Soca Warriors Online Discussion Forum

Sports => Football => Topic started by: Flex on July 16, 2017, 07:09:51 AM

Title: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on July 16, 2017, 07:09:51 AM
Six countries demand FIFA strip Qatar of 2022 World Cup, says Infantino
By ESPN Staff


Six countries that cut diplomatic ties with Qatar last month have demanded FIFA strip the Gulf state of the 2022 World Cup and threatened a boycott.

Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Mauritania, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt wrote to FIFA to ask that world football's governing body remove Qatar as hosts, FIFA president Gianni Infantino told Swiss website The Local, according to Reuters.

The countries all ties with Qatar last month, alleging that it supports Islamist militant groups, a charge Qatar has denied.

"The countries warned FIFA of the risks threatening fan and player security in a country that is 'the base and the castle of terrorism,'" the Local quoted Infantino as saying.

Infantino said the the countries cited Article 85 of the FIFA Code that allows changes to be made to World Cup hosts in case of emergency.

FIFA said in June amid the diplomatic crisis that it remains in "regular contact with Qatar."

Saudi Arabia qualified for four straight World Cups from 1994 to 2006 and could seal qualification for Russia 2018 in September. The UAE, qualifiers in 1990, maintain slim hopes of reaching Russia as well.

Egypt have not qualified for the World Cup since 1990 but are currently in position to reach Russia 2018 with four qualifiers remaining.

The other three nations have never qualified for the World Cup, though Bahrain reached the final intercontinental playoff before South Africa 2010.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on July 16, 2017, 07:59:56 AM
Bunch of hypocrites. Not that I am defending the manner in which they got the tournament.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: maxg on July 16, 2017, 12:50:25 PM
Bunch of hypocrites. Not that I am defending the manner in which they got the tournament.
why hypocrites doh ?
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on July 16, 2017, 01:09:41 PM
I say hypocrites because they want Qatar to bend to their demands. Close down Aljezera. And they accused Qatar of supporting terrorist activities. Don't the US have a base in Qatar. All the accusers making demands because Qatar on friendly terms with Iran. Sunni vs Shia.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: maxg on July 16, 2017, 02:40:24 PM
What wrong with this picture ?
https://www.google.ca/amp/www.aljazeera.com/amp/news/2017/07/trump-good-relations-qatar-170714230137824.html
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on September 11, 2017, 05:02:18 AM
David, Rougier want serious planning for 2022 W/Cup.
By Joel Bailey (Newsday).


FORMER NATIONAL footballers Steve David and Anthony Rougier have both called for serious planning to take place, at all levels, before Trinidad and Tobago embark on their 2022 FIFA World Cup campaign.

Trinidad and Tobago, under the guidance of coach Dennis Lawrence, were beaten 3-0 by hosts Panama on Tuesday to effectively end their dreams of qualifying for the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia.

Looking back at Tuesday’s game, David, the ex-T&T striker, said, “There is nothing to be really excited about. We changed our team, we had seven new players but no plan. They were just running around.” Rougier, the former national defender/midfielder, admitted that the Panama defeat was “a difficult one to swallow”.

He noted, “At the end of the day, football is in my blood, and I’ve always been a part of Trinidad and Tobago football programme.

We gave a valid effort in the early stages of the game and it went against us (thereafter).

The ex-national captain continued, “We have to now put the plan in motion now because I would like to think we had a plan before going into the Hex.

And now is the time we’ll need to see that plan come into fruition.

I don’t think we were solid favourites to go through (to Russia). I think we could have done better but now we have to concentrate on what’s next. And that’s the way we have to approach things now.” As far as the immediate future of TT football is concerned, from an administrative point of view, David stressed for a long-term plan to be put in place by the TT Football Association (TTFA).

“A long-term plan with the Under- 15 group to take us to, maybe eight years from now,” David said. “It seems as though we’re reinventing the wheel. We should plan better.” Rougier, when asked about the 2022 campaign, responded, “We (have) a new president (David John-Williams).

We had a new coach. So they had to come in with a plan (for the 2018 campaign). If we are now looking to find a plan, then we have missed the plot. I think we need to now continue the plan – I pray to God that we do have one – and that’s where we would see the opportunities of what we’ve been through and the experiences of what we’ve been through in the Hex.” He pointed out, “I believe that Dennis is a good guy. He would learn from that experience and I hope that we think that he can still be the man to take us forward.

And let’s hope that the Association gives him that chance.

It’s going to be a tough time for us now.” Stephen Hart was replaced as coach last November, with Belgian Tom Saintfiet having a short-lived stint, before Lawrence took over the mantle in January.

According to David, “(the changes) came at the wrong time, because we were already two games into this Hex.

I think they brought the new technical staff in and that was really a disaster, because they were jumping into a no-win situation.

“I think they should have let us finish with the old technical staff and, at the end of this, bring a new technical staff,” he added.

And Rougier stated, “The reality is the decision was made and we have to accept it. We have to look forward.

We can’t do anything with what has happened in the past. We can look back and see where we’ve made mistakes and make sure it doesn’t happen again. But we can learn from this.”

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on September 11, 2017, 06:19:43 AM
2022 WC?  We should be preparing for the CFU first. We have our priorities wrong at this moment. It should be CFU, GC, PanAM, Olympic, WC in that very order. We have to go back to crawling before walking. So ask DJW and DL what are their plans for the next CFU.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on March 14, 2019, 09:19:39 AM
What to expect from Friday's FIFA Council: 48-team 2022 World Cup, Global Nations League and more
By Gabriele Marcotti (ESPN)


The FIFA Council is the 37-member assembly that replaced the Executive Committee following the election of Gianni Infantino as the president of the game's governing body back in 2016. It includes representatives from each of the six confederations and is generally charged with making administrative and organizational decisions, some of which then need to be ratified by the FIFA Congress, meaning all 211 member nations.

They meet on Friday in Miami and have plenty on their plate. Three of the biggest concerns involve expanding the 2022 Qatar World Cup to 48 teams, revamping the Club World Cup into a quadrennial 24-team summer tournament and creating a "Global Nations League," following on from the success of the European version.

Here's a Q&A to make sense of what will happen when they convene.

Q: Let's start with the World Cup in Qatar. It's already a tiny country, what are they thinking in terms of cramming more teams and games into it?

A: Infantino says that because they already voted to expand the 2026 World Cup to 48 teams, they should look at doing the same in Qatar. Of course, 2026 will take place in Canada, the United States and Mexico, which jointly have nearly 200 times the population and more than 2000 times the area. And, in fact, FIFA's own feasibility study says it's logistically impossible to stage a 48-team tournament in Qatar without making it longer, something that has already been ruled out.

Q: So why are they even considering it?

A: Because that same feasibility study suggests that you could pull it off if you had another "two to four" venues with "one or more neighbouring countries."

Basically, if Qatar is willing to share some of its World Cup, it can expand to 48 teams in 2022. The problem is that Qatar has rather poor relationships with a number of nearby countries, most notably Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. All three accuse Qatar of supporting terrorism and have imposed a blockade on the country. Among other things, they have stopped all direct flights to Qatar.

Q: Looking at a map, I don't see too many other places where they can hold it...

A: The study cites 10 possible stadiums in the region, but seven of them are in countries currently blockading Qatar, which is obviously far from ideal. Then there are two in Kuwait and one in Oman; those are possibilities, except there isn't much time and, at the very least, they'd need to be refurbished. Either that or you persuade the Saudis and Emiratis to drop the blockade in the name of Gulf brotherhood.

Some of Infantino's enemies say that's his ultimate goal: to be able to sell the narrative that football leads to peace and win himself a Nobel Prize. In any case, that's what they'll be discussing and the expansion appears likely to be approved, either definitively or with a further green light at the FIFA Congress in Paris in early July.

Q: I'm guessing this is favoured by Infantino because it gives more countries a chance to play in the World Cup?

A: Exactly. Plus, according to the feasibility study, going to 48 teams in 2022 would generate an additional $400 million for FIFA -- Infantino is very big on increasing FIFA's revenues. He makes it a point of noting that disbursements to member nations for development purposes have increased four-fold since he's been in charge. It has been a mantra of his and he's sticking with it even though he's running unopposed for re-election.

Q: How many slots will be given to each confederation?

A: This will be contingent upon how many host nations we end up with, given they have traditionally been granted automatic qualification. Planning for the 2026 tournament, co-hosted by the United States, Mexico and Canada, at least gives us an idea in the event that Qatar does not go it alone. Like the question of which countries stage the tournament, the allocation is unlikely to be finalized until the FIFA Congress in July.

Q: Are there any other impediments to expansion?

It could be challenged by some countries and be used as a bargaining chip if Infantino doesn't get his way with the Club World Cup...

Q: OK, tell me about that...

A: Basically, he wants to replace the Confederations Cup with an expanded 24-team Club World Cup, to be held every four years, possibly as early as 2021. He thinks this would be a huge money-spinner. It would be held in June, with a single host nation and while the make-up of the invited teams is to be determined, you'd imagine at least six or eight will come from Europe and include the usual global heavyweights: Real Madrid, Bayern, Barcelona, Juventus, Manchester United and so on.

Q: Sounds great. What's the problem?

A: For a start, there's the fact that he rubbed UEFA and other confederations the wrong way when he first raised the proposal a year ago. Back then, he said he had a $25 billion offer over 12 years from unspecified investors -- which we later found out included the Saudi Sovereign Wealth Fund, i.e. the Saudi government -- to stage a quadriennial Club World Cup and biennial eight-team tournament for national teams, who would qualify via their confederations' respective Nations Leagues. And he said he needed approval within 60 days.

UEFA and others rejected this, feeling they were being strong-armed, particularly because he was offering so little information. Infantino's adversaries even went so far as to accuse him of "selling football," while his backers accused UEFA of kowtowing to rich European clubs who wanted to keep the summer for themselves so they could play in lucrative friendly tournaments, as well as protect the primacy of the Champions League.

Things got so bad that at the last council meeting, UEFA representatives threatened to walk out. Not only that, but there was talk of them staging their own version of a summer Club World Cup, possibly with South American clubs and possibly with the help of Relevent Sports, who organise the ICC.

Q: What has changed since then?

A: They've been working behind the scenes to hammer out some sort of deal. Infantino has the votes on the Council to force through a Club World Cup, but he knows it's better to get UEFA on board because without their support the leading clubs might even boycott his tournament. And that would make it close to worthless.

It should also be said that the original $25 billion offer is no longer on the table, at least not in its original form.

Q: Why is that?

A: Despite the success of the Nations League format in Europe, it hasn't really taken off elsewhere. CONCACAF have launched their version but other confederations have not yet done so and it's hard to see how they can make it work in the short-term.

Most likely, this part of the idea gets kicked down the road, but they'll still want to talk about the Club World Cup and in a recent interview, Reinhard Grindel -- head of the German FA and an influential FIFA Council member from UEFA -- said he thinks it will go ahead "if not for 2021, then certainly for 2025." He added that if FIFA don't do it, "somebody else will."

That's a pretty clear suggestion that UEFA are ready to back the proposal... but only if their terms are favorable. And that means you can expect some horse-trading and, potentially, a delay on the final decision -- not just for this, but for the 48-team World Cup, until the FIFA Congress in June.

Q: But that's when all this gets resolved, yes?

A: One way or another, yes, at least with regard to 48 teams in 2022. Infantino himself said that qualifying starts shortly thereafter, so they have to have a decision in place. There are other things bound to come up that could have a major impact on the game, but I'm not sure they will get resolved in Miami.

Q: Such as?

A: The single biggest is the International Match Calendar. It stipulates when the international dates are and when club football is played. The current calendar expires in 2024 and, as ever, there will be a feisty negotiation between clubs and federations.

There has been talk of having fewer international breaks but having them last longer, so the number of matches would be the same, but there would be less interruptions. And some want to see domestic football played midweek, with weekends left open for competitions like the Champions League.

There is also a raft of changes to how transfers are conducted, particularly the regulation of agents and limits on squad sizes, loans and the window. All of this will come into play, though most of it is unlikely to be resolved in Miami.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on June 18, 2019, 04:18:57 AM
Michel Platini detained over award of 2022 World Cup to Qatar
By David Conn, The Guardian


The banned former Uefa president and France football legend Michel Platini has been detained in connection with a criminal investigation into alleged corruption relating to Fifa’s decision to host the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, French justice sources have confirmed. Platini’s detention was first reported by the news website Mediapart on Tuesday morning, with Claude Gueant, the former secretary general of the Élysée Palace under the presidency of Nicolas Sarkozy, also being interviewed as a “free suspect”.

The arrest of Platini represents the first substantial public move in an investigation into the Qatar decision opened two years ago by France’s Parquet National Financier, which is responsible for law enforcement against serious financial crime.

Platini has acknowledged publicly that in November 2010, just a month before the Fifa vote on the 2018 and 2022 World Cup hosts, he had lunch at the Élysée Palace with Sarkozy and Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, now the emir of Qatar. It was made clear, he has said, that Sarkozy, who was seeking huge trade contracts with Qatar, wanted Platini to wield his Fifa vote and influence at Uefa in favour of Qatar for the 2022 tournament.

Questioned by the Guardian about his decision a fortnight ago in Paris before the Fifa congress, Platini insisted that he had already made his mind up to vote for Qatar. His son, Laurent, subsequently joined the Qatar sportswear company Burrda, owned by Qatar Sports Investments (QSI), which Platini has always denied had anything to do with his decision.

Platini did vote for Qatar, a vote, with others at Uefa, which the then Fifa president Sepp Blatter has always said were crucial to sending the tournament to Qatar rather than his preference, the USA. After the award, Qatar Airways ordered 50 French-made A320 neo-family planes made by Airbus, and QSI bought and mega-funded Paris Saint-Germain, the club Sarkozy supports.

Platini and Blatter were both banned by Fifa after Platini was paid 2m CHF by Fifa in 2011; both men argued it was in payment for Platini’s work as a Fifa football adviser, which he had finished nine years earlier in 2002.

Platini’s representative did not immediately respond to a request for comment following the arrest.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on June 18, 2019, 07:09:02 AM
It is really sad that this guy get caught up with Blatter and Jack. But it is what it is. He was an absolutely damned great player.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Tallman on July 10, 2019, 10:36:26 AM
Concacaf Announces Format for the 2022 FIFA World Cup Confederation Qualifiers
Concacaf.com


The Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football (Concacaf) today announced the format for the 2022 FIFA World Cup Confederation Qualifiers. The restructured competition will be composed of two parts, which will take place simultaneously during the FIFA-match windows in 2020 and 2021.
 
The first part of the Concacaf qualifiers, which will be played in a Hexagonal format, will be contested between the top six ranked Concacaf Member Associations based on the FIFA Ranking published after the FIFA window of June 2020. After home-and-away round robin play during the FIFA Match windows of September, October and November of 2020 and March and September of 2021, the top three teams will qualify directly to the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022™.

The second part of the qualifiers, played across a Group Stage and knockout phase, will involve the Concacaf Member Associations ranked 7-35 according to the FIFA Ranking published after the FIFA window of June 2020. For the group stage, these 29 participating Concacaf Member Associations will be divided into eight groups (five groups of four teams and three groups of three teams). After home-and-away round robin play during the FIFA Match windows of September, October and November of 2020, the first-place finishers in each of the eight group will qualify for the knock out stage.
 
The quarter finals, semifinals and final matches of the knock out phase will all be played in a home-and-away direct elimination format, during the FIFA Match windows of March, June and September 2021.
 
The winner of the knockout phase will face the fourth-place finisher of the Hexagonal group to determine the Concacaf representative in the FIFA intercontinental playoff. The home-and-away playoff matches between the two Concacaf representatives will take place during the FIFA Match Window of October 2021.

“The love for the game in this region is growing rapidly and our diverse and dynamic communities want a clear pathway to world-class football.  Through our freshly designed formats — across FIFA World Cup Qualifiers, Concacaf Nations League and Concacaf Gold Cup — we are staging more competitive international matches than ever-before to help these communities fulfill their potential,” said Concacaf President Victor Montagliani.
 
“This new FIFA World Cup Qualifying format, based on the FIFA rankings, makes every competitive match count.  Alongside the Concacaf Nations League, and our expanded Gold Cup, it will raise standards of play to unprecedented levels and develop the sport across the region.  Making the leading Concacaf nations stronger on the global stage, while giving our emerging footballing nations the chance to pursue their dreams of playing at a World Cup.”
 
The date, location and procedures for the draw which will determine the groups and match schedule for the Hexagonal will be announced later this year.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on July 10, 2019, 11:19:19 AM
Ranking is overrated.

Yet influential.

There it is.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: soccerman on July 10, 2019, 11:53:00 AM
Yup. Looks like we'll have to go the long route because I don't see us being ranked in the top 6 by next June.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on July 10, 2019, 01:49:27 PM
Big friggin deal.  We have to earn it. If they can't well too bad.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on July 10, 2019, 04:54:56 PM
Big friggin deal.  We have to earn it. If they can't well too bad.

Point taken, but the big friggin deal is that "we" (the TTFA) squandered our gains. Not marginal gains, but tangible gains. That's like walking up Hololo with a bucket of water on yuh head and then tossing de bucket when yuh reach de top ... only because yuh prefer carrying water in another bucket (also known as de calculus and economics of f**kery!)

Where Contro? :P

Without root and branch change we are not going to progress.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: 100% Barataria on July 10, 2019, 05:30:30 PM
Big friggin deal.  We have to earn it. If they can't well too bad.

Point taken, but the big friggin deal is that "we" (the TTFA) squandered our gains. Not marginal gains, but tangible gains. That's like walking up Hololo with a bucket of water on yuh head and then tossing de bucket when yuh reach de top ... only because yuh prefer carrying water in another bucket (also known as de calculus and economics of f**kery!)

Where Contro? :P

Without root and branch change we are not going to progress.

we are a stubborn lot...
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on July 11, 2019, 12:28:25 AM
CONCACAF changes W/Cup qualifying format.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


Lawrence: We have to treat every game as a fi­nal

T&T's chances of qual­i­fy­ing for the FI­FA World Cup in 2022 and be­yond have be­come in­creas­ing­ly hard­er.

The Con­fed­er­a­tion of North, Cen­tral Amer­i­ca and the Caribbean Foot­ball As­so­ci­a­tions (CON­CA­CAF) on Wednes­day an­nounced a new for­mat which could be a ma­jor both­er for T&T and the wider re­gion­al na­tions.

The re­struc­tured com­pe­ti­tion will com­prise of two parts, to take place si­mul­ta­ne­ous­ly dur­ing the FI­FA-match win­dows in 2020 and 2021.

The first part of the CON­CA­CAF qual­i­fiers, to be played in a Hexag­o­nal for­mat, will be con­test­ed among the top six ranked CON­CA­CAF Mem­ber As­so­ci­a­tions based on the FI­FA Rank­ing pub­lished af­ter the FI­FA win­dow of June 2020. Af­ter home-and-away round-robin play dur­ing the FI­FA Match win­dows of Sep­tem­ber, Oc­to­ber and No­vem­ber of 2020, and March and Sep­tem­ber of 2021, the top three teams will qual­i­fy di­rect­ly to the FI­FA World Cup Qatar 2022.

