weeks, (still not enough to improve physical capacity) this is far from a reality

Not to mention the lack of support from Local Clubs.


Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: davidephraim on June 09, 2013, 06:22:59 PM
Yuh know BaBBa and Shabazz could be coaching dey ass off right now and doing what Jose Mourinho would do to get a team ready but still get horrible results from our players. We talk about foreign players? I dare say that dem local coaches not demanding de respect dat a Don Leo would get.

We must demand more of ourselves than we even knew existed. Doh take no shorts coaches; get dem attitudes and body language correck. And then there is de TTFF and if ah guy even inspired to rep de country for love or money!  Lard help we!
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: just cool on June 10, 2013, 10:27:13 AM
It seems some people just want to see Corneal name and they gone nuts,if we could just take our time to read and understand what people saying it will not have so much contention on the forum,thanks Coache for highlighting some of the important points Corneal made.
Coop yuh dun know yuhs ah fella ah like, so i will approach yuh respectfully on this one, but for the life of me i can't figure out why yuh sooo contrary these days?

breds alvin just talk ah heap ah fackry and you endorsing that thinking?? the man is ah fackin clown and you know it!

he's talking bout looking to the local league for answers when every yr we see what the league entails during the CCL.

when these local teams come up against marathon and taluca they look quite ordinary and five steps off the pace, and it's really embarrassing and heart wrenching to watch.

to show you how under par the local league is, five of the last six games we played, the team consisted of a majority local based with ah few foreign based in the mix, as ah matter of fact the only game we played with an over whelming majority foreign based was the first peru game.

in those games we had no chances on goal, ah slow midfield in transition from offense to defense and ah whole heap of unfit players being out paced by fitter more technical opponents.

just go back and look @ all our games recently AND YOU WILL SEE HOW WE ABSORB AH TREMENDOUS AMOUNT OF OFFENSIVE PRESSURE IN THE CLOSING STAGES OF EVERY FRIENDLY WE PLAYED. that's bc of the lack of fitness amongst the players, so by the 80th min fellas are burned out and can't defend properly.

alvin talking nonsense!! we went with ah local team, and there's not much better out there to replace this bunch @ the moment, and doh tell me bout no damn under 17 players,

bc to make such a silly comparisons shows a lack of football knowledge on anyone's part who champion this thinking.

any schmuck could figure out the level of the senior team compared with any youth level would be light yrs apart, so why go there, are we that desperate??


Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Tenorsaw on June 10, 2013, 10:33:02 AM
Sounds like Corneal and the coaching staff not on the same terms.  He is voicing this in public, when honestly, this sounds like stuff that should be discussed during a meeting with the coaching staff.  He is the technical director, so he should be setting the tone by keeping track of youth players that have come through the pipeline.  The reason we don't know what's going on with some of the past players is because we do not have a scouting network in place, nor do we truly bring players through the pipeline, as they fall away.  Until we implement a proper system from grassroots all the way through the senior team, we'll be singing the same song for generations to come.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Coop's on June 10, 2013, 11:27:56 AM
Sounds like Corneal and the coaching staff not on the same terms.  He is voicing this in public, when honestly, this sounds like stuff that should be discussed during a meeting with the coaching staff.  He is the technical director, so he should be setting the tone by keeping track of youth players that have come through the pipeline.  The reason we don't know what's going on with some of the past players is because we do not have a scouting network in place, nor do we truly bring players through the pipeline, as they fall away.  Until we implement a proper system from grassroots all the way through the senior team, we'll be singing the same song for generations to come.
     Is it Anton said this or Alvin?who is the Technical director of the TTFA?i don't think Alvin is in any position to discuss anything with our coaching staff,correct me if i'm wrong.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: D.H.W on June 10, 2013, 11:31:49 AM
Coops you right. Is Alvin not Anton.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Trinitozbone on June 10, 2013, 11:35:37 AM
But they are one and the same. One blocks for the other. you fools aint see that happening for a long while now. why you think he still in the post and no positive results over and over again.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Tenorsaw on June 10, 2013, 01:01:18 PM
Sounds like Corneal and the coaching staff not on the same terms.  He is voicing this in public, when honestly, this sounds like stuff that should be discussed during a meeting with the coaching staff.  He is the technical director, so he should be setting the tone by keeping track of youth players that have come through the pipeline.  The reason we don't know what's going on with some of the past players is because we do not have a scouting network in place, nor do we truly bring players through the pipeline, as they fall away.  Until we implement a proper system from grassroots all the way through the senior team, we'll be singing the same song for generations to come.
     Is it Anton said this or Alvin?who is the Technical director of the TTFA?i don't think Alvin is in any position to discuss anything with our coaching staff,correct me if i'm wrong.

Yeah, it's Alvin.  He's not part of the coaching set-up in any official capacity, so I guess he is at liberty to express himself.  Didn't realize it was Alvin speaking , and not Anton.  Either way, it doesn't look good that he is coming out publicly like this, because it reflects on his son, who is the TD. 
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Coop's on June 10, 2013, 02:27:24 PM
Sounds like Corneal and the coaching staff not on the same terms.  He is voicing this in public, when honestly, this sounds like stuff that should be discussed during a meeting with the coaching staff.  He is the technical director, so he should be setting the tone by keeping track of youth players that have come through the pipeline.  The reason we don't know what's going on with some of the past players is because we do not have a scouting network in place, nor do we truly bring players through the pipeline, as they fall away.  Until we implement a proper system from grassroots all the way through the senior team, we'll be singing the same song for generations to come.
     Is it Anton said this or Alvin?who is the Technical director of the TTFA?i don't think Alvin is in any position to discuss anything with our coaching staff,correct me if i'm wrong.

Yeah, it's Alvin.  He's not part of the coaching set-up in any official capacity, so I guess he is at liberty to express himself.  Didn't realize it was Alvin speaking , and not Anton.  Either way, it doesn't look good that he is coming out publicly like this, because it reflects on his son, who is the TD. 
      Do you know Alvin gets paid for the articles he writes?he makes an income from it so he have to come up with things to talk about,what ever he says take it or leave it he gets paid,don't worry with what Alvin says.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: maxg on June 10, 2013, 04:16:12 PM
which is it ?
this
B.
      Do you know Alvin gets paid for the articles he writes?he makes an income from it so he have to come up with things to talk about,what ever he says take it or leave it he gets paid,don't worry with what Alvin says.
or this
A.
It seems some people just want to see Corneal name and they gone nuts,if we could just take our time to read and understand what people saying it will not have so much contention on the forum,thanks Coache for highlighting some of the important points Corneal made.

or once yuh check it again..yuh change yuh mind to B ? or ah take something out of context.. Alvin should discuss with the TD, cause his publicity is counter-productive. As JC pointed out..the National team has been selected based on the Pro League. But if we have a better player outside than that pro-league player, wheter he playing pick up league or not, and he is capable of being part of a team..then no sorry necessary.....is he saying select the Pro league player ? Good thing Cameroon went with OLD, jokey league player name Roger Milla..and they could have chosen about 200 players playing higher leagues, younger, probably more skilful...but the selectors decided to go with, combining a old experienced horse that was willing, with some open minded younger studs..They didn't win, they just put their best team forward..one can discover a kid with the skills of Pele(insert your greatest here ) in a fete match in Timbuktu..nah that is foreigner...in the revised Marlvern or Maple tryouts...he won't necessarily make a National team player in the next 2 to 3 years...Not saying it can't happen, just saying, we don't have that kinda faith in God (insert your diety here)   :-\
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Coop's on June 10, 2013, 05:20:40 PM
which is it ?
this
B.
      Do you know Alvin gets paid for the articles he writes?he makes an income from it so he have to come up with things to talk about,what ever he says take it or leave it he gets paid,don't worry with what Alvin says.
or this
A.
It seems some people just want to see Corneal name and they gone nuts,if we could just take our time to read and understand what people saying it will not have so much contention on the forum,thanks Coache for highlighting some of the important points Corneal made.

or once yuh check it again..yuh change yuh mind to B ? or ah take something out of context.. Alvin should discuss with the TD, cause his publicity is counter-productive. As JC pointed out..the National team has been selected based on the Pro League. But if we have a better player outside than that pro-league player, wheter he playing pick up league or not, and he is capable of being part of a team..then no sorry necessary.....is he saying select the Pro league player ? Good thing Cameroon went with OLD, jokey league player name Roger Milla..and they could have chosen about 200 players playing higher leagues, younger, probably more skilful...but the selectors decided to go with, combining a old experienced horse that was willing, with some open minded younger studs..They didn't win, they just put their best team forward..one can discover a kid with the skills of Pele(insert your greatest here ) in a fete match in Timbuktu..nah that is foreigner...in the revised Marlvern or Maple tryouts...he won't necessarily make a National team player in the next 2 to 3 years...Not saying it can't happen, just saying, we don't have that kinda faith in God (insert your diety here)   :-\
    Breds i was just being sacastic there.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: andre samuel on June 10, 2013, 09:32:26 PM
Its interesting to note that the two players that he referred to first are players that were not born in Trinidad.  Didnt Andre Boucaud have a good couple of games and actually was one of our better players??

Those few lines made it clear to me that Alvin probably didnt even look at the games before he commented.

It is clear that he was standing up for the Proleague, but those wrong facts that he mentioned about Honduras and their apparent use of locally based players just makes him look a man grasping at straws.

Alot of people are also forgetting that alot of players were missing from this squad......KJones, Hyland, CEdwards, LPeltier, Primus, Bateau, Hector, SPower, KDaniel are just some players who would defintely add to any TnT squad

Just to get them playing together.

Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: maxg on June 10, 2013, 09:37:09 PM
Ok Coops...wasn't sure on which statement. I will presume the last. Any thought on my opinion ?
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Football supporter on June 10, 2013, 10:45:57 PM
Obviously, I have a vested interest, but I wonder why there is so much negativity towards the Pro League. Don't get me wrong, there are a lot of changes needed in the attitudes of some clubs, but speaking from an experience of running a club for one season, guys, it's really tough.

Criticize by all means, but don't hate! Where would your national team players come from if the Pro League was scrapped? All the time the negative comments continue, it prevents people investing in the game, which in turn, leads to a continuation of the problems we face.

Most of the players overseas started life with Pro League clubs. The natural progression is for players to move overseas to further develop. It appears to me that a lot of professional T&T footballers just do not have a good attitude towards T&T football.

I'm willing to bet that if players were paid US$10,000 per game, you'd find a lot less overseas players unavailable. There is no pride in playing for T&T in many of these guys. And that lack of passion is seen on the pitch. Many of our current crop of overseas players see themselves as big time Charlies who don't need to make the effort for their country.

The legacy of 2006 is that the current batch of underachievers feel that 2006 was pure luck and that T&T would never be good enough to repeat that success.

My plan, as always, is to concentrate on 2022, work with the U17's and take the pressure off winning games and focus on building a compact squad who know each other inside out.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: just cool on June 11, 2013, 05:15:17 AM
FS im afraid you don't know these ppl well enough. when i was ah lil fella there was no such thing as ah pro league, yet it had man kicking ball in front of the grand stands in mud burying their ankles, or getting stung up by zuti or being pricked by temari, and they were still putting in ah 200% effort with absolutely no pay!

these men played for their friends, their family, their alma mater or their community, and in the end they received nothing but ah nickle plated trophy, yet still they were honored, do you know why? there was a hefty respect for the game in those days and ppl had honor and way more national pride.

no amount of money and prizes would change the condition of these footballers on the island today, bc lets face it, they just don't care!

take a look @ other footballers around the world when they go out to rep their flag, man like buffon does be signing his anthem with tears in his eyes, fellas like ahsley cole and steven gerard does be diving in the path of some venomous shots and taking bullets up side their heads for their flag, these men does play like if they are playing for the ransom and lives of their family members.

yuh watch ah trini game, especially the local based and them men does be coasting, no intensity what so ever, it makes you wonder.

i remembered watching ah game between fatima and john D, the place was packed to capacity, vibes like rain, errol lovel made ah save to keep john d in the game and i remembered his team mates went over to him and hugged him like he saved their lives.

after that game i saw fatima players and supporters alike crying like somebody died, ppl was in shock that they lost, im talking bout grown men and women sobbing un controlably. now to see that kinda passion in football today is an anomaly, the ppl doh have no passion for nothing except having ah time.

i know you have a vested interest in the pro league and i don't blame yuh for that, after all ah man have tuh eat and protect his interest while doing so, but you can't watch me with ah straight face and tell me that skeene and romany is not the problem as to why the league is in arrested development.

if they were truly serious about running that league in ah professional manner they would do every thing in their power to make it happen!

but these old men in trinidad love rank, and they will do anything in their power to stay the head cook and bottle washer, even if it means destroying ah whole generation of talented ppl.

another thing that's holding back the progress is the fact that they want to go it on their own, they're too xenophobic to receive help from outsiders who may know the game better than they do, so they refuse good help bc it came from other than a trini.

both beenhakker and wim told them that their league was substandard and they need to raise the bar, but instead of listening they took offense, but only to the country's demise. maturana said the same thing in not so many words, so did latas and finally otto pfister, but did anybody listen?? noooo!

skeene came on TV criticizing otto saying that the league and the standard of play is pretty good and the level has intensified in recent yrs, with him refusing to take any responsibility for the condition of the league.

breds i don't care what you say, i'm of the opinion that there are too many clueless ppl holding high level positions in that country, and they are running the place in the ground!

and the sad part, instead of accepting the fact that they're clueless and need plenty help, they refuse the help of ppl in the know and opt to go it alone causing further damage.

this is why i can't live in that country anymore, these ppl have way more than we had back in the sixties seventies and eighties, yet still they continue to plunge deeper and deeper into degradation, despite the resources they have @ their disposal.

these are a ppl who hate excellence, bc it's threatening to behold. and anyone who champion's excellence is met with undaunted resistance.
  go figure
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Football supporter on June 11, 2013, 06:12:55 AM
JC, a lot of what you said, I can buy into. I'm not sure about Skeene and I'll tell you why.

We recently had our player of the year awards. 4pm-6pm, bit of food, and drink, sponsors in attendance. A nice event.

Players were arriving after 4.30pm. I was vexed (as usual) but some of our coaches were "explaining" to lil ol colonial Kev that this is the culture here. I have to chill out.

I said that whether you're in Trinidad, Timbuktu or Titsuck,Tennessee 4pm is 4pm. It ain't rocket science, it's respect.

And I feel like giving up at those times. How can you fight a whole nation? The players may have been receiving a $10,000 cheque for player of the year, our sponsors were there to be impressed so we can continue to receive funding. But they still arrive late, and worse, the coaches are trying to justify that!

I'm not trying to say that Skeene is some kind of revolutionary thinker,  but I can vouch that he wants change. He's supportive of new ideas and very approachable. It may be that his weakness is leadership because decisions at the ProLeague are taken by the Board, which is made up of the clubs. It is a regular occurrence for  there to not be a quorum at board meetings. Often, club owners don't even send apologies for their absence.

You see, many of the clubs don't want change. They live in a comfort zone, so why work harder for no immediate return? Same goes for players. For many of the young, it's a live fast, die young culture. Get rich or die trying. There's no personal investment. As you said, no one wants to bleed to achieve.

I get disillusioned at times, I get frustrated.

In the UK, I had many friends who were footballers. There was mutual respect. I could walk into Orient or Spurs a sit down with 5 or 6 players and have a cup of tea and a chat. I'd meet them for a beer, go to their weddings, know their families. Sancho and Jack were at my wedding and my Dads funeral when they played for Gillingham.

I don't even know if some of the Central players are married or have kids. They don't want to know me. Their families and friends don't come to games and didn't come to the award ceremony. If every player bought 4 or 5 friends and family, that would double the attendance at matches!

I saw Graham Rix, one of the best coaches I've ever seen, disillusioned after a few months to the point that he would rather be unemployed than constantly ignored and disrespected. How must the guys like Pfister have felt?

We have to reinvent the T&T footballer. Catch them young, feed them passion for the game, separate them from the negative culture.

I won't give up yet. I have a 4 month old daughter who will become a soca princess! I can't quit, for her sake!

Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: just cool on June 11, 2013, 07:27:30 AM
FS i feel real sorry for ppl like you and graham ricks, i really do.

the reason for this is bc i was in T&T last yr, and i had ah really hard time with the ppl all bc i was ah "fresh water" yankee, and they did every thing in their power to rub it in, and make me feel un welcomed.

from the airport and back i was met with incourteous ppl who went out of their way to be rude. i remember thinking to my self, "where the fack am i ??  this can't be trinidad"!

my point is , if these ppl went out of their way to make me, a T&T national feel like ah dastardly foreigner, then i could only imagine how you were treated.

i remember goin to a game in 2008 , it was T&T vs bermuda @ the marvin lee stadium, after the game ppl just dispersed not even engaging each other, i tried to spark up conversations with random ppl and they looked @ me like i was crazy for even engaging them.

i remembered back in the seventies and eighties when ppl attended games, how ppl would engage each other on the way out of the arena like if they knew each other for yrs.

it was lime and plenty dudup drum and iron going up the road win or lose. don't get me wrong, i'm not looking or expecting that kind of interaction anymore, but when did we get like this to the point where we totally ignore one another??

i could only imagine what you have to deal with down there. there was a time when trinidad was voted the friendliest nation on the planet back in the seventies, as ah matter of fact when our girls went out to represent the country in these international beauty pageants we would always win miss amity bc of how civilized our ppl were.

now today, i don't know who these savages are!! they must be an invading force who have conquered our land and gave our ppl their life style! some how i wish that was the case, but we all know better.  our nation truly suffered a serious brain drain in the eighties and nineties, that's the only thing i could come up with to explain this strange phenomenon.

hang in there FS, just keep up the good work, you shall be rewarded.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Football supporter on June 11, 2013, 08:45:39 AM
FS i feel real sorry for ppl like you and graham ricks, i really do.

the reason for this is bc i was in T&T last yr, and i had ah really hard time with the ppl all bc i was ah "fresh water" yankee, and they did every thing in their power to make me feel un welcomed.

from the airport and back i was met with incourteous ppl who went out of their way to be rude. i remember thinking to my self, "where the fack am i ??  this can't be trinidad"!

my point is , if these ppl went out of their way to make me, a T&T national feel like ah dastardly foreigner, then i could only imagine how you were treated.

i remember goin to a game in 2008 , it was T&T vs bermuda @ the marvin lee stadium, after the game ppl just dispersed not even engaging each other, i tried to spark up conversations with random ppl and they looked @ me like i was crazy for even engaging them.

i remembered back in the seventies and eighties when ppl attended games, how ppl would engage each other on the way out of the arena like if they knew each other for yrs.

it was lime and plenty dudup drum and iron going up the road win or lose. don't get me wrong, i'm not looking or expecting that kind of interaction anymore, but when did we get like this to the point where we totally ignore one another??

i could only imagine what you have to deal with down there. there was a time when trinidad was voted the friendliest nation on the planet back in the seventies, as ah matter of fact when our girls went out to represent the country in these international beauty pageants we would always win miss amity bc of how civilized our ppl were.

now today, i don't know who these savages are!! they must be an invading force who have conquered our land and gave our ppl their life style! some how i wish that was the case, but we all know better.  our nation truly suffered a serious brain drain in the eighties and nineties, that's the only thing i could come up with to explain this strange phenomenon.

hang in there FS, just keep up the good work, you shall be rewarded.

Don't feel sorry for me mate...I chose to live here and I believe it can get better.

I guess people don't engage because they're frightened of being shot! I keep myself to myself when I'm out, because you just don't know.

How did it happen? Well somebody taught these kids, so I guess you have to blame the parents!! I know the US TV had a big influence along with movies and music, but the parents still have a role to teach respect and right from wrong. I mean, if your kid was hitting a dog with a stick and you don't tell him to stop, next thing he's gonna hit your next door neighbour with that same stick.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: just cool on June 11, 2013, 09:17:51 AM
Now back to the topic @ hand.  no i did not forget!

you said that skeene was a very nice fella and approachable to booth, and that might be true, but the question @ hand, is he capable of talking our pro league to the next level where we could contend with other leagues in concacaf?? and i'm afraid the answer to that would be........ NO!!!

i would rather have a fire breathing inapproachable all out grouch who knows how to get the job done right, than some soft talking easy going slickster pimp with no ideas.

skeene might be a likable fella, but after the beating we took from guyana he made me dislike him, and i'll tell you why.

i remembered right after the loss, him and david williams appeared in a television interview speaking out on otto pfister's failure in a manner which was most ignorant and extremely uncalled for! they seemed elated that the german had lost to a local coach, all bc pfister had the nerve to speak out on the manner in which they were taking players out of contention by sending them out on trails during WCQ.

skeene and williams were aghast @ the nerve of this white foreigner telling them how to run their business.

i could also detect a sense of relief and gloating by the pair that pfister had failed to get out of the preliminary round, i'm sure they were saying to themselves, "it wont be long now, the white trouble maker has failed and would soon be gone".

mind you, all this came @ the expense of our footballers, remember, otto pfister could walk away from any job and land another without breaking a sweat, bc he's that marketable, but our boys needed this WCQ to be seen by the numerous scouts who flock to these tourney looking for talent.

this would have made it easier on them without having to stress and strain just to get a trail in an elite league. but i guess this had alluded skeene and william who by then was more concerned with their own ego, than the welfare of the players.

lemme tell yuh something breds, i've seen this mentality for over 40 yrs, and for me jack warner exemplified that xenophobic autocratic self destructive T&T old man mind set to ah tee!

he would rather bring our football to it's knees than to have responsible capable leadership in the TTFF, all bc he hates being opposed and wants to hold on to complete power as long as he can, even though he lack the capability to bring football to a level where we could be competitive.     

imagine that this man was the vice president of FIFA, the president of concacaf, the president of CFU and he did not build one academy in T&T for the twenty something yrs or so that he's been in power??

the equivalent of that would be almost like, junior sammy's children living in ah one room wooden shack with no modern conveniences, despite him having the means to do much much better.

Does jack warner even know that youth development is the key to having a successful footballing legacy, did anytime in this man's reign did he care about having a legacy, do ppl in T&T even give ah fork about legacy??

FS, FYI i just want you to know that you are dealing with real backward one sided ppl, so be careful. yes there are wonderful ppl living in T&T, but the majority of them have ah "eat ah food mentality", and so does skeene IMO.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Football supporter on June 11, 2013, 09:53:08 AM
JC, there are many criticisms that you can lay at the feet of Skeene. I'm not sure what experiences you have had with him, but just to add a little perspective, for me, he is possibly the most forward thinking administrator I have come across in T&T.

He understands and encourages radical ideas. His major problem is that he doesn't have the necessary support to make changes, because those changes would cause clubs to think and work differently and force them to go and find sponsorship to cover additional costs.

If you could imagine a Minister of Sport who keeps getting his plans such as a national basketball academy vetoed by the cabinet because the results of his projects will not be felt for 10 years and they want to win the next election by organising another Hoops of Life.

Thats the kind of problem Skeene has. What can he do - remember, he's an employee - he can't sack the clubs CEO's!

Perhaps he's not doing enough because he's disillusioned, but when he gets a chance, he does what he can.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: maxg on June 11, 2013, 07:40:02 PM
Obviously, I have a vested interest, but I wonder why there is so much negativity towards the Pro League. Don't get me wrong, there are a lot of changes needed in the attitudes of some clubs, but speaking from an experience of running a club for one season, guys, it's really tough.

Criticize by all means, but don't hate! Where would your national team players come from if the Pro League was scrapped? All the time the negative comments continue, it prevents people investing in the game, which in turn, leads to a continuation of the problems we face.

Most of the players overseas started life with Pro League clubs. The natural progression is for players to move overseas to further develop. It appears to me that a lot of professional T&T footballers just do not have a good attitude towards T&T football.

I'm willing to bet that if players were paid US$10,000 per game, you'd find a lot less overseas players unavailable. There is no pride in playing for T&T in many of these guys. And that lack of passion is seen on the pitch. Many of our current crop of overseas players see themselves as big time Charlies who don't need to make the effort for their country.

The legacy of 2006 is that the current batch of underachievers feel that 2006 was pure luck and that T&T would never be good enough to repeat that success.

My plan, as always, is to concentrate on 2022, work with the U17's and take the pressure off winning games and focus on building a compact squad who know each other inside out.
Hope yuh don't think my disagreement with Alvin is a negative reflection of the Pro League. Just saying that our BEST Snr players would not necessarily come from our Local Pro league. It just can't compete with a foreign contract and in many cases a foreign exposure from a development standpoint. Debatable, but would Latapy have been as good had he stayed local..as opposed to playing in Canada(jokey league), Jamaica (Jokey league)...would he have had the wherewithal to then crack into Portugal, Scotland etc
Pro league probably have a few players with the Latapy potential -is that blasphemy - but would it be possible yet, to develop these potential filled individuals to beas great, if they stay in the Pro league ? Nah, the pro-league with the right admin, the right coaching and the right support, could develop down the road, but at this point, it might be growing, developing, but can't yet see it developing players this fast. Might take 15  + years...but for now it not yet strong in any of these...even if Individuals and some clubs dream of one day attaining this...
Nb: I hypothesizing, cause I didn't see a game yet...your fault..   ;D
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: Football supporter on June 11, 2013, 07:56:09 PM
Obviously, I have a vested interest, but I wonder why there is so much negativity towards the Pro League. Don't get me wrong, there are a lot of changes needed in the attitudes of some clubs, but speaking from an experience of running a club for one season, guys, it's really tough.

Criticize by all means, but don't hate! Where would your national team players come from if the Pro League was scrapped? All the time the negative comments continue, it prevents people investing in the game, which in turn, leads to a continuation of the problems we face.

Most of the players overseas started life with Pro League clubs. The natural progression is for players to move overseas to further develop. It appears to me that a lot of professional T&T footballers just do not have a good attitude towards T&T football.

I'm willing to bet that if players were paid US$10,000 per game, you'd find a lot less overseas players unavailable. There is no pride in playing for T&T in many of these guys. And that lack of passion is seen on the pitch. Many of our current crop of overseas players see themselves as big time Charlies who don't need to make the effort for their country.

The legacy of 2006 is that the current batch of underachievers feel that 2006 was pure luck and that T&T would never be good enough to repeat that success.

My plan, as always, is to concentrate on 2022, work with the U17's and take the pressure off winning games and focus on building a compact squad who know each other inside out.
Hope yuh don't think my disagreement with Alvin is a negative reflection of the Pro League. Just saying that our BEST Snr players would not necessarily come from our Local Pro league. It just can't compete with a foreign contract and in many cases a foreign exposure from a development standpoint. Debatable, but would Latapy have been as good had he stayed local..as opposed to playing in Canada(jokey league), Jamaica (Jokey league)...would he have had the wherewithal to then crack into Portugal, Scotland etc
Pro league probably have a few players with the Latapy potential -is that blasphemy - but would it be possible yet, to develop these potential filled individuals to beas great, if they stay in the Pro league ? Nah, the pro-league with the right admin, the right coaching and the right support, could develop down the road, but at this point, it might be growing, developing, but can't yet see it developing players this fast. Might take 15  + years...but for now it not yet strong in any of these...even if Individuals and some clubs dream of one day attaining this...
Nb: I hypothesizing, cause I didn't see a game yet...your fault..   ;D

Max, you didn't see a game coz you have no satnav lol

I agree 100% in that a player won't reach his full potential until he regularly plays and receives coaching from a top European league club.
My argument is that the Pro League is a feeder league much like English League 1 and 2, Serie B etc  Pro League clubs should - and could - be the best in the Caribbean. They could compete in the USL eventually, if they really get organised.
We have to know our potential and limitations. I just feel that too many people don't support the belief that the league isn't that bad and with the support of fans, can be better.

There are more English supporters at non EPL games every week than at EPL games. They all know that their team will never be a chelsea or Man Utd, but their expectations are realistic. Most Trinis will never see a Barca game live, so why not follow a local team live and watch Barca on the telly.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: maxg on June 11, 2013, 09:59:19 PM
We on the same page...however, Natinal team selection is a different beast entirely. Like indoor & outdoor football, same basic game, totally different selection of players. And so far, Pro l players not ready. Total different issue from selecting those players. Both fruit , yet apples and oranges, both have their benefits, but yuh have to pick off the tree yuh could afford to grow. Whether due to soil, climate or environment. I just saying PFL players good for home, and I will back them, but once we leave to compete in other climate & environment..look for apples. Hope I not gone to off deh

Add: still have 1st dibs on a Central kit. I'll be coming again.don't want any other. Well maybe an Impact one for balance.
Title: Re: Corneal not optimistic about soca warriors
Post by: just cool on June 11, 2013, 10:02:52 PM
We on the same page...however, Natinal team selection is a different beast entirely. Like indoor & outdoor football, same basic game, totally different selection of players. And so far, Pro l players not ready. Total different issue from selecting those players. Both fruit , yet apples and oranges, both have their benefits, but yuh have to pick off the tree yuh could afford to grow. Whether due to soil, climate or environment. I just saying PFL players good for home, and I will back them, but once we leave to compete in other climate & environment..look for apples. Hope I not gone to off deh
Oh god max, ah does want tuh read yuh columns eh, but my lord it hard tuh stick with.  :frustrated:  pls my brother, would you @ least use some paragraphs in our writing?? plsss
Title: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on April 01, 2015, 01:54:12 AM
Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


One of the most interesting features of analyses on football matches is to hear the comments coming from the coaching staff after a match is completed.

Because of the fact that the game against Panama on Friday was just a friendly and mattered not as to the relevance of the result, it is necessary for the coach to indicate his own feelings and interpretation regarding the satisfaction or lack of it by his players.

Having seen the interview given by Stephen Hart straight after the game, will surely give us all an idea as to his reaction of what he saw of his team.

Because TV interviews are sometimes very short, it was difficult to figure out whether Stephen was saying that he was very pleased, not so pleased or accepted the learning curve which the defeat gave to the team.

His diplomacy could well have been a comfort zone for his young players, a request for patience from the fans, and most of all, the consolatory relief for the anxious fans, whose main focus is to see the quality of football that this team can produce in three months’ time.

Statistically, anyone who saw the game, could not claim that they were satisfied with the fact that in 90 minutes, there was but one shot taken at the opponents’ goal. The percentage in possession of the ball in the game was a mere 38 per cent, as opposed to the Panamanians 62.

Admittedly, this particular detail does not necessarily mean that there should have been more goals by the team with greater possession.

What it does mean is that the warrior’s inability to dispossess their opponents deprived them from creating much goal scoring chances of their own.

Here was a visiting team which strength was clearly to dominate the midfield through a mixture of short crisp passing among four midfielders, shifting their positions, laterally and diagonally in order to disallow the locals to get close to regaining possession.

What that policy actually succeeded in doing was breaking the communication lines between the Warriors central defenders and leaving space for some vacancies for passing lanes which found chances created in and around the penalty area.

Strangely enough, the individual performances of both Sheldon Bateau and Mekeil Williams were technically good and their agility made up for the times when they were forced into poor covering positions.

Hart was right when he referred only to the last five minutes of the first half as good play by his team. Prior to that, the inexperience of players like Tyrone Charles, Neveal Hackshaw, and Shannon Gomez, not well supported by the more matured players like Khaleem Hyland, Ataullah Guerra, Kevin Molino and Justin Hoyte, deprived them of making full use of the opportunity given them to show their worth.

Despite Hoyte’s ability to defend well at times, he was easily drawn from the wingback position and allowed the opponents to travel the right flank and cross some dangerous services, one which was neatly headed past the keeper amidst a non-marking central defence.

The solitary goal had opened the door for Panama to capitalise, but their crosses brought three other headers, two of which needed to be saved by goalkeeper Marvin Phillip.

Recognising the vast experience of the Panama team and knowing their recent track record, I understood the complex state in which our team was challenged for keeping a well-balanced defence line.

Thanks to the national Under-20 captain Gomez, he stood out in terms of positional play, choice of passes, and decisions when in defence, to usher the flank runners to go towards restricted space between himself and the touchline.

Our selected engine room which consisted Hyland and Hackshaw, won the ball occasionally in midfield, but certainly too close to the final third of the field, causing Molino to receive the ball in his own half of the field, where there was too much traffic for him to use his scoring ability.

To be a heavy critic on this team will not serve the purpose of exposing the young players, but it requires some talking to the more advanced players, especially my favourite player Guerra, who was nonproductive most times.

Despite the substitutions by both teams in the second half, the game fell asleep and apart from a powerful drive by Codoy from near forty metres which struck the crossbar before the keeper could wink, there was very little from either side that helped keep the fans awake.

The picture is now much clearer. We must intensify the training sessions, increase the level of fitness of the players and most of all, coach Hart must decide upon strategy depending upon his opponents.

It is a task that may be possible, especially when players like Lester Peltier, Hughtun Hector, Carlyle Mitchell, Daneil Cyrus, Kenwyne Jones, Joevin Jones, and Aubrey David join the ranks.

If Hart has to continue to use these youngsters, they must be allowed to train together at least one day per week until the overseas players join them.

A few friendly matches will make a huge difference for the specific purpose of developing cohesiveness, through basic tactical patterns. This is our worst problem, hence the reason why the most attention must be made to correct it.

Structure is needed in our national teams. All of them, the juniors, the women and our senior team. We must find defensive methods which will help to win the ball, rather than just hope that the opponents make unforced errors in their passing.

The three months must be well spent and we must show improvement before we leave these shores for the Gold Cup.

Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: frico on April 01, 2015, 02:26:07 AM
Corneal is ah boss,he's right again.
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: Cowen on April 01, 2015, 07:42:30 AM
Corneal is ah boss,he's right again.

this time
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: Coach on April 01, 2015, 12:20:38 PM
"Structure is needed in our national teams. All of them, the juniors, the women and our senior team. We must find defensive methods which will help to win the ball, rather than just hope that the opponents make unforced errors in their passing."

CORNEAL NEED TO SPEND MORE TIME PLEADING TO THE MoS, TTFA & THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY THE IMPORTANCE OF FUNDING THAT IS REQUIRED TO PROPERLY PREPARE OUR NATIONAL TEAMS BEFORE EVEN TALKING ABOUT STRUCTURE AND FINDING DEFENSIVE METHODS! 
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: Controversial on April 01, 2015, 10:31:41 PM
Corneal talking a lot about the players, skill and coaching but nothing about the funds needed to run a program and get much needed friendlies...

Corneal need to stop wasting our time with his recycled diatribe of criticism and get to the meat of the matter... which is SH is getting shafted bc TTFA can't run our national football and doesn't have the funding or sponsors to do a good job
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: Sam on April 02, 2015, 09:00:36 AM
Good write for a change.

But what Corneal really expect, we had about 6/7 players making debuts, young teenagers to and they hold they own against a full strength Panama team.

What Hart doing here is brilliant !!!

Give him time.

Want to see Levi, Korbim, Ramjitsingh, Woo Ling, Brent Sam and Muckette get to train with de team.

I hope de TTFA really come though yes for a camp from now until de Gold Cup.

Come on Sheldon, I know yuh have it in you to make this happen.

Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: Majestic on April 02, 2015, 10:45:21 AM
A major concern is our midfielders retaining possession, we give away the ball too often.

I rate Hyland and although he has been inactive recently, the same thing remains...when he struggles, he really struggles. We need him to do much more.

In upcoming games, it would be good to see him and Hector given a chance to play center midfield, with Molino in front of dem.
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: coache on April 03, 2015, 09:53:49 PM
Corneal have rel years of football experience and I agree wid what de man saying ..I said it before and I sayin it again ...Justin Hoyte is a dead horse...why allyuh does be callin dese people to come and play fuh de National team?

I have no problems wid de youths and de local players but de dead horse foreigners allyuh does be callin...
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: coache on April 03, 2015, 09:56:56 PM
...And allyuh  keep talkin bout funds...yuh could have all de funds ..it would make no damn difference if allyuh keep puttin  ah dead horse on de field..

Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: dervaig on April 07, 2015, 05:47:09 PM
...And allyuh  keep talkin bout funds...yuh could have all de funds ..it would make no damn difference if allyuh keep puttin  ah dead horse on de field..



Bingo!
Not exactly a 'dead horse', but......................
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: ANC2 on April 08, 2015, 08:41:26 AM
So experts let me ask you all. Which local left back should get call? Please dont say
Jack, or Bentik, cause if allyuh saying any of them two better than Hoyte, I will  :rotfl: and then :cursing:

PS: The left back from the U20,  show he have something but really not ready. Who he with in the League?
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: Deeks on April 08, 2015, 08:55:35 AM
Why not  give them a next chance?  Their faults appeared to be more nervousness than not being good. Get some games against some regional teams to build their confidence.
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: Dynamite Warrior on April 08, 2015, 10:01:45 PM
What about a change to the 3-5-2 I think this may help get the best out of some of our players. Ive seen Jones play for the Fire three times this year and while he is average defending he has played well going forward. By all reports Gomez excelled in the Panama game after moving forward. It also seems that we are really deep at CB right now with Bateau, Williams, Hoyte, Cyrus and maybe even Inniss. It seems that we are still struggling in the midfield so maybe flooding the midfield might help us keep possession. I think this team wouldnt be bad. Ive included DeLeon because of Flex's info that he is interested.

Williams
Cyrus
Bateau
Hoyte
J. Jones
DeLeon
Molino
Hyland
Gomez
Peltier
K. Jones


Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: Deeks on April 09, 2015, 05:18:45 AM
It seems that we are still struggling in the midfield ....

Breds, that is ah understatement. We are struggling for truth!!!
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: Coach on April 09, 2015, 11:22:31 AM
What about a change to the 3-5-2 I think this may help get the best out of some of our players. Ive seen Jones play for the Fire three times this year and while he is average defending he has played well going forward. By all reports Gomez excelled in the Panama game after moving forward. It also seems that we are really deep at CB right now with Bateau, Williams, Hoyte, Cyrus and maybe even Inniss. It seems that we are still struggling in the midfield so maybe flooding the midfield might help us keep possession. I think this team wouldnt be bad. Ive included DeLeon because of Flex's info that he is interested.

Williams
Cyrus
Bateau
Hoyte
J. Jones
DeLeon
Molino
Hyland
Gomez
Peltier
K. Jones



3 in the back is risky especially with one CB. In transition from attack to defense not always you can get the FB's and DFM's tucking in fast enough to help out the 1 CB. Van Gaal learned fast, since switching back to 4 in the back Man U has more wins. Very few teams fool around with 3 in the back.
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: soccerman on April 09, 2015, 12:54:45 PM
What about a change to the 3-5-2 I think this may help get the best out of some of our players. Ive seen Jones play for the Fire three times this year and while he is average defending he has played well going forward. By all reports Gomez excelled in the Panama game after moving forward. It also seems that we are really deep at CB right now with Bateau, Williams, Hoyte, Cyrus and maybe even Inniss. It seems that we are still struggling in the midfield so maybe flooding the midfield might help us keep possession. I think this team wouldnt be bad. Ive included DeLeon because of Flex's info that he is interested.

3 in the back is risky especially with one CB. In transition from attack to defense not always you can get the FB's and DFM's tucking in fast enough to help out the 1 CB. Van Gaal learned fast, since switching back to 4 in the back Man U has more wins. Very few teams fool around with 3 in the back.
Totally agree Coach
Title: Re: Corneal: Soca Warriors have a long way to go.
Post by: Deeks on April 09, 2015, 03:01:13 PM
The way that formation is set up, the wing backs, JJ and Gomez will be doing a la Roberto Carlos. Running the who length of the field. They maybe be able to do that against "small time" opposition. These two defenders must have the ability to bring the ball decently, and when the opportunity arise, do quick counter attacks. That formation might be an attacking formation on paper, but in reality it is defensive. But I like the personel of that formation.
Title: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: palos on July 16, 2015, 11:55:44 AM
Should make for interesting reading
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: andre samuel on July 16, 2015, 12:38:05 PM
I'm also waiting on a statement from Mr Brian Williams
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: AB.Trini on July 16, 2015, 12:40:41 PM
Kinda like sitting on the toilet seat and waiting for the big drop
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: asylumseeker on July 16, 2015, 12:44:07 PM
Is statement a euphemism for "apology"?  :P
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Controversial on July 16, 2015, 02:05:17 PM
Should make for interesting reading

He will outline the negatives that is certain... Or you may not get an article just yet... ;)
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Sam on July 16, 2015, 03:26:44 PM
Doh forget Sancho.

Yuh know Trinis love to jump on de bandwaggon.

Like how de PNM government give all ah them a million each when they came back from Germany.

Hungry man Sancho was first on de bread line.

Look how ting change up now.

They should do everything in they power to keep this team and de women team active and happy.

Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: pull stones on July 16, 2015, 03:31:26 PM
Doh forget Sancho.

Yuh know Trinis love to jump on de bandwaggon.

Like how de PNM government give all ah them a million each when they came back from Germany.

Hungry man Sancho was first on de bread line.

Look how ting change up now.

They should do everything in they power to keep this team and de women team active and happy.
boy sam. that man sancho is a huge disappointment.
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Spursy on July 16, 2015, 03:33:48 PM
i am waiting for touches report :( where is he :(
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Tallman on July 16, 2015, 04:03:35 PM
I'm also waiting on a statement from Mr Brian Williams

Why? There was nothing about the form of the Warriors that suggested we would have seen the type of performances displayed thus far. Coupled with the woeful preparation and off the field issues, I doh see anything wrong with what he say. But I think ah man like he would be glad dat he was proven wrong.
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Controversial on July 16, 2015, 04:05:54 PM
i am waiting for touches report :( where is he :(

Good question.. Touches gone awol for a while now
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Mose on July 16, 2015, 10:01:50 PM
Should make for interesting reading

He will outline the negatives that is certain... Or you may not get an article just yet... ;)

Won't come until we lose.
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Cocorite on July 16, 2015, 11:16:19 PM
Should make for interesting reading

He will outline the negatives that is certain... Or you may not get an article just yet... ;)

Won't come until we lose.

So he's Jamaican
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Cocorite on July 16, 2015, 11:17:10 PM
I want to hear what Gally have tuh say. . .these days we ain't hearing much from him either way
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Deeks on July 17, 2015, 12:42:50 AM
I want to hear what Gally have tuh say. . .these days we ain't hearing much from him either way

Lord, I could see allyuh drunk with happiness. Allyuh jump on Corneal. Now Gally. Then it go be Vidale. Then it go be Butcher. A good few waggonist come back on the forum. Welcome back Breds and Sisterens. Where have you been?
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Sam on July 17, 2015, 05:17:20 AM
I want to hear what Gally have tuh say. . .these days we ain't hearing much from him either way

Lord, I could see allyuh drunk with happiness. Allyuh jump on Corneal. Now Gally. Then it go be Vidale. Then it go be Butcher. A good few waggonist come back on the forum. Welcome back Breds and Sisterens. Where have you been?

Deeks, u notice that to. And after de gold cup, they gone again

 :rotfl:

Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: injunchile on July 17, 2015, 10:47:58 AM
Well that is Trini for yuh- Only when we winning that we supporting . Are you guys surprised.
 Since the Strike squad days the stadium half full until we nearly CROSS THE JORDAN AND ALL THE PHILISTINES FULL UP THE STADIUM AND THE DIE HARDS CANT GET IN ON MATCH DAY.
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: soccerman on July 17, 2015, 11:02:27 AM
Well that is Trini for yuh- Only when we winning that we supporting . Are you guys surprised.
 Since the Strike squad days the stadium half full until we nearly CROSS THE JORDAN AND ALL THE PHILISTINES FULL UP THE STADIUM AND THE DIE HARDS CANT GET IN ON MATCH DAY.
I was one who couldn't get in even though I had a ticket and went to every qualifying home game with my father. I cry when we couldn't get in and cry even more after the game :'(
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Controversial on July 17, 2015, 01:13:34 PM
I want to hear what Gally have tuh say. . .these days we ain't hearing much from him either way

Lord, I could see allyuh drunk with happiness. Allyuh jump on Corneal. Now Gally. Then it go be Vidale. Then it go be Butcher. A good few waggonist come back on the forum. Welcome back Breds and Sisterens. Where have you been?

Deeks, u notice that to. And after de gold cup, they gone again

 :rotfl:



wouldn't call cocorite and them waggonists by any means... i think we had certain posters that kept a lot of people off the board and now that they are gone, it is returning to the good old days.. ;) the gold cup performance just adds to it..
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Controversial on July 17, 2015, 01:17:47 PM
I want to hear what Gally have tuh say. . .these days we ain't hearing much from him either way

Lord, I could see allyuh drunk with happiness. Allyuh jump on Corneal. Now Gally. Then it go be Vidale. Then it go be Butcher. A good few waggonist come back on the forum. Welcome back Breds and Sisterens. Where have you been?

vidale and butcher does talk too much rubbish, so why not call their name... them men does be eating kfc while they commentating... like they come on the mic with a hungry belly and vex talk...
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Jumbie on July 19, 2015, 05:49:12 PM
yup.. it shall bray now.
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: dreamer on July 19, 2015, 07:36:17 PM
He'll be itchin' but unable to say: "I want to see meh son as coach again"
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: AB.Trini on July 19, 2015, 08:06:11 PM
He get the cod liver laxative he wanted now wait for the latrine hole to fill and spew forth.

The other one is the Mouth of  Sanche (aka MoS)- look and listen for promises look and listen for ways to block any funding and then like some Greek tragedy - come riding in at the last minute to play like he saving the team or the world - can't blame tne fella he join aarty that did the same for the 2006 Warriors they come outta the blues and hand out money promised to them money that the government get from all the publicity of that teams success- now he go use the same mo to come looking like a knight in shining armour and want to blame the TTFA fuh a
L tho FS wrong- lawd from the mouths of those who are shortsighted we wait with bated breath
Title: Re: I anxiously await Mr Corneal's latest article
Post by: Controversial on July 19, 2015, 08:09:45 PM
Should be coming any minute or hour now..
Title: Is it fair to stop playing for your country?
Post by: Flex on December 20, 2015, 04:24:50 AM
Is it fair to stop playing for your country?
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


The answer to that question is Yes. It is fair to stop playing if you get injured, or too old to compete or if you wish to change your profession. But the reason for refusing to play for the national team should be carefully studied before making the decision.

Please understand that there is no historical past which today’s players can review in search of a solution. The question of playing for a living is vital, especially when players have their families to enjoy the benefit of their spouses’ hard work.

The better they play, the greater the fans will respect and support them and the team, and the possibility of obtaining increases in their salaries will also be supported.

However, let us not pretend that the arrangements made by the administration have not been done in a manner which resembles the work of a well-organized business.

The truth is also based upon a picture which has been adversely affected by the predecessors, leaving the administration to correct the wrong of the last decade, but has to accept the demand for competence without the financial tools available.

I was very impressed when our Captain Kenwyne Jones commented that he is not even concerned about the current “cut in pay” which he may be facing in the near future. He says that his focus is getting the Club into the Premier Division, after which the financial issues can be addressed.

I wish to draw an analogy regarding players of Chelsea whose pay packages are ready week after week, and yet still they are failing to produce the quality of play which is needed for victory and which today we are all well aware have cost the coach his job.

These world class players are struggling with maybe attitudinal problems among themselves and maybe their coaching staff, to the point that many rumours are in the air for some to leave the club.

However, they have continued to play, but way below the quality which brought them into millionaire status, hence the reason why a champion club seem shaken, not by money, but apparently something which is clearly affecting their natural talents.

These two situations leave us all with the difficulties in multi-tasking, especially when physical and mental focus are all under tremendous strain.

That is the reason why I am suggesting to the national team players to continue to give service to your club. Country and your profession, leaving the issues which are all legal, to be handled by their agents, or attorneys, all of whom are professionals in their own right.

Playing sport is a behaviour which in many instances, should not be compromised, regardless of the problems which appear in the midst of the performances of the player.

If anything, the strength of one’s character is a major factor in the life of a sportsman. Those who follow all types of sport on the TV will admit to some silly behaviour displayed by some of the outstanding players of our time, yet still they rant and rave over minor issues with an opponent, or an official.

So to increase the bad relationship between players and administrators off the Football field makes both parties losers, especially when they both know that the matter will be solved, even if it has to reach the court.

Our footballers should have learnt the lessons from our recent West Indian cricketers who walked away from performing their highly gifted talent because of a faulty piece of contract and a response by persons who seem not to understand how to deal with labour issues.

The result was a financial loss of 41 million dollars which the WICB has to pay. Just think of the January 8th 2016 one hour after the Warriors complete their match against Haiti in Panama, and look carefully to recognize how significant the result could have impacted the teams and in how many ways.

Two weeks from now, when the monies are paid (hopefully), how difficult will it be to renew the relationships among the stakeholders and then to the performance levels on the field, will all be divulged positively or negatively dependent upon the maturity of all concerned.

We all want you to be paid and certainly do not want you or the country to suffer because of the absence of dialogue among the participants. The game is bigger than the player. Which one do you want to be?

Title: Re: Is it fair to stop playing for your country?
Post by: Controversial on December 20, 2015, 01:30:10 PM
is it fair to not pay the players and make false promises??
Title: Re: Is it fair to stop playing for your country?
Post by: palos on December 20, 2015, 05:16:22 PM
Doh act like is NOw de players puttin up with bullshit from the TTFA or whatever they choose to call they self now.

And is disingenuous to play the "patriotism" card when YOU KNOW nuff times players and staff had to make extraordinary sacrifices for the team including KJ having to pay for a hotel stay with his own credit card as the hotel refuse to release dey luggage unless the bill was paid.

All due respect bro, but this post from you is suprising at best.  Especially surprising because you know better.
Title: Re: Is it fair to stop playing for your country?
Post by: Cocorite on December 20, 2015, 11:06:12 PM
I wouldn't dignify this with a response. Loud Stupes  ::)
Title: Re: Is it fair to stop playing for your country?
Post by: Rastaman on December 21, 2015, 07:46:18 AM
Ha Ha Ha.... almost read this article  ;D ;D ;D

Something just made me check the writer. As I can see from the responses above I am glad that I did catch on quickly.
Title: Re: Is it fair to stop playing for your country?
Post by: Storeboy on December 21, 2015, 03:47:51 PM
Corneal should be writing a history of the deceit and incompetence that is the TTFA (formerly TTFF) before writing this drivel. How long must players put up with this crap? Personally, I would hate to see us not make the Copa, as it could be a stepping stone to great things - financial stability, and exposure for our talented young players, but at some time players have to take a stand.  This ineptness has been going on for decades now. I do believe that the new administration could have been a little more diplomatic.  Call a meeting - Skype, phone, or whatever, of the team and have a heart to heart talk. Be trans[parent about the financial situation by showing numbers, not giving anecdotes. Give a deadline for a final resolution. Hold a discussion with the team leadership.  Negotiate in secret, not in the press. John David-Williams needs to show leadership NOW. That is what he was elected for.
Title: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Tallman on June 05, 2016, 09:56:23 AM
Three losses! Now the lessons
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian)


The question of winning matches in the three-game tour did not appear in my mind to scrutinize the final review from this journey to three countries.

Seeing that all our players are now very versed with the business of travelling from one country to another, the comments about discomfort, getting acclimatized and a reduced bunch of our quality players, should now be placed into perspective and be analyzed as far as performances were concerned.

We have all seen the way the Peruvians offer a lesson on team communication, simply because their focus has been deeply on possession, support for fellow players, and discipline within their system of play which is attached to organized football.

Uruguay also added the level of speed to that of Peru and their results were based on the fact that winning the ball back was their main target. This was met with some resistance from the Warriors, whose request to tighten up in midfield and invite aggression from the middle to the final third of the opponents half of the field.

China was different. Ranked lower than Peru, Uruguay and T&T, the Chinese did not demonstrate any outstanding display of skill and aggression, but they produced the type of game which saw them starting their build up from their penalty area, sliding passes laterally in order to open up the space that TT had to cover.

We ball watched, we accepted the fact that taking possession from the exquisite short passing game, that split delicate passes through our lost midfield. The Chinese used the flanks regularly, but their fore play was always in midfield. Penetrative passes to the flank allowed them free space to search for their attackers in the TT penalty area.

This approach created some free headers and our central defenders were not prepared to either use a man to man defensive approach, or mark the space in which the services were likely to arrive.

It was disaster from the early period of the game, right through to the end. Admittedly, the bits of selfish traits by some players in the previous matches, improved immensely and sometimes brought some competence in getting towards the Chinese defence line. As a matter of fact, some fine passing from Daneil Cyrus to smart running Hughtun Hector, penetrated the opponents back four and allowed Willis Plaza to demonstrate his talent, which should have earned him a place in the starting lineup.

China scored almost as often as they wished, simply because they recognized that the talent of our defenders was individualistic, but not compatible when it came to understanding each other, especially in making decisions in and around the Warriors penalty area.

It would be unfair to say that the defenders did not play well in certain areas of the game, but it would be very fair to observe that this has been the major problem in our defensive department and one which needs maximum attention.

As to the plan of dealing with set plays on the flanks from orthodox crossed balls, the decision to mark space  as oppose to marking players has not worked despite the fact that we have three excellent aerial players in Abu Bakr, Aubrey David and Yohance Marshall. Just look at the crosses which created some easy headed goals, simply because the Chinese player were aware of where they will run even before the ball is passed. Obviously, the set play of China and in the previous games as well, dealt us some severe blows through some soft goals.

So the experiences of the three match series may have opened our eyes to what is needed on the training field, a factor which our coaching staff must recognize if they wish to make corrections.

Finally, I have watched carefully at the Americans, one time against Bolivia where they were in complete control of the game through, speed, aggression and desire to win.

Their opening game against Colombia was filled with classroom lessons for the Yanks. Clinical accuracy in passing and the dedicated plan to support the recipient of the ball at all times, seriously in search of creating passing lanes and their analysis of the American players made the Colombians appear as though they could be hard to beat.

Admittedly, José Pékerman is one of the best football brains in the world. His contribution to Argentine Football since the 1994 youth tournaments, was mainly responsible for the brilliance of Messi and company.

Since his mistake in the World Cup of 2006 when Argentina was superb in their approach to winning the tournament, Jose changed Juan Riquelme, the game’s super star at the time, when they were in the lead against Germany and his replacement of Esteban Cambiasso, left vacant space for the Germans who equalized and won on penalties.

He immediately resigned and left the coaching for two years until Colombia literally begged him to give them his service. The results and performance levels were obvious and excellent young players are showing up in Columbia.

My reason for the explanation of this match is to alert our national team that preparation is needed for the present USA squad. They are the stumbling block for our trip to Russia, so we must take a clinical view of their present style.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: pull stones on June 05, 2016, 11:09:56 AM
why does this old geeza has a column in the sport pages when he obviously has not a clue? and why did he mention pekerman resigning in the ending of his article? this man here is a bag of confusion, him and all the other trinidad football gurus they all hate the coach and wants his place. this is why trinidad football is in the condition it's in, to many self serving people involved.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Controversial on June 05, 2016, 12:42:14 PM
Cornmeal is a clown or what?

He so absent minded he didn't realize our first team didn't play... These were testing fete matches to see who could get off the fringes..

Nothing more, nothing less.. If the first team had played it would have been different results and he would have the right to comment..

He should talk to his partner David and tell him to organize some matches that mean something for the prep of the first team..

Some real dunce in TT these days boy..
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Deeks on June 05, 2016, 02:01:40 PM
The only comment I will make about Alvin's article, is that we have to prepare for Guatemala first. After Guatemala, then we bother about the US.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Jumbie on June 05, 2016, 02:19:25 PM
Speaking bout the US game.. was a location announced?
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: andre samuel on June 05, 2016, 03:26:47 PM
Speaking bout the US game.. was a location announced?


Jacksonville
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Big Magician on June 05, 2016, 05:07:42 PM
well the Perkeman retirement story is a good one..they had to go to some mountain to find him...
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: injunchile on June 05, 2016, 05:15:43 PM
He did  mention- reduced bunch of our quality players. Let us not shoot the messenger, He does know something about Coaching,
 I tend to agree about the space / man marking problem.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: trini_stallion on June 05, 2016, 05:28:42 PM
What is the purpose of this article? He saying anything that has not already been said? The NT is not just focusing on USA, they're focusing on both games, first Guat then USA...I get the impression this man trying to tell Hart how to do his job...what to focus on in training etc...come on...Hart was there and absolutely blasted the poor performance, even stating he said what he needed to see. The exercise served it purpose!
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: MEP on June 05, 2016, 06:06:58 PM
Perhaps we should get to the root of why this tour happened because as it seems to me, there wasn't any collaboration between the TTFA and SH in its planning. Having observed SH for the past few years he has been pretty pragmatic in his building and development of the national team. Given what he has to work with his model has always been to build from the core and to have what clearly wasn't even a B team seems to go against his approach. No coach likes losing but most can accept losing with dignity as the product on the field is a representation of the coach.
So my questions are, and will continue to be, were some of the players on this team foisted on SH? He had to be have been watching them during their Pro-League games. Is the quality of the Pro-league that poor that only these players stand out. Is there a possibility that coaches/managers/owners are pushing for certain players to get National team caps with the hope  that these players can be now sold? This latter question while seemingly implausible if it were based on the performances of these last three games brings me back to when this tour was planned. Knowing the unavailability of the core was SH comfortable with "his selection"? or maybe it was simply a fundraiser for the TTFA?
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Jumbie on June 05, 2016, 08:05:40 PM

Quote


Jacksonville

Much thx.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Tobago28 on June 05, 2016, 10:25:36 PM
Perhaps we should get to the root of why this tour happened because as it seems to me, there wasn't any collaboration between the TTFA and SH in its planning. Having observed SH for the past few years he has been pretty pragmatic in his building and development of the national team. Given what he has to work with his model has always been to build from the core and to have what clearly wasn't even a B team seems to go against his approach. No coach likes losing but most can accept losing with dignity as the product on the field is a representation of the coach.
So my questions are, and will continue to be, were some of the players on this team foisted on SH? He had to be have been watching them during their Pro-League games. Is the quality of the Pro-league that poor that only these players stand out. Is there a possibility that coaches/managers/owners are pushing for certain players to get National team caps with the hope  that these players can be now sold? This latter question while seemingly implausible if it were based on the performances of these last three games brings me back to when this tour was planned. Knowing the unavailability of the core was SH comfortable with "his selection"? or maybe it was simply a fundraiser for the TTFA?