The sec­ond part of the qual­i­fiers, to be played across a Group Stage and knock­out phase, will in­volve the CON­CA­CAF Mem­ber As­so­ci­a­tions ranked 7-35 ac­cord­ing to the FI­FA Rank­ing pub­lished af­ter the FI­FA win­dow of June 2020. For the group stage, these 29 par­tic­i­pat­ing CON­CA­CAF Mem­ber As­so­ci­a­tions will be di­vid­ed in­to eight groups (five groups of four teams and three groups of three teams).

Af­ter a home-and-away round-robin plays dur­ing the FI­FA Match win­dows of Sep­tem­ber, Oc­to­ber and No­vem­ber of 2020, the first-place fin­ish­ers in each of the eight groups will qual­i­fy for the knock out stage.

Na­tion­al coach Den­nis Lawrence, in an im­me­di­ate re­ac­tion to the new for­mat yes­ter­day, said the change means they will have to play every game as a fi­nal. Lawrence, whose So­ca War­riors are ranked 10th in the CON­CA­CAF and 92nd in the world, said, "Based on the facts and the in­for­ma­tion pre­sent­ed, if you are ac­tu­al­ly in the top six ranked CON­CA­CAF teams on the Fi­fa rank­ings at this mo­ment, you’ll prob­a­bly be think­ing you’re in a favourable po­si­tion, and all you’ve got to do is pro­tect your sta­tus un­til June 2020."

He not­ed, "If you aren’t, then it means it will be a lot more dif­fi­cult in terms of the Road to Qatar 2022, and you’ve got a lot of work to do to try and get in­to the top six. If not, then you will have to bat­tle it out for a chance to have a go at the fourth spot."

Gi­ant Mex­i­co ex­pect­ed­ly leads the CON­CA­CAF re­gion, with the Unit­ed States in sec­ond and Cos­ta Ri­ca and Ja­maica se­cur­ing the third and fourth spots.

The oth­er teams Hon­duras (5th), El Sal­vador (6th), Pana­ma (7th), Cana­da (8th) and Cu­ra­cao com­pletes the six oth­er po­si­tions, but these are set to change when the new rank­ings that fol­low the just con­clud­ed CON­CA­CAF Gold Cup are re­leased.

Lawrence said, "It is dif­fi­cult, more than be­fore now for the teams ranked 7-35, and favourable for the top six ranked teams. We just have to see how it plays out. What it means now, and not that it wasn’t im­por­tant be­fore, it shows how huge­ly im­por­tant it is for us to do well in every game that we play be­tween now and June, in the FI­FA win­dows. Every game is like a fi­nal now to get in­to the Hex. If we want to im­prove on our rank­ings we have to get re­sults."

The quar­ter­fi­nals, semi­fi­nals and fi­nal match­es of the knock out phase will be played in a home-and-away di­rect elim­i­na­tion for­mat, dur­ing the FI­FA Match win­dows of March, June and Sep­tem­ber 2021.

The win­ner of the knock­out phase will face the fourth-place fin­ish­er of the Hexag­o­nal group to de­ter­mine the CON­CA­CAF rep­re­sen­ta­tive in the FI­FA in­ter­con­ti­nen­tal play­off. The home-and-away play­off match­es be­tween the two CON­CA­CAF rep­re­sen­ta­tives will take place dur­ing the FI­FA Match Win­dow of Oc­to­ber 2021.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: royal on July 11, 2019, 07:48:37 AM
CONCACAF just made it easier for the USMNT to qualify for the World Cup

While the United States women’s national team celebrated another victory at the World Cup, the men suddenly found it easier to reach theirs.

CONCACAF announced a revamp in its World Cup qualifying format, which should benefit the USMNT.

What are the changes? Primarily, the qualifying process will be split into two separate competitions, a hexagonal and a knockout phase. In cycles past, the hexagonal, or “Hex”, represented the final stage of qualifying with six teams playing a double round-robin to determine World Cup berths.

Only now, those six teams won’t have to play their way in. Instead, the Hex will be determined through the FIFA rankings published after the June 2020 window. In other words, the top six ranked teams from CONCACAF will just qualify automatically. From there, the top three finishers earn World Cup berths, and the fourth is still alive for another. We’ll get to that in a second.

So what do the rest of the teams in CONCACAF do? The teams ranked Nos. 7 through 35 will take part in the knockout phase, which will divide them into eight groups and pit the winners of each group against each other in a tournament, which will feature a two-leg elimination format.

The winner of this knockout competition will face the fourth-place finisher from the Hex, and then that winner will go to an inter-continental playoff to determine the 2022 World Cup berth, which has been a feature of cycles past as well.

Got all that?

Here’s the brass tacks for the USMNT. The FIFA rankings are determined through a complicated and frequently criticized point system, but the USMNT is basically always among the top six CONCACAF teams. In the most recent rankings, it’s 30th in the world and second only to Mexico in the region, and would need to fall 46 spots to miss out on the Hex. So even given the hideous failure of the 2018 qualifying cycle, the USMNT isn’t missing this upcoming Hex.

As pointed out by the good folks over at Total Soccer Show, instead of playing regional minnows in an effort to qualify for the Hex, the USMNT can now schedule better opposition in friendlies during international windows. They also won’t risk elimination at earlier stages of qualifying, although they’ve never failed to make the Hex anyway.

Even after a solid Gold Cup, the USMNT can’t strut around like World Cup qualification is a sure thing. But this news from CONCACAF sure doesn’t hurt.

(https://s3.yimg.com/lo/api/res/1.2/YfyFuELU_WZTRVflN2CJVg--/YXBwaWQ9eW15O3c9NjQwO3E9NzU7c209MQ--/https://media-mbst-pub-ue1.s3.amazonaws.com/creatr-images/2019-07/215d99c0-a334-11e9-beff-d235e2274a8c)
yahoo sports
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Trini _2026 on July 11, 2019, 01:42:23 PM
look how this got harder for us now  ..... we out of the top 6 and this is now a knock out series
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Trini _2026 on July 11, 2019, 01:45:42 PM
CONCACAF changes W/Cup qualifying format.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


Lawrence: We have to treat every game as a fi­nal



Na­tion­al coach Den­nis Lawrence, in an im­me­di­ate re­ac­tion to the new for­mat yes­ter­day, said the change means they will have to play every game as a fi­nal. Lawrence, whose So­ca War­riors are ranked 10th in the CON­CA­CAF and 92nd in the world, said, "Based on the facts and the in­for­ma­tion pre­sent­ed, if you are ac­tu­al­ly in the top six ranked CON­CA­CAF teams on the Fi­fa rank­ings at this mo­ment, you’ll prob­a­bly be think­ing you’re in a favourable po­si­tion, and all you’ve got to do is pro­tect your sta­tus un­til June 2020."





HE SEEMS CONFIDENT THAT HE WILL BE COACH STILL BY NEXT YEAR
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on July 11, 2019, 04:16:36 PM
look how this got harder for us now  ..... we out of the top 6 and this is now a knock out series

... which is why it is ENTIRELY farcical that Lawrence should remain the NT coach.

Parse his comments well and it is permeated with farce and crafted comments.

Not a thing against Dennis personally, there is a lot to respect about his accomplishments ... BUT on a point of order it is ridiculous that he could be maintained in the role of NT head coach to continue his on the job training, particularly in the face of the WC qualifying format. This particular road should not be his road to repair or to hoe.

 :shameonyou:
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Trini _2026 on July 12, 2019, 07:44:54 AM
Victor Montagliani is really somthing else  did members have to vote on this . ???crappy formatt ... mexico and usa have an easy bye .. he did some crap with the the under 20 last year then changed the under 17 format now this
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on July 12, 2019, 08:24:15 AM
Victor Montagliani is really somthing else  did members have to vote on this . ???crappy formatt ... mexico and usa have an easy bye .. he did some crap with the the under 20 last year then changed the under 17 format now this

It reflects DJW's prestige within CONCACAF.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on July 12, 2019, 08:34:48 AM
@Trini_2022, see a few nuggets below regarding your comment.

Quote
...

It is true that both the USMNT and Mexico always qualified for the Hex under the old system, but at least they had to earn their way in by winning actual matches against direct competitors—something the U.S. came close to failing at ahead of the 2018 World Cup. And even more to the point, at least the old system gave CONCACAF’s mid-tier nations a real shot to challenge for entrance to the Hex and the World Cup beyond.

It’s that mid-tier group of CONCACAF nations just below the U.S. and Mexico that get the shortest shrift in the new format. Before, CONCACAF’s middle class knew they would be given a direct shot against their betters to win their way into the Hex, and upon doing so, pushing in the Hex for an automatic World Cup qualification spot. Now, a team could be kept away from all the Hex’s automatic qualification spots by a handful of aggregate rankings points, and then forced to try and climb through the muck of the 7-35 tournament in hopes of maybe possibly getting the chance to enter two different playoffs.

This is no idle worry, either. As of right now, the CONCACAF teams ranked six through nine (El Salvador, Panama, Canada, and Curaçao) are split by only 10 slots on the world rankings, from 69 to 79. If the confederation used the current rankings to decide the Hex participants, Panama—you know, the team that killed it in the last Hex and won one of the automatic qualification spots to make it to the 2018 World Cup—would miss out by a mere six spots. When the margins are so small, and the FIFA rankings of such dubious value and accuracy, it seems crazy to decide not to pit those teams against each other on the field of play and to instead leave it all up to whatever FIFA’s algorithm barfs up.
...

In another way, though, the form of the new qualifying rules might imply something about the future direction of CONCACAF. While they might not make total sense in sporting terms, as a political move, the new tweaks are savvy. Confederation president Montagliani has done the two mega-powers of CONCACAF a solid by making it a little easier for them to make it to Qatar. At the same time, he’s made good on his promise to bring home some bacon to his large number of constituents at the bottom rung of the confederation. In doing so, Montagliani shores up his position amongst the nations of little power but with a vote that counts as much as anyone else’s, while also strengthening his ties with the true power players at the top so that he stays in their favor.

Looking at it that way, Montagliani’s political strategy as president is the same one that’s proven so successful in the infamously sleazy and venal world of international soccer since the dawn of FIFA: the top and the bottom working together against the middle.

www.deadspin.com/concacafs-new-world-cup-qualifying-format-makes-it-hard-1836250950

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Trini Madness on July 12, 2019, 10:56:24 PM
On one hand, the US and Mexico have it nice and easy while the rest are crabs in a barrel. On the other hand, us crabs are getting competitive games, real cut throat games where we have no choice but to perform. As for the US and Mexico, yea they'll get good friendlies but the teams they play wont go at them full velocity. That's how I see things...
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Brownsugar on July 14, 2019, 07:01:28 AM
@ Trini_2022....change yuh handle one time..... ::) :banginghead: :frustrated: :yellowcard:
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: maxg on July 14, 2019, 09:34:44 AM
@ Trini_2022....change yuh handle one time..... ::) :banginghead: :frustrated: :yellowcard:
:D :rotfl:
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: lefty on July 14, 2019, 12:00:44 PM
@ Trini_2022....change yuh handle one time..... ::) :banginghead: :frustrated: :yellowcard:
:D :rotfl:
ENT!!!!!HAHAHAHA ;D ;D ;D :rotfl: :banginghead:
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on August 08, 2019, 12:26:30 AM
CONCACAF could destroy World Cup spirit
By Gary Griffith (Guardian).


Caribbean foot­ball fans con­tin­ue to de­bate CON­CA­CAF's re­cent de­ci­sion to seed the top six FI­FA-ranked coun­tries in­to a six-team pool which will play next year for the top three au­to­mat­ic 2022 World Cup spots avail­able to the re­gion. This will see the top three teams go­ing to Qatar while the re­gion’s oth­er teams, among them the 29 Caribbean coun­tries, for the right to play for a re­main­ing half spot, with the win­ner still fac­ing a coun­try from an­oth­er re­gion in a fi­nal play­off to earn a berth on the world’s biggest foot­ball stage.

Many have ar­gued this is elit­ist and will be the death of Caribbean foot­balling na­tions.

Guardian Me­dia Sports Desk in­ves­ti­ga­tions have al­ready re­vealed that CFU mem­bers seemed un­aware that this for­mat, put for­ward some two years ago as a pro­pos­al, had ac­tu­al­ly been agreed to and fi­nalised be­fore it was an­nounced by CON­CA­CAF last month. CFU mem­bers may al­so pos­si­bly soon lob­by for a re­view of the de­ci­sion if TTFA pres­i­dent David John-Williams, who re­port­ed­ly was against the move, can con­vincd them to do so.

Com­mis­sion­er of Po­lice gary Grif­fith, an avid foot­ball fan whose son al­so plays at the na­ton­al lev­el, has added his voice to the dis­cus­sion. To­day, Guardian Me­dia presents his ar­gu­ment.
 
CON­CA­CAF dream killers would de­stroy the spir­it of what World Cup Foot­ball stands for, if not stopped.

The de­ci­sion by a hand­ful of in­di­vid­u­als in CON­CA­CAF to vir­tu­al­ly ma­nip­u­late the sys­tem by us­ing their po­si­tion to al­ter the qual­i­fy­ing for­mat for the 2022 World Cup CON­CA­CAF qual­i­fi­er must be ex­posed and stopped, with the im­me­di­ate in­volve­ment of FI­FA, if good sense does not pre­vail at CON­CA­CAF lev­el.

The clan­des­tine de­ci­sion, main­ly by those who hold posts in CON­CA­CAF to jet­ti­son their own coun­tries in­to a safe zone and by­pass the rig­ors of qual­i­fy­ing through ini­tial pre­lim­i­nary rounds, is noth­ing short of abuse of pow­er, and is in to­tal con­trast to all that World Cup Foot­ball stands for, which is for small na­tions to dream big.

This ridicu­lous for­mat be­ing de­cid­ed up­on, by a hand­ful of CON­CA­CAF mem­bers is vir­tu­al­ly killing the as­pi­ra­tion of small na­tions to dream big, hence de­stroy­ing all that World Cup Foot­ball is about, as it is more than just foot­ball, but al­so al­low­ing mil­lions of cit­i­zens from 29 oth­er coun­tries to sim­ply try, hope and to be­lieve.

This base­less and bi­ased for­mat in­tends to de­stroy just that.

To put it in­to a sim­ple per­spec­tive, the for­mat high­light­ed be­low has been used for decades by the oth­er Re­gions in World Cup Foot­ball qual­i­fi­ca­tion, with these Re­gions all hav­ing ex­pe­ri­enced far greater suc­cess than our CON­CA­CAF Re­gion, via re­sults, and some hav­ing even few­er teams than CON­CA­CAF. How­ev­er, they are ma­ture enough to un­der­stand the val­ue of a lev­el play­ing field, some­thing which seems be­yond the un­der­stand­ing of those who make de­ci­sions on be­half of CON­CA­CAF.

The for­mat used for decades is still to be used in 2022 by the fol­low­ing Re­gions for qual­i­fy­ing in Eu­rope, Asia, South Amer­i­ca, and Africa, which in­volves every­one be­ing on a vir­tu­al lev­el play­ing field from the start of qual­i­fy­ing, as this is what World Cup Foot­ball stands for; every­one hav­ing an equal op­por­tu­ni­ty and not as CON­CA­CAF of­fi­cials ap­par­ent­ly see it, with some be­ing more equal than oth­ers.
 
The for­mat of a lev­el play­ing field al­so en­gi­neers a struc­ture to en­sure de­vel­op­ment and growth by so-called weak­er coun­tries, hence, the gap is clos­ing on a reg­u­lar ba­sis be­tween great teams and weak­er teams in all oth­er re­gions, thus mak­ing the de­vel­op­ment of foot­ball in those re­gions more ef­fec­tive.

It may ap­pear that cer­tain CON­CA­CAF of­fi­cials, seem wor­ried about this and are in­tent on us­ing this new bi­ased for­mat to de­stroy such a pos­si­bil­i­ty.

The con­trast is glar­ing:

Eu­rope - [UE­FA] - 54 teams, with the great­est suc­cess in World Cup, and al­so the largest mar­gin of rank­ings, but a lev­el play­ing field is pro­vid­ed from Day One in qual­i­fy­ing, as all 54 teams are placed in 9 groups of 6 teams each, with Bel­gium ranked Num­ber One in the world, be­ing placed in qual­i­fy­ing along the same lev­el as San Mari­no, ranked 211th, the low­est in the world. UE­FA un­der­stands the val­ue of this, not just for the weak­er teams, but for the over­all de­vel­op­ment of foot­ball in their re­gion.

South Amer­i­ca [CON­MEBOL] - Like­wise, with enor­mous World Cup suc­cess, but with on­ly cer­tain na­tions. How­ev­er, like Eu­rope, there is no easy pas­sage to slip in­to the World Cup Fi­nals, based on past track record. All 10 coun­tries start on a lev­el play­ing field, from Brazil, ranked 2nd in the world, vy­ing for a spot from Day One in qual­i­fy­ing, with the low­est-ranked team in this re­gion, be­ing Bo­livia ranked 73rd.

Asia [AFC] - No lu­di­crous for­mat like CON­CA­CAF, of teams, get­ting a safe pas­sage to the fi­nal round, but every coun­try fight­ing from day one in Qual­i­fiers, with 40 teams be­ing di­vid­ed in­to 8 groups of 5 teams, in­clu­sive of the high­est-ranked Japan,[ 28th], be­ing on par with Sri Lan­ka, ranked 201st.

Africa- [ CAF] - A Re­gion com­pris­ing 54 teams, with the low­est-ranked 28 teams play­ing a home and away, and the 14 win­ners im­me­di­ate­ly be­ing placed in a lev­el play­ing field with the oth­er 26 teams, hence Sene­gal, ranked 20th, could be along­side Chad, ranked 175th, from the sec­ond round.

CON­CA­CAF- Now com­pare this to what can on­ly be de­scribed as a back­room de­ci­sion made by CON­CA­CAF, be­cause it is in­con­ceiv­able that 29 coun­tries out of the 35, would agree to such a bi­ased de­ci­sion, by de­cid­ing that the 6 high­est ranked teams, none ever hav­ing even reached a World Cup semi­fi­nal, would now be just jet­ti­soned in­to a fi­nal round with­out play­ing a sin­gle world cup qual­i­fy­ing game, and get­ting 3 au­to­mat­ic spots out of 6 teams, and leav­ing the 29 re­main­ing coun­tries to fight for one lone spot to play the 4th placed team in the self-ap­point­ed elite group of 6 for a play­off spot, to then par­tic­i­pate in an­oth­er play­off game, against an­oth­er coun­try from an­oth­er Re­gion for a spot in the World Cup Fi­nals.

So a team that is ranked 6th in CON­CA­CAF, present­ly be­ing El Sal­vador, that is ranked 68th in the world rank­ings, can get an easy pas­sage to a group of 6 teams with 3 au­to­mat­ic spots for a World Cup Fi­nal qual­i­fi­ca­tion; while a team ranked just be­low the 6th ranked team, in 7th or 8th ranked Pana­ma, [ranked 74th in the world], or Cana­da, [ranked 78th], now hav­ing to fight with 29 teams for half a spot.