Solely a fundraiser that sank our FIFA ranking.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: injunchile on June 06, 2016, 09:21:24 AM
This was an opportunity to widen the pool- to expand the bench and to look at players who seemed to have performed at the local level whether they can step up.
 I guess the opposition was too much for this bunch of players- El Salvador- Cuba- Puerto Rico would have been a better yardstick. You cant run donkeys in a horse race.
 Secondly it was a fund raiser for the TTFA.
 Thirdly it answers the Question about preparation for the W/C and makes the President look good- So we cant be asking what is he doing for the NT.
 Finally, we  are assuming that Mr Hart attends most of the Local Games? I know for a fact because my friend Mr Cummings related to me one Sunday , that the problem with local coaches is that they  have their favorite players that they want to see on the National team. Now it is worse because playing on the NT is a passport for being scouted for bigger leagues and not to mention transfer fees.
 I hope it was a learning curve for players and coaches.
 My concern is for Hart's  job , In this business success is what counts. We have a history of firing local coaches and bring a big name coach when we reach the HEX, Captain Burrell once said when Jamaica reached the World Cup , that Caribbean islands need a foreign Coach to take them  to the World Cup.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Mose on June 06, 2016, 10:48:09 AM
Perhaps we should get to the root of why this tour happened because as it seems to me, there wasn't any collaboration between the TTFA and SH in its planning. Having observed SH for the past few years he has been pretty pragmatic in his building and development of the national team. Given what he has to work with his model has always been to build from the core and to have what clearly wasn't even a B team seems to go against his approach. No coach likes losing but most can accept losing with dignity as the product on the field is a representation of the coach.
So my questions are, and will continue to be, were some of the players on this team foisted on SH? He had to be have been watching them during their Pro-League games. Is the quality of the Pro-league that poor that only these players stand out. Is there a possibility that coaches/managers/owners are pushing for certain players to get National team caps with the hope  that these players can be now sold? This latter question while seemingly implausible if it were based on the performances of these last three games brings me back to when this tour was planned. Knowing the unavailability of the core was SH comfortable with "his selection"? or maybe it was simply a fundraiser for the TTFA?

Solely a fundraiser that sank our FIFA ranking.

Actually, considering the way the rankings work, this is not a given. I haven't done the calculations, so, do you know for a fact that our rankings have been sunk by these losses?
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Coach on June 06, 2016, 11:38:37 AM
"and a reduced bunch of our quality players" after clearly identifying the problems it would of been nice to see some mention of the valiant effort by the coaching staff with the limited talent they had to work with.

Article is more like nitpicking on Harty.
 
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: palos on June 06, 2016, 12:00:47 PM
why does this old geeza has a column in the sport pages when he obviously has not a clue?

I hold no brief for Alvin Corneal, but he has forgotten more about football than most here would ever know COMBINED.

He may have his agenda and it runs counter productive to the overall good of T&T football IMO.....but yuh cyah question his knowledge of the game.  Question his tactics/strategy?  Sure.  His coaching results?  Definitely.  But at the end of the day, he knows his football.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Rastaman on June 06, 2016, 02:13:00 PM
I learned my lesson my lesson a long time ago.....Do Not Read Articles Written by Alvin Corneal....


But it was fun reading the responses  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Tobago28 on June 06, 2016, 03:15:41 PM
Perhaps we should get to the root of why this tour happened because as it seems to me, there wasn't any collaboration between the TTFA and SH in its planning. Having observed SH for the past few years he has been pretty pragmatic in his building and development of the national team. Given what he has to work with his model has always been to build from the core and to have what clearly wasn't even a B team seems to go against his approach. No coach likes losing but most can accept losing with dignity as the product on the field is a representation of the coach.
So my questions are, and will continue to be, were some of the players on this team foisted on SH? He had to be have been watching them during their Pro-League games. Is the quality of the Pro-league that poor that only these players stand out. Is there a possibility that coaches/managers/owners are pushing for certain players to get National team caps with the hope  that these players can be now sold? This latter question while seemingly implausible if it were based on the performances of these last three games brings me back to when this tour was planned. Knowing the unavailability of the core was SH comfortable with "his selection"? or maybe it was simply a fundraiser for the TTFA?

Solely a fundraiser that sank our FIFA ranking.

Actually, considering the way the rankings work, this is not a given. I haven't done the calculations, so, do you know for a fact that our rankings have been sunk by these losses?

Formula is simple: P = M x I x T x C
M=3,1,0 for win, draw or loss. Naught times anything is naught. Then take them 3 naughts and add to our 12 month average. The ranking must go down.

http://www.fifa.com/fifa-world-ranking/procedure/men.html
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Mose on June 06, 2016, 03:24:24 PM
Perhaps we should get to the root of why this tour happened because as it seems to me, there wasn't any collaboration between the TTFA and SH in its planning. Having observed SH for the past few years he has been pretty pragmatic in his building and development of the national team. Given what he has to work with his model has always been to build from the core and to have what clearly wasn't even a B team seems to go against his approach. No coach likes losing but most can accept losing with dignity as the product on the field is a representation of the coach.
So my questions are, and will continue to be, were some of the players on this team foisted on SH? He had to be have been watching them during their Pro-League games. Is the quality of the Pro-league that poor that only these players stand out. Is there a possibility that coaches/managers/owners are pushing for certain players to get National team caps with the hope  that these players can be now sold? This latter question while seemingly implausible if it were based on the performances of these last three games brings me back to when this tour was planned. Knowing the unavailability of the core was SH comfortable with "his selection"? or maybe it was simply a fundraiser for the TTFA?

Solely a fundraiser that sank our FIFA ranking.

Actually, considering the way the rankings work, this is not a given. I haven't done the calculations, so, do you know for a fact that our rankings have been sunk by these losses?

Formula is simple: P = M x I x T x C
M=3,1,0 for win, draw or loss. Naught times anything is naught. Then take them 3 naughts and add to our 12 month average. The ranking must go down.

http://www.fifa.com/fifa-world-ranking/procedure/men.html


While I will admit it is likely, it is not a given. It also depends on what happens with the teams around us and what points have dropped off of our 12 month average if any at all. There have been instances in the past where we've had good results only to see our rankings go down and I'm pretty sure I've also seen instances in the past where teams have lost and their rankings have gone up.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Tobago28 on June 06, 2016, 03:33:04 PM
Perhaps we should get to the root of why this tour happened because as it seems to me, there wasn't any collaboration between the TTFA and SH in its planning. Having observed SH for the past few years he has been pretty pragmatic in his building and development of the national team. Given what he has to work with his model has always been to build from the core and to have what clearly wasn't even a B team seems to go against his approach. No coach likes losing but most can accept losing with dignity as the product on the field is a representation of the coach.
So my questions are, and will continue to be, were some of the players on this team foisted on SH? He had to be have been watching them during their Pro-League games. Is the quality of the Pro-league that poor that only these players stand out. Is there a possibility that coaches/managers/owners are pushing for certain players to get National team caps with the hope  that these players can be now sold? This latter question while seemingly implausible if it were based on the performances of these last three games brings me back to when this tour was planned. Knowing the unavailability of the core was SH comfortable with "his selection"? or maybe it was simply a fundraiser for the TTFA?

Solely a fundraiser that sank our FIFA ranking.

Actually, considering the way the rankings work, this is not a given. I haven't done the calculations, so, do you know for a fact that our rankings have been sunk by these losses?

Formula is simple: P = M x I x T x C
M=3,1,0 for win, draw or loss. Naught times anything is naught. Then take them 3 naughts and add to our 12 month average. The ranking must go down.

http://www.fifa.com/fifa-world-ranking/procedure/men.html


While I will admit it is likely, it is not a given. It also depends on what happens with the teams around us and what points have dropped off of our 12 month average if any at all. There have been instances in the past where we've had good results only to see our rankings go down and I'm pretty sure I've also seen instances in the past where teams have lost and their rankings have gone up.

Agreed! likely but not given, corresponding fixture results will have impact. My conviction is based on the fact that the teams around us are playing African Cup of Nations, Euro2016 and Copa America which have a higher(2.5 or 3.0) match importance factor than the 1.0 for friendlies which we lost.  All that is important now is victories at Quatamela and USA, if that happens who cares about the fundraising tough we desperately need said funds
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Mose on June 06, 2016, 03:50:56 PM
Perhaps we should get to the root of why this tour happened because as it seems to me, there wasn't any collaboration between the TTFA and SH in its planning. Having observed SH for the past few years he has been pretty pragmatic in his building and development of the national team. Given what he has to work with his model has always been to build from the core and to have what clearly wasn't even a B team seems to go against his approach. No coach likes losing but most can accept losing with dignity as the product on the field is a representation of the coach.
So my questions are, and will continue to be, were some of the players on this team foisted on SH? He had to be have been watching them during their Pro-League games. Is the quality of the Pro-league that poor that only these players stand out. Is there a possibility that coaches/managers/owners are pushing for certain players to get National team caps with the hope  that these players can be now sold? This latter question while seemingly implausible if it were based on the performances of these last three games brings me back to when this tour was planned. Knowing the unavailability of the core was SH comfortable with "his selection"? or maybe it was simply a fundraiser for the TTFA?

Solely a fundraiser that sank our FIFA ranking.

Actually, considering the way the rankings work, this is not a given. I haven't done the calculations, so, do you know for a fact that our rankings have been sunk by these losses?

Formula is simple: P = M x I x T x C
M=3,1,0 for win, draw or loss. Naught times anything is naught. Then take them 3 naughts and add to our 12 month average. The ranking must go down.

http://www.fifa.com/fifa-world-ranking/procedure/men.html


While I will admit it is likely, it is not a given. It also depends on what happens with the teams around us and what points have dropped off of our 12 month average if any at all. There have been instances in the past where we've had good results only to see our rankings go down and I'm pretty sure I've also seen instances in the past where teams have lost and their rankings have gone up.

Agreed! likely but not given, corresponding fixture results will have impact. My conviction is based on the fact that the teams around us are playing African Cup of Nations, Euro2016 and Copa America which have a higher(2.5 or 3.0) match importance factor than the 1.0 for friendlies which we lost.  All that is important now is victories at Quatamela and USA, if that happens who cares about the fundraising tough we desperately need said funds
:beermug:
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: ffisback on June 06, 2016, 08:01:11 PM
Its not a good sign when people in your own camp start to lose faith in you Cormel Glen was wright outside of the caribbean SH is just a average coach.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: MEP on June 06, 2016, 08:10:31 PM
Its not a good sign when people in your own camp start to lose faith in you Cormel Glen was wright outside of the caribbean SH is just a average coach.
best average coach we have
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: coache on June 06, 2016, 11:14:25 PM
The last time China played in Trinidad it was back in 1981...it was difficult to beat the Chinese because all the Chinese players looked the same.
When they came out in the second half it was suspected that they had a fresh eleven on the field..
The Chinese players couldn't be beaten on the dribble either...whenever a Chinese player was beaten he always reappeared in front the player...this actually brought on anxiety for the Trinidad players because it was as though the Chinese had the ability to magically reappear even when left behind a split second before.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Sam on June 07, 2016, 04:35:53 AM
When Corneal coach T&T, like they accomplish something?

Steups.

SH, keep doing yuh stuff pardna.

Bull them hard.

Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Tobago28 on June 07, 2016, 05:10:57 AM
Its not a good sign when people in your own camp start to lose faith in you Cormel Glen was wright outside of the caribbean SH is just a average coach.

ffisback, why you using Corneal Glenn to make your point. Stand up and say you think outside the Caribbean SH is an average coach.

If he is average then he is better than we deserve because we have a well below average TTFA, well below average Ministry of Sports and a well below average SPORTT.

In my opinion not dependent on anybody else, SH is the best coach for TnT at this point in time. For those who say he is average please provide the standard for this assessment. Is it based on wins, losses, playing style, success in Gold Cup, success in WC Qualifying, etc please provide the yardstick.

We can't agree or disagree because Mr. Glen say so, tell us the standard for evaluation for average then we could talk.

Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: injunchile on June 07, 2016, 05:44:14 AM
Chile is a good case in point. The Coach left them and it was four losses and yesterday they lost to Argentina. I guess the Jury is out about SH after Canada fired him with the loss to Honduras in a W/C qualifier. If you pay peanuts you get monkeys. With the salary scale that is being offered , I guess we are lucky to have SH. Another plus for us is that he knows the region and style of play in CONCACAF.
 The players will play for him and he has improved the style of play and we look like we can compete with the big boys in CONCACAF.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Tallman on June 07, 2016, 07:09:05 AM
The last time China played in Trinidad it was back in 1981...it was difficult to beat the Chinese because all the Chinese players looked the same.
When they came out in the second half it was suspected that they had a fresh eleven on the field..
The Chinese players couldn't be beaten on the dribble either...whenever a Chinese player was beaten he always reappeared in front the player...this actually brought on anxiety for the Trinidad players because it was as though the Chinese had the ability to magically reappear even when left behind a split second before.

This give meh ah good laugh to start de day.  :rotfl:
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: Tobago28 on June 07, 2016, 09:51:46 AM
Chile is a good case in point. The Coach left them and it was four losses and yesterday they lost to Argentina. I guess the Jury is out about SH after Canada fired him with the loss to Honduras in a W/C qualifier. If you pay peanuts you get monkeys. With the salary scale that is being offered , I guess we are lucky to have SH. Another plus for us is that he knows the region and style of play in CONCACAF.
 The players will play for him and he has improved the style of play and we look like we can compete with the big boys in CONCACAF.

Chile has a population of 18 million, we have 1.5 million. Chile keeper is Claudio Bravo(BARCELONA), Chile Defenders Gary Medel(Inter), Enzo Roco(Espanyol), Mauricio Isla( Marseille), Chile midfielders Arturo Vidal(Bayern Munich), Pablo Hernandez(Celta), Erick Pulgar(Bologna), Charles Aranguiz(Bayer Leverkusen), Marcelo Diaz (Celta); Chile forwards are Fabian Orellana(Celta), Eduardo Vargas(Hoffenheim), Mauricio Panilla(Atalanta), and Alexis Sanchez(Arsenal). 

Chile current ranking is 5th while TnT is 64th; looking at the team make up and ours, looking at our ranking and theirs why the reference/comparison to Chile?

All Hart Haters love to reference the 8-1 loss when the now head of CONCACAF, accepted his resignation but what was his record as manager of Canada. September 2006-June 2007 In 10 games 5 W 1 D 4L. From May 2009 - October 2012 in 35 games 15 W 9 D 11 L.  Is this an average record? Also, in the 9 months after Hart they had 3(Three) Interim Managers. Since July 2013 they have hired Spaniard  Benito Floro. Has Canada become a global power since Hart? Has Hart stabilized our football and are we ranked higher than Canada. We are 64, Canada is 93 plus we are down from 50 and to 64 and still above Canada. Hart Haters stop bringing up one loss look a the whole picture.

Hart is the best coach for us at this point in time, people look in the mirror and know who we are. Hart has multiple youth programs that he would love to implement but cant because our Pro League, Schools League, Youth football and sport administration is 20 years behind where we need to be to get where he can get us.

What Hart Haters are missing is that we do not have first world football infrastructure but we have a coach with First world ideas, plans, strategy and implementation.



Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: pull stones on June 07, 2016, 12:04:40 PM
Its not a good sign when people in your own camp start to lose faith in you Cormel Glen was wright outside of the caribbean SH is just a average coach.

ffisback, why you using Corneal Glenn to make your point. Stand up and say you think outside the Caribbean SH is an average coach.

If he is average then he is better than we deserve because we have a well below average TTFA, well below average Ministry of Sports and a well below average SPORTT.

In my opinion not dependent on anybody else, SH is the best coach for TnT at this point in time. For those who say he is average please provide the standard for this assessment. Is it based on wins, losses, playing style, success in Gold Cup, success in WC Qualifying, etc please provide the yardstick.

We can't agree or disagree because Mr. Glen say so, tell us the standard for evaluation for average then we could talk.
you have time. this man in a wanker, so why bother with his silly comments?
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: lefty on June 07, 2016, 12:06:57 PM
The last time China played in Trinidad it was back in 1981...it was difficult to beat the Chinese because all the Chinese players looked the same.
When they came out in the second half it was suspected that they had a fresh eleven on the field..
The Chinese players couldn't be beaten on the dribble either...whenever a Chinese player was beaten he always reappeared in front the player...this actually brought on anxiety for the Trinidad players because it was as though the Chinese had the ability to magically reappear even when left behind a split second before.

This give meh ah good laugh to start de day.  :rotfl:

tallman dat shit ever happen? hear dis story nuff times in meh youth
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: lefty on June 07, 2016, 12:24:40 PM
I think in local football cycles there are people of the view that, as it stands now, the Pro league should have more players on the first team, even though the evidence suggest otherwise, and they are selfishly and shamelessly prepared to hang that on coach Hart......I ask this though of the naysayers what about d football education or lack thereof d players receiving from there club coaches, whose own football education quite obviously leaves much to be desired.

imagine man does be strollin and trottin in d pro leagues, what is d league doing about upping the pace and by extension fitness levels in d pro league....they get d odd stand out like cummings and de silva because they break a very poor mold and offer someting to work with dais why.
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: palos on June 07, 2016, 12:41:04 PM
Yuh does only miss de water when de well run dry


Dem vulture tryin to suck out all moisture from dis particular well.  Is a wonder it still functioning...and in pole position to boot.

A setta forkane daywalkers all a dem
Title: Re: Three losses! Now the lessons
Post by: maxg on June 07, 2016, 12:50:47 PM
Chile is a good case in point. The Coach left them and it was four losses and yesterday they lost to Argentina. I guess the Jury is out about SH after Canada fired him with the loss to Honduras in a W/C qualifier. If you pay peanuts you get monkeys. With the salary scale that is being offered , I guess we are lucky to have SH. Another plus for us is that he knows the region and style of play in CONCACAF.
 The players will play for him and he has improved the style of play and we look like we can compete with the big boys in CONCACAF.

Chile has a population of 18 million, we have 1.5 million. Chile keeper is Claudio Bravo(BARCELONA), Chile Defenders Gary Medel(Inter), Enzo Roco(Espanyol), Mauricio Isla( Marseille), Chile midfielders Arturo Vidal(Bayern Munich), Pablo Hernandez(Celta), Erick Pulgar(Bologna), Charles Aranguiz(Bayer Leverkusen), Marcelo Diaz (Celta); Chile forwards are Fabian Orellana(Celta), Eduardo Vargas(Hoffenheim), Mauricio Panilla(Atalanta), and Alexis Sanchez(Arsenal). 

Chile current ranking is 5th while TnT is 64th; looking at the team make up and ours, looking at our ranking and theirs why the reference/comparison to Chile?

All Hart Haters love to reference the 8-1 loss when the now head of CONCACAF, accepted his resignation but what was his record as manager of Canada. September 2006-June 2007 In 10 games 5 W 1 D 4L. From May 2009 - October 2012 in 35 games 15 W 9 D 11 L.  Is this an average record? Also, in the 9 months after Hart they had 3(Three) Interim Managers. Since July 2013 they have hired Spaniard  Benito Floro. Has Canada become a global power since Hart? Has Hart stabilized our football and are we ranked higher than Canada. We are 64, Canada is 93 plus we are down from 50 and to 64 and still above Canada. Hart Haters stop bringing up one loss look a the whole picture.

Hart is the best coach for us at this point in time, people look in the mirror and know who we are. Hart has multiple youth programs that he would love to implement but cant because our Pro League, Schools League, Youth football and sport administration is 20 years behind where we need to be to get where he can get us.

What Hart Haters are missing is that we do not have first world football infrastructure but we have a coach with First world ideas, plans, strategy and implementation.




:beermug: :applause:
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on January 02, 2017, 06:24:35 AM
Did Nicaragua serve its purpose?
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


The question is: Did the Nicaragua series served it purpose?

For me I will say it I think they did, if only because of the fact that you are now more informed about the quality of the players who participated in the two match exercise.

And according to our Tom Sanitfied himself, “People sometimes people forget that I am only two and half, three weeks in Trinidad and that I saw only a few league matches and I had not a lot of time to select and to find the right players for the coming weeks. So this two-week training camp plus these two friendly matches helped me a lot to know which players are ready, which system is best and how we can be prepared for Suriname and Haiti. I am a very happy coach that we use these days between Christmas and New Years to prepare our team because we have made a lot of steps forward.”

I suppose that you have also tested the competence of our organization in many ways, especially the problems which saw one player and the Chef De Mission. The player in particular who may have not remembered to check his passports for the expiry date.

That aside, your disciplined attitude to training must have sent some messages to your stringent policy regarding same.

As to the matches itself, because we have been deprived of getting the opportunity to see our new look coach and his selected players, I was faced with doing a search for any type of coverage available. When I actually began to get a glimpse of the actual match the coverage was lousy and it came over as a stop and start football match (there is no such thing).

So the only information which I could have told myself was regarding the time of possession which we were only able to hold 44 per cent of the first match and marginal better in the second.

There was also some coverage which was actually showing the movement of the ball in animated style with the abbreviated names T&T and Nicaragua guiding us.

At times, when the quality improved marginally, the Central Americans appeared more organized and displayed some good ball possession.

Thankfully, all the goals in the two matches were shown on television via news. The opening goal by Luis Peralta in the 3rd minute of the first match was a sloppy piece of defending, where three red shirts lingered around the six-years-box with trying to reach a cross which started its downward trend amidst the trio, but they allowed enough space for a Nicaraguan to demonstrate the perfect technique of heading it past our keeper.

The second goal from Daniel Cadena was even more comical whereby a shot taken from at least 40-metres saw our keeper having to cover the length of the penalty area to catch the looping ball. He failed to reach and we were two goals down. Thankfully we retaliated with an attractive goal by Hashim Arcia, way of a well taken shot from 15 meters out.

My assessment for the first game was in T&T’s favour, simply because the home team is usually start with a two-goal advantage. This meant that the Warriors may have been an formidable opponent, and could take some credit for the one goal deficit at the conclusion of the first encounter.

The second match statistically was a great plus for the new coach with an improved quality of play, but more importantly, scoring three goals in the process.

My impression of the quality of play on both sides appeared slower than it should have been, and there was too much facility offer to the players with the ball from both sides. That signalled that the game was treated as a “true friendly”, maybe with the thought of avoiding injuries at this with T&T having two crucial matches in less than a week’s time against an always tough Haiti and Suriname in the CFU Gold Cup play-off starting on Wednesday in T&T.

Nothing negative about the exercise, but whatever has been shown by the instructions from the new coach must be seem when the Warriors face Suriname and Haiti.

The real test will begin on Wednesday.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on January 03, 2017, 06:06:00 AM
Soca Warriors face serious challenges.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


In just the first week in the New Year, our national football team is faced with the first challenge of the year, tomorrow to be exact, where opponents Suriname and Haiti will be formidable opponents.

I suppose that the new coach has given sufficient thought for the selection process and it will be senseless to challenge the team without seeing any training sessions at home or its two matches in Nicaragua.

Of course, the quality of the players is well known to those who follow the game closely. However, now that the recent confusion regarding the availability to represent the national team, is complete and the players are all available for selection.

The omission of Jan-Michel Williams is not understandable, unless of course he is injured, because he is undoubtedly the best and most outstanding keeper in the country, plus his vast experience at international level cannot be underestimated.

Being careful and hopefully fair that I am when it comes to matters of this great game, I realise that the chosen team is filled with some talented players, even without the Daneil Cyrus and Jomal Williams.

With the reason given by the coach for omitting these players, I applaud his decision. But if the reason for Cyrus being late because of a busted car tyre, then there should have been some level of compassion displayed. If his reason was truthful, then the coach may have acted unreasonably.

The case of Joevin Jones playing a practice match for W Connection is one which I would like to hear a comment from the TTFA President David John Williams or the management of W Connection. Jones, who is home on vacation from MLS champion Seattle Sounders, was unavailable for selection for the national team which toured Nicaragua last month.

We are all aware that the MLS season had ended, and all players from T&T who are attached to clubs are able to return home, especially when they have matches of competitive value.

The decision taken by the player himself or the management of the “W Connection team” to represent “W Connection” in a practice match against our Gold Cup Competitor, Haiti for a place in the Summer tournament, is strange and awkward for the new coach.

If the left-footed talented player needed to get some match activity before the Gold Cup qualifying matches tournament, why did he not travel with the team to Nicaragua?

I assume that no one saw anything wrong with his decision, except the Coach, who decided to remove his name from the previously selected squad.

Nevertheless, the true test for the current squad and their new coaching staff will be these two upcoming match against Suriname and Haiti.

The Dutch has not been setting the Caribbean world afire in recent times, but their players have shown levels of improvement marginally within the past two years.

However, a victory is terribly needed for the Soca Warriors, especially as the Haitians, their next opponent, are a much stronger team. They defeated T&T to eliminate us from the Copa America mega tournament last July.

Meanwhile, the little that I have recognised from Carlos Edwards’ squad does not allow me to make any strategic assessment on the team. However, having seen their last encounter against Haiti, and witnessing the matches played against the south Americans, gave me the feeling that speed will be their main asset, plus their absolute desire to gain possession.

T&T need to pay as much attention to this mini tournament so that qualification to the Gold Cup will provide the much needed experience and exposure before the team meet the more advanced Mexico and Panama.

This is a crucial year for the Soca Warriors football.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: maxg on January 03, 2017, 10:40:50 AM
come on Mr Corneal, yuh stating what the average football fan know, you supposed to be on another level..Express yuh technical opinion (even if ppl not in agreement), or report on the individual intracies of the football/club contracts releases the avg fan won't know or even, the FIFA rules involved in playing off season matches outside of Fifa dates..but don't just give TT a piece like if you a fella in the street, whether ppl like your writing or not, you are not any average guy in TT football. Bring it man. Teach
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on January 06, 2017, 05:57:15 AM
Warriors one foot out of Gold Cup.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


The score is 1-2, it’s your service Tom.

I wonder if the pain of defeat was a lesson to the new coach Tom Saintfiet.

Did he measure the importance of accepting the job when he had so little knowledge of players with whom he had to work with?

With one foot out of the Gold Cup, the high profile Belgian is now faced with having to swallow his words about players being “drunk” and “not interested” in representing their country.

Surely, these incidents which preceded our Suriname encounter, must have done something to the mindset of the players. The psychological mental patterns which reflect the mood of athletes when all is not well, are not easily recognised by just watching them prepare prior to the start of the event.

With approximately ten to 15 minutes into the match between the Soca Warriors and Suriname, the picture of lethargy and number of inaccurate passing sent the wrong message to the fans.

Despite the fact that there was sufficient quality in a number of our players, the absence of collective thinking was obvious almost at every turn of the encounter.

Suriname’s approach to the game was based upon the disciplined commitment to the instructions which were provided by their coaching staff. Their players do not have the ability of the majority of the Warriors.

The difference is that the Dutch were diligent in their planned passing game, and patience was their greatest virtue. They kept shape in their defensive ploy and offered little opportunity for penetrative passing lanes.

The Warriors helped their opponents by unforced errors through some inaccurate passing at a ratio of three in every seven. The effectiveness of attacking from the flanks came through the guile and speed of Tyrone Charles and Nathan Lewis. The exquisite passes which they created, failed to finish the sharp crosses, giving Suriname little trouble to avert danger.

Our midfield did not show up in attack, especially Kevan George and Hughton Hector, who left the job of turning the crossed balls into goals to Caesar and Arcia into the penalty area, which could have changed the game.

Attitudinally, the pace of the game was abysmally slow by both teams, not comparable to teams in this category of international football.

Suriname saw the need to shoot more frequently at goal and could have scored three times. However, their opening goal demonstrated that Guno Kwasi found space into a good shooting distance, before Carlyle Mitchell made a late tackle and deflected the shot past keeper Adrian Foncette.

The T&T wake up call saw a Suriname defender committing a foul on substitute Winchester. Tyrone Charles utilised clinical accuracy with a dipping swerver which landed in the right upper 90, giving the goalkeeper Claidel Kohinor no chance.

A drawn result at full time saw the teams going for glory in extra time, maybe with a bit more effort than the regular time. However, Ivanildo Rozenblad (substitute) surprised the Warriors midfield, rushed through the open space and rifled a powerful shot past the hapless keeper Foncette for the goal which subsequently was the winning goal.

It was difficult to understand any organised form of play, as players were operating instinctively and without good reason most times. Even the coach will agree that his charges were helter skelter in a game which all the players had previously claimed to understand the instructions of the new coach and the system of play which he requested. My! My!

The next game is clearly one which is victory for Warriors or exit the Gold Cup.

The first thought for coach Saintfiet is whether or not he will recall the players who have not been included for one reason or another.

Was the displayed sense of discipline practiced by the Belgian a short term decision? If so, then the recall of Joevin Jones, Kevin Molino, Daniel Cyrus, Jomal Williams, Jan-Michael Williams, and maybe the holiday maker Sheldon Bateau, could make a difference against Haiti.

My answer lies in the attitude of the players, the experience which many of them could portray in this crucial game and of course, a true picture of the talents of Jones and Molino returning to the team with the national flag in mind.

Oh what a painful situation to the fans, many of whom have given up the ghost by walking out of the stands earlier than they should.

There needs to be a complete turnaround in temperament and intensity in the Warriors, plus that collective process which good teams display when in search of a great result.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on January 10, 2017, 05:48:08 AM
Waiting on John Williams reactions.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


The second effort by our new look national football programme has been completed in a manner which can provide a review of some kind as to the success or lack of it.

Coach Tom Saintfiet has had much of the players, home based and foreign, not only on the field of play, but off it as well.

In a crowded four match programme, our national team’s performance fluctuated from match to match, leaving the fans and also the administration with a complexed impression regarding the quality of team and management.

Maybe a lot of “off the field” activity had affected certain aspects of the exercise, where the question of discipline, inappropriate comments from all stakeholders and faulty management could all have produced a picture of its own.

The chosen players during the period saw locals being projected among the more advanced ones and in certain cases, creating a positive standard for themselves, while the foreign based stars may not have faced the new image with the seriousness it deserved.

The structural formula regarding systems of play was never recognised as organised as good as was needed, and occasional skill and creativity was noticed on the basis of individual output as opposed to collective team play.

The fact that we were defeated on three occasions, twice in the official Gold Cup competition, did not allow the coaching staff any reasonable excuse, simply because the attitude, level of understanding the game, the instructions of the coaching staff or the inability of the pros and amateurs to adjust effectively all seemed flawed.

What seemed more visually obvious was the selection processes which were made regularly without bringing any improvement to the quality of our game.

I suppose that we are forced into commending Suriname and Haiti, both of which outplayed our team and also to demonstrate the tactical display of instructions given by their coaches.

The inclusion of some veteran players may have been beneficial in the very short term, but the two muscular injuries which affected both Carlos Edwards and Cornell Glen lent some guidance as to the disadvantage of age in the competitive world of football.

Pockets of ill-discipline were not helpful to the players or the team and appeared to have been unacceptable by the coach.

These were all part of the reason for failure to give the success which we expected, add to that the useless forms of communication which affected the smooth running of the media by placing complaints and accusations which were not even related to the game itself.

It would be unfair not to congratulate Shahdon Winchester for scoring a hat-trick on his birthday, an occasion which he will probably cherish for the rest of his life.

And finally, coach Saintfiet, how would he describe the performances of the team as opposed to his instructions on and off the field?

Moreso, how would David John-Williams react to the reasons or excuses which he may put forward for the failure to achieve his goal? Will he retain his opinion that these matches will lead positively to the Mexico and Panama World Cup activity?

What about us the public? Are we convinced that better days ahead or should we redirect the course of future events by changing the guards and the generals, invest into new ideas and look at the progress as a long term project which would allow the promising youngsters to develop within an environment which will place them into a comfort zone surrounded by the culture of the people, the task of guiding the minds of the players, and providing the country with a plan which may well gain the ascendency which our youth programmes from the 2004 - 2012 era.

Finally, we need to change our colonial belief that the foreigner is always superior.

We must understand that the majority of our star players of yesteryear were not because of the foreign coaches but by the extraordinary talent which they nurtured and attracted the world with a ball at their feet.

There is no need for a blame game, but more so, as to the search of organised education and extensive coaching all year round. The next two months could be a nightmare for our football.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Lower St. John on January 10, 2017, 08:16:45 PM


Finally, we need to change our colonial belief that the foreigner is always superior.

We must understand that the majority of our star players of yesteryear were not because of the foreign coaches but by the extraordinary talent which they nurtured and attracted the world with a ball at their feet.


There is nothing in Coach Saintfiet resume to suggest that he was a "Superior" coach.

Blessings
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: MEP on January 11, 2017, 03:54:17 AM


Finally, we need to change our colonial belief that the foreigner is always superior.

We must understand that the majority of our star players of yesteryear were not because of the foreign coaches but by the extraordinary talent which they nurtured and attracted the world with a ball at their feet.


There is nothing in Coach Saintfiet resume to suggest that he was a "Superior" coach.

Blessings
there yah go
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on January 18, 2017, 05:09:56 AM
T&T football between a rock and a hard place.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


There is no space for excuses, ifs and buts, not even a decent reason why the game in this country has plummeted into total misery to the fans.

In case you are in search of answers to the present dilemma, we must all look into a mirror, and identify the numbers of erroneous mistakes, or face the absolute realities of player behaviour, coach selection, preparatory process towards our target, desist from confrontation between the experts and the members of the hierarchy whose authority appeared to have eroded the path to success.

As we speak, the complacency which is presently existing from all the stakeholders simply means that there is not organised method as to what is the next move.

Maybe they should take the primary step in assessing the true picture of the current quality of our recent matches, try to understand why the same players have deteriorated in their attitudes and by extension, their on the field performances, if we judge their contributions over the past three years.

It makes no sense worrying about the month-long inclusion of our Belgian friend whose arrival to this job is as mysterious as we have never expected.

While the corrective methods to ultimate success should have been guided by every aspect of choice of players, coaches, psychologists, medics, and most importantly, a committee which consist of qualified personnel, all of whom must pay attention to his areas of qualification.

Am I dodging the issue of the day which seems to all, which is selection of the new coach? NO! The TTFA must seek technical and tactical information as to the deficiencies which were exposed within the entire programme.

Unfortunately, time is a key factor and getting a team in training could be initiated by the present staff available, but not yet appointed, just offering assistance to regain the enthusiasm which appeared lost among the players.

If the authorities reach to the conclusion of the present point of the road to Russia, then it will create a better picture as to what type of coaching expertise is needed for the journey.

The decision can then be made intelligently and not a repetition of a “fly by night” dream coach who wanted to turn water into wine, and TT dollars into Euros.

Our plan must be one which needs maximum efforts for facing the next eight matches, and a selected coach must have the experienced coaching staff to work with both eyes upon that target, but also glance further into the future where the sequence of using the present competent players (in his opinion), can connect with players who are probably aiming for their entry into that last world Cup effort.

The picture can project the total physical efforts of all the players, while the younger ones can glance further towards the GOLD CUP in 2019.

Attitudes will need to be addressed in a manner which will send a message to all and sundry, that nothing less than disciplined and assertive approach, full commitment to the task and extraordinary sacrifices which may be just what the coaching staff will need.

This may call for a very experienced coach, supported by vibrant coaching staff of maybe three of our up and coming technicians, whose temperament have reflected a picture of anxiety to learn and be excellent listeners to the selected Professor.

Finally, the most disrupted problems have been seen to be coming from the boardroom and THIS MUST DISCONTINUE. The administrative structure was chosen on the basis of their capabilities of administering the management of the game, not their tampering with players, coaches, doctors, and the media.

We are behind the eight ball and only the brilliant minds, like the Crawfords and Mottleys, The Laras and (late) Carews, add the geniuses like the late Sir Frank Worrell to the group.

If the current administrative novices are incapable, then, do like the ailing and seek the services of those who can guide you along the way.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on January 23, 2017, 05:56:43 AM
Welcome Warriors new head coach.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


Dennis Lawrence is well known for heading the winning goal against Bahrain which took this twin island state straight into the FIFA Germany world Cup Finals 2006.

The lanky central defender was chosen by the technical committee of the T&T Football Association (TTFA) eventually after accepting the resignation of Belgian Tom Saintfiet some two weeks ago.

The deliberation period which existed before making the final choice leaves me with the impression that there was serious dialogue with a few contenders and maybe numerous essential questions of absolute importance and digging deep into their coaching experience had to be dealt with.

Taking into consideration the accepted mistake by the TTFA when deciding upon the choice of the flamboyant Belgian, whose bark turned out to be much more powerful than his bite, and left nothing to show his worth as a coach, we need a real coach.

So my congratulations go out to Dennis for accepting the job of coaching our national team for the first time.

I have to admit that while I can vouch for the professional approach which the San Juan defender showed on the field of play during the World Cup, his coaching ability could only be described in writing, especially as he was not a head coach on any of his assignments.

Clearly, the decision makers must have done deep assessment of Dennis’s work from the bench and I will trust them on this occasion.

I do not wish to hear of any promises made by the president similar to the one he made to the fly-by-night bargain dealing coach who travelled for thousands of miles and did not know the length of his contract.

It will be fair to assume that the former national player may have learned much of the fundamentals when sitting next to the English coaches with whom he worked and probably sometimes used the football language commented by the “gaffas”.

It is close to three weeks since the resignation of the former coach and it is a pity to see that an interim coach (or even the assistant named coaches) have not been placed in temporary positions in order to work with the locally-based players who may be pleased to have the coaches take a close look at their real quality as local professionals.

With eight weeks before the continuation of the Hexagonal qualifying, every session will have had immense value and the thought of a few relevant opponents, is vital for the preparation of the squad.

It would have been great for the technical committee to recognise the need for at least three or four practice matches such as Venezuela, Jamaica, Canada and any one of the final four qualifiers in the African Nations Cup.

Our team needs to find opponents who also need to sharpen their performance levels for competition of similar quality of the Hexagonal standard.

Because of my many years of assessing coaches, national and club, I will certainly cast a look at our local choice with the hope that the exposure afforded him by the English coaches will bring much valuable information to our own.

We need to support him totally and demand that the TTFA give him the respect of getting a few friendlies which I previously mentioned and a contract which is not filled with the two-match dismissal clause in advance of the giants - Mexico and Panama.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Deeks on January 23, 2017, 07:11:40 AM
Alvin said the "the TTFA choice of the flamboyant Belgium". Honestly, there was nothing flamboyant about the Belgian. He walk right into a mine field.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on January 25, 2017, 12:52:43 PM
FYI, Alvin told me...

Flex,
I have actually played 119 matches and scored 69 goals. However many of these matches were players before independence when the country was colonial. Between 1955 and 1962 I had played 38 matches, many of which were english 1st division clubs such as Arsenal, Chelsea, Wolves, Coventry, French national team playing under Air France, Barbados, British Guiana, Haiti twice, Suriname twice before independence. 3 Brasilians clubs and On the first ever West indies Team in 1959, we played 17 match against many first and second division teams between Aug.6th to November 9th 1959.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: ffisback on January 25, 2017, 09:58:00 PM
FYI, Alvin told me...

Flex,
I have actually played 119 matches and scored 69 goals. However many of these matches were players before independence when the country was colonial. Between 1955 and 1962 I had played 38 matches, many of which were english 1st division clubs such as Arsenal, Chelsea, Wolves, Coventry, French national team playing under Air France, Barbados, British Guiana, Haiti twice, Suriname twice before independence. 3 Brasilians clubs and On the first ever West indies Team in 1959, we played 17 match against many first and second division teams between Aug.6th to November 9th 1959.
STEUPS!!
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Deeks on January 25, 2017, 11:11:25 PM
FYI, Alvin told me...

Flex,
I have actually played 119 matches and scored 69 goals. However many of these matches were players before independence when the country was colonial. Between 1955 and 1962 I had played 38 matches, many of which were english 1st division clubs such as Arsenal, Chelsea, Wolves, Coventry, French national team playing under Air France, Barbados, British Guiana, Haiti twice, Suriname twice before independence. 3 Brasilians clubs and On the first ever West indies Team in 1959, we played 17 match against many first and second division teams between Aug.6th to November 9th 1959.
STEUPS!!

Why STEUPS!! ?
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Controversial on January 25, 2017, 11:15:30 PM
FYI, Alvin told me...

Flex,
I have actually played 119 matches and scored 69 goals. However many of these matches were players before independence when the country was colonial. Between 1955 and 1962 I had played 38 matches, many of which were english 1st division clubs such as Arsenal, Chelsea, Wolves, Coventry, French national team playing under Air France, Barbados, British Guiana, Haiti twice, Suriname twice before independence. 3 Brasilians clubs and On the first ever West indies Team in 1959, we played 17 match against many first and second division teams between Aug.6th to November 9th 1959.
STEUPS!!

Why STEUPS!! ?

He's jealous and envious, he suffers from an inferiority complex and insecurity which is all symptoms of being a house negro that has sold out...

That's why he steups
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Sam on January 26, 2017, 03:55:04 AM
FYI, Alvin told me...

Flex,
I have actually played 119 matches and scored 69 goals. However many of these matches were players before independence when the country was colonial. Between 1955 and 1962 I had played 38 matches, many of which were english 1st division clubs such as Arsenal, Chelsea, Wolves, Coventry, French national team playing under Air France, Barbados, British Guiana, Haiti twice, Suriname twice before independence. 3 Brasilians clubs and On the first ever West indies Team in 1959, we played 17 match against many first and second division teams between Aug.6th to November 9th 1959.
STEUPS!!

Why STEUPS!! ?

He's jealous and envious, he suffers from an inferiority complex and insecurity which is all symptoms of being a house negro that has sold out...

That's why he steups

Controversial, you need to learn how to shut your coont sometimes. What de f00ck you ever did for your country T&T Canada except whine and bitch?

Alvin, as a footballer was a boss !!!!

Give credit where credit was due, not he fault he played for different countries before independence.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Quags on January 26, 2017, 09:18:13 AM
Think contro was referring to ffisback not Alvin .
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Deeks on January 26, 2017, 03:53:17 PM
I think Flex needs to clarify something here. They way I reading it, is that Alvin said that he played for TT against all those teams mentioned. Then he also played for the West Indies team. So he only played for TT and the West Indies. That is how I understand what the article said.

By the way Alvin was a BOSS player, and many people felt that had he had the chance, could have played in the old English div. 1. He had speed, good first touch and excellent ball control. He had a stinging left foot shot. Great at dead ball situation. Dangerous corner kicks. I would rate him in the top 10 forward/left wing. Superb youth coach( I can attest to that). First West Indian at that time, to attain an English FA coaching badge.

 And by the way an excellent cricketer/opening batsman. Should have played at least one game for the WI. You may have issues with Alvin, and lots of people do, but he was par excellence. Hall of Famer indeed.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Storeboy on January 26, 2017, 04:53:02 PM
I think Flex needs to clarify something here. They way I reading it, is that Alvin said that he played for TT against all those teams mentioned. Then he also played for the West Indies team. So he only played for TT and the West Indies. That is how I understand what the article said.

By the way Alvin was a BOSS player, and many people felt that had he had the chance, could have played in the old English div. 1. He had speed, good first touch and excellent ball control. He had a stinging left foot shot. Great at dead ball situation. Dangerous corner kicks. I would rate him in the top 10 forward/left wing. Superb youth coach( I can attest to that). First West Indian at that time, to attain an English FA coaching badge.

 And by the way an excellent cricketer/opening batsman. Should have played at least one game for the WI. You may have issues with Alvin, and lots of people do, but he was par excellence. Hall of Famer indeed.
Most of the people on this forum have no knowledge of memory of football in Trinidad before the 70's. For those of us familiar with 60's football, you are spot on.  You may not like his opinions (I don't agree with them many times), but he was a great TT footballer and a decent coach.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on January 28, 2017, 02:10:21 PM
Alvin said: I have only represented T&T, Barbados and the West Indies in football. i have coached Grenada, St. Vincent, St, Kitts, Anguilla, US Virgin Islands, T&T and the West Indies team which toured Mexico for a six game friendly, One match against Iraq in Grenada.

My answer related to matches which I represented Trinidad and Tobago and the WI team (which were also considered international matches, seeing that we were not yet Independent). My matches in the Barbados team were also Internationals.

Let me point out that the players who wore the TT red shirts after 1962 Independence, are the ones who had each match recorded as a National caps and I commend them all for their contribution to our Football."



Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Deeks on January 28, 2017, 03:20:40 PM
Alvin said: I have only represented T&T, Barbados and the West Indies in football. i have coached Grenada, St. Vincent, St, Kitts, Anguilla, US Virgin Islands, T&T and the West Indies team which toured Mexico for a six game friendly, One match against Iraq in Grenada. "

I will get some more clarification.



Flex, thanks for the clarifications. Well, he played for TT, Barbados and the West Indies. And yes, I know of the West Indies tour to Mexico.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: palos on January 28, 2017, 03:29:15 PM
Most of the people on this forum have no knowledge of memory of football in Trinidad before the 70's. For those of us familiar with 60's football, you are spot on.  You may not like his opinions (I don't agree with them many times), but he was a great TT footballer and a decent coach.
Alvin Corneal was undoubtedly a T&T football great. That cannot be debated IMO.

He was also a dedicated coach who was responsible for the development and instrumental in acquiring scholarships for many T&T footballers.  The criticism of him was that if you weren't part of his Alcons team, then he didn't care much about you.  That is debatable.
 
Another debatable point is his international coaching record.  It can be argued that his international coaching record, especially for T&T, left something to be desired.

But Alvin Corneal has dedicated his life to football. I dare say he has forgotten more about football than anyone else involved in T&T football will ever learn.  I think when all is said and done, despite my own criticisms of him, Alvin Corneal's contribution to T&T football is immense and should be recognized accordingly.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Controversial on January 28, 2017, 03:45:08 PM
FYI, Alvin told me...

Flex,
I have actually played 119 matches and scored 69 goals. However many of these matches were players before independence when the country was colonial. Between 1955 and 1962 I had played 38 matches, many of which were english 1st division clubs such as Arsenal, Chelsea, Wolves, Coventry, French national team playing under Air France, Barbados, British Guiana, Haiti twice, Suriname twice before independence. 3 Brasilians clubs and On the first ever West indies Team in 1959, we played 17 match against many first and second division teams between Aug.6th to November 9th 1959.
STEUPS!!

Why STEUPS!! ?

He's jealous and envious, he suffers from an inferiority complex and insecurity which is all symptoms of being a house negro that has sold out...

That's why he steups

Controversial, you need to learn how to shut your coont sometimes. What de f00ck you ever did for your country T&T Canada except whine and bitch?

Alvin, as a footballer was a boss !!!!

Give credit where credit was due, not he fault he played for different countries before independence.



I was referring to ffisback aka the terrorizer you fool... and his blatant disregard about Alvin corneals achievements which was disrespectful

And for the record I've done more for Trinidad and Tobago than you ever will, but I never sit here and boast about it... educate yourself before you talk rubbish

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on February 01, 2017, 05:17:00 AM
Dennis you’re in charge.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


The official appearance of the Soca Warriors newly-appointed head coach Dennis Lawrence and his assistant, Englishman Sol Campbell, now hold the reins of authority over the national Football team.

After the poor start to the Concacaf Hex tournament, the country has been faced with many confusing states of which coach will be able to bring the team back on victory road and raise our hopes of qualifying for the Russia 2018 FIFA World Cup.

Support for Dennis, a hometown boy, whose goal against Bahrain in 2005 took us to a historic appearance at the 2006 World Cup in Germany, will contribute to the team’s overall success, and I am calling on all of T&T to support.

This memorable achievement brought many of our players into the professional arena, mainly in the United Kingdom, and Dennis grabbed the chance to join Wrexham to start a career which carved his path towards the ranks of professionalism as player and assistant coach up to this day.

Even if he had not set the world afire in the Premier League in England, his performances in the championship division brought him respect from the coaches who guided his destiny.

He has ventured into a very new experience as a head coach of our national team, a challenge which is vastly different from club activity and certainly as the head honcho, where every decision is graced by his final word in terms of team selection, player’s behaviour, management responsibilities. He will also have to administer the sideshows which are part of every national team.

It is my sincere hope that his contract is clearly defined in terms of reference which covers areas like salaries, length of contract, picture clear understanding among team manager, medical staff, and stakeholders who may be attached in some indirect way.

His first major meeting with the technical committee is vital, if only because he can make his path perfectly clear as to his training programme, the organisation of friendlies leading up to the official matches, written commitment regarding the overseas based players and their clubs with respect to availability, and most of all his request for complete control over his players, and definitely no interference from non-related personnel.

Dennis’ request for Sol Campbell must have come from their relationship during both his playing career while in England. The former England Central defender, whose partnership with Rio Ferdinand stood out during the FIFA South Korea World Cup final, will be a great asset to the team and to the players having achieved at the highest level internationally. He may well inform our people as to his inexperience as a coach, in probably the same way that his inspirational strength when dealing with players will have brought to his fellow players.

Now we must await their duties as the coaching staff of our national senior team.

I will admit that the invitation to have at least one local assistant will have been ideal, if only for the information which could be shared about the local players.

Here is a good luck wish for Dennis Lawrence and our national team.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Deeks on February 01, 2017, 03:55:39 PM
I will admit that the invitation to have at least one local assistant will have been ideal, if only for the information which could be shared about the local players.


I agree on that point, but let's wait and see.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Big Magician on February 01, 2017, 06:17:50 PM
PALOS...spot on..
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Deeks on February 01, 2017, 07:12:54 PM
Another debatable point is his international coaching record.  It can be argued that his international coaching record, especially for T&T, left something to be desired.


 Palos maybe correct on his international record. That is on the senior level. But he was working in the era of Jack. Tell me which coach in that era had a stellar record for TT. As a youth coach, he lead TT to 3rd place in U-19 Concacaf. TT first U-19 tournament. He coached TT for the Spain WC. We lost to Haiti in the prelims 2-1, home and away. He got axed. The next opportunity, I think, was the Concacaf tournament(precursor to the GC). I don't think we did well. He got axed. That is it
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on March 13, 2017, 05:00:50 AM
Soca Warriors display midfield presence.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


I like what I saw.

Barbados may have been very much of what the Warriors wanted to test the mettle of the local players and also to observe the early preparations of Dennis Lawrence introduction into international coaching as head coach.

His former national teammate Stern John, who he called in as one of three assistants will have been pleased to see striker Jamille Boatswain display excellent potency in his short stint by scoring two well taken goals that lead T&T to victory.

There was a very interesting start to the game where the locals were able to demonstrate the midfield options of cohesiveness and accurate passing—a feature which our regular players often tend to ignore by their preference to individualism.

The newcomers to this level certainly were motivated to show their worth and although Hughton Hector, Sean De Silva, and Curtis Gonzales all have previous experience at this level, it was a breath of fresh air to see the solid defensive play of Tristin Hodge, who seem to have the flair for recognising his responsibility, but utilising the task of overlapping to the flank when the need arose.

Alvin Jones, whom we already know, seemed ready to take on the duty of travelling the flank to provide service to the forwards.

Barbados left wing back, Alvin Chapman, allowed him the space to receive passes but kept him at bay each time he rushed the sideline.

It was a pleasure to see the high work rate of the midfield and expose the central defence of the visitors. Their biggest opponent in that regard was the use of boots which deprived them to retain proper footing. Two more goals could have been scored if Hashim Arcia and Dennis Mitchell had not lost their footing at crucial times within the penalty area of the visitors.

Striker Jamille boatswain was brought onto the field in a timely fashion and from his first touch of the ball, his speed, his desire to turn some good passes by De Silva and Hector into goals, two of which he did before half time, that’s after just being on the field four no more than four minutes.

Clearly, the coaching staff decided to get a look at almost every player on the bench, a decision which was certain to restart the previous inter-passing game and swift approaches towards the opponents’ goal.

This immediately allowed the Bajans to improve their tactics, controlled the midfield, and created three chances, all of which could have been goal chances.

They lost superior possession of the ball in the second and did not look the part.

The introduction of Cummings brought a new picture to the Warriors team. His speed, skill, and desire to challenge defenders reminded us all of the wonderful performances in a previous Gold Cup in the USA, when he scored some excellent goals.

Unfortunately, the speed level of the team dropped considerably and their opponent used the opportunity to show their worth if given the chance.

Eventually, no goals were scored in the second half, a factor which gave consolation to the visitors who enjoyed a drawn second half.

Coach Lawrence and his staff will not be able to ignore the efforts of players like Hector, De Silva, Arcia, Hodge and of course Leston Paul and Keron Cummings.

The foreign based players must now take note and show that they are superior, if they really are.

To this point, Coach Dennis Lawrence and his squad can take this step forward as acceptable. Now, the task of paying attention to their next opponents must be viewed seriously from watching video tapes of Panama and Mexico.

We look forward to the new two. weeks. Well done, Warriors.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on March 23, 2017, 01:50:27 AM
Another chance for Warriors to show worth.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


The local football fans will again be asked to support our national team for their next two matches against Panama and Mexico.

Dennis Lawrence has done a very good job in the process of decision making, with regards to arriving at the final 26 players, who will form the squad.

Following his comments through the media after getting a glimpse of his players against Barbados, the body language of players’ coaches and fans alike will have restored faith in our team.

Admittedly, their consistency has not been compatible with truly professional units, hence the reason why there were substandard performances in the early part of the tournament.

On this occasion, there was more interest in making the correct choice of players from home and abroad.

Dennis spoke to many of the coaches who have contracted players in their clubs in different parts of the world, before making a final choice as to whom he would select. He saw enough of the locals to place confidence in many of them who normally would not have been considered for selection.

How could he have ignored, Tristen Hodge, Alvin Jones, Hughtun Hector, Leston Paul, Jamille Boatswain, and Jan-Michael Williams, after working with them regularly leading up to the Barbados encounter.

I expected some form of speculation when it came to choosing the foreign based players, although, dependable contributors like Sheldon Bateau, Khaleem Hyland, Andre Boucaud, Kevin Molino, Levi Garcia, Cordel Cato and Joevin Jones, could hardly have been omitted because of their desire to be successful through their hard work on the field.

Despite all that organised selection process, the 11 players who will take the field with the red shirts need careful analysis and this will be the most difficult task for coach Lawrence.

Panama’s squad has been almost similar to the ones used for the past two years and apart from a few ageing but experienced players, they know that T&T is capable of springing some surprises as they had done in the past two years.

It would be unfair to be critical of any starting team chosen by the coach. Many times, coaches go in search of reliable, hardworking players in key positions, for the purpose of stability.

Judging from the past three years, it would be difficult to omit Williams as the goalkeeper, while names like Bateau remain the most outstanding defender in the country. A fellow central defender could come from one of Curtis Gonzales, Radanfah Abu Bakr and Keith Hodge.

They are all diligent workers but because the Panamanian attackers are quick, skillful, and go for penetration through the middle of the field, I will give the quickest and most aggressive, defender Tristin Hodge to force and unsettle the nippy forwards from Panama.

Daniel Cyrus and Carlos Edwards can be crucial wingbacks for this match. Because of Bateau’s experience, I believe that he can control the positional play of Hodge.

Our entire game could be determined by the performances of Hyland, Boucaud, both of whom are excellent ball winners, and provide service for the likes of Joevin Jones on the left and Cordel Cato or Alvin Jones on the right. Both wing midfielders can win this game for T&T if they use the wall passing effect with flank penetration with Cyrus on the right side and Edwards on the left.

The left footed Seattle Sounders craftsman has demonstrated some superb cohesive combination with his teammates at right midfield and wing back in his MLS team. The same is the case with Cato, both of whom are quick, skillful and will get to the opponents byline to provide that semifinal pass for a goal.

If their game is built upon this flank strategy, their crosses could meet the key forwards Molino, and anyone of Plaza, Boatswain, or Hashim Arcia.

No doubt, Panama will be looking for Kenwyne Jones and may well get the surprise of their lives with any of the three mentioned above. Jones can be left for the second half when the opposing defense will surely be slower than their first half. The half metre advantage gained by the fresher Kenwyne will serve the purpose. You must bear in mind that international football is expected to produce great performances.