What makes it even more lu­di­crous, is that such a de­ci­sion should have been told to Na­tion­al team coach­es and Ad­min­is­tra­tions in ad­vance. As some coach­es, not know­ing that there would be a rank­ing sys­tem to get a fast pass in­to the fi­nal hexa­gon round, have been us­ing friend­ly games and Tour­na­ments against much stronger op­po­nents, not as a com­pet­i­tive na­ture or even be­ing too con­cerned of the re­sult, but us­ing it as a tri­al and er­ror for­mat to find the right mix of play­ers in prepa­ra­tion for qual­i­fi­ca­tion. By not let­ting them know in ad­vance that even friend­ly games would now be an av­enue to World Cup qual­i­fi­ca­tion via rank­ing is bla­tant­ly un­fair and can be seen as foot­ball am­bush­ing.

Where­as some have been at­tempt­ing to vir­tu­al­ly bul­ly their way for decades in this foot­ball re­gion, this de­ci­sion, how­ev­er, is the last straw, where­by the 29 coun­tries, not just from the Caribbean but al­so oth­er CON­CA­CAF na­tions such as Cana­da, Guatemala, Be­lize and Nicaragua, need to stand up to put an end to this dra­con­ian rule by a few, that is af­fect­ing foot­ball de­vel­op­ment in the re­gion. One won­ders if this is a fear fac­tor by so-called big coun­tries, af­ter a small coun­try knocked one of them out of the World Cup in 2018, and they are do­ing what they can, out­side the field of play, to pre­vent a re­peat.

And to any Caribbean coun­try that de­cides to jump on this band­wag­on now be­cause of where they may be ranked at this time, I humbly ask them to re­mem­ber that this rank­ing is very flu­id, as "to­day might be for you and to­mor­row for me", which is not what World Cup foot­ball stands for, and how one should have an eas­i­er pas­sage to such a pres­ti­gious tour­na­ment.

Some may ask what is my con­cern and in­volve­ment in this, as a Po­lice Com­mis­sion­er from Trinidad and To­ba­go.

I would not ven­ture in­to stat­ing that sport, through prop­er de­vel­op­ment, can as­sist in crime re­duc­tion, or that I was part of the Tech­ni­cal Staff of the Na­tion­al Team in the 2018 World Cup Qual­i­fi­ca­tion cam­paign, or that I saw what qual­i­fy­ing for the World Cup Fi­nal did for my coun­try in 2006.

In­stead, I would say that I am a sim­ple sup­port­er, who is just as con­cerned as the tens of mil­lions of cit­i­zens/sup­port­ers from dozens of Caribbean coun­tries see­ing a grave in­jus­tice be­ing done, to de­stroy dreams of na­tions, due to the tun­nel-vi­sioned think­ing of a hand­ful of per­sons who present­ly hold the of­fice.

It is hoped that the vast ma­jor­i­ty of CON­CA­CAF, be it, foot­ball of­fi­cials and sup­port­ers, stand up to this foot­ball bul­ly­ing, and to ad­vise these so-called stronger na­tions to stop be­ing cow­ards and come up and fight for their spot in the World Cup Fi­nals like any­one else.

Do not let one elim­i­na­tion by a small coun­try, cause you to lose fo­cus on what is right for foot­ball.

To the few who may claim that this bi­ased for­mat is jus­ti­fied be­cause their team is bet­ter than us,  they may even be cor­rect, but show that su­pe­ri­or­i­ty not via hav­ing rep­re­sen­ta­tives in a board­room, who would use a world rank­ing to by­pass pos­si­ble em­bar­rass­ment.

If you want to make your coun­try great again, (in foot­ball), then do not do so, via a board­room de­ci­sion.

Do it on the foot­ball field, where the play­ing field is lev­el.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: soccerman on August 08, 2019, 07:30:57 AM
Get them Gary! I'm not in favor of this Concacaf's current format at all and do agree that every country should be given an equal chance of qualifying at the start. Surely they can come up with a better format, just don't like the idea of 29 countries fighting for a half a spot.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on August 08, 2019, 02:28:06 PM
Get them Gary! I'm not in favor of this Concacaf's current format at all and do agree that every country should be given an equal chance of qualifying at the start. Surely they can come up with a better format, just don't like the idea of 29 countries fighting for a half a spot.

Gary for TTFA PRESIDENT. NOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on April 15, 2020, 08:43:06 AM
Blatter suggests 2022 World Cup could be moved to US, other countries
Kyle Bonn
NBC Sports


Former FIFA president Sepp Blatter, who is serving a six-year ban from football, has stated that the awarding of the 2022 World Cup to the United States or other well-developed countries is still a possibility after fresh corruption charges were brought forth by the U.S. Department of Justice.

Last week, Russia and Qatar both released statements denying the charges, but formal proceedings could potentially push through change regarding the upcoming tournament host where years of speculation and conjecture could not.

In an interview with German publication Sport Bild, Blatter inferred that change is still possible and laid out a short list of countries who would be capable of hosting on short notice.  Referencing the joint-bid for the United States to host the 2026 World Cup with Canada and Mexico beginning an expanded field, Blatter suggested that could be formally moved forward.

“Germany could do it. But this would mean the World Cup being staged in Europe again after 2018,” Blatter said. “Europe therefore would not be first choice. The United States could do it instead of 2026. They are capable, it’s not rocket science! Japan could also do it. They also bid to host the 2022 World Cup.”

“Fortunately, the 2022 World Cup will only have 32 teams and not 48 as [FIFA president Gianni Infantino] had planned. The organisational effort would not be bigger than 2018.”

There would still be massive logistical roadblocks to this. As Blatter mentioned, the upcoming 2022 tournament is not yet featuring an expanded field, so filling out a scheduled also playing games in Mexico and Canada could be troublesome with fewer games. If only the United States hosted in 2022 and the 2026 bid was reopened, Mexico and Canada could be left out in the cold, which would clearly not go over well.

Qatar’s denial of the latest allegations was forceful, although their defense continues to shift from “we didn’t do anything wrong” to “you can’t prove it.”

“Despite years of false claims, evidence has never been produced to demonstrate that Qatar won the rights to host the FIFA World Cup 2022 unethically or by means that contravened FIFA’s strict bidding rules,” said the Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy in a statement. “The SC maintains that it strictly adhered to all rules and regulations for the 2018/2022 FIFA World Cup bidding process and any claim to the contrary is baseless and will be fiercely contested.”

Still, the pressure is mounting on Qatar to prove its innocence, and the murmurs continue about whether they will actually prove a viable host.

Title: T&T gets improved 2022 World Cup qualifying chance
Post by: Tallman on May 06, 2020, 09:11:59 PM
T&T gets improved 2022 World Cup qualifying chance
By Nigel Simon (T&T Guardian)


T&T Soca Warriors are set to be handed a much-improved chance at qualifying for the Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup thanks to the coronavirus pandemic.

This after it was stated that Concacaf’s 2022 World Cup qualifying format to determine which three teams earn direct tickets to Qatar and which one will head to an inter-continental playoff is expected to change due to the impact of the COVID-19.

The expected change in the qualifying process has come out due to the delays caused by the virus which has forced sporting activities worldwide to grind to a halt since mid-March and was stated by Concacaf president, Victor Montagliani while speaking on One Soccer's Inside the Game with Gareth Wheeler on Tuesday night in Toronto, Canada.

Before the coronavirus outbreak the top six Concacaf teams in the FIFA rankings as of June 2020 (Mexico, USA, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Honduras,  El Salvador) were expected to enter into the Hexagonal (six-team) final round, featuring a round-robin format with tenth-ranked T&T set to compete with 28 other countries for the lone playoff-spot to compete against the fourth-placed team in the  "Hex".

Among the other teams due to compete for the one spot were seventh-ranked Panama (7th), Canada (8th) and Curacao (9th).

However, FIFA vice-president Montagliani confirmed that the upcoming qualifying for the 2022 World Cup the “Hex” in its current form on the balance of probabilities will change due to delays from COVID-19.

The "Hex" was set to start in early September, with the fourth-place team squaring off with the winner of the 29-team second-tier event in October 2021. The winner of that playoff would then oppose a team from Asia, South America or Oceania in March 2022 for a spot in the World Cup, later that year.

But those plans are complicated by the fact that FIFA cancelled its scheduled international-match windows in March and June, and the September international date might end up being scratched, too, depending on when domestic leagues can restart.

At the moment, it is unclear if Concacaf would have time to hold a full ten-game "Hex" in addition to the subsequent playoffs.

Montagliani said, "We will be reformatting the current one, so we are going to have 35 countries, and until we know from FIFA how many windows we have it's going to be very hard for me to say what it will be like.

"I think one of the things we have to keep in mind is that whatever the format is we have to keep in mind is sporting integrity.

"Yes, we are going to have to use FIFA rankings to start somewhere because that's the reality of our confederation, and in terms of having 35 countries, which is a weird number to start with, means we will have to do some sort of elimination process and then eventually get into some group stage process.

"But I don't' know that yet until we know what the FIFA calendar is going to look like."

Asked if the "Hex" as we know it today or yesterday may not exist in the same way at least for this qualifying phase based upon how everything has played out Montagliani replied, "Yeah, I think on the balance of probabilities in terms of what has happened so far and what likely will continue to happen, the current World Cup qualify format will have to change which means automatically that the "Hex" will have to be changed to some other form.

"It will be bigger, but what that number is I don't know until we have a calendar.

"If we look at the old format, it will not allow us to play all those games in sequence, so going forward with the expected changed format we will have to use the FIFA rankings at some point to put teams somewhere.

"But for me to put teams into the old format of the "Hex" or no "Hex"  using a FIFA ranking when nobody has played football for almost nine months, ten months or whatever it will end up being to me, an integrity issue," said the former Canada football boss who noted that several people asked why the format of going from Nations League to World Cup qualifying could not be used, but he admitted they were not allowed to.

 "The TV rights of the World Cup qualifiers are sold by each country to third parties and the Nations League is owned by Concacaf and that's how we pay for teams expenses during that period as teams don't pay a dime.

"We could not use our products for World Cup qualifying calendar, and so that's how we came to that system, and it wasn't based on helping out anybody."

Looking towards the near future, a hopeful Montagliani said that Concacaf was now at the table with FIFA and other confederations to decide on what this new calendar will look like moving forward because they have no idea right now.

Newly appointed T&T coach, former England World Cup defender Terry Fenwick was delighted by the expected change.

He told Guardian Media Sports On Wednesday, "I thought FIFA and Concacaf, by extension, were trying to move us in the wrong direction away from what is positive for the Caribbean nations. So I'm pleased that we have run out of time and things will remain as is at the moment and I am waiting to see what comes in the not too distant future," said the former T&T Pro League-winning coach with San Juan Jabloteh and Central FC."

He said, "I thought the format which was to be implemented alienated a lot of the Caribbean national teams like T&T and I wasn't in favour of that change at all as it was, and I much prefer it as it was before. Despite the imminent change, Fenwick said he still expects it to be a tough road ahead in the qualifiers saying: "We have to recognise that we are up against the might of USA, Mexico and emerging teams like Canada who have had a three-to-four year development programme that's starting to pay off."
Title: John, Sancho delighted with "Hex" reshuffle
Post by: Tallman on May 08, 2020, 09:55:27 PM
John, Sancho delighted with "Hex" reshuffle
By Nigel Simon (T&T Guardian)


Former T&T World Cup duo, striker Stern John and defender Brent Sancho, expressed their delight with the news that existing qualifying format with regards to the "Hex" is expected to change for the FIFA 2022 World Cup in Qatar due to the coronavirus pandemic which has greatly affected this year's FIFA international football calendar.

The pair were speaking on Friday at the re-opening of the refurbished St James Police Barracks Training Academy football field which underwent an $800,000 upgrade by Landscaping & Central Contracting Company Limited.  

Before the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the top six Concacaf teams in the FIFA rankings as of June 2020 (Mexico, USA, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Honduras,  El Salvador) were expected to enter into the Hexagonal (six-team) final round, featuring a round-robin format from which the top three teams will earn direct tickets to Qatar, while the fourth-place finisher in the "Hex" was set to first contest a playoff with the 29 other Concacaf nations who were to compete for one spot after which that playoff winner was due to compete in an inter-continental playoff against either Asia, South America or Oceania for a World Cup spot.

As it stood, T&T, ranked tenth in Concacaf,  along with 28 other nations who are illegible to compete in Concacaf, were due to battle it out for the right to battle the fourth-place team from the "Hex".

However, on Tuesday, Concacaf president Victor Montagliani speaking on One Soccer’s Inside the Game with Gareth Wheeler in Toronto, Canada, confirmed that the upcoming qualifiers for the 2022 World Cup, the “Hex” in its current form on the balance of probabilities will change due to delays from COVID-19.

The “Hex” was set to start in early September, with the fourth-place team squaring off with the winner of the 29-team second-tier event in October 2021. The winner of that playoff would then oppose a team from Asia, South America or Oceania in March 2022 for a spot in the World Cup, later that year.

Montagliani noted that those plans have been complicated by the fact that FIFA cancelled its scheduled international-match windows in March and June, and the September international date might end up being scratched, too, depending on when domestic leagues can restart.

A FIFA vice-president as well, Montagliani said: "We will be reformatting the current one, so we are going to have 35 countries, and until we know from FIFA how many windows we will have it’s going to be very hard for me to say what it will be like.

On the expected reformatting of the qualifiers, John and Sancho who were members of the Leo Beenhakker-coached national team at the 2006 FIFA Germany World Cup, expressed the belief that the new format will work in T&T's favour.

Sancho said, "We definitely have gotten a reprieve because as it stood before we were basically out of the World Cup due to the little chance we had. Now obviously with the COVID-19 and the havoc it has played and will continue to play on the FIFA international window, it certainly gives us a chance back into the main phase.

"But for us, we first have to get our house in order, of course, Yes the news that Concacaf and FIFA have to do a reconfiguring of the draw will give us a better chance at qualification to the World Cup, but it will remain a difficult proposition for us.

"This is because we have seen a lot of improvement from not just the normal powers like the USA, and Mexico, but you can look at teams like Panama, El Salvador, Canada and Honduras have all been showing tremendous strides in international football and pulling off some great results over the last two years or so.

"Then we have the Caribbean Football Union nations like Jamaica, and Haiti who have been doing quite well, so I think that even though the format will change I still think it will be a daunting task for us and we have a lot of work to do. But with that being said we may still have been presented with a greater possibility of qualifying than before.

 John, T&T's all-time leading goalscorer with 70 goals from 115 international matches, to be joint 15th on the FIFA all-time for players with their national teams, was quick to note that it will present the national team with a greater opportunity.

"Now that' the format is expected to change and the schedule will be pushed back it will a great opportunity for us and we will have a better chance to qualify for whatever the final stage or new "Hex" will look like," said John, who was an assistant coach to former national coach and fellow World Cup team member Dennis Lawrence.

"So it's up to us now as I believe most of the countries are experiencing the same setbacks due to the coronavirus pandemic, so we will have to come out and hit the ground running when the all-clear is given for the return to international football and work away to getting back into the top segment of Concacaf football where I think we deserve to be."
Title: Eve, Morris feel T&T could have better chance to reach 2022 World Cup
Post by: Tallman on May 10, 2020, 11:30:11 AM
Eve, Morris feel T&T could have better chance to reach 2022 World Cup
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express)


The hope is that the yet-to-be-revealed Concacaf Zone qualifying format for the Qatar 2022 FIFA Men’s World Cup will be a more equitable and open one, which gives all 35 participants a chance at qualifying.

Former national footballers Clayton Morris and Angus Eve, both agree that the plan to scrap the current controversial qualifying system for Qatar benefits Caribbean teams. Former Trinidad and Tobago technical director Anton Corneal felt it was quite too early to comment meaningfully, but acknowledged that the originally planned qualifying system “was difficult for Caribbean teams”.

Canadian Victor Montagliani, president of the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (Concacaf) last week announced a likely change to the controversial qualifying system as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, which could result in most of this year’s football being lost.

Montagliani anticipated that in its current format, there will not be sufficient time to run World Cup qualifying, which is due to begin in September.

The controversial system will see fourth-ranked Jamaica as the only Caribbean team eligible for the “Hex”, from which the six highest-ranked Concacaf teams are seeded and will battle for three automatic World Cup qualifying spots.

Twenty-five other Caribbean teams - including T&T and Haiti - will play a back-door 29-team competition along with Canada, Panama, Nicaragua and Guatemala, after which the winners will meet the fourth-place Hex finishers for a spot into an inter-continental World Cup qualifier.

“I thought the initial qualifying system was unfair in the sense of equality for all,” said Eve.

Eve made reference to small European countries like Malta, the Faroe Islands and Azerbaijan - the latter beaten twice by T&T in international friendly matches.

“You look at Azerbaijan and all these other countries all over the world who have never qualified for any major tournament, but the fair opportunity for them to play has never been taken away from them,” stated the T&T national boys Under-17 coach.

“I think that was not in our favour,” former national futsal coach Morris added. “I think we were at a disadvantage.”

With Concacaf Nations Cup and Gold Cup qualifying matches already postponed, Montagliani anticipated having to reformat the World Cup qualifying process.

“The current World Cup format will have to be changed,” he said. ‘Ultimately the ‘Hex’ would have to be changed into some other form. Obviously it would be bigger. ‘What the number is, obviously I don’t know until FIFA tells us how many days the calendar is.”

While not yet knowing what the new qualifying format will be, both Eve and Morris hoped the new plan, when unveiled, would give all Concacaf teams a fair opportunity at qualifying for the World Cup.

“It gives us a chance to be in the next World Cup,” stated former T&T captain Morris, “It still will not be easy, but it was impossible to make the Hex under the system they had.” Eve added:“I hope good sense prevails. We (should) have a qualifying round from the Caribbean. We then go onto a second stage and then the next. With the limited amount of windows, I think that will be fair for everybody.”

In his statements last week, Montagliani also stressed that there had been agreement on the current Hex format.

“Everybody confirmed. This was not done in my office with my general secretary,” Montagliani said. “It was done with a series of meetings with the 41 member nations over three years. Everybody was at the table, including Canada.

“It wasn’t made based on helping out anybody and besides the decision was made two-and-a-half years before,’ the Concacaf president added.

However, Eve had a different take on the Hex decision. “I think a certain team did not like how Trinidad knocked them out of the World Cup (2017 World Cup qualifying) and I think that was done because of that,” he declared. He felt conditions were put in place for teams like the USA not to face the difficult conditions presented in places like the Caribbean.

“In my opinion, the process of qualifying is for teams to go into places which are undesirable or to go to difficult places where they don’t like to go, and battle to come out with a result.”
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: ABTrini on May 12, 2020, 08:06:22 AM
At this current time, they could change all the playoff format. We just don't have the calibre of players to get to that WC level. The former coach DL, had set a goal of TnT regaining its position as Caribbean champions and dominating in the region- we struggled against Guyana, Grenada - could not match Haiti  - At this time St Kitts may even  prove to be a challenge.

 No players in the English top league - we relying on ZuSFL players and those in the Indian league - forget about the shambles of the local pro league.