However, the philosophy of each player will have to be the part of a collective policy, where running into spaces in support of the ball must be as important as taking opponents away in bad defensive positions.

Plans to know how, when, and where to be of service to your fellow players will bring distractions, defenses in disarray, and cause even the sturdiest defender to lose communication with his partner and cause vulnerability of the opponents.

Our solid midfield can swing the game in favour of the Warriors if only they do their jobs of reducing the effectiveness of Felipe Baloy, Alberto Quintero and Blas Perez.

Finally, support is vital to our national team, not only by attending the match but cheering on the lads and almost demanding from each of them, the 100 percent which they are promising to provide. Good luck, Warriors. Your nation is behind you.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: maxg on March 23, 2017, 11:46:17 AM
 :o   :devil:   :applause:
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on March 28, 2017, 01:44:21 AM
Soca Warriors earned all 3 points.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


After two matches in this competition, and three months of ultimate failure to cope with the needed quality of football to be played in the hexagonal, T&T has had the opportunity to see some level of improvement and a victory in game number three against Panama.

The expression of joy is obvious and was expected so long as the lads put their heads down and respond positively to their new Coach.

Even the statistics which emanated from the match, divulged that the percentage of ball possession of both teams saw the home country having two per cent more in the first half while Panama was three per cent more in the second half.

That statistic does not always make logical sense.

The Soca Warriors appeared to be directed to start the game from Keeper Jan Williams by using the wing defenders, just to ensure that they can begin a methodical possession and work their way towards the opportunity of using either Joevin Jones or Cordell Cato.

The ploy was impressive in the early stages and the tempo of the early minutes saw the effectiveness of the two speedsters.

It also caused Panama to follow suit with starting their possession game with their defense as well.

The principle was overdone and the possession game meant little for either one.

Thanks to Kareem Hyland and Carlos Edwards for opening up passing options which included the use of Joevin on the left.

It was impressive and left the crowd with a feeling of methodical attacking from the flanks.

A few good chances came by because of this, and some penetrative opportunities through either side where Cato was also very assertive in his duties to discomfort the left wing back Quintero.

Two chances came by, the first with an attempted wall pass between Cato and Kevin Molino.

The Minnesota striker, who was enjoying the full use of the field with his mobility, failed to finish a half chance from within the penalty area.

Edwards was working well with a triangle that comprised Joevin and Kenwyne Jones.

The chemistry was attractive and effective.

The Panama defense may have been in panic mode for a while, seeing that their wing defenders Edgar Barcemas on the right and Quintero of the left were uncertain as to stop T&T flankers.

Then it came to fruition, when Hyland broke the slow methodical forward approach by our defense line and rushed forward, passing Olavve and Godoy before releasing an exquisite through pass into the pass of a diagonal run from Joevin and almost like clockwork, Molino started to plan for the third man running space just in time to stride into the path of Joevin’s pass.

The rest of his act was typical of his main area of strength.

He rushed towards a vacancy which was left by Armando Cooper, deceptively body shifted the main defender Torres and got enough space to hit his right footer clinically into the net. WOW.

The joys of the crowd brought an atmosphere which triggered off the teams as a whole, where skipper Kenywne was out jumping the Panamanian defenders and flicking diagonally backward to either Cato or Joevin.

It was attractive and gave a glimpse to the fans that there was more success for the Warriors.

A free kick just outside of the penalty area on a foul again Jones, brought an opportunity which may have excited both Hyland and the left footed J Jones.

Against the north easterly wind, my choice would have been hyland. But, who can deny Joevin a chance of sending his team further forward.

He did not, but sent the ball skyrocketing way overbar.

I have a concern that we used ten defenders in the penalty area defending our goal.

That’s a misjudgment, if only because, in the event of gaining possession by our players, there would have been no release players, causing the Panamanians to collect the ball and continue to place pressure in our half of the field.

Secondly, defending players, even seven of them with strong aerial capability should be trusted to win the battle of the crossed balls against a Panama which consist of two five footers and a reluctant keeper to leave the line.

As it is on two situations saw five Warriors awaiting crossed balls against one pint size Henriguez, in the first instant, and substitute Tejada in the other.

Unbelievably, on both occasion saw the opposition got their heads before all else.

However, As we say, “God is a Trini” and he saved the day.

The team was much more organised that we had seen in the recent past and gave the impression that better performances could be on the horizon.

Title: I look forward to reading Alvin Corneal's analysis of the 2 games
Post by: palos on March 29, 2017, 01:09:27 PM
I expect it will be a bit "different"

but.....time will tell
Title: Re: I look forward to reading Alvin Corneal's analysis of the 2 games
Post by: MEP on March 29, 2017, 02:14:41 PM
Different how????? you know he will probably say it's ALL in the STARS and they played well and this is stark contrast to the PHASE we were in before which wasn't 2 good or good at all ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on March 30, 2017, 01:49:03 AM
Great effort by Warriors.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


After witnessing the first 20 minutes of the contest against Mexico, it would have been difficult to recognise the difference between the two teams. Maybe it was the most electrifying atmosphere that these young “Trinis” have experienced.

Our minds could easily have endorsed the realism with which coach Dennis Lawrence have progressed with the national team.

Mexico also had a similar opinion as they struggled to retain their usual chemistry in midfield because the speed, skill and mobility of Joevin Jones, Khaleem Hyland and Kevin Molino may well have been much more than Mexican coach Juan Carlos Osorio expected.

Initially, my observations were focused upon any adjustments to the errors from Friday’s game, and after ten minutes, the picture was positively different.

It was a joy to see the mixture of combination by the high profile players in the home team.

How wonderful it was to witness the coordination among the four defenders, their choices of passes and the changed approach of wanting to just make short passes within the vicinity of 40 metres from their goal-keeper Jan-Michael Williams.

This adjustment surely forced the Mexican midfield to think defensively and more so to make the long diagonal passes, from their own defense area, a pattern which they use when under pressure.

Once again the initiative by the local players was clearly gaining attention especially when the Jones duo, Joevin and Kenwyne, connected beautifully with the natural talents of the Mucurapo alumnis, Hyland and Molino.

The contest became so intense that neither team entered the penalty areas and created easy chances. They exchanged strategies in centre field and left too much room for any team to control for long.

Mexico’s patience was based upon the fact that they were not allowed luxuries of ball possession in the first half and were bothered by some swift moving forwards.

No doubt, the aggression and penetrative efforts by Cordell Cato and Joevin Jones created discomfort to the point that the Mexicans decided to play the ball in the opponents half of the field.

This caused the Warriors to have to make eight or nine passes to their opponents’ goal, a factor which brought them to the half time whistle without conceding a goal.

The discussions during the interval would have been targeted at getting victory.

Dennis Lawrence must have evaluated the Mexicans during the first half and so did the visitors to the home team.

Maybe the T&T camp was asked to increase the commitment, force the “Ole” squad to have more work than they had done previously.

Quietly, tactical second half changes by Mexico made a significant difference and with the wind behind their backs, they moved into a 4-4-2 system, stretched their passes through and over the physical capabilities of Hyland, Molino and Kevan George.

This created an unfamiliar pattern, with substitutes Carlos Velo and Gallardo joining Layun being instructed to attack through Mekeil Williams, a factor which needed some more defensive bodies for the Warriors.

The central defenders, both of whom were excellent for the better part of the game, were faced with two extra attacking players with the ability to take on opponents with consummate ease.

They held position in T&T half of the field, created four wonderful efforts, three of which were brilliantly saved by Williams, until a corner which Mexico had deliberately sent forward central defender Diego Reyes.

He casually started his run from outside the penalty area and rushed accurately into a space which was left by six defenders, placing a header into the top corner for the only goal of the match.

Not even the presence of Jamille Boatswain and Willis Plaza could have made an impact in the goal scoring department, as Mexico, with their bits of strategy and time wasting, played the possession game in T&T’s half of the field.

It is unfair to even believe that the Warriors did not play in the manner that coach Lawrence wanted, but when teams change strategy during a match, that is when the experience of players has to be crucial.

Admittedly, the only truly spot was the powerful strike from Joevin Jones which rocketed into the top corner of the net, but was surprisingly discarded by the assistant referee whose position at the time of his decision should not have allowed him to make the decision.

However, at the same time, only persons who were in line which could have provided the proof of the decision.

Nevertheless, have you ever seen a referee change his mind because of calls from the fans? Not even close.

Good defensive players, with proof of only conceding one goal, midfielders having over 40 per cent of possession, and attackers who caused the number 17 ranked football country in the world to change their pattern of play twice during the event in order to force a close victory.

That is with great effort.

Congratulations to Mexico and the Warriors have left us all with the feeling that our path to Russia is still very much possible.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Tallman on April 28, 2017, 07:07:42 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/l35VtPiarMM
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on June 12, 2017, 03:56:21 AM
I’m not let down.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


Due to their pre-game preparations, the Soca Warriors appeared to have been more than ready for what the USA could produce, in terms of high altitude, increased ball speed and troublesome respiratory issues for the players. T&T went down 2-0 in a very tough, but competitive match-up.

Both teams recognised that any increased velocity during the early stages of the game may incite physical discomfort. After the first five minutes, which was filled with slow methodical build-up by both teams within their portions of the field, the quality of the game during that period appeared to demonstrate their intention of caution before aggression. But as time passed the USA recognised that coach Dennis Lawrence decided upon a “wait and see pattern” by rotating passes laterally and causing the opponents to chase from side to side.

There was good chemistry in the process as the back three of Daniel Cyrus, Sheldon Bateau and Mekeil Williams, showing a pattern of play which could have allowed five midfield players to combine ball possession and extra defensive strength.

Tactically, our system seemed to have been lopsided with Nathan Lewis, Mekiel Williams and Joevin Jones being left sided players. This was well done in defense, but the attacking process did not materialise. I was hoping and praying that the coaching staff made the decision to use a solid defender to mark the young German American Pulisic, whose goal scoring success over the past five matches should have invited the thought.

However, Hyland seemed to have been the player to do the job, but his first tackle on the youngster brought a serious warning from the referee early in the first half, a factor which would have received the signal to the former Mucurapo dynamo to transfer the responsibility to his defensive midfield partner Kevon George.

The plan did not work as Pulisic has a tremendous work rate and his blindsided runs towards the T&T goal, attracted the attention to the entire defense, causing space and time for Dempsey and Altidore to fire seven shots at Jean Michel Williams, whose brilliance showed up seven time in the first half alone, and if we understood the extra speed of the ball through the air space, you will appreciate the keeper’s brilliance even more.

It actually work as a challenge to keeper Tim Howard and as competent as he was in his career, he was forced into error when Hyland missed the target by centimetres, Edwards made him bungle a diving save, and misread Joevin Jones’ impeccable cross to Kenwyne Jones’ header. It was the gift of the night which may have turned the game the way of the visitors.

Unfortunately, two tactical errors brought victory for the USA. The both goals came from the right side for the USA with Nagbe making full use of the distorted defence line which Williams attempted to drift in central defence to offer some assistance. Pulisic’s blindsided run saw him rushing between two defenders and sliding the cross into the net. The second portion of his brace cam from the same position, but has tap in was much easier.

The statistics will show a two-nil victory, but the consolatory picture was a possible three goal opportunities for the Warriors and two of them before the Americans had scored. Possession percentage was almost equal, but an 8-5 advantage of goal chances gave the USA the victory they had worked for. Tough game, but home teams usually end up with a two-goal advantage if the teams are equal in strength.

Tuesday is another day and although Costa Rica was held to a draw by Panama the same night, our task is now more difficult, but not impossible. The game will be more exciting because both these teams will make use of skill and creativity rather than the robotic methods of the USA. Good luck Warriors.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: spideybuff on June 12, 2017, 08:41:43 AM
Been a long time since I actually agree with a Corneal article
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Jayerson on June 12, 2017, 10:05:48 AM
I’m not let down.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


Due to their pre-game preparations, the Soca Warriors appeared to have been more than ready for what the USA could produce, in terms of high altitude, increased ball speed and troublesome respiratory issues for the players. T&T went down 2-0 in a very tough, but competitive match-up.

Both teams recognised that any increased velocity during the early stages of the game may incite physical discomfort. After the first five minutes, which was filled with slow methodical build-up by both teams within their portions of the field, the quality of the game during that period appeared to demonstrate their intention of caution before aggression. But as time passed the USA recognised that coach Dennis Lawrence decided upon a “wait and see pattern” by rotating passes laterally and causing the opponents to chase from side to side.

There was good chemistry in the process as the back three of Daniel Cyrus, Sheldon Bateau and Mekeil Williams, showing a pattern of play which could have allowed five midfield players to combine ball possession and extra defensive strength.

Tactically, our system seemed to have been lopsided with Nathan Lewis, Mekiel Williams and Joevin Jones being left sided players. This was well done in defense, but the attacking process did not materialise. I was hoping and praying that the coaching staff made the decision to use a solid defender to mark the young German American Pulisic, whose goal scoring success over the past five matches should have invited the thought.

However, Hyland seemed to have been the player to do the job, but his first tackle on the youngster brought a serious warning from the referee early in the first half, a factor which would have received the signal to the former Mucurapo dynamo to transfer the responsibility to his defensive midfield partner Kevon George.

The plan did not work as Pulisic has a tremendous work rate and his blindsided runs towards the T&T goal, attracted the attention to the entire defense, causing space and time for Dempsey and Altidore to fire seven shots at Jean Michel Williams, whose brilliance showed up seven time in the first half alone, and if we understood the extra speed of the ball through the air space, you will appreciate the keeper’s brilliance even more.

It actually work as a challenge to keeper Tim Howard and as competent as he was in his career, he was forced into error when Hyland missed the target by centimetres, Edwards made him bungle a diving save, and misread Joevin Jones’ impeccable cross to Kenwyne Jones’ header. It was the gift of the night which may have turned the game the way of the visitors.

Unfortunately, two tactical errors brought victory for the USA. The both goals came from the right side for the USA with Nagbe making full use of the distorted defence line which Williams attempted to drift in central defence to offer some assistance. Pulisic’s blindsided run saw him rushing between two defenders and sliding the cross into the net. The second portion of his brace cam from the same position, but has tap in was much easier.

The statistics will show a two-nil victory, but the consolatory picture was a possible three goal opportunities for the Warriors and two of them before the Americans had scored. Possession percentage was almost equal, but an 8-5 advantage of goal chances gave the USA the victory they had worked for. Tough game, but home teams usually end up with a two-goal advantage if the teams are equal in strength.

Tuesday is another day and although Costa Rica was held to a draw by Panama the same night, our task is now more difficult, but not impossible. The game will be more exciting because both these teams will make use of skill and creativity rather than the robotic methods of the USA. Good luck Warriors.



I am personally not a fan of his opinions but most of what is said I agree. I just think that if you take the time to write such a piece, you should do the proper research. Christian Puliisic is not German American. He has a grand father that was Croatian. I am not sure what he was trying to infer by putting in that piece of information and not even getting it correct.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on August 07, 2017, 03:49:15 AM
Little time to correct mistakes.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


The eventual re­sult against Ecuador (3-1) was not as sta­tistically awful as it may appear, seeing that teams playing at home usually aim to show their opponents that their home advantage is often judged by a two goal strength in their favour.

This especially after they ensure that the playing conditions, their crowd support and the desire to win matches, players are driven to get the only acceptable result, a victory.

Dennis Lawrence used this exercise to take a closer look at the home-based players so that he can ob­serve the comparison between the overseas-based and those who were on show.

By his own admission, he admitted to simple er­rors made because of the inability of players failure to communicate quickly and accurately at crucial times, especially in defence. He also accepted the fact that his team was outplayed in the second half.

As I mentioned earlier, the desire of two more opponents may well have attempted to correct the errors and bring the quality of soccer closer to what he expect of the team.

However, his comment regarding the fact that the players will now be returning to their local clubs, which meant that he is unlikely to have them at practice sessions until a week from their official World Cup fixture against Honduras.

The acceptance of that arrangement would again deprive the former Everton coach of correction of faults which he mentioned in his interview, leaving the few days of training prior to the match to be difficult to get things right.

Maybe, this is a wonderful opportunity to get the players from the match to sit and view video areas of errors so that theoretically there may be better understanding of similar issues. His aim to explain the problems will be useful to add off the field training to his plan.

Many coaches do not attempt to demonstrate in the replays methods to correct tactical faults. The value for the least experienced players may well bring some cohesive patterns during the match which could be productive.

I have to admit that the biggest problem which confront the coaching staff is time for extensive tactical work on and off the field. My consolation is that the national team has played well at times in their previous matches, a factor which will certainly be expected on September 1 against Honduras.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on September 08, 2017, 01:40:12 AM
Warriors defensive strategy poor.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


To give any sort of report on the Panama versus the Soca Warriors match will make fans and supporters unhappy, disappointed and in some cases, give up hope for the future.

I humbly prefer to break this performance down to the reality of the picture which our players presented during the course of the game.

The game actually did not start when the whistle was blown to indicate the ball to being kicked off.

Of course, these points of view are from hindsight, except for the different team selection which was handed down one hour before the start.

My immediate observation was the choice of player personnel, not necessarily because of the talent of the players individually, but the implication which was recognised within a system formula of the great game.

After seeing the names of five competent central defenders on the starting eleven, immediately the impression from my point of view was that our performance will be based strategically on solid defence. Some may claim that five defenders will surely solidify our protection and ensure that no goals are scored.

With my sincere respect for two former English premier league defenders in our coaching staff, this was probably our most crucial error of judgement.

In football mathematics, five defenders will find much more difficulty to coordinate alongside each other, and all the problems will come from an absence of adequate communication among themselves especially when the tacking policies of the opponents will surely come from short quick diagonal runs in and around the individual players almost at the same time. The end picture was confusing, and although individual skill showed up at times for Kevin Molino and Joevin Jones to bring glorious chances to Willis Plaza three times in the first half, the formula deprived the real goal scorers no decent scoring opportunities.

Then there was the question of regaining ball possession. It was non existent. The players waited to see when Panama will make a mistake and hand a bad pass or two over to them.

The reality of choosing defensive ploys have actually been demonstrated by our English friends in the World Cup finals in 1966 in England. They sole the dimensional formula that four defensive players can cover the width of a field and also can develop defensive methods of being either defending or supporting.

The world accepted that concept and extended different formulas to fit the quality APand understanding of such a defence.

This move by our experts led to the weakness of our midfield, a factor which left that area to be occupied by one solitary defending midfielder in Kevon George and two of our effective goal scorers and creators in Molino and Jones plus a promising attacking midfielder in Nathan Lewis, whose skill within the opponents penalty area have been known to upset bigger defenders than the Panamanians have brought our goals at times.

Unfortunately, the original strategy failed, maybe not because of the implementation recommended by the technocrats, but because they have lost their way. During that time, Panama grew in confidence. They were faster to the ball, which was not difficult and after some awful mistakes by our defenders, the roof fell in and shadows of defeat were obvious.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Tallman on September 08, 2017, 08:23:48 AM
With my sincere respect for two former English premier league defenders in our coaching staff, this was probably our most crucial error of judgement.

Who he talking bout? Sol Campbell and ???????
Title: Alvin Corneal: The Caribbean’s coach
Post by: Tallman on September 08, 2017, 06:13:21 PM
Alvin Corneal: The Caribbean’s coach
By Erline Andrews (Caribbean Insight)


‘He’s done so much for the Caribbean when it comes to influencing the game.’

Corneal coached the national teams of T&T, Barbados, Guyana, St Vincent and St Kitts and Nevis

August 30, 1974 had such an impact Alvin Corneal that he devoted an entire chapter to it in his autobiography.

The Trinidad and Tobago Under-20 soccer team were competing in the semifinal round of the CONCACAF Youth Tournament. It was the first time T&T participated in the competition. Defending champs Mexico had already advanced to the final and the T&T team were confident of getting there as well. It would be the first time a team from the English-speaking Caribbean made it that far. Jamaica managed third place in 1970.

To beat that, T&T only had to get past two weaker teams—Cuba and the USA.

But on that day, Cuba surprised them by keeping things goalless until halftime then scoring later in the game. Caught off guard, the team weren’t able to equalise and, after beating the USA, had to settle for the bronze medal. (T&T would wait 16 more years before getting the silver in 1990, the first team from the English-speaking Caribbean to do so.)

Kendall Walkes, who Corneal described in the autobiography as an outstanding player and who went on to become a senior national player then a coach in the US, missed the chance to score with a free kick in the second half. But Corneal blamed himself for the debacle.

“While I felt confident of the way the lads played, I suppose my ego might have taken precedence over the reality of players getting over-confident,” he wrote.

“The atmosphere created by their behaviour led to complacency, and seeing Cuba was in the easier group with Canada and the USA, I was caught in the false world of premature success,” he added.

Asked via e-mail recently whether the experience was the biggest let-down of his coaching career, Corneal responded: “IT WAS. BECAUSE WE WOULD HAVE WON THE SILVER MEDAL RATHER THAN THE BRONZE IN THE FIRST EVER CONCACAF U20 COMPETITION.”

His use of all caps suggested strong feelings even now.

It was the only game the team lost during his time as head coach from 1973 to 1976.

Corneal, a former star player himself, went on to coach the senior team from 1979- 1982, when the team won its first Caribbean Nations Cup, then again for less than a year in 1990.

He coached the national teams of Barbados, Guyana, St Vincent and St Kitts and Nevis. Between 1983 and 1986 he coached the Pro-League team ASL. They topped the league for two years under his guidance. From 1993 to 1998, he spent time in North Carolina coaching the North Carolina State University women’s soccer team and a club team called the Raleigh Flyers.

KEY TO A TEAM’S SUCCESS
In a face-to-face interview, Corneal responded affirmatively when asked if coaching was the key to a team’s success.

“It’s the key. I tell you why,” he said. “Because when players on the field they’re not within their normal faculties. They’re tired. They’re disagreeable with one player or another. They’ve lost the ball, they’re disappointed. There are too many negatives inside of their mind for them to correct it at the moment. That’s why the coach needs to recognize these things and correct them as he goes along.”

“It’s like the importance of anybody who must be an example to the people with whom they are working or bringing up,” he said at another point in the interview. “It’s just like a mom or a dad bringing up kids. In this business, you’ve got to understand what you want out of those people.”

Corneal, in beige button-up T-shirt and knee-length pants, was standing at the periphery of the sports grounds in St Joseph. About 30 or so players with the Alcons Soccer Academy, which Corneal founded in 1969, were training behind him. The thud of the ball bouncing off feet and chests and shouted instructions and the occasional whistle from the assistant coach provided arrhythmic accompaniment as Corneal spoke.

Some of T&T’s best players have passed through Alcons, including Earl Carter and Russell Latapy, alumni of the Strike Squad, who in 1989 came heartbreakingly close to getting T&T to the World Cup for the first time, and Shaka Hislop, Stern John and Clayton Ince, who were part of the 2006 team that finally qualified. T&T still remains the smallest country to ever qualify.

The academy fields a team, the Malta Carib Alcons, which won the Caribbean Professional Football League in 1993 and have won the Eastern Football Association Premier Division title four times.

Players travel all over the world for matches. And through the connections Corneal has developed in the US some of them get sports scholarships to universities in that country.

Talent alone doesn’t make a good player, Corneal explained. Discipline and education are important too.

“These kids came in here when they were six and seven years old. So they’ve been here a long time,” said Corneal. “We want them to be good players but we want to get them scholarships. We also try to use this for the development of the kids, to understand what life is about. Good behaviour. Good social standing—you don’t want to see them cursing or in the bar or anything like this. A good education as well. We call their teachers all the time to find out how they’re going.”

As he spoke, one latecomer approached then stopped a short distance away, his young face earnest, his eyes trained on Corneal. “Permission to join the team, sir.” Corneal waved him on.

LEADERSHIP MATTERS
Corneal, 79, said former national senior team coach Stephen Hart, a Trinidadian who spent most of his life in Canada and who was fired last November, had been “doing a good job”, but criticised one aspect of his stewardship.

“Stephen Hart did not have in my opinion the conviction of saying to the good players, ‘Hey listen, is either you do it or I find somebody else to do it’,” said Corneal, who’s also a well-known sports broadcaster and newspaper columnist. He’s clearly unafraid to speak his mind.

“So long as you lose the respect of the players, it’s time to change,” Corneal continued. “He was doing a good job in my books. But he failed in the process of trying to maintain the kind of discipline and [decorum] which players need. These guys that went on a boat trip two days before a game and he still selected them and they still lost. Those are the things that make coaches make mistakes.”

Belgian Tom Saintfiet, the coach who followed Hart, resigned after one month and three lost games, including a humiliating first-time defeat to Nicaragua.

“They brought a guy who didn’t know the country. He didn’t have a clue,” said Corneal. “How do you know his weakness? [Trinidad and Tobago Football Association president David John-Williams] says, ‘If you don’t win these two matches you’re fired.’ No coach leaves their country to come here to get that.”

Corneal faulted the TTFA for how they choose coaches for the national teams.

“They pick a coach from out of England. They’ve never seen him. He does not know how the people of this country live,” he said. “He doesn’t know how the grounds are. He doesn’t know where to go and find a youth player. You go into the little villages and you see the little guys doing things. You say, ‘Okay, come with me and let’s get it better.’

“For a coach to be able to coach a country he’s got to be part of the country.” As happens regularly while speaking about a topic he’s clearly passionate about, Corneal’s tone thickened with conviction on the last few words.

He isn’t saying a foreign coach is always unacceptable. “There are great coaches who’ll come and the first thing they’ll do is they’ll take one or two people who are coaches from the country and say, ‘Tell me a little bit about this. Let me work together with you.’

“We don’t even ask the coach to show us a session like this”—he gestured to the players on the field—“to see if that coach can communicate.”

TROUBLED WATERS
There’s no love lost between the TTFA and Corneal. In 1982 TTFA general secretary Jack Warner, in a unilateral and controversial move, suddenly replaced him as senior national coach with Dutchman Jan Zwarthuis. Corneal learned of the action when he was contacted by the media in Spain, where he was attending the World Cup with the TTFA president and vice-president. He was offered the post of technical director but turned it down.

Corneal and four other members of the football fraternity who engineered an unsuccessful vote of no confidence in the TTFA executive were subsequently ostracised. Corneal claims in his memoir that there were attempts to get radio stations to stop giving him commentator gigs.

In 1990 Corneal was fired as national coach for a second time under contentious circumstances. In a letter to the media at the time, Corneal suggested he was axed in part because of unfavourable testimony he gave to the commission of enquiry into the overselling of tickets to the World Cup-qualifying game with the USA the year before.

The relationship between man and organisation seems to have improved little since then.

“The administrative structure in football is in total disarray. And if up there is broken down, don’t expect down here to work,” he said. “Somebody has got to reorganise it. Somebody has got to rethink it. They personalise everything so long as you criticise it.

“I don’t hate David John-Williams,” he continued. “But I know he doesn’t know anything about the game. I’m sorry for him. I told him so. I said, ‘David, you love the game but you don’t know the game.’ I told him, ‘If you want to be a good president get people who will sit down and study this game and make it better for you.’”

Since before John-Williams’ tenure and now during it, there has been a stream of news reports about problems in the TTFA, one of them being a seeming inability to regularly pay staff, including Corneal’s son, Anton, who resigned as technical director of the TTFA in 2014.

Corneal believes there needs to be more emphasis on coaching education and training in T&T.

In 1981, FIFA held a coaching instructors course for CONCACAF coaches in Trinidad. Corneal took part and graduated on top of the class. Years later he became an official FIFA coaching instructor, the first person from the Caribbean to do so. He’s since trained coaches all over the world.

“I did 47 coaches in the Caribbean in 20 years. T&T never requested one,” he said.

In his memoir, Corneal said the idea of coaching “gripped (his) imagination as early as age 20”. He was a multidisciplined athlete and at the time took stints on both the national football and cricket teams. He was a player on the first attempted West Indies football team in 1959 when the English coach, Harold Hobbis, made an observation.

“He said, ‘You play the way I believe that you can do coaching in ten years’ time’,” said Corneal.

He retired from international football in 1969 to focus on cricket in the hope of making the West Indies cricket team. When he wasn’t chosen, he joined an English team, International Cavaliers, and got his first coaching certification—a preliminary badge from the University of Exeter—while there. He built on his qualifications over the years.

Corneal’s son, Anton—an alumnus of the Alcons academy who in 1979 became the youngest player on the senior national team at 16—followed in his father’s footsteps. He’s coached the youth national teams and was assistant coach for the senior team. He was a technical development officer with FIFA and has organised coach-training programmes in T&T.

“He’s a legend,” he said of his father. “He’s formed the pathway for so many of us as coaches. These coaches are now all over the world. I worked the Caribbean in the last two-and-a-half years. I can’t say how many times I heard coaches say they started to coach and continued to coach because of the influence of my father. He’s done so much for the Caribbean when it comes to influencing the game.”

COACHING THE FUTURE
Corneal plans to do do what he can to make a difference in T&T football through coaching. The Alcons Academy, which he runs with Anton, is going to train coaches who are interested in using their skill in small communities. In a recent interview with sports show host and former T&T national soccer player Steve David, he described the programme as a “satellite expansion” of the academy

“I’m offering it to all the communities,” he said. “If they have one or two coaches, they can come in, and I will do the programmes with them. I’ll do it as long as they’re working in their communities.  We’re going to send some of our coaches into the communities to help them to build those teams.”

Alcons doesn’t charge for its training.

“Simply because of the fact that half of them cannot afford anything,” he said of participants. “All the other academies are trying to make money out of it. They’re going to get the middle income and upper income class. [At Alcons] so long as your behaviour is good and you can obey the rules that’s fine.”

Corneal remembers when there was only one World Cup qualifying spot for the entire CONCACAF. Now there are four spots and therefore more opportunities to qualify.

“We should be doing better,” he said of T&T.

“This is a country that beat Argentina before, we beat Colombia before, we beat Mexico before,” he said. “The Republic of Ireland came here just before the ‘86 World Cup—we beat them out at Arima. So nothing is wrong with our people and our football. It is wrong with the way it is led.”
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Tallman on September 08, 2017, 06:25:59 PM
(https://scontent-mia3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/21314733_1209249445846261_6689523029641624085_n.png?oh=e12f850ddcabb7242546611c363871fd&oe=5A59C179)
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Deeks on September 08, 2017, 06:56:30 PM
I think DJW is good for the game, BUT for his organization. NOT the TTFA. Many people disagree with Alvin, but he has a point there.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on September 13, 2017, 01:39:26 AM
Where next for the Warriors.
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian).


This question must be hanging over the heads of the entire football fraternity and it is a most appropriate one.

Firstly and to the point: the emphasis on winning the final two matches must be still the top priority, regardless of what we believe the chance to qualify is feeble.

Dennis Lawrence and his staff must hold their commitment to success until the end of the road.

The next step following the final result will be to set a variety of targets, all leading up to various tournaments such as U-17, U-19, U23 Olympics and the 2022 World cup.

I have noticed just recently that the ball has begun to roll by the TTFA regarding the start of a youth development program which seems to have set a path from our hosting of the U-17 FIFA WC and spiralled through maybe the most successful progress line in our history of Football as our U-15 won the CFU champions in 2005. These players graduated into the U-17 age group and after a well organised preparatory process which included a series of international friendlies, the CFU qualifying and the Concacaf qualifying matches saw our team reach the U-19 Fifa World Cup finals in Korea in 2007.

The same was the case for the U-20 FIFA WC for which we qualified to play in Egypt in 2009. We may also recall our Olympic qualifying team very nearly made it to London, but failed to shake the strength of Mexico and Honduras.

However, there must be a methodical plan to keep the effort which National teams should engage itself by having a series of regular international matches. A good start for this will be to use the “Russian FIFA” Qualifiers for friendlies, which should start in early

January and get five of them to play against the Warriors. They will need the exposure and so will we, hence the reason for this option.

I am still qualified that there is need for further education for our coaches at the high levels of the game. Grassroots coaching and “C” and “D” licenses are fine for the youngsters between 13 and 15 years.

The game at higher levels seem to always evade the level of our experience and understanding of the game. This has shown itself on numerous occasions, providing us with evidence as to what quality of knowledge must be used.

I strongly recommend that our young local coaches with good potential should be made to attend international matches anywhere around us, with the specific instruction to learn more of what the experts do for success.

Finally, the current coaching staff should meet with the Technical committee who could present the picture which was offered to the team within the last six matches coming directly from the mouths and minds of the staff. This may well be the most essential challenge and could expose some lessons which we may have learnt under the guidance of the current staff.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on September 22, 2017, 01:37:28 AM
99th in FIFA rankings accepted quietly.
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian).


I suppose that we are all disappointed over the Soca Warriors ranking of 99th in the FIFA rankings. But many do not know how this low ranking will affect the game generally in T&T.

After a very mathematical formula by some experts in FIFA, the ranking tend to be based upon results against all the opponents each country has played.

The result of each country will be judged by the ranking of the opponent, the results of the matches whether competitive or friendly.

For a country which had enjoyed good results against some of the best countries in world football over the years. The placing is painful especially when teams like Haiti, Curacao, Honduras, Republic of Ireland, USA (28), Costa Rica (21) and of course Mexico.

Although we had some good results against Argentina, Columbia and even Sweden, our progress line did not show moves forward in the manner expected.

The major effects for our teams and players are usually downgraded by the scouts across the world, and when we negotiate with opponents, their judgement is based upon our ranking, while the scouts who are forever following the trail of players the world over, will veer away from our local lads, and if still interested, they will search for weaker ranked countries.

History of the Soca Warriors FIFA Rankings

August 1993 -85.
June 2001 -25.
October 2010 -106.
September 2017 -99.

Our coaching staff will also be theoretically be judged by the team’s results, which will offer very little chance of employment in the more recognised countries. The salaried scale for our local players are hardly rated in accordance with the ranking, but the progressive countries of the world will certainly do.

No wonder why players like Lionel Messi, Neymer Jr, Paul Pogba and many others, are given exceptional salaries and the advertisers follow their trail to get their garments onto these brilliant players.

This assessment must be of importance to all aspects of the game in the country. Visitors do not have the time to go in search of teams and players to all countries, which will make our attention span very menial to them.

This country knows what it has been within the top sixties and even higher over the years and our target must be based upon improvement up the ladder.

Friendlies against higher rated opponents and those against recognised confederations.

Not only will it address the quality of our players, bring better results to the fore and help to attract our players to the player trailers across the world.

Our coaching staff at all levels should understand the reason why we have reached to that low ranking, and view the reason as shortage in quality of their professions. It is not an embarrassment to admit one shortcoming in our profession.

A more productive solution is to go in search of football education, watch closely at the high profile teams and players to understand the various areas of strength and organisation of the game on the field.

We must begin our rise soon.

Title: Should football return to Amateur status?
Post by: Deeks on September 27, 2017, 05:43:20 AM
Should football return to Amateur status
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian)


The extent of the problems that currently exist in local football may well have been the reason why the thought of one Pro league Club owners had to openly reject the idea of returning to Amateur status even before it was suggested by anyone else.

It is probably the appropriate time that the clubs can open their eyes, recognise the numerous problems, financially, administratively, and leagues disorder right across the board.

There are many persons in life whose effort to engage in the business of change for the better is often aborted in fear that the future may be worse.

In the case of football, this is not the case. The country has sufficient evidence that change is inevitable simply because all of the EFA, the newly reconstructed (Super league), The Pro League, are all amidst some form of confusion.

The evidence of the Proleague’s problems have been clearly proven judging from the comments made by the Central FC owner, Brent Sancho, whose forceful demand for funding for all the “Professional” Clubs from the Ministry of Sport and the Sportt Company.

It is my belief that this issue may be viewed realistically before any action with regard to making any adjustment or complete change in structure should be attempted.

The first question is: why has the league not been able to bring out the fans to support matches played in that league? The answer lies in the mediocrity of the performances by the teams.

The game of football is the commodity which should be the main target for correction and unfortunately, there is an absence of football education on the benches of the clubs in the country.

For some unknown reason, this country has never placed great emphasis in the training our coaches need when they are working at the highest Club level of the game.

This education is not only about the game on the field, but specifically to define to the players themselves of the manner in which a professional approach is based upon the processes of commitment, intensity of training methods which include understanding the tactical ingredients, the use of clever understanding among the players in a team, and most of all, the portions of communication which must be practiced in order to produce quality of football that will satisfy the fans.

Sancho said that we must not return to Amateur status, but at this stage, we are currently operating in that category. The difference is that these players are demanding payment for their efforts, quite naturally because they are contracted to do same.

Not for the very first time did we hear of the need for government to finance the TTFA Pro league, and my reaction comes from the principle that the Club owners who have chosen to invest their money in a proleague franchise must have catered for all the preliminary financial commitments from Club registration, to players’ and coaches’ salaries, to supply all the regular areas of financial coverage such as balls, uniforms, medicine kits, Team internal travel and even external when the Concacaf clubs championship requires travel and hotel abroad.

The Franchise owner’s financial return comes from gate receipts, prize monies and investors from the business sector who may wish to support the club as shareholders.

These requirements appear to have failed and the team performances have not reached the level which fans will respond by attending matches.

I have seen a formula which the East Germans have used when they were separated from the West Germans. These clubs all got support from the business sector by employing the majority of players in their company’s pay package where team representation is primary in their terms of employment.

They employ excellently trained coaches and demanded maximum efforts from the chosen players.

This project worked so well, that in the year 1976, the East Germany won the gold medal in Soccer in the Montreal Olympics and also defeated West Germany in a world cup fixture.

That is the way forward, especially as our Government had already committed to allowing tax breaks for members of the business sector which are approached by clubs to be shareholders.

However, clubs must be trained to handle their administrative efforts from all angles. If the processes professionalism or Amateurism are not dealt with, then nothing will work.


http://www.guardian.co.tt/sports/2017-09-27/should-football-return-amateur-status
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on September 29, 2017, 01:45:00 AM
Soca Warriors must compete with the USA.
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian).


Yes, I can understand the discomfort of playing matches when the odds seem to minuscule for success.

I also understand part of the problem which emanated from players being penalised for making irresponsible decisions prior to the Honduras match.

Unfortunately, the behaviour of two players giving preference to playing fete match prior to a key World Cup game was a signal to you and everyone else their level of patriotism to our national programme.

Actually, your forgiveness to allow them to stay attached to the team was stretching your patience and at the same time, sending the wrong message to those who follow the rules.

As to the omission of eleven players who were attached to the squad for almost every qualifying match in this tournament, one wonders what the reasons behind the decision.

You agreed that in the previous matches that these guys were giving great effort and slipped along the way because of strategy which failed to get the results intended.

However, that being said, your weeks of preparation with those players showed some level of improvement.

Also keep in mind that these experienced players are the ones who can adjust to the heights and marvellous talents of Mexico (14th ranking) and the rigours of the USA (ranked 28th).

If these new players were capable of a national team shirt in the recent past, why were they not given the chances while our chances were still possible?

Coach, I have always been of the opinion that coaches do not expose players with potential, but incapable of outdoing the regular players, to play in World Cup competition.

Those players must be made to utilise the friendlies and if the national team is fully in control of one of the major tournaments, then slip one in for the short term experience.

Your decision to make this drastic change sends the message of one or two trends of thought. The first is that you have given up the ghost. The second is that you may see your decision to use these relative newcomers together is the way to prepare them for the future World Cup tournament five years down the road.

I humbly disagree. These present players have come through the mill and are probably in the prime of their football lives. Tossing them aside is tantamount to your desire to take pressure from the fact that you have failed to make it to Russia.

Maybe, you will recall that a great international coach called Bora Milutinovic carried a Mexican team to play Jamaica in Kingston, which was well short of almost all the top players, simply because Mexico has qualified. Jamaica got the result they wanted and qualified for France.

However, the Mexican coach was immediately fired for the decision even before they went to France.

International tournaments are special to every country and in a most indirect way, each country must play hard enough to force all opponents to work hard for points, whether they can qualify or not.

I hope that for your sake, your selected team will surprise us all and even the USA which is struggling and need three points against the Soca Warriors to keep its automatic qualifying birth alive in the tournament. There is also a shadow of stinging defeats which can destroy the future of our youngsters and cut our support to a minimum. Good luck.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: maxg on September 29, 2017, 12:16:29 PM
 :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Coach on September 29, 2017, 06:50:00 PM
The decisions DL has made since given the TT coaching job shows he is not ready to be a head coach, hopefully the risk TTFA took by giving him the job will workout for TT football in the future.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: pull stones on September 30, 2017, 09:10:54 AM
what a pile by alvin Alzheimer's corneal. we have absolutely nothing to play for ATM save pride, so to compare mexico's situation with ours is quite silly. mexico was on their way to the world cup then just as now and they played a rookie squad, we have nothing at stake so why not give the youngstars some valuable experience, nothing's wrong with that.

 in fact I think it's a grand opportunity to see how some of the rookies react to the pressure of playing before tens of thousands. this is quite topical of our people with the age ole scenario of too many chiefs and not enough indians all trying to stir the pot.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on October 13, 2017, 03:57:28 AM
The Yanks were too cocky.
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian).


The statement carries much joy for the football lovers of this country and even throughout the Caribbean. After six matches played in the hexagon, it was clear that our national team would not qualify for Russia.

With two games to go, the sport loving public actually dropped their guard when coach Dennis Lawrence decided to make drastic changes to the team which has been failing to get to the winning pole.

His catch phrase was “eleven starting players” were dropped and the focus in the selection process will be on the World Cup 2022 in Qatar.

But as we looked at the names on the sheet, there were many who have been on the field during the 2018 campaign.

The news of some naughty players breaking the rules may have led the coach to take the irresponsible behaviour of the guilty and decided to veer away from them for the final two matches.

Nevertheless, Mexico and the USA could not be considered walkovers and the fans became jumpy as to who will take the field against Mexico. The story of a good performance by T&T public after the team’s 3-1 loss was much better than previous matches.

However, the majority of players were in the squad previously, except the newcomers Adrian Foncette, Kevon Villaroel, and to a lesser extent Shahdon Winchester.

The team started well and the brilliance of goalkeeper Foncette left us with a chance to hold a lead to victory. It did not happen, but the memory of excellent defensive play and the commitment displayed during the match revealed that the team could have done much better.

Away from home and against a highly ranked Mexico, was a fine effort by the Soca Warriors. The USA did not take notice of the T&T players change in attitude and speed level which showed up.

The USA came to Couva with only victory in mind, simply because they are following history of the past encounters, 1989 in particular.

It all started when the Americans attempted to utilise their mandatory practice session at the Ato Boldon Stadium to demoralised not just the T&T team, but the country by taking their protest of a waterlogged Athletic track to social media in which they posted players walking through water while others gave jockey backs to teammates as they crossed the athletic track onto the playing area. Their posts even made it to the traditional news media outlets in the USA and they did not forget to highlight the plight of their team.

USA coach Bruce Arena’s comment seemed realistic when he said, “both teams have to use the same field, so it is no problem.”

On game day it was a heavy surface, no water, as the conditions suited skilled players with quick feet.

The US players came with a certain degree of over confidence and kept on chatting over what they felt was a certain result. “We only need a draw, we are going for victory against the last placed country in our group.”

What they missed was the change of attitude demanded by T&T coach of his players. The speed of Lewis, and Caesar, the creativity of Leston Paul and Kareem Hyland, plus an energetic goalkeeper in Foncette, whose challenges in life very nearly ended his career by accident, be good enough. Did they observe the strength of the Warrior’s defence-line for seventy minutes of the Mexican Game?

They were too busy reciting their code message,” fait accomplit,” a feature which may have derailed their thoughts and taken them into victory road well before the match.

Coach Lawrence did his job well and in hindsight, many of us could not see exactly why some of the experienced players were omitted. A courageous decision, but the type which good coaches make.

It is history now. It is not about the Yanks whose desire to highlight our rainy situations.

This country did not qualify. Neither did the USA. However, I can’t help but feel that we learnt more lessons from the challenges that our team faced during our efforts to reach Russia.

Our next step could well provide the value of the lessons learnt, especially the commitment of our players who may now realise that talent is nothing with commitment and courage to be team players. We now look to prepare for the future.

Well Done, Soca Warriors.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on October 20, 2017, 03:21:55 AM
Soca Warriors debate next move.
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian).


What’s next for the Soca Warriors?

I suppose that the answer to that question is more complicated than losing a football match or even a regional tournament.

Our current ranking position of 83 tells its own story and being last in the Hexagon could relate to the status of the game at this juncture.

This brings to the table the opportunity to view matters in hindsight from as long as the appointment of former national coach Stephen Hart through to the victory over the USA by Dennis Lawrence and his squad. Starting from the beginning would be the work of Hart for the period that he was employed until he was replaced.

Some stability was brought to the national programme vis a vis team preparation and to a certain extent, communication with the foreign-based players, which was actually the ideal way to jump start his programme.

Knowing Stephen for many years during his career as a coach attached in different capacities for the Canadian national teams, I understood the former national Midfielder’s approach which bears similarity to the Canadian Pattern regarding local and foreign-based players.

However, as we walked along the road of challengers, a number of unforeseen problems began to show themselves coming from unexpected directions.

Firstly, the improper communication which existed between the T&T Football Association (TTFA) and the coaching staff which appeared to divide the players into different directions started casually affecting the smooth running of sessions, even when the selection process was said to be complicated with issues that had nothing to do with the game itself.When things appeared to be corrected and the team began to appear to be heading in the right direction, coach Stephen worked hard at trying to find the players with the right attitude as opposed to be prima donnas, an issue which most coaches undergo from time to time.

The fans were becoming more interested as the team was appearing to be good competitors in the regional setting.

However, a terrible start to the Hex started to scare the TTFA and they went for a change in coach, without even reviewing the progress that the team had made prior to the sudden losses.

Enter a new coach Tom Saintfiet, a Belgian whose claim to fame had nothing in his portfolio. His accepted contract was the joke of the century when he admitted that if he failed to win the next two matches in the Hex, he will be fired. So said, so done.

The selection of Dennis brought satisfaction as the former national defender had been under coach Roberto Martinez with Everton FC. Although his coaching certification was short of what is expected for national teams, his player’s experience plus his learning from high profile club coaches, got him the job.

Honestly, success for Dennis was far-fetched, especially after he defeated Panama in the early stages and fought Mexico down to the wire of a tough defeat.

Naturally, despite some impressive portions of the matches, it was clear that Dennis was short of some tactical adjustments and he was fast beginning to learn about player behaviour.

It must be recorded that he had done well in his analyses of some of the players whose commitments were far from what was expected. He made what appeared to be drastic changes, but the transition from mediocre turned into progressive and a route to better results. USA was his huge payday and that was enough to give him the chance to continue the job and prove his real test between now and the next Gold Cup.

A one year match schedule programme will be a key factor, even before Dennis documents his principled choice regarding the process for selecting our national teams. On completion of the above we shall wish to see the trail in search of success, the improved choice of his coaching assistants and most of all, his constant search of players from every part of the country.

Finally, it is necessary for coach Dennis to prove his worth by the quality of his team’s preparation, his analyses of previous matches by showing deficiencies using videos of each match and methods of improvement.

The onus of a coach is to show that his methodology, organisation and creation of major features for success within his teams. That is crucial for the longevity of his profession.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on October 21, 2017, 05:15:50 AM
Corneal apologises to coach Lawrence.
T&T Guardian Reports.


My recent column published in T&T Guardian on Friday, October 20, 2017, which made reference to your qualification to coach our national team which was written in chapter six, was not meant to degrade your certification which you have earned during your stint in the coaching profession.

I will agree that, in hindsight, the comment may have challenged your ability to handle our national team, which was really intended to imply your inexperience to coach a national team before this assignment. The comment was NOT intended to degrade you or your professional qualification in any way whatsoever, therefore I apologise profusely to you and anyone who may have read the article.

As they may further have read in the same article, it was clear that I am completely in favour of you carrying on the job from the present position from which the national squad will approach the next major tournament. I also wish to extend my apologies to your employers.

Again, my sincerest apologies.

Regards
Alvin Corneal
Former National Coach


Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: asylumseeker on October 21, 2017, 06:06:05 AM
I suppose this is the offending comment:

Quote
Although his coaching certification was short of what is expected for national teams, his player’s experience plus his learning from high profile club coaches, got him the job.

Corneal's apology is as muddled as his writing.

Someone at the Guardian should invest in editing his contributions or the publication should end the relationship. Surely it can't be escaping the braintrust at the Guardian that the writer's contributions in their unedited form detract from the broader credibility of the newspaper.

We all want to learn from Mr. Cormeal's body of knowledge, but no one wants to wade through a bed of seaweed to get there.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: dcs on October 21, 2017, 07:07:20 AM

Don’t think that warranted an apology....at least not as a stand alone piece.

Call it as it is even if you perceived as harsh.

If someone from the organization complained they need to relax. I guess they leveraging Anton being on board to get him to ease them up.  Don’t!!!

I think it is clear everyone, including Alvin wants to stay with Dennis for the long haul.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: asylumseeker on October 21, 2017, 09:14:49 AM
???

It is patently incorrect to state that "his coaching certification was short of what is expected for national teams". No ifs, no buts, no howevers.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on November 10, 2017, 05:04:42 AM
A test for the Warriors.
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian).


It is a new start, and one which will be important for all concerned.

Now that the pain of failure to qualify for Russia may have subsided, the country must now welcome the beginning of a new dawn.

The recent comments from the coaching staff and a few members of the team indicate that there is a certain degree of seriousness from the entire squad.

I suppose that the victory over USA will have lifted our spirits, despite the fact that we have not qualified, at least, the country’s ranking at FIFA has been consoling.

Grenada and Guyana will surely wish to bring their status to a new high by winning these matches against a team which defeated both Panama and USA. Some will recall the recent past when both these countries have played well enough to reach the Gold Cup finals (Grenada) and a defeat (Guyana).

On looking at the selected squad, there is every reason to believe that Coach Lawrence has viewed carefully the future of the country’s football by mixing the experienced with the newcomers.

However, all these players have previously had a taste of the matches in the Russian effort, and should have a more matured approach to what lies ahead for the warriors.

It is expected that there will be a series of targets which will be attempted in these matches, simply because the thought of defeat must be thrown far from the hearts of both fans and players.

Outside of wanting to win these matches, there is need to demonstrate that our technical chemistry must be recognised by superior ball possession, recognisable system of play and an improvement of the clinical accuracy in our passing and shooting at goal.

Conceding goals against these teams will expose the inconsistency of our discipline, although they have shown their strength, albeit, inconsistently.

I look forward to seeing the quality of our midfield which seemed to have been dominating against both Mexico and the USA. Maybe the selection of Leston Paul in recent matches will bring a semblance of a Latapy style in the middle and expose the opposing defences by his exquisite penetrative passes.

Having realised that the bright young talent of Levi Garcia has not been as successful in results as we expected, his experience gained between these matches and those of his foreign team, should now bring out the best in him.

The relative newcomer Foncette has brought some excitement to our fans by his excellent performances in the two key matches.

So the major challenges in these fixtures will be tested are having clean sheets in terms of goals and a reasonable target of scored goals which should prove our superiority.

Four goals scored by our forwards in each match will be giving notice to all and sundry that lessons during the ten match series must have left us with some lessons.

Our supporters must come out to see the improvement in all aspects of the game.

To the coach, he is given a new start which should be carefully observed from game to game. There are no obstacles and his knowledge of the players is no longer a problem.

He will be fully responsible for his own destiny and the future of the country’s football direction will determine the fate of both players, coaching staff and management.

Good luck to all.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on November 17, 2017, 05:29:12 AM
A second draw for the Warriors.
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian).


It may not be the result expected by the national team coaching staff, but the thought of failing to defeat teams with a lower FIFA ranking and also following two impressive victories, may have worried Dennis Lawrence and his staff.

Having not seen the first game, I made it compulsive to attend the second against Guyana, who had defeated us not too long ago. After reading the reports given to the media by the coaches of both teams, it led readers to believe that both teams were more than ready for a serious encounter.

The Guyanese coach indicated that his team was more than prepared for this game, as he knew a number of the Warriors players and some of his players played with and against them in our Local Pro league.

On a slippery surface, but ideally suited to good football, Pregame comments were important. After some careful caution by both teams, what was seen was an initial plan of the warriors playing the possession game in their own half of the field, but being unable to move forward into the opponents’ portion.

My first observation was that the practice of possession was really a case of passing around the responsibility of their defence players, and gradually searching for inroads to the midfielders.

Their opponents almost robotically awaited the attacking thrust from the home team, and were able to win the ball easily when it was played forward.

Some were because of inaccurate passes while others were because of an absolute lack of creativity among the midfield four.

Maybe inexperience, but it appeared more as thought they were short of the tactics which invites passing lanes and cohesive rotation in order to force the Guyanese to reshuffle or lose their defensive direction.

The percentage of inaccurate passes became the initial problem, either through good interception by the opposing midfield, or/and by pathetic ball distribution from the back.

Having checked the consistency of possession through consecutive passing, the strings of accurate passes did not go above eight, and when it did, most times it was in their own half of the field, hence the reason for the scarcity of shots taken.

The visitors decided to pay respect to the World Cup contenders who mastered both USA and Panama, which made sense, but also had the problem of using the ball effectively when they won it.

What was even more disconcerting was the desire of the key warriors’ players to utilize their individual skills instead of team building aggressive sequences towards goal, another reason for a terrible shortage of shots at goal.

In defence while the players appeared to have the physical capability to perform, they were far short of communication when the opposition was coming into their portion of the field.

Guyana got one 30% opportunity when a ball was played towards their striker Holder who, at the time was marked by both warrior central defenders. Lack of communication caused both defenders to allow the young man to collect the ball on his chest with one metre from both. He recognised the crowd and decided to make a pass from the penalty area to his wing midfielder on the left side and it was neatly headed into the far corner of the goal.

Up to that time, goal chances from either team was A SCARCITY. However, the home team increased the velocity of movement and appeared to be more effective at times. But the inaccuracy of key passes were easily lost to a defense line whose claim to fame was listening to the instructions of their coach.

The tension rose higher, but so did the anxiety and disorder of organised by both teams. A counter-attack coming to the end for Guyana very nearly gave them a match winner, except for a superb piece of goalkeeping. Eventually, Levi Garcia moves smartly into the middle from an accurate left side ground cross with five metres of the Guyanese goal. The promising youngster allowed the ball to roll across him and his right footed attempt missed an open goal and possible victory for the warriors.

Despite all the investments of young players, the signals appear to be some distance away from what our national team standard should produce.

More training is needed and in some cases, the fundamental principles of good team play.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Deeks on November 17, 2017, 07:10:17 AM
Despite all the investments of young players, the signals appear to be some distance away from what our national team standard should produce.

More training is needed and in some cases, the fundamental principles of good team play.



Reality bites!!!
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on November 24, 2017, 07:06:42 AM
Concacaf’s advice to clubs in the Caribbean.
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian).


Although my duties at Concacaf and Fifa have been in the area of technical and football oriented issues, it would have been remiss of me if I did not seek to learn from the management style of the most popular international Sports federation in the world.

Admittedly, it was not difficult to recognise the efficiency of Fifa if one wished to judge them on the basis of their competence in running World Cup activities in countries which are not first world in every aspect of the word. So when the president of the TTFA delightfully mentioned to the country that Concacaf has given strict instructions to all the Caribbean countries to demand from their affiliated clubs, the level of management which will provide evidence of club structure, and annual financial statements, I was encouraged to see the revival and reinforcement of this requirement.

There is even a deadline date for clubs in the country to provide these details to the TTFA and failure to do same, these clubs will not be able to participate in the national competitions.

Strangely enough, this principle has always been the policy of Fifa, simply because their desire was to have well run management in each country. They granted some huge financial subventions to each country in order to raise the quality of good administrative practices.

However, there seemed to be much of a secret for the administrators who were mandated to streamline the organisational function of the country’s football.

The only problem with that structure was that the instructions from Fifa which should have come from the members of the hierarchy from the CFU and Concacaf, hardly ever reached the ears of the ordinary clubs.

Even the countries themselves were not adhering to the instructions of Fifa, even though the funding was being handed over as regular as was promised.

The stagnancy of the Caribbean countries as far as the quality of the game and the management teams, appeared to be non-functional and the leaders in Switzerland made efforts to enquire about the reasons for the failure of their financial aid to reap the benefits for the region. It is well known that the majority of the Caribbean countries were never presenting audited financial statements to Concacaf and Fifa for many years.

Surely, the new regime may have done similar surveys and came up with the new pattern whereby, the demand was made through Concacaf, that all clubs in the region must provide these details to their associations in order to retain their membership.

Excellent! This important step will be the ideal recipe for competence in the future, especially when we are all aware that there are a number of “teams” playing football than “organised Clubs,” which means that audited statements are like speaking broken Dutch to many of the management committees. Having said that, should there be a successful attempt to get these requests from the clubs, the stability of our football will rise rapidly, but in the offices and on the football fields.