To qualify, Fenwick go have to come out of retirement and anchor the defence and that looks like a better option than what we have - so to qualify we will need a real turn around in terms of players
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: maxg on May 12, 2020, 09:29:19 AM
 ??? ???
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on May 12, 2020, 10:06:05 AM
My 2 cents here. I think that the TTFA under DJW should have entered the U-23 in the Olympic qualifiers whether we qualified or not. At least they would have had a head start in figure out some of the youths who could have formed the nucleus of the the WC squad.
Title: Altered format: Pandemic forces changes in route to Qatar 2022
Post by: Tallman on June 27, 2020, 07:43:31 AM
Altered format: Pandemic forces changes in route to Qatar 2022
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express)


CONCACAF confirmed Thursday that World Cup qualifying for the region will definitely change due to the calendar disruption of the Covid-19 global pandemic. However, the confederation that covers North and Central America and the Caribbean did not put forward a revamped format.

At a FIFA Council meeting on Wednesday, football’s governing body announced the cancellation of the September international match window for AFC (Asia), CAF (Africa), OFC (Oceania) and Concacaf regions while expanding the June 2021 international window to four match dates.

The announcement had an immediate effect on the Caribbean, North and Central American region (Concacaf). In a press release. Concacaf confirmed earlier speculation from its president Victor Montagliani that time lost as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic will likely see drastic readjustments to the Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifying process.

“This means our qualifying process for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 will not begin in September, as previously scheduled,” was Concacaf’s reaction to decisions taken at Wednesday’s FIFA Council meeting.

Concacaf provided no details of the coming changes. However, there has been speculation that the 12 top Concacaf teams, divided into three groups of four, will play for three automatic World Cup spots. Teams ranked 13-35 in Concacaf will play in a supplemental competition with the winner vying for an inter-continental playoff spot, against the team finishing fourth among the top 12.

Incomplete FIFA rankings

“The challenges presented by postponements to the football calendar, and the incomplete FIFA rankings cycle in our confederation, mean our current World Cup Qualifying process has been compromised and will be changed. We will now work with the new framework provided and liaise with FIFA to finalise a new World Cup Qualification format for the Concacaf region,” Concacaf said.

“We will also work with our stakeholders to reorganise the Concacaf Road to Gold Cup Qualifiers (originally scheduled for March and June 2020), the Concacaf Nations League Finals (originally scheduled for June 2020) and a range of other suspended competitions. A further update on World Cup Qualifying and other Concacaf men’s international competitions will be provided in the coming weeks.”

Trinidad and Tobago head coach Terry Fenwick was not yet aware of FIFA’s recent action and is unable to yet make an assessment of how the national team is affected. Appointed in January by the TTFA administration headed by William Wallace, Fenwick has not yet been in charge for a single match due to a combination of the Covid-19 outbreak and also FIFA’s intervention in local football which has seen a normalisation committee replacing Wallace’s executive.

Fenwick’s team was expected to see action in March. However, due to Covid 19, Concacaf Gold Cup qualifiers were postponed. But since the easing of quarantine restrictions this month, Fenwick has begun the process of preparing the team with a contingent made up mainly of young prospects.

“I’m trying to bring the local kids together. We have been training three days a week,” he said, “We stopped because of the Sahara dust.”

The 60-year-old former England defender also announced that he can at the moment make no concrete plans until his status is finalised.

“I am still waiting for official feedback,” he told the Express. “I am waiting on direction.”
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on June 28, 2020, 01:40:32 PM
CONCACAF to workout WC qualifying format.
T&T Guardian Reports.


ZURICH, Switzerland – Football’s world governing body FIFA has confirmed that CONCACAF’s planned qualifiers for the 2022 World Cup have been postponed in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

CONCACAF’s Hexagonal was set to kick off during the September international window, but a statement issued after a FIFA Council meeting on Thursday said that window would be closed for federations outside Europe and South America. CONCACAF will therefore be forced to alter plans in the run up to the World Cup, including changing the format of the qualification competition.

However, the decision to alter the match calendars was welcomed by the regional football governing body, which said many of its member associations and their communities continued to face significant challenges due to the spread of the highly contagious virus.

“The rescheduling of competitions, and agreements on new international match dates, provide some encouragement across the football world and enable CONCACAF to progress our planning to resume men’s and women’s international football when it is safe to do so,” CONCACAF said.

It added that it would work with its stakeholders to reorganize the CONCACAF Road to Gold Cup Qualifiers (originally scheduled for March and June 2020), its inaugural Nations League Finals, originally scheduled to be held in Houston and Dallas this month, and a range of other suspended competitions.

Given the elimination of the September window, the football body will be revamping the World Cup qualifying competition, nixing the Hexagonal which would have had to be followed by playoffs in two international windows.

In the Hex, the top six ranked CONCACAF teams based on the FIFA rankings play home-and-away round-robin matches. The top three teams would qualify for the World Cup, and the fourth-placed team would advance to the CONCACAF play-off round.

“The challenges presented by postponements to the football calendar, and the incomplete FIFA rankings cycle in our confederation, means our current World Cup Qualifying process has been compromised and will be changed. We will now work with the new framework provided and liaise with FIFA to finalize a new World Cup Qualification format for the CONCACAF region,” the continental body said said.

FIFA had also announced that the June 2021 window would be extended by seven days for CONCACAF and other federations outside Europe and South America, so they can play four games instead of two.

Meantime, in its statement, FIFA announced that its Council on Thursday approved stage three of its US $1.5 billion COVID‑19 Relief Plan which was created to assist the football community amid the pandemic.

In that stage, FIFA will provide national federations with grants and interest-free loans to cope with budget hits.

A universal solidarity grant of US$ 1 million will be made available to all member associations, with an additional grant of US $500,000 allocated specifically to women’s football.

In addition, each confederation will receive a grant of US$ 2 million.

Member associations will also be able to apply for interest-free loans.

Both grants and loans can be directed by member associations to the wider football community in their respective territories, including clubs, players, leagues, or others that have been affected by COVID-19. - CMC

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on July 15, 2020, 10:39:27 AM
World Cup 2022 dates and times revealed as FIFA announce four games a day in Qatar.
ESPN.


World Cup fans will be able to watch an unprecedented four games a day on television, spread out over 11 hours, during the group stage of the Qatar 2022 tournament after the schedule was confirmed on Wednesday.

With the relatively short travel distances for the venues in and around Doha, it could be possible for fans who travel to the 32-team tournament to attend multiple games each day.

The early games will kickoff at 13.00 local time with the fourth match starting at 22.00 local time and finishing just before midnight.

The tournament's opening game on Nov. 21, will be at the 60,000 capacity Al Bayt Stadium, with its distinctive "tent" style covering.

The final on Dec. 18 will be held at the 80,000 Lusail Stadium, which, like Al Bayt, will also host a semifinal.

Nasser Al Khater, CEO of the Qatar World Cup organising company, said plans for the tournament were well on schedule with 90% of the work finished on roads and infrastructure.

"When we talk about the stadiums, more than 85% of the work has been completed and really now, the last two years, we're focusing on our operation readiness and making sure we get the fan experience plans in place," he said.

"The World Cup is always a festival of football, a real celebration for the fans who come on-site and watch," FIFA chief tournaments and events officer Colin Smith said. "In Qatar, with the compact nature, this is going to be amplified even more with 32 teams and 32 sets of supporters all in and around Doha.

"FIFA will wait until the draw for the tournament is held in March or April of 2022 before assigning specific games to venues and time-slots. That will enable them to better align games with time zones for domestic television partners of the competing teams. The tournament was switched from it's usual June-July slot due to the heat in the Gulf state and is the first that will be held in the middle of the European season."

The tournament draw for the 2022 World Cup in Qatar is set to be pushed back by two months after FIFA rescheduled qualifying playoffs due to the coronavirus pandemic.

FIFA said in June its council agreed to delay an intercontinental four-team playoff -- from March 2022 to June that year -- due to fixture congestion.

The 32-team tournament draw was planned for April 2022, likely in Doha. The earliest option is now to hold it in June ahead of the Nov. 21-Dec. 18 tournament.

FIFA has agreed to a $1.5 billion relief plan to help with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the global game.

FIFA's plan means it will dip into its reserves to provide national federations with a number of grants and interest-free loans to cope with budget hits.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on July 15, 2020, 03:53:27 PM
We bringing the cup to POS. What a lovely Christmas present that will be.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on July 28, 2020, 03:28:50 AM
Soca Warriors seeded for World Cup Play-offs
T&T Guardian Reports.


NEW YORK — CONCACAF is changing its World Cup qualifying hexagonal to an octagonal in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and delaying the start until next June.

The United States, Mexico, Costa Rica, Jamaica and Honduras receive byes directly to the octagonal, the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football announced yesterday.

CONCACAF's other 30 nations will compete for three additional spots in the final round. The octagonal will take place with four games per team in next June's double FIFA international match window followed by two apiece in September, October and November 2021, and two each in January and March 2022.

By staying with a large total of teams in the final round, CONCACAF ensured two high-profile, lucrative qualifiers between the US and Mexico. The format also provides margin for slip ups, though there were not enough to prevent the US from missing the 2018 World Cup in Russia when it lost to Mexico and Costa Rica at home and at T&T on the final night.

"It's good that we have clarity regarding the format and scheduling, which allows us to chart the course ahead," US coach Gregg Berhalter said in a statement. "We are looking forward to the challenge that this new World Cup qualifying format will present."

The hexagonal was to have started this September and be based on the June FIFA rankings, in which El Salvador was just ahead of Canada as the region's sixth team. Teams not in the hexagonal would have competed for the right to represent CONCACAF in an intercontinental playoff.

FIFA removed the September window for international matches because of the pandemic.

Under the new format, nations currently ranked 6-35 will be drawn into six groups of five in a seeded draw next month, with El Salvador, Canada, Curaçao, Panama, Haiti, and T&T seeded. Each group will compete in a single round robin of four matches per nation this October and November.

Group winners will advance to a home-and-home, total-goals second round next March, and the second-round winners will advance to the octagonal.

The top three teams in the octagonal qualify for the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, and the fourth-place nation advances to an intercontinental playoff in June 2022.

The first CONCACAF Nations League semifinals and final will be rescheduled for a US site next March. The US plays Honduras, and Mexico meets Costa Rica in the semis, which originally were to have been played on June 4 in Houston. The final was to have been June 7 in Arlington, Texas.

The 2021 CONCACAF Gold Cup will take place from July 10 to August 1 next year. The Gold Cup likely will be missing many top players, who will be taking time off and then reporting to clubs ahead of the 2021-22 European club seasons. The tournament originally was scheduled for next July 2-25.

CONCACAF will work to create a Gold Cup preliminary round in the US ahead of the tournament involving Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Cuba, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Montserrat, St Vincent and the Grenadines, and T&T.

National coach Terry Fenwick told Guardian Media Sports yesterday that the fixtures are a breath of fresh air, it is something that we can look forward to, something that we can plan ahead and move things and we can get the multiple players that we have seen playing somewhere else in the world with T&T parentage. We need to fast track their passport details.

"This journey will be difficult, we need the public support. We need the public to come out and get behind the national team. It has been a terrible few years we had under the last administration, the results have been shocking. The only chance we have is careful planning together and hardwork and we need to pull together," he explained.

Concacaf Nations League:

The Concacaf Nations League (https://www.espn.com/soccer/concacaf-nations-league/story/3961558/concacaf-nations-league-all-you-need-to-know) is a key part of the Confederation’s strategy to provide more competitive football opportunities for national teams across the region.

The inaugural group stage included all 41 Concacaf men’s national teams in the FIFA match windows of September, October and November 2019 with great competition across the region.

The League A group winners: Mexico, USA, Honduras and Costa Rica qualified for the first Concacaf Nations League Finals, originally scheduled for June 2020 but suspended due to the public health situation.

The 2019/20 Concacaf Nations League Finals will now take place in the FIFA match window of March 2021, at a venue in the USA to be determined.

As previously announced, the semifinal matchups are Costa Rica vs Mexico and USA vs Honduras as determined by their performances on the field during the group stage.

A Concacaf Nations League Final match will follow the semifinals to crown a first Concacaf Nations League champion. There will also be a third-placed match with all games played across one FIFA match window.

Additionally, Concacaf can now confirm that the second edition of this exciting competition, the 2022/23 Concacaf Nations League, will begin in June 2022 and conclude with the 2022/23 Concacaf Nations League Finals in March 2023.

2021 Concacaf Gold Cup:

The Concacaf Gold Cup (https://www.concacaf.com/en/article/new-concacaf-qualifiers-announced-for-regional-qualification-to-fifa-world-cup-qatar-2022) is the Confederation’s flagship men’s international football competition.

This event is eagerly anticipated by fans across the region and Concacaf can now confirm the start date for the 2021 Gold Cup will be July 10, 2021, and the Final will take place on August 1, 2021.

The Concacaf Road to Gold Cup Qualifiers were due to be played in the March 2020 and June 2020 FIFA match windows which were suspended.

Concacaf will now work towards creating a centralized Gold Cup preliminary round for those teams which had been due to play the Road to Gold Cup Qualifiers.

This will take place in the United States in the week before the commencement of the Gold Cup group stages. Further details on the format and schedule of this preliminary round will be provided in the coming weeks.

The 12 participating teams in the preliminary round are Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Cuba, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Montserrat, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and T&T.

The draw for all rounds of the Concacaf Qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 will take place in mid-August 2020 with full details to follow in the coming days. - (AP)

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Trini on August 01, 2020, 09:26:47 AM
The road to the hex/Octagon goes through El Salvador..

In many ways, this extra round of games is good for us, gives Coach and team time together.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on August 01, 2020, 01:05:07 PM
The road to the hex/Octagon goes through El Salvador..

In many ways, this extra round of games is good for us, gives Coach and team time together.


There is some truth in that. let's see the squad that they will pick.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: gawd on pitch on August 01, 2020, 07:47:05 PM
My analysis: 
 
- We dont want to play Canada. Their team is good. A lot of young guys playing great ball in top flights in Europe. 

- Just put it this way, Curacao keeps finding more Dutch born players. . When Kluivert took over, his goal was for Curacao to make 2022.

- Haiti is always Haiti. They have numbers too. When it really counts, they always give us trouble.

- Panama. Just like Haiti. They always give us trouble. We lucky we aint going down the same road with them.

- El Salvador.. We at least have a chance. It wouldnt be a shocker if they beat us, or if we beat them.

El Salvador gives us the best chance. And the Salvadorans feel that we give them the best chance. This all depends on who gets grouped with who.

These teams will also affect the outcome of the groups.
- Guyana
- Cuba
- Guatemala

I have a funny feeling, we getting one of these teams in our group. And if we do, we will have our work cut out for us.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: ABTrini on August 01, 2020, 09:48:14 PM

These teams will also affect the outcome of the groups.
- Guyana
- Cuba
- Guatemala

I have a funny feeling, we getting one of these teams in our group. And if we do, we will have our work cut out for us.
[/quote]

I have a funny feeling anyone of these teams could cut we arse- At this time we are most vulnerable, mentally we are sitting with so much uncertaintity- regarding FIFa' impending  decisions
Physically- we have not seen any physicality from our team to  put fear in any regional team much less for the big guns - not taking anything from the previous coach but we did have a good run against Wales
Emotionally - we are too susceptible to being ' woe' is me attitude
Discipline- ent seeing anyone  player to stabilize or to  command a leadership role

So unless TF could instill some  or all of the above elements we going down to  any team wearing an opposing uniform - right now ah think India  or even Nepal could put ah licking on we
We need to establish a commanding assertive presence and approach to the game .
95 % is getting into the heads of these players and instilling some confidence pride in the national colours and an unceasing desire and will to domnate against all comers
Man have to be relentless in their professional approach to playing this game. Char play de game as of it is ah " fete match"
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Tiresais on August 10, 2020, 12:29:32 PM
Haiti is a massive threat if we get into the next round - they keep finding quality youngsters and always have the chance to get players from France - one of their youngsters recently got a place in Spain too.

In terms of who we should fear from the seedings? The sad truth is a lot right now. I know Fenwick can do well, but the situation isn't great and I really fear coming up against Guatemala, Suriname, and Guyana. The Dominican Republic has really improved in the last two years domestically, so it would be good to avoid them, and Cuba are always "roll a dice, see if they turn good or shite". Grenada and Bermuda are probably also underrated right now, and there's a reason Antigua is ranked close to us.

Assuming a "seeded" draw means the places in each group will be drawn by ranking;

1st team threat;
 Antigua and Barbuda (126)
Guatemala (130)
 Saint Kitts and Nevis (139)
 Suriname (141)
 Nicaragua (151)
 Dominican Republic (158)

2nd team;
 Grenada (159)
 Barbados (162)
Guyana (166)
 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (167)
 Bermuda (168)
 Belize (170)

3rd team
 Saint Lucia (176)
 Puerto Rico (178)
Cuba (179)
 Montserrat (183)
 Dominica (184)
 Cayman Islands (193)

4th team
 Bahamas (195)
Aruba (200)
 Turks and Caicos Islands (203)
 U.S. Virgin Islands (207)
 British Virgin Islands (208)
 Anguilla (210)

So my literal worst case scenario would be a group with;

T&T
Guatemala
Guyana
Cuba
Aruba
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on August 13, 2020, 02:09:56 AM
T&T set for CONCACAF draw Wednesday.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


The qualification pathway for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 in North, Central America and the Caribbean will take shape later this month following FIFA's confirmation this week that the Concacaf preliminary draw will be held on Wednesday 19 at the Home of FIFA in Zurich, Switzerland.

With 35 member associations from across North, Central America and the Caribbean set to be involved, the preliminary draw is a significant moment that will determine the tournament pathway for the first and final rounds under the new qualification format.

Based on the FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking as of 16 July 2020, the draw for the first round will allocate the 30 lowest-ranked Concacaf teams to six groups.

This will be followed by the draw for the final round, which will indicate the position of each team within the final qualification stage, which will also be contested in a group format.

The six highest-ranked teams in the first round - El Salvador, Canada, Curaçao, Panama, Haiti, and T&T - will be pre-seeded into groups A to F respectively.

The first round will be played in a single round-robin format, meaning each team will play four matches: two home and two away.

During the second round, the six group winners will face off in a home-and-away elimination format in three predetermined pairings. The winners of each tie will proceed to the final round.

The final round will see the three winners from the second round join the five highest-ranked Concacaf teams according to the FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking as of 16 July 2020, which will play each other in a home-and-away round-robin format.

Fans around the world will be able to follow the draw live on FIFA.com, with the exception of the territories where the draw will be broadcast live on TV.

Meanwhile, High Court Judge Carol Gobin will decide on Thursday whether the T&T Football Association's decision to challenge FIFA's appointment of a Normalisation Committee to govern the affairs of local football will be done here in the T&T courts, or if it will revert to the Court of Arbitration for Sports in Lausanne, Switzerland.

In the initial hearing on July 29 at the High Court at the Hall of Justice in Port-of-Spain, the court heard submissions from both sides, before adjourning to today. TTFA president William Wallace said after the hearing that his team was still open to negotiation.