Poor management and insular behaviour from a few over ambitious people, created the dismantling of the major leagues across the country through the use of numerous extraordinary, and sometimes unorthodox administrative adjustments. Having learned much from some of the finest experts in Sports Administration such as deceased Eric James, Ken Galt, Ernil Paul, St Elmo Gopaul, Oscar Harvey, and a few others in the era of the fifties to the seventies, it was easy to understand why the club structure which was as solid as Malvern, Maple, Casuals, Shamrock, Colts, Dynamos, Juniors, Lantern Giants, Sporting club, Naiads, Corinthians, Ebonites, and all the well-managed clubs in the East, Central, South, have deteriorated totally in a short space of time.

Each of these clubs had regular meetings, communicated with their members, demanded monthly fees from each member, player or not, and best of all, they had club houses, they enjoyed social activity among their members and friends. In other words, there was the creation of bringing together members in our societies to live, laugh, play harmoniously, and still compete against each other among thousands of fans.

The sport then, never depended upon Fifa or any other international organisation and are not known to be in debt after their successful seasons.

So the challenge has been thrown at the current “clubs” to put together their financial statements before a particular date, otherwise they will not be able to re-join the arms of the TTFA.

I believe that it is fair, it is a step forward, and should be pursued. However, the example must come from the top of the table, and our friends at the head of the association must be prepared to assist these clubs while they are taking care of their own audited financial statements at year end.

The foundation seem to have started with the expansion of having their own stadium, land space for two training fields, a hotel and the funds to do same.

If the request from Concacaf to the TTFA regarding these new concepts is implemented, maybe we shall see a better future for the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: coache on November 24, 2017, 10:33:58 PM
I love to read Alvin Corneal's articles about the great days of Colts, Maple, Malvern, Lantern Giants, Juniors, and Casuals..those teams have been out of existence or at least out of the top flight for close to fifty years..
How can we get back to those good ole days eh ..?

I feel we should stop Pro league go back to amateur days ..let  de fellas go and learn trade ..dey could do plumbing and welding during de day and train on evenings..de best players make a few extra dollars off gamblers who bet on how much goal he score..bring back de ole time days..
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Tallman on January 24, 2018, 12:51:24 PM
He travelled to his first two FIFA world cups in 1978 and 82 as a part of the then TTT's television coverage crew, and he has since witnessed every competition for the better part of the last three decades operating in various capacities as a FIFA employee.

Alvin Corneal's work as a coaching instructor and member of FIFA's technical study group has been hugely rewarding and is set to continue when he heads to Russia in 2018. He gave some insight to Gyasi Merrique.

https://www.youtube.com/v/PY56pSCuaP0
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: maxg on January 24, 2018, 01:52:00 PM
Oh Gorm Alvin, not even Anton get ah lil quick course self...  :devil:

btw, we need a women's coach all now..an DL could use ah refresher, wha yuh say ? how about coaching instead of just doing critiques. We need help, bad.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on March 02, 2018, 05:11:34 AM
I support Concacaf structural changes.
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian).


It is always been good sense to view unsuccessful situations carefully before deciding to make drastic changes. This statement goes for almost anything area in life, where times have changed and the call for adjustment and sometimes complete change processes, should enter our minds.

The CONCACAF has just taken a decision to restructure the format of the long reigning Gold Cup competition in a manner which seem superficially adequate, but somewhat complex when viewed from all aspects of the original formula of many years ago. The increase number of qualifying teams will not be challenged.

Originally, the venues for tournament finals were often directed towards the USA and Mexico, until it appeared to bring success to the Mexicans more regularly than expected by the Americans.

Then the host country has been the USA alone, leaving the other countries to have to strategise ten times more, in relation to travel arrangements, time changes, climate conditions and in some unusual situations where the inability to get some selected players from some Caribbean countries deprived through Visa permission, from travelling to the tournament.

It is not surprising that the two major countries USA and Mexico have always been victors of the Gold Cup. Admittedly, the input from other countries have improved considerably and names like Costa Rica, Panama, Jamaica, Haiti, and T&T, challenged profusely, not consistently, to keep the dream of winning the Gold cup sometime in the future.

Because of my method of studying changes carefully before a reply one way or the other, I shall bring the details of my observation so that readers can make their own decisions.

Pending U-16 Pro League campaign

I wish to discuss the recent decisions of our Under-16 national squad members which are preparing for age group competitions later this year.

My information through the media is that these young selected players have been asked to sign forms to play in the youth division as members of a youth arm of a Pro League team.

Reports are that parents are challenging the decision of the proposal, especially since their sons have been asked to sign forms even before some of the parents were aware of same.

In the first place, in International football, there is a rule which calls for parents to be the signatories for their children when it comes to legal documents and this falls into that category.

This is a practice which the ruling body (The TTFA) must pay close attention too, especially when these youngsters are still at school and their future participation in obtaining football scholarships in North American universities can be affected because of operating within the professional ranks of competition.

It also appears to invite these youngsters to leave their commitment to their schools in order to enter this decision for the U-16’s to play elsewhere.

These extraordinary decisions need to be addressed seriously by taking all aspects of movement into consideration in a manner which does not conflict with the association’s constitution or even the academic and football educational rulings which may be unfair to the students and schools or even unethical to parents and children themselves.

I will seek to examine the value of such a move and try to document the reasoning positively or adversely for the benefit of the sport itself and also the students.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on March 09, 2018, 05:17:43 AM
How will regional teams benefit?
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian).


The history of Concacaf premier competition could only be remembered by those who have been around in the early sixties when the number of affiliated countries in the Caribbean was less than what exists today.

Like every new kid on the block, the leaders of Concacaf, all of whom have not been around the confederation's in-depth participation of countries, a factor which deprives them from understand the problems that existed in the past, not normally through errors of the past administrators, but because of the inability of the small populated and less developed football territories.

Today it is easier to recognise the trend of the past decade or two and therein lies the serious disadvantages which face the smaller Islands (now called countries). There was a time when Haiti was a popular venue for the regional finals. Despite their weak economy, they were ably assisted by France.

The facilities were not comparable to even the other Caribbean countries like T&T, Barbados, Jamaica, or even Antigua.

So there is no surprise regarding the new structural change when the ten leading countries are chosen to lead the pack into the finals of the competition.

I suppose that the reorganising of the minnows may be allowed at least three matches in order to find a place and none of the matured countries are among them.

Immediately, my thoughts ran upon the financing of such a venture for the islands whose economies have in the past deprived them of the process of team preparation, the scarcity of fans in their pint size venues.

OK! FIFA has not clearly informed the Concacaf region as to the financial assistance which are (or will be) available to each country, especially to the Caribbean participants.

Then there is the question of development and performances improvement for same, where money does not necessarily bring about improved quality of play among the communities, clubs and national teams.

Occasionally, we have seen Grenada, Martinique, St. Vincent and the Grenadians, creeping into the higher echelons of the Gold Cup final, but they hardly ever sustain their consistency to leave their mark.

There are other issues as well, especially regarding the question of team preparation and the opportunities which these “tiny tots” can get face to face with teams which are more advanced in the world of Football, such as a South American, or European. These are the opponents which provide the lessons in a practical sense and bring the level of intensity, the dedication, and the open minded to their efforts with a burning desire to reach the bright lights of Canada, America and Mexico, whether it be practice, or official competitive matches.

Finally, money is always placed dangling before those countries are awaiting to start their program. But unfortunately, the area which is needed urgently to bring the improvement in the CFU must be coaches Education.

The decision to supply funds for improvement will hardly achieve the success of quality football. It never has and always seems to be insufficient, (as long as FIFA and/or Concacaf) place great emphasis of coaching courses of high quality. There is also the concept of a difference between teaching and coaching, whereby, the age group of kids under ten years must be taught to develop the fundamental skills, of passing, collecting, heading and shooting. Add to that the guidance for these kids to utilize on the movement on the field when they are not in possession.

These are teaching methods which, if not effectively mastered at the early ages, will not reflect themselves when the players enter the middle to late teens.

In the year 2014, as a member of FIFA's Technical committee, I had the opportunity to present an evaluation of the current position of the Concacaf and what I would recommend to the authorities for an improved Confederation. The comparison between what I recommended and what has now been put in place, appears to bear resemblance, except there was an absence of the financial requirement for a better Caribbean success in Concacaf football. Maybe, that is next on the list.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: maxg on March 09, 2018, 09:12:37 AM
Can’t seem to get google to translate, could someone please bear with my lack of understanding  and explain
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: asylumseeker on March 09, 2018, 09:29:27 AM
Can’t seem to get google to translate, could someone please bear with my lack of understanding  and explain

The Guardian should be fined ... maybe they will respond to that.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on March 23, 2018, 04:02:22 AM
Our football is in ruins.
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian).


The silence is deafening these days regarding the the aborted Annual General Meeting (AGM) of the TTFA last week.

At this point in time, the variety of confusing issues could make the image of the local game become more difficult to accept and it can even push away the start of the upcoming season for all the Football leagues in the country.

My understanding is that the AGM which was scheduled some time ago and was postponed because of the absence of a quorum.

A restart was attempted and while the original number of participants did not reach the quota stage, the ruling indicated that the meeting must continue with the number present.

Nevertheless, my question is: why was the original meeting date did not bring the participants together, especially when the substance of the meeting was the financial statement, one which need to be addressed by all key stakeholders on the TTFA.

FIFA has committed itself to a large sum of money which literally covered the various areas of the administration, the national programmes, the youth development, the women's' senior and junior teams.

We are all aware of the poor management skills of the TTFA over the years and the current administration should be more than careful as to the request by the general council to display the figures where the FIFA contributed, and where the moneys were disbursed.

The request turned into turmoil because the request for the document could not be made available by the executive committee.

Cross talk followed the refusal to carry on the meeting by the leader ignited a “he say, she say” exchange of words, few of which referred to the spent funds. From what was said in the news, it was clear that the floor members were upset over the desire of the hierarchy to terminate the meeting.

Whether this was so or not, surely the reasons should have been explained to the gathering and maybe share some thoughts on the next move forward.

This apparently did not happen and the meeting turned itself into an environment which more resembled an unruly fish market.

It would appear that some preferred to go the route of personalisation among the group which had the responsibility to conduct the business of Football and none could have request for the financial statement examined.

And almost simultaneously. Another group called the “Proleague” executives, some recently resigned their positions, decided to ignore the august body for Football and went straight to the Minister of Sport office in search of special grant of funding for their league, which is a franchise oriented league.

This was confusing to my own mind, simply because I was always of the belief that the Government's subvention to sport in the country must be shared through the national associations whose duties in turn must provide a budget which will identify the direction of the funds allocated by the TTFA..

This is not the case and immediately, the thought of this process of funding to a “Private” body which calls itself the professional league is tantamount to a number of business who invested their money in the game of football with the hope of making a profit on same.

The poor performances on the field provided them with concrete evidence that better quality football is the answer to earn a profit and continue with the investment.

If the government accepts the request to hand out monies to the Proleague, then they will have to continue their precedent and finance the clubs affiliated to the northern, eastern, central, southern and the Tobago leagues.

These are the leagues which need the financial support most, especially as they do not have gate receipts, they have to pay their referees, and they have to pay registration fees for club.

Their community grounds are not well kept, a factor which invites postponed games because of uncut grass and sometimes two teams scheduled for the same field.

This quagmire has to stop and the clubs must make their present felt in the midst of serious dialogue regarding the restructuring of all football in the country. There were successful methods used in the past and the fans supported the game. To return to a successful past is not unproductive, but rather more intelligent.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: gawd on pitch on March 23, 2018, 06:12:31 AM
It sad that DJW is the elephant in the room (in more ways than one).. and no one seems to have a clue on how to oust him. I think his house of cards will fall soon. I expect one or two or more of his supporters to jump ship soon. People on that level of corruption usually don't do their due diligence.. someone will start to sing soon. Well at least I hope so.
Title: Football financial corridors open
Post by: Tallman on May 04, 2018, 06:34:22 AM
Football financial corridors open
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian)


The pendulum seems to have swung drastically within the corridors of the Sports Company of T&T (SporTT) and the Ministry of Sport and Youth Affairs. It was not too long ago, the rumours of promised payments by the former Minister of Sport to the Pro League was hot among social media and elsewhere. Then suddenly, we found out that this will not actually happen.

A newly appointed Minister of Sports has brought a shining light with loads of money for eight of the ten clubs and suddenly, the League’s kick off date is June 1.

Then the Cricket administrators decided to ride on that bandwagon, seeing that the precedent was set by the new Ministry of Sports.

It would not surprise me if the Super League and the Zonal Associations jump into the fray justifiably so seeking their handouts too.

Now, out of the minds of two different ministers, the decision to finance clubs who have made themselves professionals, have received a slap followed by a kiss, just by crying crocodile tears as a result of their failure to make their primary individual investment become profitable.

Quietly, the TTFA was not even concerned about the Pro League issue, seeing that they had absolutely no control of the “professionals”.

Actually, this absence of interest shown y the TTFA extends towards their own Zonal Associations, all of whom have been “scrunting” because many of their “affiliated clubs” have not been paying their registration fees and as soon as their results on the field became southward, they casually dropped out of the league, simply because they can no longer in line to get prize money and they will have to travel from venue to venue for matches away from their home venues.

If they happen to be in winning ways, then they will battle against their opponents, most of whom have paid their registration fees, referees’ payments and maintain the cutting process of their community fields.

Who cared when these administrators from the zonal areas were unable to pay their prize monies to winners in their zones, to the clubs which have honoured their financial commitments to be eligible to participate legally.

Funnily enough, this definition of “professional leagues” namely the “Pro League” and the “Super league” has no difference from all the clubs in the TTFA. There is NOT a single amateur organisation of Football in this country again.

The word Amateur was removed from the TAFA to TTFA, which means that all clubs could undertake the challenge of paying some of all of their players if they wish.

In other words, there is absolutely nothing wrong in a club decides to pay their players to play in the Zonal leagues.

The question is, will that allow them to receive financial assistance from the Ministry of Sports?

Eventually, the majority of footballers, especially those who play in the zonal leagues will become disgruntled and see themselves as bastards in a football family.

No wonder why we are witnessing horrible behaviour on and off the field, players disrespecting referees, and our zonal administrators have no hard feelings when they refuse to pay prize money, neither do they care if referees or players become exposed to the dangers of being confronted by ill-disciplined behaviour without any form of security to protect their players or spectators or even children alike.

Will some of the people who are party to this quagmire of football administrative confusion and unfair practices, sit up and lend your thoughts to the development of the greatest game in the world?
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on May 13, 2018, 01:39:33 AM
Pro League football begins June 1.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


After all the complexities of problems within the football fraternity, the listed date for the season is carded for June 1.

Not much has been divulged by the Pro League about their shaky financial situation over the past few months.

We must now await the promise of financial aid to the league which may well have put the teams in place of the details.

Venues for their matches, players who may now have been settled in their terms for salaries and bonuses are to be registered on the rosters.

While silence has been the role for the Pro League administration, the Super League has been demonstrating their vigilance in getting their act together.

Already clubs have been kicked out of that league because they have not paid their $50,000 franchise fee. This may bring sudden but joyful news for some of the unknown clubs who can be accepted from their zones into what some will call huge promotions.

Together with this positive move by the leagues, the next step for all the clubs will be their search for new players to strengthen their performances on the field exercise.

This means that player transfers from club to club and the conditions which will be placed on departing players from their club to another have actually rigorously started.

Strangely enough, the method of the transfer process will provide much confusion to the clubs.

Even in the zonal competitions, the clubs who fought to finance their team registrations, paid their players’ expenses vis a vis uniforms, their training equipment, supplying some of their players with boots, transport, and in the case of my own club, lending financial support when our team travels on tour, all these forms of expenditure, referees payments, when accumulated, without any help of gate receipts.

Thanks to sponsors Malta Carib, our club and some others may have gained financial help; The task is enormous, though.

I am aware of three clubs seeking to gain transfers for players from the zones, but they do not expect to have to pay transfer fees of any kind.

The T&T Football Association (TTFA) has rules for transfers and must protect the lesser financially capable clubs. It will be interesting to see whether these (financially equipped professional clubs) will be allowed to just take players from the minority organisations, without going through the confirmation of the transfer forms to be given from the TTFA.

Funny enough, seeing that both Pro Leagues are conducting their affairs autonomously and may assume that they are working on issues like transfers and almost anything else.

It is still my opinion that the management of the TTFA must pull every team that falls under their jurisdiction to discuss the grey areas among players, clubs, referees, disciplinary committees, technical committees for the purpose of which players are eligible to be considered for national selection of all age-groups.

These discussions should take place before the start of any league, and the grey areas must be cleared.

It will also be a positive move if the financial statement concerning the activities of conducting all the affairs can be placed in the hands of the clubs, a factor which should be a regular practice at the start of every year.

We shall all await these happenings. I wish all the leagues and clubs, good luck for the upcoming season.


Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on September 14, 2018, 12:43:05 AM
Football is a ticket to your career.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


In what ap­peared to be an en­thu­si­as­tic open­ing for the sec­ondary schools 2018 sea­son, the news of schol­ar­ships must be great for the ears of par­ents who are hop­ing that the foot­ball tal­ent of their chil­dren will get them to the USA to play foot­ball and get an ed­u­ca­tion in ex­change.

The at­trac­tive open­ing for the sea­son is ap­pro­pri­ate for all con­cerned and the school's foot­ball fans must be ex­cit­ed. Hav­ing been lit­er­al­ly a pi­o­neer for this type of ex­po­sure for our out­stand­ing school­boy foot­ballers to the Unit­ed States Uni­ver­si­ties, whose de­sire for de­vel­op­ing the qual­i­ty of foot­ball since the late six­ties, our stu­dents have ben­e­fit­ted im­mense­ly.

Ad­mit­ted­ly, the ear­ly en­try in­to the North Amer­i­can Uni­ver­si­ty sys­tem was sim­ple and did not war­rant a guar­an­tee of strin­gent Aca­d­e­m­ic stan­dards from our stu­dents, most of whom were aca­d­e­m­i­cal­ly strong. I dis­tinct­ly re­call the names of per­sons like Alvin Hen­der­son (now Doc­tor), Ian Bain, Kei­th Look Loy, Neil Williams, Dr. Trevor Lei­ba, Sha­ka His­lop, through to Dex­ter Skeene, David Nakhid, Mar­lon Charles, Veron Skin­ner, Derek Lewis, Richard Chi­napoo, Dami­an Coop­er, Graeme Ro­driguez, and lit­er­al­ly hun­dreds ben­e­fit­ting from the op­por­tu­ni­ty.

In those days, those play­ers were bril­liant stu­dents hence their ab­solute suc­cess at at­tain­ing their suc­cess in the class­room and at the same time im­prov­ing the qual­i­ty of foot­ball, enough to earn na­tion­al team se­lec­tion.

This trend had con­tin­ued for a pe­ri­od of time. Then the NCAA de­cid­ed that en­try in­to the sys­tem need­ed a bet­ter aca­d­e­m­ic base such as five sub­jects, a good SAT score and even de­mand­ed that stu­dents who wished to en­joy the op­por­tu­ni­ty to gain schol­ar­ships must re­frain from join­ing pro­fes­sion­al ranks at home pri­or­i­ty to at­tend­ing uni­ver­si­ty.

The added de­mand af­fect­ed the num­ber of schol­ar­ships, be­cause of the in­abil­i­ty of many stu­dents who were promis­ing foot­ballers, was not aca­d­e­m­i­cal­ly strong and were not ac­cept­ed.

Strange enough, the de­sire to have stu­dent gain schol­ar­ships dug deep in­to the hearts of some school prin­ci­pals and the ab­sence of at­tend­ing school for the gift­ed foot­ballers, did not af­fect their se­lec­tion in the School teams.

Our sec­ondary schools dur­ing the re­cent past, have been re­cruit­ing play­ers from one school to an­oth­er, some­times even pri­or to their fi­nal year, so that they can strength­en an­oth­er school.

My ob­ser­va­tion has been a more chal­leng­ing op­por­tu­ni­ty to find the top foot­ball play­ers who can aca­d­e­m­i­cal­ly qual­i­fy to gain the schol­ar­ships that are avail­able.

What we have seen is that dif­fer­ent sys­tems of en­try in­to Ju­nior col­leges for the “not so bright”ones have un­der­tak­en over from the Uni­ver­si­ties of ad­vance cred­i­bil­i­ty, de­spite the less qual­i­fied stu­dents.

To­day, the op­por­tu­ni­ty of­fered by some Uni­ver­si­ties to our cur­rent play­ers should be a form of en­cour­age­ment to stu­dents who aca­d­e­m­i­cal­ly strong enough to gain en­try to these in­sti­tu­tions.

There are SAT class­es all around the coun­try and the em­pha­sis to pre­pare the stu­dents must come from the school teach­ers, whose love for pro­vid­ing the foot­ball teams with the tal­ent­ed ones, must ex­tend their role as aca­d­e­m­ic teach­ers as will­ing­ly as they view the stu­dent's foot­ball ca­reer.

Maybe I could have learnt the sys­tem dur­ing my col­lege days, when the prin­ci­pal of Fa­ti­ma Col­lege, in­sist­ed up­on the ath­letes get­ting spe­cial class­es be­fore they re­turned home, but hav­ing our ded­i­cat­ed school teach­ers to en­sure that they do their home lessons.

We are in search of stu­dent-ath­letes for the uni­ver­si­ties abroad. To­day's stu­dent-ath­letes just need to look at the his­to­ry of the stu­dents who were pi­o­neers in the 1960s, 70s and 80s and see where their pro­fes­sions have tak­en them be­cause of foot­ball. Par­ents, this is a les­son for you as well. We need well-round­ed young­sters and you have a role to play.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on September 21, 2018, 12:54:27 AM
Money just in time for Women’s qualifiers.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


Since the day of achiev­ing the chal­lenge to com­pete in the CON­CA­CAF World Cup qual­i­fy­ing se­ries, most fans were look­ing for­ward to the qual­i­ty of play which we saw in Ja­maica could be raised in or­der to meet and beat USA, Mex­i­co, af­ter tak­ing their three points from Pana­ma in the open­er.

Well, sur­prise! sur­prise! When we were all look­ing for the team to en­gage in prac­tice ses­sions and match­es, even though the op­po­nents may be lo­cal teams, the ex­er­cise will have been worth the while and the girls will be im­prov­ing their phys­i­cal and tech­ni­cal abil­i­ty. Un­for­tu­nate­ly, the con­fus­ing state of ad­min­is­tra­tive com­pe­tence seems to be the most dif­fi­cult hur­dle.

First, it was the ques­tion of se­lect­ing a coach to pre­pare the team for the pe­ri­od of 20 days be­fore the first match against Pana­ma. Hints of who will coach the team was not of­fi­cial­ly an­nounced un­til a few days ago, and when it came to a fi­nal arrange­ment with ref­er­ence to the fi­nan­cial com­mit­ment, a so­lu­tion came on­ly three days ago af­ter some un­cer­tain com­ments which were ex­pressed by one of the over­seas play­ers and fol­lowed by a plea from the team man­ag­er.

It was strange that the gen­er­al sec­re­tary, the pres­i­dent and maybe one or two oth­ers, were chastis­ing the “team man­ag­er” for mak­ing a di­rect re­quest from the Min­istry of Sport di­rect­ly, re­al­is­ing that time is pass­ing quick­ly and not a sin­gle word of progress is reach­ing the ears of the play­ers.

Did we not re­call a sim­i­lar in­ci­dent re­gard­ing late re­quests for fi­nance just a month ago? Why then should the same oc­cur? That is why I agree with the team man­ag­er, whose re­spon­si­bil­i­ty it was to en­sure that every­thing is put in place, so that the peace of mind for the play­ers, can rekin­dle their ef­forts to prac­tice and to play as hard as pos­si­ble.

Hon­est­ly, if our prac­tice ses­sions and match­es were ad­e­quate­ly done and the se­lect­ed coach could have planned some form of strat­e­gy, sure­ly the prob­lems which were un­solved must have been leav­ing some form of psy­cho­log­i­cal dis­com­fort, which may eas­i­ly re­tard their men­tal fo­cus.

Here are some of the things which were se­ri­ous­ly miss­ing from our prepa­ra­tion. First­ly, we must send a scout to go in search of the prepa­ra­tions of our op­po­nents, the sys­tems which they will play and the key play­ers, to­geth­er with the fit­ness lev­el?

If so, who would have done same and where would they have seen the "Yanks" and Mex­i­cans play or prac­tice? Sec­ond­ly, I have heard noth­ing about bring­ing the full squad to­geth­er for as many prac­tice ses­sions as they can. How about set plays, both in de­fence and at­tack?

All these is­sues are part and par­cel of team prepa­ra­tion and get­ting to the venue for one of the mem­bers of the coach­ing staff is of high pri­or­i­ty to our team plan­ning.

Al­ready, we are aware of the pa­tri­ot­ic form of crowd sup­port when play­ing the USA at home? This calls for a par­tic­u­lar ap­proach in the ear­ly part of the game against them be­cause they have a his­to­ry of throw­ing down the gaunt­let ear­ly against a shaky op­po­nent and the in­ten­tion is to un­set­tle their op­po­nents.

Against T&T, that will prob­a­bly be the plan for the more ad­vanced coun­tries, see­ing the num­bers of un­solved dis­trac­tions which our girls have un­der­gone.

I shud­der to think of the fi­nal re­sults but my ex­pec­ta­tion is for the team to work as hard and as con­sis­tent as they can.

First­ly, do not start your play from the keep­er’s ser­vice with short pass­es to de­fen­sive play­ers. Both the USA and Mex­i­co will start the ball win­ning process as high as out­side of our penal­ty area.

Our mid­field­ers must win the ball in cen­ter­field and not al­low the back four de­fend­ers to be chal­leng­ing “de­fend­ers” but sup­port­ing de­fend­ers, which means that the op­po­nents will al­ways have lim­it­ed space to per­form their strat­e­gy.

In the Ja­maica match, our de­fend­ers ap­peared vul­ner­a­ble in de­fence against the "Reg­gae Girls" whose in­tense at­tack tend­ed to weak­en against the speed of two of our for­wards.

Our main form of pen­e­tra­tion must come from the long balls which must be served on the flanks and some­times di­ag­o­nal­ly to­wards cor­ner flags. We have the speed with Kay­la Tay­lor and one of two oth­ers and our mid­field­ers can shoot the ball well from out­side the op­po­nents’ penal­ty area.

In­ten­si­ty must be the name of our game and there could be the chance of re­duc­ing the ef­fec­tive­ness of our op­po­nents.

Our task is a dif­fi­cult one, but nev­er im­pos­si­ble. Give it your best shot.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on October 26, 2018, 12:50:40 AM
What is T&T's football future?
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


It is as if I was not aware of the many chal­lenges which the great game of foot­ball has been af­fect­ed by here in T&T.

Hav­ing had a pe­ri­od of 1954 to this present day will have brought to my mind, var­i­ous lev­els of sport, foot­ball and crick­et specif­i­cal­ly.

Hav­ing said that, the de­sire to hear any­thing with ref­er­ence to de­vel­op­ment in ei­ther of the sport­ing dis­ci­plines and maybe sport gen­er­al­ly, has some in­ter­est­ing val­ues of learn­ing, or in some cas­es, rel­e­vant teach­ing prin­ci­ples of sports come to my mind reg­u­lar­ly.

Be­cause the com­pe­tence of both ma­jor sports in the coun­try was high qual­i­ty, or­gan­i­sa­tion­al sport­ing events were con­duct­ed by some of the finest sports ad­min­is­tra­tors. Any his­to­ri­an can sup­ply you with the names.

My anx­i­ety to hear the re­marks of the cur­rent ad­min­is­tra­tors in their ef­forts to iden­ti­fy with a pos­i­tive path for­ward is al­most like read­ing sign lan­guage with­out any les­son on the sub­ject.

A re­cent in­ter­view on tele­vi­sion with the T&T foot­ball pres­i­dent David John-Williams pro­duced one of the lessons which I was hop­ing to lis­ten care­ful­ly and un­der­stand the di­rec­tion which is tak­en to bring foot­ball up to the stan­dard which had been at­tract­ing hun­dreds or thou­sands of fans to the avail­able grounds to ac­com­mo­date club com­pe­ti­tion.

To every state­ment made by the pres­i­dent, my rec­ol­lec­tion of yes­ter­year's glo­ry days al­lowed me to re­live the joy of the foot­ballers and the fans, on and off the field.

The ini­tial light to­wards the end of a long tun­nel was the struc­ture of some sol­id for­mu­lat­ed clubs, whose main in­ten­tion was to pro­duce a high qual­i­ty brand of the game which caught the eyes and ears of the pop­u­la­tion and lit­er­al­ly urged the fans to spend al­most every af­ter­noon ei­ther walk­ing, rid­ing, or us­ing any form of lo­cal trans­port pos­si­ble to ar­rive at the venues to line the play­ing fields to be en­ter­tained.