On July 15, FIFA lawyers told the T&T courts that: “The removal of the Normalization Committee before appropriate controls, policies, and procedures are in place at the TTFA will not only jeopardise the achievements to date and reintroduce the threats to the solvency of the TTFA, but it will be a disincentive to FIFA to provide any further funding to the TTFA given the absence of appropriate controls.”

In March the FIFA, the sport's supreme body, took the decision to appoint the committee only three months after the Wallace-led team assumed office, citing management flaws which placed the association on the brink of insolvency, coupled with crippling debt that the association had to way of clearing.

The TTFA followed procedure by taking their matter to the CAS before making a round about turn, citing institutional bias

The pots for the first-round draw are as follows:

Pot 1: El Salvador, Canada, Curaçao, Panama, Haiti, T&T.

Pot 2: Antigua and Barbuda, Guatemala, St Kitts and Nevis, Suriname, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic

Pot 3: Grenada, Barbados, Guyana, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Bermuda, Belize

Pot 4: St Lucia, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Montserrat, Dominica, Cayman Islands

Pot 5: Bahamas, Aruba, Turks and Caicos Islands, US Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, Anguilla

The pots for the final-round draw are as follows:

Pot A: Mexico, USA, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Honduras, winner of A vs F, winner of B vs E, winner of C vs D

Pot B: teams 1-8.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: gawd on pitch on August 19, 2020, 11:15:09 AM
Live link for the draw:

https://www.fifa.com/worldcup/news/coming-soon-live-stream-for-the-preliminary-draw-for-concacaf-qatar-2022-qualifi

So far we avoid Guatemala. But we got Guyana.

Groups


Group A

El Salvador
Antigua
Grenada
Montserrat
US Virgin Islands

Group B

Canada
Suriname
Bermuda
Cayman Islands
Aruba

Group C

Curacao
Guatemala
SVG
Cuba
BVI

Group D

Panama
DR
Barbados
Dominica
Anguilla

Group E

Haiti
Nicaragua
Belize
St Lucia
Turks and Caicos

Group F

Trinidad and Tobago
St Kitts and Nevis
Guyana
Puerto Rico
Bahamas

Not a bad draw. For us. I hope we get this sh1t sorted out with FIFA/NC and TTFA.

Group of death? Group C

Curacao
Guatemala
SVG
Cuba
BVI

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Trini _2026 on August 19, 2020, 01:01:58 PM
guyana is the team to beat
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Controversial on August 19, 2020, 01:10:58 PM
guyana is the team to beat

 :rotfl:

Since when?

The dictator was in charge at that time... if we select our best 11 we have nothing to worry about
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Trini _2026 on August 19, 2020, 01:15:03 PM
lol we start of against guyana ....... oct 8 .. they have to give exemption for the football tem to train ...
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on August 19, 2020, 01:57:24 PM
Soca Warriors, Guyana clash in WC opener.
By Gyasi Merrique (Guardian).


Trinidad and Tobago senior men's footballers will open their quest to qualify for the Qatar 2022 World Cup by hosting Guyana on Thursday, October 8, 2020.

This was determined at the draw for the CONCACAF qualification competition, which was conducted at FIFA's headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland on Wednesday, to reveal the line up of teams ranked 6th to 35th in the confederation, in groups A to F of the preliminary round.

T&T and Guyana will be joined by national teams from St Kitts and Nevis, Puerto Rico, and the Bahamas in Group F.

Following their opening assignment against Guyana, the Soca Warriors will travel to face Puerto Rico three days later on October 11th.

In the group phase, which takes place during the FIFA international match days in October and November 2020, teams will play four matches in total. Two of those matches will be played at home and two away.

Therefore, the Soca Warriors will then play away to the Bahamas on November 14 and end the group phase by entertaining St Kitts and Nevis on November 17.

History shows that T&T should have few problems in navigating the preliminary round, with the Warriors boasting winning records against each of the teams in its group, with the exception of the Bahamas who the Warriors have never met at the senior level.

T&T's toughest challenge could come from Guyana who the warriors drew against at the Gold Cup in 2019 but whom they have only lost to once in four world cup qualifying encounters and just twice in 22 meetings overall.

At the end of the four group stage matches, each of the six group winners advances to the second stage of the competition.

It means that if Trinidad and Tobago is successful in winning its group, the Soca Warriors will travel to play the winner of Group A in the next phase of qualifying in 2020 is March 22-30. That tie takes the form of home and away from direct elimination for progression into the third and final round to join CONCACAF's first to fifth-ranked teams Mexico, USA, Costa Rica, Jamaica and Honduras.

The third stage, also called the 'Octagonal' will also take a home and away format and will be played during the FIFA match dates in June, September, October and November of 2021 and January and March of 2022.

WORLD CUP QUALIFYING GROUPS

GROUP A

El Salvador
Antigua and Barbuda
Grenada
Montserrat
U.S. Virgin Islands

GROUP B

Canada
Suriname
Bermuda
Cayman Islands
Aruba

GROUP C

Curacao
Guatemala
St Vincent and the Grenadines
Cuba
British Virgin Islands

GROUP D

Panama
Dominican Republic
Barbados
Dominica
Anguilla

GROUP E

Haiti
Nicaragua
Belize
St Lucia
Turks and Caicos

GROUP F

Trinidad & Tobago
St Kitts and Nevis
Guyana
Puerto Rico
Bahamas

CONCACAF SECOND ROUND

Winner Group A v Winner Group F

Winner Group B v Winner Group E

Winner Group C v Winner Group D

CONCACAF FINAL ROUND - Match Day 1

Winner BvE vs Honduras

Winner AvF vs USA

Winner CvD vs Costa Rica

Mexico vs Jamaica

RELATED NEWS

T&T pull Guyana, St Kitts and P/Rico in W/Cup draw, but Fifa will rule on possible ban first.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


The Soca Warriors must top Guyana, St Kitts and Nevis, Puerto Rico and Bahamas to advance past the preliminary stage of Concacaf’s Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifying series. But before a ball is kicked, the Trinidad and Tobago Men’s National Senior Team first has to contend with a Fifa Congress on Friday 18 September, which could make today’s draw irrelevant for local football fans.

Fifa’s 70th Congress, which will be held online, lists its fourth agenda item as: ‘suspension or expulsion of a member’. The member association is not named but the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) has been in the crosshairs of the world governing body since March.

Last week, Madame Justice Carol Gobin dismissed an application by Fifa which sought to compel TTFA president William Wallace to move his grievance, over the implementation of a normalisation committee in the twin island republic, from the local High Court to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) or dismiss it outright.

Wallace and TTFA vice-presidents Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick and Sam Phillip responded to the ruling on Monday by again inviting Fifa to mediate the disagreement.

Thus far, Fifa has not responded and sources indicate that the governing body has no intention of backing down—despite Justice Gobin’s judgment, which denounced the Zurich-based body’s perceived bullying behaviour.

Fifa’s position so far has been that it is willing to make an advancement payment to CAS and do whatever else is necessary to move its legal tussle with TTFA back to the sport arbitration body in Lausanne, Switzerland. But it is not expected to make any other concession to Wallace and the United TTFA.

Fifa, according to a football insider, believes it can nullify any potential negative international press over its struggle with the local body by pointing to past links between TTFA third vice-president, Phillip, and United TTFA member Keith Look Loy and disgraced former Fifa vice-president Jack Warner.

Wallace denied any involvement from Warner with his slate and there has been no proof to suggest otherwise—other than a claim by the latter figure himself.

Fifa president Gianni Infantino still has until tomorrow to decide if the organisation will appeal Justice Gobin’s ruling.

In the midst of the uncertainty, Men’s National Senior Team head coach Terry Fenwick must prepare for World Cup qualifying battle.

The Warriors have not trained since July while Fenwick and his coaching staff have never been paid. Thus far, TTFA technical director Dion La Foucade and director of football Richard Piper are believed to be the only members of the technical department to receive remuneration.

Normalisation committee chairman Robert Hadad has not spoken to his national coaches since 29 April, much less arranged payments on their behalf.

The Warriors are also owed money dating back to the tenure of previous coach Dennis Lawrence; and, with sport cancelled since March due to Covid-19, most of the local players have not collected a cheque since February.

Fenwick too has been a target of disdain within local football circles, since details broke on his contract—which has vastly improved terms to what was agreed by the TTFA board and, according to Wallace, was signed off by the football president with lax scrutiny and no independent legal oversight.

Current Covid-19 regulations mean Trinidad and Tobago may have to play all their fixtures away from home, with local-based coaches and players forced to subject themselves to a 14 day quarantine period on their return.

The last time that Trinidad and Tobago started a campaign in disarray was in 2011, just months after Warner and then TTFF president Oliver Camps quit the game while under Fifa probes.

It was not nearly as chaotic as the current situation, yet the Warriors were eliminated in the preliminary stage of that series—by Guyana.

The ‘Golden Jaguars’ might be smelling an upset again. The two Caricom neighbours drew their last two meetings under Lawrence and, although Guyana have lost inspirational English coach Michael Johnson, they have reason for optimism by the current state of T&T’s football.

Trinidad and Tobago have never lost to Puerto Rico while their last defeat to St Kitts and Nevis was 18 years ago, when interim head coach Clayton Morris used an experimental team comprising mostly youth players. Bahamas are ranked 195th in the world and not expected to pose a threat.

On paper, the draw is about as good as Fenwick could have hoped.

Should the Warriors advance past the preliminary stage, which begins in early October, they would face the winner of Group A with El Salvador being the most likely opponents.

But Trinidad and Tobago have an encouraging record against that Central American nation too, with six unbeaten games against them since their last defeat in the 2007 Concacaf Gold Cup. The Warriors travelled to that Gold Cup with a ‘B’ team after the 2006 World Cup bonus dispute led to a ban on 13 first team players, with the others—Densill Theobald apart—withdrawing their services in protest.

If the Warriors top Group F and then see off El Salvador, they will advance to the Concacaf Hex to push for a Qatar berth on equal footing with the likes of Mexico, Costa Rica, Honduras, Jamaica and the United States.

But, first, they must survive Infantino’s wrath at the Fifa Congress on 18 September.

A Fifa ban would mean curtains for the Men’s National Senior Team and probably a similar fate for any national outfits due to compete over the next 12 months at least.

Last week, Wallace explained that the United TTFA did everything it could to shield the local football body from the repercussions of its court case.

“We have always said from the outset that, if this resulted in a personal ban from Fifa, we are prepared to accept that,” said Wallace. “We also calculated that the risk of the country getting banned was pretty low. What we did is we took up this matter as elected individuals rather than as the TTFA—so we did not draw the TTFA into the case in essence but acted as elected members who were unfairly removed from office.

“That is why all the funding used in the case was from personal funds and not from the TTFA’s coffers. So if there is to be a ban, it would be on us as individuals.”

Justice Gobin also suggested that Fifa might be violating its own statutes if it bans the TTFA and the blame for such action rests with Infantino and his gang rather than Wallace.

“As for the concerns about irreparable fallout or adverse consequences to TTFA and Trinidad and Tobago, I am encouraged by the lofty objectives identified in Fifa statutes,” stated Justice Gobin, “and particularly articles (3) and (4) of Fifa’s commitment to respecting internationally recognised human rights, non-discrimination of any kind against a country for any reason and its commitment to promoting friendly relations in society for humanitarian objectives all of which are underpinned by an appreciation for the rule of law.

“I do not expect Fifa to walk off the field or to take its ball and go home if after full ventilation of the issues, this court were to confirm the primacy of an Act of the Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago over the Fifa Statutes.”

Infantino and the Fifa Council will have the last word on that, though.

Concacaf 2020 Qatar World Cup qualifying preliminary stage

Group A: El Salvador, Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada, Montserrat, US Virgin Islands.

Group B: Canada, Suriname, Bermuda, Cayman Islands, Aruba.

Group C: Curaçao, Guatemala, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Cuba, British Virgin Islands.

Group D: Panama, Dominican Republic, Barbados, Dominica, Anguilla.

Group E: Haiti, Nicaragua, Belize, St Lucia, Turks and Caicos Islands.

Group F: Trinidad and Tobago, St Kitts and Nevis, Guyana, Puerto Rico, Bahamas.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on August 19, 2020, 02:12:56 PM
From FIFA.COM.

The agenda for the 70th FIFA Congress, which will take place as an online event from Zurich, Switzerland, on Friday, 18 September 2020 at 15:00 (CET), has been confirmed and is now available on FIFA.com.

In addition, the agenda includes the proposed amendments to the Regulations Governing the Application of the Statutes and to the FIFA Statutes and Standing Orders of the Congress.

We could get banned before we first game.  :devil:

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on August 19, 2020, 02:18:14 PM
FYI

The T&T players are still owed money dating back to the tenure of previous coach Dennis Lawrence, while most of the local players have not collected a cheque since February. In-addition, coach Terry Fenwick and his coaching staff has not been paid to date.

With the Covid-19 regulations in T&T, and fixtures away from home, T&T will have to quarantine themselves for 14 days upon their return from any games, so hopefully, the fixtures are spread out?

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Tiresais on August 19, 2020, 02:52:52 PM
That is as easy a group as we could hope. Guyana and SKN aren't pushovers but if we play well we should have enough to see them off. The problem is whether we turn up - they can both beat us on their day
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on August 19, 2020, 03:37:45 PM
Nah boy, this is the group of death.

Group B

Canada
Suriname
Bermuda

Cayman Islands
Aruba
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: gawd on pitch on August 19, 2020, 04:33:43 PM
Nah boy, this is the group of death.

Group B

Canada
Suriname
Bermuda

Cayman Islands
Aruba

Nah Deeks. Canada has improved tremendously. They are well ahead of the next best team in that group (Suriname). Bermuda has improved too. But none of them catching Canada off guard. Canada is now reaping the benefits of having 3 teams in the MLS.

There is not much distance between the teams in group C. Curacao, Guatemala and Cuba can easily upset one another. . Then you got SVG that can throw a wrench into any of them teams plans. But in the end, Curacao should come out of that group.

One thing to note (which might be good for us) El Salvador has an easier group than us. So that might work in our favor when we play them.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on August 21, 2020, 09:35:19 AM
Quote
The U.S. could potentially play Trinidad and Tobago away in their opening match of the Final Round of 2022 FIFA World Cup Qualifying, depending on the results in the earlier rounds. Trinidad and Tobago defeated the USMNT in their final match of qualifying in October of 2017 to keep the U.S. from missing the 2018 FIFA World Cup. Trinidad and Tobago, the top seed in Group F, would need to win their group and then win the playoff against the winner of Group A.

USSOCCER.COM

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on August 28, 2020, 12:27:42 PM
‘Who’s looking after players?!’ Hyland and Bateau on owed monies, Qatar 2022 and United TTFA/Fifa.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


Soca Warriors captain Khaleem Hyland and veteran defender Sheldon Bateau are urging stakeholders to remember the young men and women who play the game, as they pointed to the desperate financial state of many local-based players at present.

Former Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president David John-Williams left office without paying match fees for the Warriors’ last nine international outings, worth between US$300 and US$1,000 each.

It is the sort of money that anyone would miss, but the local-based players are especially vulnerable. Pro League salaries have dropped to between TT$3,000 and TT$6,000 per month at most clubs; and, even then, there is no guarantee that players would be paid at the end of the month.

The Covid-19 pandemic stopped the domestic game altogether, as the Pro League ended in March and most clubs did not even pay salaries that month. Local footballers have not earned a dollar since—with the exception of Terminix La Horquetta Rangers players and those fortunate enough to be employed as soldiers or police officers at Defence Force or Police FC.

Hyland, who plays for Al Faisaly FC in Saudi Arabia, said the Warriors are really hurting and pleaded with stakeholders to show more compassion towards the national athletes.

“This is a tough situation and it is worse for the players who are back home, as football hasn’t played there in a long time and the income is so small anyway,” Hyland told Wired868. “They have kids and families and it is unfair to the players at this point in time. I would just like and hope that the TTFA or the prime minister or sport minister can assist somehow with the national footballers.

“Most of the players are owed between seven to nine games, dating back to the St Vincent and the Grenadines friendly.”

As team captain—and without a functioning players’ association—Hyland represents the Warriors in negotiations with the local football president. It is a job that became so frustrating under John-Williams that the midfield workhorse gave up, and began to just rely on then coach Dennis Lawrence and team manager Richard Piper.

“For a long time, I would have conversations with John-Williams concerning the players’ money and he would give me promises and not keep it,” said Hyland. “Eventually I started going through Dennis and Piper. I like to deal straight up and I don’t like people who aren’t straight to me.

“It was unfair to the players knowing they are squeezing up in economy—which is not usual for our national players—and going all over the world playing games, and the TTFA is getting money for those games but then doing other things with the money and not paying the players.”

Since John-Williams was voted out of office on 24 November 2019, Fifa withheld its annual subvention to the TTFA. Relations between the two entities took a turn for the worse on 13 March, when the world governing body announced a normalisation committee on the twin island republic, which sought to bring the term of new president William Wallace to a premature end.

Wallace and his vice-presidents, who refer to their slate as the United TTFA, are contesting Fifa’s decision in the local High Court.

Hyland said the situation is frustrating, although he refused to point fingers at either Wallace or normalisation committee chairman Robert Hadad.

“It is difficult to blame Hadad or Wallace, as the money was owed before either of them even came on board,” said Hyland. “They have to patch up what was left there for them, so I am not blaming anyone. I just want the players to be paid.”

For national coaches, creditors and journalists, Hadad is so unreachable that he might as well be a ghost. Hyland had a better experience, although he said the normalisation committee boss explained that his actions are restricted by Fifa.

“I spoke to Hadad on the 14th and he said he is hoping that, if everything goes in his favour, he can move how he would like to; and he gave me his word that he will make the players a priority,” said Hyland. “I don’t want the players to get involved in the political thing that is going on with the United TTFA and Fifa. That is not our business.

“I know Mr Wallace personally, as he was the manager for our [national senior] team and I know he is someone who will fight to the end, because he used to fight for our rights and match fees under [then head coach] Stephen Hart. All I can do is wish him the best.”

Hyland, a former East Mucurapo Secondary schoolboy, admitted that the players are very concerned at the possibility of a Fifa ban, which would spell doom for their Qatar 2022 Fifa World Cup qualifying campaign.

Trinidad and Tobago are scheduled to host Guyana in their opening preliminary qualifier on 8 October. Both nations are in Group F along with Puerto Rico, Bahamas and St Kitts and Nevis. The group winner will advance to a two-legged play off for a shot at getting into the final eight team Concacaf qualifying round, with three and a half World Cup places at stake.

“I know if things go wrong and Fifa gives us a sanction, the players of Trinidad and Tobago will feel it,” said the 31 year old midfielder. “We have World Cup qualifiers very soon and hopefully we can put all this behind us and go out and represent our country. We are praying that Fifa sees this isn’t the players’ fault.

“If players don’t have this opportunity to live their dreams, who knows what they might turn to. People need national caps to go abroad and further their careers, so I hope Fifa doesn’t make the youths of tomorrow pay for what is going on today.”

Bateau, a Fatima College alumni who plays professionally for KV Mechelen in Belgium, was more outspoken over the current legal wrangling between Fifa and the TTFA.

Bateau represented Trinidad and Tobago at the South Korea 2007 Under-17 and Italy 2009 Under-20 World Cups—Hyland joined him at the latter—and is desperate for a chance to wear red, black and white at a senior Fifa World Cup.

“For me, it is a bit frightening because after personally working so hard and qualifying for two World Cups, the dream is to play in a senior World Cup,” said the 29 year old defender. “And to know we can lose that opportunity for things outside our control—if it comes to that and we actually get banned due to the actions of Wallace and [technical committee chairman Keith] Look Loy and the other people, it will be a bitter pill to swallow.”

Bateau is particularly upset over what he felt was a lack of communication by Wallace and his elected officers to the players.

“We know they will have their reasons for fighting Fifa but, for me, it looks a bit selfish, as the players are the ones who stand to lose the most,” said Bateau, “and you would expect there would have been some level of communication to see how we felt about it. I feel they didn’t do enough of that and they just made their decision.

“If we are banned, the players would feel it the most because this is the players’ bread and butter. For the local players, the goal is to get on the national team to be seen or earn a proper match fee to add to their small salaries.

“As one of the older guys in the game, I feel I can speak for the younger ones. This will damage players’ careers and it will have a huge negative effect on not only our generation but future generations.”

Hyland and Bateau both played as teenagers for San Juan Jabloteh, under current Men’s National Senior Team head coach Terry Fenwick, and are enthusiastic about the immediate future.

Still, the Warriors are coming off the worst run of result in the history of the TTFA. Bateau said the players must be the first to hold their hands up for their on-field performances. However, he suggested that many things worked against the squad during John-Williams’ tenure.

When ‘DJW’ was elected president in 2015, the National Senior Team had been quarterfinalists at successive Gold Cup tournaments and drew twice with Mexico and once with the United States in that same calendar year.

Bateau felt the instability that followed took its toll, along with the issues surrounding the domestic game—which went from being a seven month competition offering roughly TT$8,000 per month, to a four month event with less than half that salary.

“The last campaign had so much drama and chaos, with how they removed Stephen Hart and all the players coming in and out, that I believe we didn’t have a fair chance,” said Bateau. “Obviously with Dennis, the record wasn’t the best and as players we need to take some responsibility. I think the coach would also accept some responsibility.

“But I think the results came from the chaos behind the scenes, as there were a lot of things that were not in our favour. We have been fighting an uphill battle for years to put a positive face on the football, and now to come into this situation…”

Bateau pointed to the TTFA’s controversial Home of Football, which was spearheaded by John-Williams, as another example of how players are disregarded.

The defender has not visited the venue himself, but the reports from his teammates was that the venue is awful for multiple reasons.

“If you have players in a camp setting, you must have a games room—whether it is a table tennis board, a pool table, a big screen television where we can watch football together, and four or five tv screens with play stations,” said Bateau, who has 42 full senior international caps. “It cannot be designed as if you are in a prison. Yes, you have to be focused but you also need to relax. There isn’t even a conference room from what I understand, or a proper kitchen.

“When I played in Kazakhstan, we had a home of football, and of course past players like Kenwyne Jones know what a proper facility is supposed to have. John-Williams meant well but, if he had consulted with players, he would have had a better concept for what he was trying to do and would have designed a better venue, without necessarily spending more money.

“They need to better utilise the past players who have that experience and can help.”

Bateau criticised the standard of the local game too, which fails to provide national teams with the right structure.

“All the successful countries have a proper local league and I feel enough of our past players and presidents, who know that, do not put enough pressure on the Association and the government to make sure there is proper structure in place for us,” he said. “In other countries, no matter who comes or goes at the top, the structure is there. As a youth, we played football every Saturday and Sunday in the savannah whereas there doesn’t seem to be enough football for the youths anymore.

“Fenwick took me and [Ronald] Primus at 17 and 18 and we were the starting centre backs for Jabloteh. But nowadays, players are staying in the schools’ game until 19 or 20—whereas we have a 19 year old at Mechelen from Burkina Faso, Issa Kaboré, who just signed for Manchester City.”

Despite the problems, Bateau feels that, given the chance, the Warriors can get back on track for the 2022 campaign. Nine members of the current squad, including ace midfielder Kevin Molino and versatile defender Daneil Cyrus, played together in at least one youth World Cup and have enough experience at the top to face all comers.

“We have a generation of players who have been to at least one youth World Cup if not two and the core of the team has been together for a few years,” said Bateau. “And we have Terry Fenwick—a lot of us worked with him before and we were successful under him. With these things, I think we have a real good chance and we can do very well.

“With our full team and the right structure, I definitely think we can do something positive by getting into the [final Concacaf round]; and after that it is all about how badly we want it as a team.”

Hyland, who has 87 full senior international caps with four goals, will be competing in his fourth World Cup qualifying campaign—Fifa threats notwithstanding. After spending most of his professional career in Belgium, he is enjoying life in the Middle East and has a first hand view of the improvements there.

“It will be great for everyone to see the love that people on this side of the world have for the great game of football,” he said. “We hear a lot of the negatives but people don’t really see the great structure or understand how strong the leagues are here… It is something the outside world should see for themselves.

“I think the Qatar World Cup will be a great one and I hope I can achieve my dream by qualifying for it.”

Closer to home, Hyland wants to leave a lasting mark too.

“I want to play for as long as I can give back to my country and I want to help guide the younger ones and give them something [solid] to walk on,” he said. “I don’t want them to go through the struggles we went through as players… I think we have a lot of potential and quality and we need to guide the future players. We cannot just walk out and leave the younger ones to fend for themselves.

“I feel like the ones who played before us never put things in place to look after us. True, they qualified for a World Cup but we didn’t have a platform as players—or maybe with the blacklist [due to the infamous bonus dispute], they never got the chance.

“As a small country, we have so much talent in every category: sport, music, running, cricket, acting. We need to wake up and see the beauty and potential in our people and start building up each other instead of bringing down each other.

“[…] If we get together as one people and support each other, we will have a bright future.”

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Tallman on September 08, 2020, 10:53:51 AM
Update on the Concacaf Qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022
Concacaf.com


Concacaf has held recent discussions with its member associations, FIFA and other stakeholders as the confederation continues to plan for the resumption of its competitions across the region.

Following those discussions, Concacaf and FIFA have jointly agreed that the Concacaf Qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 will not be played in the FIFA match windows of October or November 2020, and will instead begin with the first round in the FIFA match window of March 2021.

Many parts of the region continue to have very challenging public health situations, and that has been a key factor in this decision. Additionally, several countries across the confederation have travel restrictions and quarantine requirements, which would make international football involving 30 national teams extremely difficult.

Concacaf will now work with FIFA to finalize a new schedule, beginning with the first round in March 2021, which will be communicated in due course.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on September 08, 2020, 02:51:45 PM
Update on the Concacaf Qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022
Concacaf.com


Concacaf has held recent discussions with its member associations, FIFA and other stakeholders as the confederation continues to plan for the resumption of its competitions across the region.

Following those discussions, Concacaf and FIFA have jointly agreed that the Concacaf Qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 will not be played in the FIFA match windows of October or November 2020, and will instead begin with the first round in the FIFA match window of March 2021.

Many parts of the region continue to have very challenging public health situations, and that has been a key factor in this decision. Additionally, several countries across the confederation have travel restrictions and quarantine requirements, which would make international football involving 30 national teams extremely difficult.

Concacaf will now work with FIFA to finalize a new schedule, beginning with the first round in March 2021, which will be communicated in due course.

If anyone ever asks you to explain the difference between blind optimism and optimism, refer them to the above.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: SUPA on September 08, 2020, 07:31:51 PM
Greetings to one and all. Y'all know we don't post anymore. Just take ah read as ah guess and then we bounce. We know this is a football thread, but fork eight, we too over joyed about we Miami Heat victory over the Bucks and heading to Eastern conference finals. The wife, kids, myself, brother-in-law and de crew, we are so happy for our Heat team. Go Heat. HIGHLY BLESSED.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on September 09, 2020, 12:14:22 AM
Postponed qualifiers bring disappointment, understanding.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


On Tuesday, the FIFA/CONCACAF World Cup qualifiers which were scheduled to starts in October was postponed but the decision was met with a great sigh of disappointment but also understanding.

In a release mere weeks before the start of the action, said: "CONCACAF held recent discussions with its Member Associations, FIFA and other stakeholders as the Confederation continued to plan for the resumption of its competitions across the region. Following those discussions, CONCACAF and FIFA have jointly agreed that the CONCACAF Qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 will not be played in the FIFA match windows of October or November 2020, and will instead begin with the first round in the FIFA match window of March 2021."

It added, "Many parts of the region continue to have very challenging public health situations, and that has been a key factor in this decision. Additionally, several countries across the confederation have travel restrictions and quarantine requirements, which would make international football involving 30 national teams extremely difficult."

This means that the players and their staff will have to wait a while longer to begin action. T&T's senior national team manager Basil Thompson told Guardian Media Sports on Tuesday that the players were obviously disappointed, as they were eager to put into action what they have been working on since June.

"I think the staff of the team are also disappointed since they too wanted to see their work being executed. However though, we are all very much in agreement with the decision, since the health of the players and all involved are of paramount importance," Thompson explained.

The Soca Warriors were scheduled to begin their Group F campaign with a clash with regional neighbours Guyana on October 8. The other teams in that group are St Kitts/Nevis, Bahamas and Puerto Rico. Only the winner will advance from the group.

National coach Terry Fenwick had painted a picture of gloom when the draw was made on August 20, lamenting on the team's dire financial position which was due mainly to the ongoing feud between the United T&T Football Association and the sport's world governing body- FIFA, over the FIFA's appointment of a Normalisation Committee to manage TT's football.

However, Thompson, dismissed those concerns, saying the normalisation committee, which is being headed by businessman Robert Hadad, has taken care of all the team's financial concerns, thereby putting the players in a state of readiness. He said another matter of salaries for coaches could soon be taken care of as Hadad is set to meet to discuss this with the coaches of the national teams.

Thompson said, "Other concerns such as outstanding match fees for players, I cannot speak on because I do not know."

According to Thompson, the T&T team was set to be boosted by the return of several players from abroad, but this now is uncertain.

Concacaf will now work with FIFA to finalise a new schedule, beginning with the First Round in March 2021, which will be communicated in due course.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on September 09, 2020, 04:49:57 PM
I think it is a good thing!
Title: T&T footballers expect challenges ahead of qualifiers
Post by: Tallman on November 21, 2020, 10:07:25 AM
T&T footballers expect challenges ahead of qualifiers
By Narissa Fraser (T&T Newsday)


NATIONAL footballers Robert Primus, Radanfah Abu Bakr and Marvin Phillip say while they are relieved FIFA has lifted its suspension of the T&T Football Association (TTFA), there lies some inevitable challenges ahead of the qualifiers for the 2021 CONCACAF Gold Cup and 2022 FIFA World Cup.

But through teamwork, they said, the challenges can be overcome.

The TTFA was banned on September 24 as its ousted executive, led by William Wallace, refused to drop a legal challenge against FIFA from the local court.

The ousted executive (United TTFA) had challenged FIFA’s decision to remove it and appoint a normalisation committee, headed by Robert Hadad, to run T&T football. FIFA lifted this ban on Thursday.

But with the T&T Pro League and Super League on hold due to covid19, and with training being inconsistent with constantly changing lockdown measures, locally-based players may have to jump straight into the forthcoming qualifiers.

On Friday, men’s national team coach Terry Fenwick told Newsday he was hoping to get permission to host “at least three” friendlies before the end of the year to help prepare the team. But there is still the possibility his proposal may not be approved by the government.

World Cup qualifiers begin in March and Gold Cup qualifiers begin in July.

Defenders Abu Bakr and Primus compete in the Hero I-League in India.

On March 13, the All India Football Federation (AIFF) had initially suspended the league until March 31 owing to the covid19 pandemic. But as lockdown measures began being implemented in the country, the remaining league matches were cancelled and table-toppers Mohun Bagan were crowned champions.

Abu Bakr and Primus, play for Churchill Brothers FC and Phillip is a goalkeeper for Neroca FC.

Should the national team go directly into qualifiers only having trained among themselves, Abu Bakr said it would be difficult.

“But one thing these unprecedented times have taught us, is to improvise,” he said, “So we must do the next best thing. Training has already resumed, which is positive.

“Having a few local/regional friendly games is crucial to achieve the match sharpness that would be needed going into those games. The revised qualifying formats for the Gold Cup and World Cup are unforgiving, so there isn’t much room for error.”

He said he is relieved the drama between the TTFA and FIFA is finally over, but added, “Unfortunately, the inevitable consequence was yet another display of how institutions such as FIFA ruthlessly guard their power structures.

“The priority should now be on the most important stakeholders in the game, the players, and ensure that they are given the best possible preparation to enable them to perform well in the upcoming games.”

Primus told Newsday he feels “very happy and excited” the ban was lifted, “so we can get our football under way.

“It’s been a while since we played or even trained (consistently) so this is good news for all the players.”

He said times have been particularly difficult for the local-based players

“...Not having a league going on for them to play or participate in or even getting a salary. We are professional footballers so this is how we make our money,” he said.

Primus added, “It’s going to be very difficult going into these qualifiers without having played a season before so it’s very difficult for them, but we will get the work in together.”

Phillip said he is “definitely happy” the ban has been lifted.“And I’m not only glad for the senior men’s team but also the women and the youngsters who could come back out and get the opportunity to show their talent and go after their dreams and goals again.”

He agreed with the other two players that tough times lie ahead.

“The local-based players haven’t been playing (competitive) football for months and they won’t be anytime soon. So the onus is on the players to put in that work and be up to a certain level of match fitness.”
Title: Warriors open against Guyana on March 25th
Post by: Tallman on December 05, 2020, 01:27:46 PM
Warriors open against Guyana on March 25th
T&T Guardian


National men’s senior football coach Terry Fenwick can feel a bit of relief finally knowing the dates of his team’s first phase on the road to the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar.

On Friday, Concacaf confirmed the schedule for the eagerly anticipated regional qualifiers for the World Cup. This after FIFA, the sport’s governing body, announced that certain international match windows will be extended to enable Confederations to schedule triple-match dates. This is due to the challenges faced by global football due to COVID-19, in particular for those regions where several 2020 FIFA international match windows were suspended.

In Concacaf’s case, FIFA’s decision means the Confederation can schedule three matches in each of the September and October 2021 and January and March 2022 FIFA international match windows.

This will enable Concacaf to begin its eight-team Final Round of the Concacaf Qualifiers in September 2021, following a First Round played in March and June 2021 and a Second Round in June 2021 (June 2021 includes two FIFA international match windows).

On learning, the Warriors’ opening match is at home to Guyana on March 25, Fenwick said: “It’s a bit of important information for us at this stage as it relates to the schedule of the World Cup qualifiers. We knew the teams before but now we know exactly what we’re going to face.

“Being at home in the opening game is good and we will prepare as best as possible for this first game against Guyana which we know has a bit of history with T&T and will certainly be no pushovers. Matter of fact, no team will be a walkover in these qualifiers.”

The draw for the Concacaf Qualifiers for FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 took place in August 2020 and with the certainty provided by FIFA’s decision regarding the triple-windows, Concacaf can now confirm the schedule.

The First Round will be played between the Concacaf Member Associations ranked 6-35 based on the FIFA Men’s Ranking as of July 16, 2020.

Fenwick continued: “With this schedule before us now it tells you how important it was for us to have gotten the suspension lifted and having the Normalisation Committee in charge of our football.

“I know for a fact that chairman Robert Hadad and the rest of the Normalisation Committee are at work and are putting things together for us to be able to breathe a bit easier and for all the right conditions to be in place for our teams. I’m grateful that we’d been able to restart training last month and now we can look forward to executing our plans ahead of March.”

The FIFA Council also voted that the 2021 Club World Cup will be hosted by Japan in late 2021 with seven teams. A Major League Soccer (MLS) team has never advanced to that tournament, though four remain in contention when the Concacaf Champions League returns to action December 15 with Atlanta United, LAFC, New York City FC and the Montreal Impact all competing.

The 2021 Club World Cup ensures there will be two editions held within the same calendar year, since this year’s tournament is being held February 1-11, 2021 in Qatar. The reigning Club World Cup champion is Liverpool, snapping a streak of three straight titles by Real Madrid.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on January 09, 2021, 04:55:55 AM
Morris sees uphill task for T&T in World Cup qualifiers.
By Nigel Simon (T&T Guardian).


Former national men’s football team captain and Futsal team coach Clayton “JB” Morris says this country faces a difficult task to qualify for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar.

T&T under the guidance of new head coach, former England World Cup player, Terry Fenwick will begin its revised Concacaf qualifiers on March 25 at home to neighbours Guayana in Group F of the preliminary round.

The 2006 Germany World Cup qualifiers, T&T will also face St Kitts & Nevis, Puerto Rico, and The Bahamas from which only the group winners will advance to the next phase of qualification where a possible clash with El Salvador awaits for a spot in the ten-team.

In addition to El Salvador, the other teams in Pool A are Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada, Montserrat and US Virgin Islands.

Each team in the six preliminary groups will play every other team in their group once, playing a total of four matches; two home and two away.

These games will be played in the FIFA match windows of March 2021 and the first FIFA match Window of June 2021.

At the end of the First Round, the six group winners will progress to the Second Round, with the winner of A meeting the winner of F in a home and away direct elimination format, from which the winner progresses to the Final Round where Concacaf’s top five nations, Mexico, USA, Costa Rica, Jamaica and Honduras respectively, all advance based on their world rankings.

Looking ahead of the National Team World Cup qualifying campaign, Morris the new T&T Super League president and cooach of the University of T&T (UTT) painted a difficult picture for coach Fenwick, who previously led local clubs San Juan Jabloteh and Central FC to domestic league and regional cup triumphs.

Morris told Guardian Media Sports that, “To be honest putting myself in the national senior team coach position, I really don’t envy him because it's really a challenging time you know as the covid-19 brought about a change in that we have to get accustom to the new norm and football is a team sport and looking at it, the players who are training now I really not sure if those players will make up the bulk of the team going into the first World Cup game because the level as we know in football, you could train how much you train but if you are not playing then you won't really know where you are and how far you have to go."

He added, "So I think it's going to be a really uphill battle for us to say we can really qualify, but again at the same time, I think the other teams will be in a similar position. The only advantage I think that the coaches in those other teams may have is training because as I said I don’t feel the players in the squad now will make up the bulk of the team, so then we will be going with players who may be training outside but football is a team sport and chemistry and without practicing and playing games together that is a challenge."

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on January 09, 2021, 05:24:58 AM
See you in 2026!
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: ABTrini on January 09, 2021, 02:42:01 PM
See you in 2026!

This is not a rocket science revelation- unless we restructure our approach to team selection,  create a local competitive structure leading up to identification of talent, instill a competitive process for foreign based players to earn and demonstrate justifiable reason to be on the team and not just a given that they could be a walk on.

Need to be a revamp -  national zonal programs and refocus them as developmental programs that could feed into a national team Not as some regional league beneath the pro league-

Put a structured program in place that all lead up to national program. Have regional/ zonal national competitions- North south east west Tobago combine teams in competitive playoffs.
WC -qualifications is a process not having local sessions with some players and then wait for availability of foreign players then have a hastily put together camp and go for it!!!!