As I lis­tened to the dis­cus­sion with the pres­i­dent I heard of the spe­cif­ic deals which would have im­proved the ad­min­is­tra­tive of­fices and al­lowed the sport to be­come the own­er of a na­tion­al sta­di­um and a ho­tel at its - Home of Foot­ball - at the Ato Boldon Sta­di­um in Cou­va.

The Pres­i­dent shared with the na­tion­al com­mu­ni­ty the fi­nan­cial prob­lems and chal­lenges which are se­ri­ous ob­sta­cles for the sport and how to ad­dress it. He did not for­get to blame pre­vi­ous pres­i­dents and high­light­ed the rea­son for the new leader a dis­mal start in of­fice, and be­moan­ing the cur­rent fact as to how much mon­ey and to whom they owed.

He made a quick jump to his achieve­ments - the sports' own­er­ship of the venue, ad­min­is­tra­tive of­fices, and the soon to be opened ho­tel. Per­haps, this to him is progress to the great game, while very lit­tle was men­tioned about play­er de­vel­op­ment and the process which would leave a path to the stan­dard of foot­ball for which he may one day wish to en­joy.

He boasts of hav­ing 100% sup­port for each de­ci­sion which was tabled with his board mem­bers, many of which were be­ing re­port­ed in the me­dia end­ing in to­tal chaos.

He gave an ac­count of the fi­nan­cial in­debt­ed­ness to the na­tion­al coach­es which left the pub­lic to be­lieve that he was try­ing to “as­sist” them with small bits of pay­ments at a time and out­lined how much debt the sport had be­fore he came in­to of­fice in the seat of pres­i­dent.

May I say that I can­not re­call him stat­ing what his plans were to cor­rect that fi­nan­cial prob­lems of the which were al­ways high­light­ed in the me­dia be­fore he ac­cept­ed the job.

In amidst of some friv­o­lous items for which he could not have giv­en an ex­pla­na­tion or in­for­ma­tion that could not be di­vulged, up came a “de­fin­i­tive com­ment” from him - "Pro­fes­sion­al foot­ball is here to stay."

I wish I had the space to chal­lenge the com­ment be­cause I have not seen any ev­i­dence to back up such a state­ment.

For ex­am­ple, how can play­ers be trans­fer­ring from one club to the next in the same league, and the same clubs can­not af­ford to pay play­ers their month­ly wages with­out go­ing to the gov­ern­ment to beg for as­sis­tance.

If that is the an­swer to "Pro­fes­sion­al foot­ball is here to stay" - then the ex­is­tence of the Pro League, then we can pre­pare a de­f­i­n­i­tion of pro­fes­sion­al­ism in the con­text of T&T foot­ball. That state­ment proves the ex­tent of our ad­min­is­tra­tors dis­tance from the re­al­i­ty of what is be­fore them.

Maybe an­oth­er ar­ti­cle will be worth of­fer­ing an ex­pla­na­tion.

Title: I welcome the football Commission
Post by: Tallman on April 07, 2019, 09:08:57 AM
I welcome the football Commission
By Alvin Corneal (T&T Guardian)


One of the most ac­cu­rate com­ments which have been made about the coun­try's foot­ball was the de­ci­sion to im­ple­ment an ad­vi­so­ry com­mit­tee to man­age the af­fairs of the high­est lev­els of our foot­ball. This move will al­so en­sure the fra­ter­ni­ty that the num­ber of ills which have de­te­ri­o­rat­ed the qual­i­ty of the great game be­cause of the de­fi­cien­cy in deal­ing with the ad­min­is­tra­tive as­pect of it.

I was pleas­ant­ly sur­prised that the com­ment would have been made by cur­rent ex­ec­u­tive mem­bers who were par­ty to the present state of the game.

The fact that a re­view of the cur­rent dis­play of un­solved prob­lems was recog­nised by those in charge. So I asked, why would they wish to uti­lize the same per­son­nel to form the ad­vi­so­ry com­mit­tee?

What else could they have done which they would like to change?

The ab­solute con­fus­ing state of lead­er­ship across the board ap­peared to re­place in­tel­li­gent dis­cus­sions in ex­change for per­son­al­iza­tion, far less than con­struc­tive to mod­ern day sports man­age­ment. FI­FA had sent their ex­perts to lec­ture to the clubs in the var­i­ous leagues inT&T, to en­sure that they will re­turn to their vil­lages and turn the tide around for a bet­ter foot­ball ad­min­is­tra­tion.

Yes, there is a need for qual­i­fied per­son­nel who can take care­ful scruti­ny at the con­sti­tu­tion of the TTFA and make the as­sess­ment which ex­ist­ed with­in the rules and reg­u­la­tions.

This is not the first time that there was a need for the au­thor­i­ties to rewrite the con­sti­tu­tions of all the ma­jor sports in the years 1972-74.

What they would ob­serve in the cur­rent doc­u­ment (con­sti­tu­tion) it that it varies ap­pre­cia­bly, not so much in the or­tho­dox struc­tures which were de­fined, but the num­ber of changes which have brought the present con­di­tion to its demise.

It would take lit­tle or no time to recog­nise that the struc­tures which were writ­ten in­to the books by some of the most in­tel­li­gent men in ad­min­is­tra­tion in that era to de­tect, had ei­ther been mis­un­der­stood or brought changes which did not work.

The suc­cess­ful sports per­son­al­i­ties of the past have left com­pe­tence in foot­ball man­age­ment, much of which is no longer with us to fol­low be­fore it was de­stroyed by rule-break­ing which is the present rule of the day. It is re­placed by the use of un­nec­es­sary ar­gu­ments amount the cur­rent ex­ec­u­tive which have caused nu­mer­ous ar­gu­ments in what is sup­posed to be ex­ec­u­tive meet­ings ad­dress­ing con­cerns that would in­stead im­prove the qual­i­ty of the game and sports in gen­er­al.

The sports fans are still very pa­tri­ot­ic and ex­pect­ing to wit­ness the en­ter­tain­ing dis­plays which came out at the venues of all the ma­jor sports, every af­ter­noon in the past.

I won­der how many have been in­formed of the won­der­ful dis­play of both crick­et and foot­ball when the pop­u­lar teams com­pet­ed against each oth­er on the week­end for crick­et and af­ter­noons for foot­ball.

Where were the su­per for­eign ath­letes like Har­ri­son Dil­lard, Ben John­son, and oth­ers who graced our venues to match strides with the likes of Ed Roberts, Kent Bernard, Char­lie Joseph, Hase­ly Craw­ford, Wen­dell Mot­t­ley, Ed Skin­ner, Ains­ley Arm­strong and oth­ers? They were su­per­stars in our midst.

There was no time for mal­ad­min­is­tra­tion and word bash­ing among the com­pe­tent lead­ers of the sports as­so­ci­a­tion at that time of life.

The days have gone and un­for­tu­nate­ly, in­stead of our peo­ple try­ing to fol­low a pre­vi­ous path of suc­cess in ad­min­is­tra­tion, they pre­fer to take the course of want­i­ng to fight to be­come lead­ers in these fields, when, as we now know, how in­ca­pable they have turned out to be. If you doubt me, just look at the num­bers of na­tion­al sports who are lin­ing up be­fore the courts for one rea­son or an­oth­er.

Fi­nal­ly, if the ad­vi­so­ry is need­ed, please al­low our min­istry of sports to se­lect qual­i­fied per­son­nel to re­or­gan­ise the struc­tures if nec­es­sary and fol­low their path by way of hon­esty, good man­age­ment, and cre­ate the most com­fort and ded­i­ca­tion which our sports­men and women could ever have wished.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on August 23, 2019, 12:39:13 AM
Please save our football.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


Will some­one help save our foot­ball?

This is a ques­tion which I have heard asked by nu­mer­ous sup­port­ers of the great sport. Their re­quest though is not de­signed to cas­ti­gate the per­sons who may have been re­spon­si­ble for the com­pli­cat­ed state of the sport and com­pe­ti­tions them­selves.

Be­cause of the lim­it­ed space, I have to work with, it makes no sense for me to start from the be­gin­ning of the fi­as­co and send the game in­to a fur­ther con­fused state for which it is al­ready in.

What I am cer­tain about is that from the com­mence­ment of the As­cen­sion In­vi­ta­tion­al Foot­ball League, which brought at­tach­ment to the Pro League and the Su­per League, re­ports have in­di­cat­ed that it has run in­to fi­nan­cial prob­lems even be­fore its ini­tial match-sched­ule is com­plet­ed.

For those, who have any de­gree of knowl­edge con­cern­ing the of­fi­cial guid­ance which is be­ing fol­lowed and by whom has the au­thor­i­ty to make de­ci­sions re­gard­ing the com­pe­ti­tion, then pro­vide some as­sis­tance, it is need­ed.

Hon­est­ly, I be­lieve that the time is ripe for the Sports Com­pa­ny of T&T (SporTT), the Min­istry of Sports and the clubs, which have been en­gaged with any type of foot­ball tour­na­ment pre­vi­ous­ly con­trolled by the T&T Foot­ball As­so­ci­a­tion (TTFA), to get in­volved.

All we are hear­ing from mem­bers of the T League is for the gov­ern­ment to fund the League, a league which is un­able to ex­plain what fund­ing has been utilised by the com­mit­tee to date.

The As­cen­sion League match­es are giv­en good me­dia cov­er­age for the ef­fort to ex­pand its in­ter­est that will help lure the fans to match­es. How­ev­er, fans are not flock­ing the var­i­ous venues which means that that fundrais­ing as­pect of the project seems to have failed be­cause the in­for­ma­tion which has been passed to the me­dia has not en­ticed the peo­ple who sup­port foot­ball to trav­el to the var­i­ous match­es in great num­bers.

From a gen­er­al stand­point, the prob­lems of foot­ball and com­pe­ti­tions need a group of cho­sen per­son­nel whose knowl­edge in sports man­age­ment (plan­ning, fundrais­ing, ac­count­ing, mar­ket­ing) and most of all, those who need to ex­press the im­por­tance of in­volv­ing the pres­ence of com­mu­ni­ties as the foun­da­tion for any event to get in­volved to for­mu­late a plan which would change the cur­rent di­rec­tion of foot­ball and foot­ball man­age­ment in the coun­try.

If the present ad­min­is­tra­tors are not ca­pa­ble of do­ing as stat­ed above, please give oth­ers an op­por­tu­ni­ty be­fore our foot­ball reach­es a state where it is un­re­pairable like has been the cas­es in Zim­bab­we and Egypt where they are now lit­er­al­ly beg­ging the FI­FA to in­ter­vene to solve prob­lems which will help their foot­ball change its course of di­rec­tion and im­prove their com­pe­ti­tion blue­print.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Tiresais on August 23, 2019, 04:42:27 AM
Please save our football.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).

If the present ad­min­is­tra­tors are not ca­pa­ble of do­ing as stat­ed above, please give oth­ers an op­por­tu­ni­ty be­fore our foot­ball reach­es a state where it is un­re­pairable like has been the cas­es in Zim­bab­we and Egypt where they are now lit­er­al­ly beg­ging the FI­FA to in­ter­vene to solve prob­lems which will help their foot­ball change its course of di­rec­tion and im­prove their com­pe­ti­tion blue­print.

TT football is already at this stage. No professional football for 12 months, clubs ejected from continental competitions due to our glorious leader's inability to fill in bloody paper work, collapse of positive progress on the league, total disregard for the new constitution, fractures in the board that sees factionalism win over football, and they expected big attendances? I mean they're higher than the Pro League ever got, but there's precious little local attachment for a number of these clubs - why beg a community that you're not part of? We're rapidly reaching "scrap the whole bloody lot and rebuild" territory.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: maxg on August 23, 2019, 09:35:19 AM
Yes.. but now we have a home , just for this homelessness eventuality. Everybody find it nice, nice. Every other failings, club, National, regional, must be that Look Noise fella and his bandits, only bothering builders with questions and lawyers.. they so bad and mean  ::)


Add: I know TT ppl not foolish, but when it comes to hustle and cleverness- read smart man ting, UTT don’t have enuff certificates to hand out .  Not realizing how in the long run it’s devastating to the country. Therein lies the stupidity. It ain’t wrong if the successful fella with the money say it right .
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: asylumseeker on August 23, 2019, 12:03:02 PM
Please save our football.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).

If the present ad­min­is­tra­tors are not ca­pa­ble of do­ing as stat­ed above, please give oth­ers an op­por­tu­ni­ty be­fore our foot­ball reach­es a state where it is un­re­pairable like has been the cas­es in Zim­bab­we and Egypt where they are now lit­er­al­ly beg­ging the FI­FA to in­ter­vene to solve prob­lems which will help their foot­ball change its course of di­rec­tion and im­prove their com­pe­ti­tion blue­print.

TT football is already at this stage. No professional football for 12 months, clubs ejected from continental competitions due to our glorious leader's inability to fill in bloody paper work, collapse of positive progress on the league, total disregard for the new constitution, fractures in the board that sees factionalism win over football, and they expected big attendances? I mean they're higher than the Pro League ever got, but there's precious little local attachment for a number of these clubs - why beg a community that you're not part of? We're rapidly reaching "scrap the whole bloody lot and rebuild" territory.

Would it interest you to know that ...?

Under the Glorious Leader's watch, the TTFA is ONE of only three FIFA member associations within CONCACAF NOT to have been responsive to requested submissions from FIFA regarding reporting on club licensing and related club data.

The TTFA holds that honour with Montserrat and SVG.

Would it interest you to know that ...?

This absence of diligence came significantly before the exclusion from the CONCACAF Champions League ... and was not directly related to that sanction ... HOWEVER, had the Glorious Leader been attentive to the appropriate conditions on the ground in the office, the TTFA would have recognized that omission (or commission, assuming that the non-compliance was not instructed) as a harbinger of things and might have avoided the embarrassment.

One has to applaud the imagination of the Glorious Leader though ... not facilitating reporting when licensing and reporting go hand in hand.

It's notable that ... (let me quote with specificity) ... "... a number of reminders were sent ..." in this regard.

Between 2017 (http://ttfootball.org/2017/02/11/9953/)  and 2019 (https://www.socawarriors.net/concacaf-champions-league/21585-three-t-t-clubs-banned-by-concacaf.html) there was more than ample time for the Glorious Leader to put his house in order ... yet still the Letters to the Editor flow singing the Glorious Leader's praises. Building one Home, yet mashing up the one yuh live in must be a thing to be applauded.

Was Ms. Lynch scapegoated and dismissed merely because W Connection was one of the clubs that suffered DJW's self-inflicted wound? After all, other screw-ups have gone unpunished.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on October 19, 2019, 12:40:29 AM
Corneal expresses concern with T&T players.
By Ryan Bachoo (Guardian).


For­mer T&T foot­baller and now an­a­lyst of the game Alvin Corneal has slammed the self­ish­ness of some play­ers on the na­tion­al team fol­low­ing the lat­est 2-0 de­feat at the hands of Venezuela on Mon­day night in Cara­cas, Venezuela.

“From my ex­pe­ri­ences, I get the dis­tinct be­lief that some of them are not team play­ers. They are play­ing abroad and think ‘we are back home, and we are su­per­stars…’” Corneal said in an in­ter­view dur­ing CNC3’s The Morn­ing Shot on Fri­day.

He went fur­ther in nam­ing Seat­tle Sounders FC left-back, Jo­evin Jones, who plays for T&T in the same po­si­tion as one of the cul­prits. He said, “Jo­evin Jones is one in point, won­der­ful and tal­ent­ed foot­baller, but he wants to play for him­self and he wants to have his way, and be­cause of this we are los­ing a play­er of im­mense tal­ent and he’s on the side­line all the time.”

While Corneal was crit­i­cal of some of the play­ers, he de­fend­ed Den­nis Lawrence against grow­ing crit­i­cism. The T&T head coach has not won a game in 14 match­es which com­pris­es 10 de­feats and four draws, but Corneal said the is­sues go be­yond the field of play.

Corneal, a for­mer Maple stand out, and who al­so scored 69 goals in 119 ap­pear­ances for the na­tion­al team be­tween 1955- 1969 said, “Yes, he has not had good re­sults, but you got to look down the line be­cause the op­por­tu­ni­ties have not been giv­en to him to make him have all the tools to im­prove the qual­i­ty of Trinidad and To­ba­go’s foot­ball. We must un­der­stand that foot­ball is not on­ly on the field, but it’s al­so in the ad­min­is­tra­tive of­fices as well. It is the plan­ning that takes a lot of time and a lot of ef­fort for teams to be very co­he­sive.”

Corneal, a for­mer FI­FA in­struc­tor and tech­ni­cal an­a­lyst, went fur­ther in stat­ing that the for­eign-based play­ers have not prop­er­ly gelled with the lo­cals. He said, “Life, I know, is be­com­ing very dif­fi­cult for him be­cause he’s got choic­es to make of play­ers at home and play­ers abroad. That’s very dif­fi­cult be­cause these play­ers abroad are get­ting in­for­ma­tion dif­fer­ent­ly. There are dif­fer­ences be­tween coach­es and sys­tems.”

With five weeks left to the T&T Foot­ball As­so­ci­a­tion’s (TTFA) elec­tion, Corneal, who coached a Caribbean team from 1982-1983 and 1993-1994, was stern in his analy­sis that it doesn’t mat­ter if pres­i­dent David John-Williams is re­moved. He said, “If the con­sti­tu­tion is not dealt with be­fore the elec­tions then as far as I’m con­cerned, it doesn’t mat­ter who gets the pres­i­den­cy or any­thing else.”

In say­ing that com­mu­ni­ty foot­ball has been ne­glect­ed by the TTFA, Corneal stressed on the im­por­tance of con­sti­tu­tion­al change with­in the body. “If they go in­to the elec­tions with­out look­ing at that con­sti­tu­tion, they will be fight­ing a dead­ly bat­tle. Sim­ply be­cause, the fact that the con­sti­tu­tion of Trinidad and To­ba­go’s foot­ball has been pros­ti­tut­ed in every sin­gle way and no­body seems to wor­ry about what hap­pens there and now we wor­ry about what hap­pens on the field,” Corneal said.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: pull stones on October 19, 2019, 04:41:55 AM
This old dude is a DJW apologist or what? he needs to put blame where it rightfully belong. in this article he talks about defending dennis when dennis is the one overlooking good players to play the players that he likes, so when he gets flogged with the players he insists on, then who’s fault it is exactly? 

as for the players, if Alvin don’t know by now that’s how trini players are, they get besides themselves and very swellheaded with the littlest of success.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: maxg on October 19, 2019, 10:23:08 AM
This old dude is a DJW apologist or what? he needs to put blame where it rightfully belong. in this article he talks about defending dennis when dennis is the one overlooking good players to play the players that he likes, so when he gets flogged with the players he insists on, then who’s fault it is exactly? 

as for the players, if Alvin don’t know by now that’s how trini players are, they get besides themselves and very swellheaded with the littlest of success.
I get the impression, only your opinion and analysis matters. Anyway, although I don't agree with everything Alvin Corneal writes, have some respect even if he is an 'old dude'. He has played, coached and involved in more National football than most of us will ever experience in our lifetime. We tend to not give credence and disregard our past heroes and representatives while they are alive.
 Read, assimilate, agree or disagree but shouldn't be necessary to denigrate. We all get the(and your) DL point. I think Alvin just expressing an opinion, no one can know for sure what will be the correct answer.
God can pick our best players and Jesus coach the team, and look how as man, he get crucify- doh I not really a bible kinda guy- yet so many still believe and follow.
  Btw, what's YOUR plan ? Yes, Fire DL, replace DJW, revamp TTFA. Then we sure to win the next 5 of 10 ? I don't really think so nah. In your plan, include your coach suggestion, how you gonna pay him, players you select - hoping your coach selects the same players - and their incentives to them, given the situation we are in today, future program and technical development, financing, and finally time-frame for future successes. If we have a new coach today, would the your best team win the next 3 games ? If so, throw yuh candidacy hat in the ring, man. I sure you will get a ton of support with those guarantees you promise.  :beermug:
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: pull stones on October 19, 2019, 01:46:59 PM
This old dude is a DJW apologist or what? he needs to put blame where it rightfully belong. in this article he talks about defending dennis when dennis is the one overlooking good players to play the players that he likes, so when he gets flogged with the players he insists on, then who’s fault it is exactly? 

as for the players, if Alvin don’t know by now that’s how trini players are, they get besides themselves and very swellheaded with the littlest of success.
I get the impression, only your opinion and analysis matters. Anyway, although I don't agree with everything Alvin Corneal writes, have some respect even if he is an 'old dude'. He has played, coached and involved in more National football than most of us will ever experience in our lifetime. We tend to not give credence and disregard our past heroes and representatives while they are alive.
 Read, assimilate, agree or disagree but shouldn't be necessary to denigrate. We all get the(and your) DL point. I think Alvin just expressing an opinion, no one can know for sure what will be the correct answer.
God can pick our best players and Jesus coach the team, and look how as man, he get crucify- doh I not really a bible kinda guy- yet so many still believe and follow.
  Btw, what's YOUR plan ? Yes, Fire DL, replace DJW, revamp TTFA. Then we sure to win the next 5 of 10 ? I don't really think so nah. In your plan, include your coach suggestion, how you gonna pay him, players you select - hoping your coach selects the same players - and their incentives to them, given the situation we are in today, future program and technical development, financing, and finally time-frame for future successes. If we have a new coach today, would the your best team win the next 3 games ? If so, throw yuh candidacy hat in the ring, man. I sure you will get a ton of support with those guarantees you promise.  :beermug:
oh did I smash your corn? I take it you must be a senior citizen, well get this, it’s our elders ( hope it’s appropriate enough for you) who have us in this quagmire and they’re quite happy with the outcome from sports to quality of life in trinidad, and I see no one apologizing.

this is why we remain the boo boys of concacaf. we are quite happy with underachievement and mediocrity is our comfort zone. most rated teams in concacaf including El Salvador knows that when they’re coming to trinidad to play a home and away leg it’s easy points in the bag guaranteed, we are a low hanging tree and everyone knows that. they don’t feel that way going to Jamaica or haiti even though we have way more resources and facilities at our disposal to be a much better footballing nation than those two, yet we still suck at the technical and administrative level.

the USA lost a few games in the hex and missed out on the World Cup and their federation president handed in his resignation despite winning the gold cup countless times and going to the World Cup every time since 1990 and at our expense. for the past 25 years mexico has changed coaches for every world cup despite the success of those coaches by winning the gold cup and taking them to a world cup, is it any mystery why we struggle just to get a draw against these teams?


it’s poor thinking like mr corneal’s that have us hamstrung as a nation in totality, be it sports  quality of life  education  economics  technology  infrastructure  politics. the people who are in charge in this country and those who are appointed to high positions are only there as a means to an end. but please don’t take my word for it.

we went to a world cup for the first time and after the taste of success you would think that we would build on it, but jack warner had other plans. in his mind going to the world was a way of getting even richer in spite of setting our football back 20 years, and only for the good of his own pockets.

Raymond timkee was doing a decent job of getting our football out of the doldrums, yet it wasn’t even 4 years when our football fraternity decided he wasn’t working fast enough for them, as somehow we were entitled to more success than we were experiencing so they put DJW in the drivers seat, and this appointment proved disastrous as he took football back another 10 years. same could be said for politics and other areas of our existence. we are so prone to poor thinking.

pat manning had us on a treadmill to development but mrs persad bissessar had other ideas, she interrupted that progress under the pretext that she could do way better just like DJW, but it was only a means to an end, her intent was to steal and make her friends wealthier while destroying the good work that was put in place by the previous administration.

so please sir, not because I don’t live in trinidad means I don’t know the mentality of the people or what’s taking place there. I am there a few times a year and those people are not patriotic and could care less about that country. everyone is out for themselves or on the take and no one cares about service to nation, instead everyone is looking for handouts or a way to beat the system, in fact it’s quite sickening to behold.

it’s true that mr corneal has been in football for a very long time and has made his contribution, and he should be commended for his long standing service (point taken), but so did mr Sunil gulliati and el paco hernandez, but that didn’t stop their people from making plain how they felt about them? and i think I’m entitled to say what I feel about Alvin corneal without being made to feel like I’ve commited treason.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: maxg on October 19, 2019, 03:55:41 PM
What ? smash my corn.    :laugh:   Yup, i'm a senior citizen. Blasted elders. So  no suggestion, no plan. ok, carry on.
Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: pull stones on October 19, 2019, 11:21:08 PM
What ? smash my corn.    :laugh:   Yup, i'm a senior citizen. Blasted elders. So  no suggestion, no plan. ok, carry on.
first of all i’m nothing but a fan who has no power to change a single thing in trinidad be it political social or other wise, i guess you already know that. but what i do have is a say as a trinidadian who wants the best for his place of birth and how i’d like to see us progress as a tiny but blessed nation who has made very notable contributions to humanity and to ensure the children coming behind has a clear path to greater success.

i do have to confess that it pains me to see a little thriving nation with so much potential go to utter waste at the hands of clueless self serving educated fools who have no problem with watching our children underachieve and steam rolled by other nations who has way less than us.

when i tuned in to the under 15 games a few months ago and watched our young men trampled by venezuela and panama it hurt me to my core, and not that we loss the game, but because this has been going on for far too long and no one cares enough to fix it. it’s like being in the twilight zone where you’re trapped in a very predictable scenario that happens every time a big tournament comes around, and you’re powerless to stop it, and this tragedy happens at all age levels of our football and no one at the top has the testicular fortitude to say enough is enough and put an end to it. as it stands we’re just happy to send our children out there unprepared to be shamed and scoffed at like a side show.

We are too rich, too talented, too blessed with all the facilities and resources at our disposal to be lagging behind like this. and this is not a hard equation to figure out and solve, all it takes is people at the top who care enough to make the effort and get up off their asses and do something about it, and it’s an easy fix.......that is........if they’re bothered enough to get up off their fat asses and get it done.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: Flex on June 11, 2021, 02:13:45 PM
Corneal uncertain of Gold Cup qualification.
T&T Express Reports.


Gold Cup doubts

“Will they qualify for the CONCACAF (Gold Cup)? How can I tell you yes when they can’t beat Bahamas,” stated Alvin Corneal, the former Trinidad and Tobago national team footballer and coach.

The pressure to qualify for the 2021 Gold Cup in a month’s time has increased given T&T‘s early exit from Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup qualifying.

Should T&T qualify for the Gold Cup, head coach Terry Fenwick is guaranteed a two-year contract renewal and a salary upgrade to U.S. $25,000 a month, due to controversial clauses included in his contract when he signed a deal with the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA).

The Soca Warriors will play Montserrat from 9.30 p.m. on Friday, July 2 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Former Caribbean whipping boys Montserrat have adopted an organised team made up totally of England-born players and have improved significantly, drawing 1-1 recently and also three times losing by a single goal to El Salvador, while also holding Caribbean rivals Curacao, Antigua and Barbuda and St Lucia to draws in recent years.

Should T&T get by Montserrat, they will advance to a second playoff round at the same venue on Tuesday 6 July against the winners between Cuba and French Guiana. The winners of that tie go into the 2021 CONCACAF Gold Cup group stage, beginning with a preliminary match against giants Mexico, against whom T&T drew 4-4 with in their last Gold Cup outing in 2015. Corneal was speaking on the Alcons Recon podcast, dissecting T&T’s recent World Cup exit.

He anticipated that T&T will have to improve significantly to reach the Gold Cup. Some of hint of the needed improvement came in the final World Cup qualifier on Tuesday, a 2-0 win over St Kitts and Nevis. He said the previous 0-0 draw with the Bahamas was a huge disappointment.

“It was a horrible display of football by them. I make no apologies to say that, despite the fact that a number of these players have represented Trinidad and Tobago and they have played in various parts of Europe,” said Corneal (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7s0dseNXbag). They did not allow the Bahamas to realise that they should not even be on the same field with them when it comes to competitive play.”

And Corneal surmised that the Caribbean had lost out by having one of its few teams that can compete with the best team in CONCACAF, knocked out at such an early stage. “The last thing the Caribbean would want to hear is that the Bahamas threw Trinidad and Tobago out of the Qatar 2022 World Cup,” Corneal said.

Title: Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
Post by: pull stones on June 11, 2021, 02:27:25 PM
This minstrel is another part of the problem with football in TT, full of opinions but never got up off his ass and at least did something substantial for football. so what he had a coaching school, but did he have any top notch coaches, did they even has a proper base to develop players?

 oh Alvin please pack in man, you too has failed so as the rest of trinidad and tobago’s football fraternity with their tournament frenzy. you all fail to realize the sport need fixing before we could achieve any kind of success, so fix the blasted sport and stop complaining every six months when we lose a game.