This is not a sustainable system  for ongoing  success to WC qualification with the limited talent pool we have.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Tallman on January 11, 2021, 08:15:50 PM
WATCH: Men's Senior Team continue World Cup qualifying preparations

https://www.youtube.com/v/waJZ-5Zq2bc
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on January 30, 2021, 04:09:47 PM
‘Don’t treat us like a scrape-up side’; Joevin and Hyland discuss wish-list for W/Cup campaign, a tough 2020, and USA challenge.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


Trinidad and Tobago Men’s National Senior Team head coach Terry Fenwick is expected to name his squad tomorrow to face the United States in a friendly match on 31 January in Orlando.

Two names that are sure to be absent from his list are Fenwick’s most high-profiled players at present: the US Major League Soccer (MLS) duo of 30-year-old attacking midfielder Kevin Molino and 29-year-old winger Joevin Jones.

Jones, who finished the 2020 season as MLS Cup runner-up and Western Conference champion, said he and Molino were initially allowed a vacation by Fenwick, only to be belatedly invited to join the Soca Warriors training squad for the game.

The two players are well into their off-season and preparing to swap clubs. Jones said the timing did not feel right.

“Before we came home, Fenwick said he would give us some time to spend with our families,” Jones told Wired868. “He then asked us to join the team for the game; but right now I am waiting to hear where I may need to go [to sign my next professional contract].

“I told him I would sit out this one but I will be ready for the World Cup qualifiers.”

The upcoming friendly falls outside the Fifa international match window and, as such, clubs are not obligated to release players to be involved.

Molino recently agreed a move from Minnesota United to MLS Cup winners, Columbus Crew, while Jones’ future is also in flux, as he weighs up a new offer from Sounders and proposals from other teams.

Jones hinted that an intense outing against the United States offered more cons than pros. But he remains committed to the Warriors.

“My brother (Alvin Jones) says everything is running smooth in training and it’s going nice for now,” said Jones. “So after the trip, I will ask how things went.”

Jones admitted that he felt the Warriors’ choice of sparring partner is, to be diplomatic, a brave one. Although US coach Gregg Berhalter could not select his full squad, he still has a fully professional roster with experienced players like forward Jozy Altidore, winger Paul Arriola and defenders Aaron Long and Walker Zimmerman.

In contrast, at least half of Fenwick’s training team have little to no experience of top flight senior football—whether for club or country.

“My opinion is that it is a death trap,” said Jones. “We don’t have our full squad and America is in camp training with guys who are MLS players that play week in and week out. When last did some of our players have a good 90 minutes?

“Those practice matches [that the team played over the last two months] are not intense or physical or challenging. So they can’t prepare you for this. For me, I think that was a bad game to choose.

“[…] I know football is funny and you never, never know; because it is played on the day. But on paper, we are not ready for this game as yet.”

It is not a case of ‘us’ and ‘them’, though. Jones sees himself as an elder statesman of the national team now. He will be 30 on 3 August and gave the impression of a man who is considering his legacy.

For players within solid football programmes, the dream is about winning trophies and starring on the big stage. It says something that in Trinidad and Tobago—a country that played in one senior Fifa World Cup and five World Youth Cups (four boys and one girls competition)—the players aim significantly lower.

Jones, who made his first international outing in 2010, just wants to join a national team camp that looks and feels as though it is about serious business.

“We want better uniforms to train in, we want to feel like we are a part of a national team and not a ‘scrape-up side’ with players training in different pants and socks,” he said. “We want togetherness and a professional approach with things running smooth off and on the field, so we don’t have to worry about payments and stuff. We want to be able to go into games worry free.

“This [dream] isn’t for us—Kevin [Molino] and I maybe have three or four years left—but this is for the future. This is for the younger guys. We want them to feel that this is a national team and [it is something special]; and have that motivation to train harder to keep their spot.”

National players have often been provided with a single kit as hotel wear for team camps. It means that they were asked to wear the same jersey and pants at every meal and team meeting for four or five days straight.

It is unsanitary at best.

Jones also knows the benefit of efficient travel arrangements. In the MLS, teams often fly commercial over long distances and management does everything possible to lessen the ‘wear and tear’.

“Sometimes there are direct flights available and the TTFA will book a cheaper flight with two or three stops,” said Jones. “And even then, they wouldn’t do the little things that can make it more comfortable for you. Even if they can’t do first class, at least get you a window or aisle seat, or try for less time at the airport.

“Sometimes guys have to spend 13 or 14 hours at the airport and they don’t even give you money to spend the night in a hotel. We want our management to be more respectful to the players than that, and more professional.”

Team captain Khaleem Hyland, 31, agrees with Jones. At present, Hyland plays professionally in Saudi Arabia and it takes him at least 24 hours to get to Trinidad via London.

“The length of time you stay in the airport is very important when you are competing at international level,” said Hyland. “We are one of the few teams who still have these long [stop-overs] when travelling to games.”

Hyland also hopes for better team camps for the squad, as he noted the lack of amenities at the Home of Football in Couva.

“As a national team, we have a so-called Home of Football but no gym or gym instructor, and things like a hot tub and ice bath—which are very important for recovery and strength training,” said Hyland. “Things like a table tennis board and video games help in team bonding and give you something to do on camp and most teams outside know this.

“[…] Still, I am in contact with [normalisation committee chairman Robert] Hadad and he has the same ideas. I know we need to give him time. Rome cannot be built in one day, but I hope for the future generation all of these things are installed.”

Jones secured another Western Conference honour in 2020, as Sounders edged Molino’s employers in the conference final. But they were routed 3-0 in the MLS Cup final on 12 December. (Jones, Molino and Hyland grew up in Carenage and are all former Mucurapo Senior Comprehensives students.)

It means Jones, a gifted, versatile left footed player, has two MLS Cup titles and two runners-up medals to go with four Western Conference trophies.

He admits though that it was hardest season; and his worst. His daughter, Joneeka, was born on 7 July 2019; but she and his live-in girlfriend, Tamika, were denied a visa to join him in the United States.

The Covid-19 pandemic meant he was stuck at home in Seattle without his loved ones, who remained in Trinidad.

“The club’s Covid protocols were really serious, and we couldn’t even go to eating places—we were only allowed to go to the grocery,” said Jones. “Then we would be testing every other day and we were training without even knowing for sure when the league was going to restart.

“It was a challenging, roller-coaster year, especially in terms of my personal life. Most of the Trinidad and Tobago players don’t have their family with them and at times like that, with the Covid, you want your family nearby and they are far away. My daughter was a year and some months old and I couldn’t see her.”

Jones then had a ligament injury followed by an ankle injury, which robbed him of over two months of playing time in total. On his return to the first team, coach Brian Schmetzer assigned him to the right flank, as opposed to his usual spot on the left. The results were not spectacular.

“It is the poorest season I ever had in my career,” said Jones. “First, I was picking up injuries. Then when I was playing, I just wasn’t clicking and I wasn’t consistent.

“[…] The team was winning when I came back and I think the coach didn’t really want to change things, so he put me on the right and asked me to tuck in more and give them an extra man in the midfield.

“I tried to do it but I didn’t think it was playing to my strengths, which is running at people and bringing in crosses.”

Jones is weighing up his next professional move at present.

“You never know what the future holds but God is working,” he said. “For me, I am willing to go where ever I would be comfortable playing and where my family would be safe.

“I have now won two MLS Cup finals and lost two, and won four Western cups. There are guys playing their whole lives here who never won as much.

“I can look back and say I won titles in Finland [with HJK Helsinki], Trinidad and Tobago [with W Connection], and America. That is a plus for me.”

He wants to succeed in the red, black and white gear too. But he is just as anxious to make a difference by pushing for improvements for players.

Hyland feels the same way. He just signed a two-year deal in Saudi Arabia, where he has played professionally since 2017—after nine years in Belgium. But health concerns for his father-in-law separated him from his wife, Cherise Baird-Hyland, and daughter, Kaylee Grace Hyland, for much of 2020.

“My father-in-law had a stroke and my wife is the one who helps take care of him,” said Hyland. “So it would be difficult for her to stay here and do that because he needs assistance. My daughter also moved from school in Belgium to Trinidad, and we don’t want to keep moving her from school to school to follow me.

“I don’t have so many years left in my career, so hopefully I will reunite with them sooner rather than later.”

Hyland also had his injury problems last year. A scan after a knock in training with Al-Batin revealed that he had been playing with a broken bone in his right instep for years.

“Apparently it first happened while I was at [Belgian top flight club] Genk [between 2011 to 2015],” he said. “[…] The doctor said it should be one month before I restart training, but I was playing games again within three weeks. I don’t think it was a risk.

“The doctor said I would get slight discomfort for months but it is not enough of a problem for me to stop. The problem is already removed.”

Discomfort and arduous flight notwithstanding, Hyland looks forward to rejoining the Warriors for the Qatar campaign. He is one of several players in the current national pool who represented Trinidad and Tobago at the Egypt 2009 Under-20 World Cup, along with: Sheldon Bateau, Daneil Cyrus, Curtis Gonzales, Leston Paul, Mekeil Williams, Aubrey David, Marcus Joseph, Sean De Silva, Glenroy Samuel, Robert Primus, Jean-Luc Rochford, and Molino.

It remains uncertain how many of them will get a chance under Fenwick.

“My goal is to help as much as I can, give back to the national team with my experience and also lead from in front,” said Hyland. “I think we have a good group of players, who know and love and respect each other. And hopefully that can take us to where we want to be.”

Hyland is involved in negotiations with the normalisation committee, on behalf of the current players, for match fees and per diem for their trip to Orlando. They hope to reach an understanding before the boys step on to the plane.

Again, he complimented Hadad and the normalisation committee for their approach to talks so far.

“I wish the team best of luck against the USA,” said Hyland. “It will not be an easy game, [as] the team is now forming and it is Terry’s first game. They just have to work hard, give their best and enjoy it. At the end of the day, everything is in God’s hands.”

(Career by numbers)

Khaleem Hyland

Caps: 78 starts, 9 substitute appearances, 4 goals. (Ejected once as substitute against Cuba, so not given a cap.)

Last goal: Scored with a shot from outside the box in a 2-1 World Cup qualifying win away to Guatemala on 13 November 2015.

Highlights: Helped Trinidad and Tobago to the Concacaf Gold Cup quarterfinal round in 2013 and 2015, and played in the Egypt 2009 Under-20 World Cup. His two World Cup qualifying goals puts him level with Andy Aleong, Leo ‘Twinkle Toes’ Brewster, Philbert Jones and ‘Marvellous’ Marvin Faustin.

Joevin Jones

Caps: 67 starts, 10 substitute appearances, 8 goals.

Last goal: Scored from the penalty spot away to Martinique, as T&T fought back to pull off a 1-1 tie on 6 September 2019.

Highlights: Helped Trinidad and Tobago to the Concacaf Gold Cup quarterfinal round in 2013 and 2015. Has three World Cup qualifying goals, which is as many as Everald ‘Gally’ Cummings, Cornell Glen, Leonson Lewis, and Kerry Jamerson.

Kevin Molino

Caps: 41 starts, 9 substitute appearances, 21 goals.

Last goal: Scored the opener in 2-2 Concacaf Nations League draw with Martinique at the Hasely Crawford Stadium on 10 September 2019.

Highlights: Helped Trinidad and Tobago to the Concacaf Gold Cup quarterfinal round in 2013 and played in the Korea Republic 2007 Under-17 World Cup and Egypt 2009 Under-20 World Cup tournaments. His four World Cup qualifying goals put him level with Hutson ‘Barber’ Charles and Lester Peltier.

Editor’s Note: Trinidad and Tobago’s record scorer in World Cup qualifying competitions is Stern John with 20 goals.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: pull stones on January 30, 2021, 11:29:06 PM
I’m so glad that we have a whole new crop of foreign based players to pick up the slack, all we need now is an organized federation to keep them happy and by avoiding the silly money games with players and coaches. I had to watch for years these trinbago born players sabotaging the team when they don’t like a coach, playing half hearted and running to the media to complain for every little thing, when these same players are being treated like kings in foreign leagues.

renown Players like Messi neymar and Ronaldo come home to play for their respective countries and endure the same lack of facilities and amenities but endure for love of country, and put out their best performances surpassing the efforts they make for their clubs all for the love of country.

I’ve watched jovin, cato and cyrus play like they didn’t care to be there, players tackling half heartedly and escorting attackers to their 18 yard box where dim wit marvin was waiting all the way out off his line giving attackers so much angles to score. In addition these lads are indisciplined and could poison your dressing room with their malcontent attitudes and longing to flout the rules, like molino and mikel williams with their boat ride escapades.

Terry needs to be careful with those old lads, and if I was him I would have moved on totally, let the kids show them how football is played, the same way they beat the USA without jovin, kenwin, bateau, mikel and Kevin molino. time to rid of these boys terry and start afresh.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on January 31, 2021, 09:29:34 AM
I beg to differ with Molino. He was recovering from his ACL injuries. In the Gold Cup he was half fit and still looked better than most players on our squad.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on February 25, 2021, 02:18:30 AM
Report: More than 6,500 migrant workers have died during Qatar's World Cup prep
By Jason Owens
Yahoo Sports.


More than 6,500 migrant workers have died in Qatar amid the nation's preparation to host the 2022 World Cup, The Guardian reports.

The report cites government data from the home nations of migrant workers, including India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. The data have been compiled since Qatar was awarded the World Cup in 2010, working out to an average of 12 deaths per week, according to the report.

FIFA awarded the World Cup to Qatar despite widespread concerns over human rights violations and treatment of migrant workers. Amnesty International has since documented conditions of workers being "exploited" and "subjected to forced labor."

"They can’t change jobs, they can’t leave the country, and they often wait months to get paid," a report from the human rights organization states.

Guardian estimate: Actual death toll 'considerably higher'

According to The Guardian, 2,711 workers from India, 1,641 from Nepal, 1,018 from Bangladesh, 824 from Pakistan and 557 from Sri Lanka have died working in Qatar since 2010. The Guardian estimates that the actual death toll of migrant workers is "considerably higher" since the data it cites is limited to the listed countries.

The nation with a population of less than 3 million is depending on 2 million migrant workers to man its labor force. The Philippines and Kenya are among other nations to send migrant workers to Qatar, according to the report.

The listed causes of death include electrocution, blunt injuries due to a fall from height and suicide. Most of the deaths are listed as "natural" while citing heart or respiratory failure, according to the report.

Daytime temperatures in Qatar can approach 120 degrees during the summer. Normally played in the summer, Qatar's World Cup will be held in November and December because of the oppressive heat.

Massive nationwide construction project, including a new city

Nick McGeehan of labor rights organization FairSquare Projects told The Guardian that World Cup construction accounts for much of the death toll.

“A very significant proportion of the migrant workers who have died since 2011 were only in the country because Qatar won the right to host the World Cup,” he said.

Qatar has built or is building seven new stadiums in addition to significant infrastructure upgrades, including roadways, hotels and an airport in preparation to host the World Cup. The opening and closing matches will be held at Lusail Iconic Stadium in Lusail, a city being built from the ground up ahead of the World Cup.

atar: Death toll within 'expected range'

Qatar's government didn't dispute The Guardian's findings and characterized the death toll as "expected" in a statement to publication.

“The mortality rate among these communities is within the expected range for the size and demographics of the population," the statement read. "However, every lost life is a tragedy, and no effort is spared in trying to prevent every death in our country."

FIFA also provided a statement to The Guardian.

“With the very stringent health and safety measures on site … the frequency of accidents on FIFA World Cup construction sites has been low when compared to other major construction projects around the world,” the statement reads, per The Guardian.

FIFA did not provide The Guardian with data to back up its claim.

Why do workers risk these conditions?

According to Amnesty International, migrant workers seek employment in Qatar to escape poverty and unemployment at home. It describes dirty living conditions with eight workers living in a single room once they arrive. Workers are sometimes promised one salary only to be provided a lower wage once they arrive.

The group spoke to workers who agreed to anywhere from $500 to $4,300 in recruitment fees to agents that left them in debt before they began working in Qatar.

(https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/uDkp.vqGDI8NldlF3J2cwA--/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MDtoPTY0Ni4zNzM2MjYzNzM2MjY0/https://s.yimg.com/os/creatr-uploaded-images/2021-02/9affc960-7722-11eb-b5fb-3f110f916e9a)
Workers walk toward the construction site of the Lusail stadium which will be build for the upcoming 2022 FIFA World Cup during a stadium tour in Doha, Qatar, Dec. 20, 2019. (REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on February 25, 2021, 06:22:19 AM
If this is true and I believe most of it is true, it is real sad, very sad. For the game we love, WE indirectly have "blood on our hands". But to to be honest, if I or some of us were born it that situation, we would have done the same thing to raise our family out of poverty. RIP and condolences to the work and to their families.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on March 03, 2021, 06:25:18 PM

Jamaica plot audacious move to call-up TEN English stars, including Michail Antonio, Demarai Gray, Max Aarons and
 Nathan Redmond ahead of next year's World Cup - and eight
 of them have already applied for their Jamaican passports!



https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-9321995/Jamaica-plot-call-10-English-stars-including-Michail-Antonio-Demarai-Gray-Aarons.html#reader-comments

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 25, 2021, 04:47:31 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ExSyqQpXAAIwmip?format=jpg&name=small)


Results across confederations. (https://www.fifa.com/worldcup/news/follow-the-world-cup-qualifiers-live#portugal-v-azerbaijan-fifa-world-cup-2022-qatar-qualifier)
Title: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
Post by: Trini _2026 on March 25, 2021, 12:12:44 PM
I see jamaica is giving the USA a good game  and they are playing with 6 new english born players who tappa never saw before against a better usa team.    they down 1-0 but a good game
tappa is taking the risk of startiung 6 new player he never sw before omg .... and leave the locals on the bench ,,,
Title: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
Post by: Deeks on March 25, 2021, 02:52:03 PM
I saw the JA-USA game. 4-1. I think JA played well. I was impressed with the way they kept their form in defence. The US dominated and could have score more but the JA team held firm. The only thing I will say about their foreign born and ours, is the quality is in their favour. I think all JA players are from England and play in a better league than ours.
Title: Re: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
Post by: Deeks on March 25, 2021, 02:53:08 PM
Germany dominating Iceland. 2-0. Iceland putting up stiff resistance.
Title: Re: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
Post by: maxg on March 25, 2021, 03:09:44 PM
The difference with the JA English and us is “we go beat dem”. Until such time that they prove me wrong. Hopefully much later than sooner.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
Post by: pull stones on March 25, 2021, 03:10:28 PM
Haiti v belize is on according to livescore.com and they are in the 5” of the game 0-0
Title: Re: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
Post by: pull stones on March 25, 2021, 03:31:22 PM
I don’t know if we ever give the United states mentality any thought, but from what I have observed they harp on things and live for revenge when things are not that serious. losing out on that last world cup seriously took a chunk out of their ass and they obviously wants to send a message to all concacaf that they will never allow that to happen again.

as it stands they got their revenge and more than their pound of flesh back from us with two devastating defeats, or should i say drobbing in the extreme. we in the Caribbean really needs to cater for our sports by partnering with Europe to get academies and proper development programs and leagues, because the United states and Mexico will dominate the two spots in concacaf, and the rest of us have to fight for scraps, the one and a half spot, and that could never be fair.

I believe CFU should be separated and be our own confederation since concacaf and Africa is the only confederations that have to go through rounds of qualification. they need to give CFU 2 spots and central and North America two spots since we have 35 countries compared to their 10. we will never grow as a region joined to this crazy absurd arrangement.
Title: Re: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
Post by: gawd on pitch on March 25, 2021, 07:44:24 PM
I watching Panama vs Barbados. 77th minute 0-0. Panama is HOME. .

Latapy might pull off the result of the night. Bim players playing their heart out. This is probably the best I have seen Bim play.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 26, 2021, 05:14:15 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ExYRc8LWgAI8jmO?format=jpg&name=small)

Only ONE goal scored among the losing teams.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 26, 2021, 05:36:25 AM
I watching Panama vs Barbados. 77th minute 0-0. Panama is HOME. .

Latapy might pull off the result of the night. Bim players playing their heart out. This is probably the best I have seen Bim play.

Highlights of Panama vs Barbados. (https://youtu.be/syxQNDOwnW0)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: pull stones on March 26, 2021, 06:42:14 AM
I watching Panama vs Barbados. 77th minute 0-0. Panama is HOME. .

Latapy might pull off the result of the night. Bim players playing their heart out. This is probably the best I have seen Bim play.

Highlights of Panama vs Barbados. (https://youtu.be/syxQNDOwnW0)
can you please post some TT guyana highlights mate? even the full game will be most welcome.  thanks.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 26, 2021, 07:01:53 AM
I watching Panama vs Barbados. 77th minute 0-0. Panama is HOME. .

Latapy might pull off the result of the night. Bim players playing their heart out. This is probably the best I have seen Bim play.

Highlights of Panama vs Barbados. (https://youtu.be/syxQNDOwnW0)
can you please post some TT guyana highlights mate? even the full game will be most welcome.  thanks.

Hold this for now. (https://youtu.be/mxZtlPo2HUA)

And this. (https://youtu.be/LdY3p6agYSA)

Also this. (https://youtu.be/viZZoBFKvqQ)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on March 26, 2021, 08:12:27 AM
What !!!!! No fire and thunder this morning on the thread. Winning is all that matters! Congrats.!
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: maxg on March 26, 2021, 10:50:41 PM
I not counting no chickens, but the winner of our group will play which group winner in the 2nd rounds  ? or id it a home and away with all the other 5 ? I think it's the former, but can't find which plays which.

"New format
On 27 July 2020, CONCACAF announced a new qualifying format for the World Cup.[6]

First round: CONCACAF teams ranked 6 to 35 based on the FIFA rankings of July 2020 are drawn into six groups of five and play single round-robin matches (two home and two away), with group winners qualifying for the second round.
Second round: The six first round group winners will play in a two-legged home-and-away series. The three winners will advance to the final round.
Third round: The three second round winners will join the top five CONCACAF teams based on the FIFA rankings of July 2020 and play home-and-away round-robin matches in one single group. The top three teams qualify for the World Cup, and the fourth-placed team advances to the inter-confederation play-offs."


Ok found it..Was in same Wiki

Second round
Main article: 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification – CONCACAF Second Round
The second round will see the six group winners from the first round playing in three home-and-away ties of predetermined pairings. The winners will advance to the third round.

Team 1   Agg.   Team 2   1st leg   2nd leg
First round Group F winner      First round Group A winner   12 Jun   15 Jun
First round Group E winner      First round Group B winner   12 Jun   15 Jun
First round Group D winner      First round Group C winner   12 Jun   15 Jun
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 27, 2021, 11:16:24 AM
Highlights: Antigua and Barbuda vs Monserrat. (https://youtu.be/8qgOJf-ZMmo)

Highlights: Curacao vs St. Vincent and the Grenadines. (https://youtu.be/S0Ag4VqEuaQ)

Highlights: Guatemala vs Cuba. (https://youtu.be/81xzjC_2KyE)

Highlights: Haiti vs Belize. (https://youtu.be/t9LLupkm0bo)

Highlights: El Salvador vs Grenada. (https://youtu.be/pamGKR3jPz8)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 28, 2021, 01:43:51 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ExiHMYwXIAEBIT7?format=jpg&name=small)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 28, 2021, 01:52:04 AM
Highlights: Suriname vs Cayman Islands. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAQ-NZsTER8)

Highlights: British Virgin Islands vs Guatemala. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQykZpZwyGI)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: lefty on March 28, 2021, 07:53:41 AM
it difficult to measure how much of d SVG result is SVG looking woeful and how much is Curacao being competent, We take seven from d states but I can't honestly say dat all ah we player look like dey shoelaces were tied together, some yes but not all....SVG seems to have lost a step.....or three, dey won't really good, but ah cyah remember dem lookin dis awful even when we gih den 6
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Tiresais on March 28, 2021, 10:51:29 AM
SVG not looking good at the moment. No surprises in those results, although arguably BVI did better than expected.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 28, 2021, 06:28:28 PM
Highlights: Dominica vs Panama. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6A1UcLSMh8s)

Highlights: Montserrat vs El Salvador. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHG58EMArkE)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Tiresais on March 29, 2021, 12:41:49 AM
Montserrat have thr strongest team in their history, so if they were going to seriously threaten now is the time
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 29, 2021, 07:13:56 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Exm5LjsWgAEHjPe?format=jpg&name=small)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 29, 2021, 10:41:17 AM
WATCH: Cayman Islands president, Alfredo Whittaker, speaking about the logistical challenges of playing during COVID-19. He stresses that the federation has kept a promise made to players of the Cayman Islands regarding participation in all official tournaments. Whittaker was speaking several days prior to the postponement of the Canada vs. Cayman Islands (described below).

Whittaker confirmed off air that his association is spending around $214,000 to cater the travel costs, stayover, stadium rental, player wages and much more. He noted that over $30,000 is being spent on airfare and each player will receive a stipend of $100 per day. (https://www.caymancompass.com/2021/03/20/alfredo-whittaker-speaks-on-wc-qualifiers/)


https://www.youtube.com/v/2ZvIzGz1GeE&t=338s


Canada's WC qualifying game postponed
The Canadian Press


The complexities of executing sporting events in a global pandemic were illustrated Sunday when Canada's World Cup qualifier against the Cayman Islands was pushed back a day to Monday.

At issue were the pre-match COVID-19 tests taken by the Cayman Islands delegation, which did not meet FIFA requirements.

It appears the Caymans delegation did its best but was foiled by a plane ride from hell as it tried to get to Florida from Suriname, where it lost 3-0 on Wednesday in the capital of Paramaribo.

Alfredo Whittaker, president of the Cayman Islands Football Association, said his team missed its scheduled testing upon arrival because of travel issues.

The team's charter was originally scheduled to arrive at a private airport in Sarasota, only to be turned away by U.S. Customs. The plane was diverted to Miami but, as it was about to descend, the pilot was told he could not land because it was not a scheduled flight. The plane eventually landed in Tampa with the team not getting to its hotel until 1:30 a.m. local time Friday.

The delegation underwent a rapid antigen test, which detects protein fragments specific to COVID-19. While the rapid test can deliver results in as quick as 15 minutes, the results are not always accurate.

FIFA requires a PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test which is considered the gold standard in testing for the virus. It involves a lab testing a sample typically collected using a swab inserted into a person’s nose or throat. Turnaround time for the PCR test is longer.

"We did a rapid test because there was no lab around the area that would give us results until Monday or Tuesday," Whittaker said. "But miraculously we managed to get that lab that was originally closed on Saturday and Sunday to open for us (Sunday)."

The results are expected to be ready between 2 and 3 p.m. ET Monday, ahead of the 6 p.m. kickoff at the IMG Academy in Bradenton. (https://canadasoccer.com/national-teams/matches/national-team-match-live/?matchId=3118)

News of the one-day postponement came out Sunday in brief releases from Canada Soccer and FIFA in the hour before the scheduled 4 p.m. kickoff. The decision to delay the match was made "to ensure the safety of all participants in the match," according to FIFA.

Whittaker said Canada Soccer had been "very understanding."

"We're living in difficult times. These are requirements and we respect requirements," he added.

Whittaker noted the Caymans have been pretty much COVID-free.

According to the Cayman Islands government website, the country had 487 confirmed cases of COVID and two deaths as of Friday. The four most recent cases were tourists, who tested positive following routine screening.

As of Friday, 28,861 (44 per cent of the estimated population) had received at least one dose of the Pfizer vaccine, with 26 per cent having completed the two-dose course.

The Canadian team was still at its hotel in nearby Sarasota when it got news of the problem Sunday. Canada coach John Herdman said his squad took news of the postponement in stride, after some initial "disappointment, shock."

"I think we're used to the many ups and downs that this world keeps throwing at us," Herdman said in a video posted by Canada Soccer.

"If anything we'll look at the positives which are more recovery, more regen time for those players that played on Thursday," he added.

Herdman said he pulled his team's leadership group together in wake of the news. The decision was made to go ahead and hold a "light, bright" training session Sunday.

"We just turn the page and (Monday) will be the big day for us."

Canada Soccer said teams are required to provide FIFA with negative COVID-19 PCR test results for all players and staff taken no earlier than 72 hours before accessing the venue. Without the test results, teams can't access the stadium.

Canada Soccer said it had "engaged a laboratory to be on-site with the team to conduct its testing" and that all of its players and staff had received negative testing before arriving and while in camp in Florida.

Sunday's game was officially a home game for the Caymans. But the three-island group has the same 14-day quarantine as Canada so opted to shift the site to Bradenton.

The current FIFA international window runs through Tuesday for CONCACAF teams. But the delay in the Caymans game means extending whatever quarantines are in place at the other end when player return home.

Canada captain Atiba Hutchinson left Friday to return to his club team Besiktas in Turkey as part of an apparent prearranged deal.

The Canadian men are ranked 73rd in the world, 120 places above the Cayman part-timers.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Trini _2026 on March 29, 2021, 11:44:35 AM
Highlights: Dominica vs Panama. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6A1UcLSMh8s)

Highlights: Montserrat vs El Salvador. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHG58EMArkE)

 that was a good panama side ....
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on March 29, 2021, 11:58:33 AM
"We did a rapid test because there was no lab around the area that would give us results until Monday or Tuesday," Whittaker said. "But miraculously we managed to get that lab that was originally closed on Saturday and Sunday to open for us (Sunday)."

It seems not only TT in the same covid boat. It is so sad. None one the Concacaf countries with resources or Concacaf tired to help the smaller or least fortunate countries with the incredible laborious logistics. The rum and coconut drinkers are on their own.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 29, 2021, 07:17:10 PM
Cayman Islands 0 - Canada 11
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 29, 2021, 07:22:42 PM
It seems not only TT in the same covid boat. It is so sad. None one the Concacaf countries with resources or Concacaf tired to help the smaller or least fortunate countries with the incredible laborious logistics. The rum and coconut drinkers are on their own.

Quite right. Very striking. Seems that more should have been done. Here's a team that invested a lot of resources to place itself in the crosshair of an 11-0 loss as a servant of CONCACAF football.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: soccerman on March 29, 2021, 07:31:58 PM
Cayman Islands 0 - Canada 11
:o Looks like Canada sent a message.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: pull stones on March 29, 2021, 07:55:49 PM
It seems not only TT in the same covid boat. It is so sad. None one the Concacaf countries with resources or Concacaf tired to help the smaller or least fortunate countries with the incredible laborious logistics. The rum and coconut drinkers are on their own.

Quite right. Very striking. Seems that more should have been done. Here's a team that invested a lot of resources to place itself in the crosshair of an 11-0 loss as a servant of CONCACAF football.
please, cayman is simply the second worst pick up team this side of the Atlantic after angulla, didn’t we beat Anguilla recently by the same ridiculous margin? to prove my point tomorrow barbados plays anguilla and I’m betting that they win handsomely by more than 5 clear goals. they are the andora and the feroe islands of the caribbean. touché. big deal.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 30, 2021, 03:05:11 AM
It seems not only TT in the same covid boat. It is so sad. None one the Concacaf countries with resources or Concacaf tired to help the smaller or least fortunate countries with the incredible laborious logistics. The rum and coconut drinkers are on their own.

Quite right. Very striking. Seems that more should have been done. Here's a team that invested a lot of resources to place itself in the crosshair of an 11-0 loss as a servant of CONCACAF football.
please, cayman is simply the second worst pick up team this side of the Atlantic after angulla, didn’t we beat Anguilla recently by the same ridiculous margin? to prove my point tomorrow barbados plays anguilla and I’m betting that they win handsomely by more than 5 clear goals. they are the andora and the feroe islands of the caribbean. touché. big deal.

I hear yuh ... However, if I design a tournament that includes a team (its quality aside), I need to weigh in at less than armslength. Even more when there is an umbrella organization and member associations. Recall this is a factor in Haiti having a woeful opening match in Olympic qualifying.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 30, 2021, 10:10:55 AM
Highlights: Cayman Islands vs Canada. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwByrbaDIic)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 30, 2021, 06:30:05 PM
Guyana 4-0 The Bahamas
Belize 5-0 Turks and Caicos Islands
St. Vincent and the Grenadines 3-0 British Virgin Islands
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: pull stones on March 30, 2021, 06:54:02 PM
Guyana 4-0 The Bahamas
Belize 5-0 Turks and Caicos Islands
St. Vincent and the Grenadines 3-0 British Virgin Islands
latapy catching hell to best anguilla, wouldn’t that be a slap in the face to lose to or draw with anguilla...the worst team in fifa?
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 30, 2021, 07:09:23 PM
Grenada vs USVI 1-0 FT

Bermuda vs Aruba 2-0 HT

Barbados vs Anguilla 0-0 at 79'.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on March 30, 2021, 07:13:45 PM
Guyana 4-0 The Bahamas
Belize 5-0 Turks and Caicos Islands
St. Vincent and the Grenadines 3-0 British Virgin Islands
latapy catching hell to best anguilla, wouldn’t that be a slap in the face to lose to or draw with anguilla...the worst team in fifa?

Barbados just scored.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on April 02, 2021, 05:30:16 AM
Mikele Leigertwood speaks with SportsMax about Antigua & Barbuda's WC qualifying campaign. (https://youtu.be/F8eWs5qta94)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on April 02, 2021, 06:02:12 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Exxv8nbU4AITtqV?format=jpg&name=small)

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on June 03, 2021, 07:27:35 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E27BNKJWUAE-4jb?format=jpg&name=small)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on June 03, 2021, 11:59:43 AM
India vs Qatar     https://www.alkass.net/alkass/live.aspx?ch=one  Qatar 1-0 final

Australia vs Kuwait  https://www.alkass.net/alkass/live.aspx?ch=one  Aus. 1-0 in the 1:02 minutes of the game.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on June 05, 2021, 07:06:17 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E3FqsheX0AIk10j?format=jpg&name=small)

Guatemala vs SVG (https://youtu.be/fAfB7s0cCH0)

Dominican Republic vs Barbados (https://youtu.be/CvqP-etUSFE)

Nicaragua vs Belize (https://youtu.be/J8EAvC7xl4k)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on June 05, 2021, 07:31:08 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E3FnfgXXEAA0QtN?format=jpg&name=small)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on June 06, 2021, 09:02:59 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E3KkQmUWEAcsdt1?format=jpg&name=small)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Peong on June 06, 2021, 05:27:28 PM
That is the stark embarrassing reality of our performance.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on June 09, 2021, 03:16:57 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E3aVCLWWUAgQosj?format=jpg&name=small)

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E3aVCCAWEAMP1Nv?format=jpg&name=small)

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on June 09, 2021, 07:13:03 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E3aVPllXIAMxVn0?format=jpg&name=small)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on June 09, 2021, 09:01:48 AM
The only unbeaten team in the group not going.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: pull stones on June 09, 2021, 09:54:27 AM
The only unbeaten team in the group not going.
yet you all wants to fire a coach who lost one game to the regions power house, won 2 and drew 2.  I hope terry stays. we love to fire coaches in this country.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on June 09, 2021, 10:08:48 AM
The only unbeaten team in the group not going.
yet you all wants to fire a coach who lost one game to the regions power house, won 2 and drew 2.  I hope terry stays. we love to fire coaches in this country.

 :rotfl:

Accountability. Matters not that we were unbeaten in the series match by match because we were beaten to the next round.

Yuh never work a match problem, arrive at the correct answer and get the same # of points as "de dog ate my homework"? Nought is nought. Zilch is zilch. We get zought. So no blasted credit.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on June 09, 2021, 02:11:03 PM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E3afCmBUUAU95z_?format=jpg&name=small)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Flex on June 09, 2021, 04:00:39 PM
T&T’s failed World Cup campaign
By Colin Murray (T&T Guardian).


So much is going on in the world of sport that the feeling of being spoiled for choice may seem borderline ridiculous. From athletics, tennis, cricket, golf and football - the FIFA World Cup 2022 qualifying games around the world and the Euro Championships get going tomorrow. To top it all off, at 10:00 am (Eastern Caribbean time) today, West Indies take on South Africa in the first test match at the Daren Sammy National Cricket Stadium (previously known as Beausejour Cricket Ground) in St. Lucia - one of my favourite grounds in the Caribbean. Quite literally, sport is on non-stop and so with the lockdown and curfew in T&T, sports fans must be thrilled and may not think of a better way to spend their time than watching their favourite sports.

Let’s kick off with World Cup qualifying and as someone mentioned to me, Trinidad and Tobago qualification for the 2022 FIFA World Cup ended before it started. T&T did not get out of the first round. One of the darkest days in the history of the sport, far less football in the country.

St Kitts & Nevis (who won the group) performed with heart, determination and exhibited their fighting qualities, something I thought T&T woefully lacked in the games they played. Even though defeating Guyana 3-0 looked good on paper, T&T did not exhibit the characteristics of a well-oiled machine but it was the only game in which the team grinded out a victory and the best teams when they are not playing well, it is their determination and fight that shines through.

Drawing with Puerto Rico after taking the lead against the run of play, one would have hoped for a similar fighting, plucky defensive performance ensuring the Puerto Ricans did not equalise and if T&T had to win ugly by 1-0, the important scenario was the three points. That was a minor setback I thought and with the Bahamas next, who conceded seven goals three days before T&T was up against them, it meant that St Kitts & Nevis match would have been the ultimate decider. The Bahamians made three changes to the team that was hit for more than half a dozen yet the T&T team, who knew full well the importance of this match, could not get the ball into their opponent’s net.

With that draw, T&T waved bye-bye until the next World Cup qualification campaign comes around in another four years. Expectedly, the blame game quickly began. The players were thrown under the bus by the coach for squandering chances, and they probably did, but the fact remains - they could not score a goal against a team that conceded seven goals three days before plus another eight in their two previous games. What a disaster of titanic proportions! Even the hollow victory in what looked like a practice match against a St Kitts and Nevis team in their final game of the round can’t remedy the disaster.

Unfortunately, the coach can say what he wants but ultimately, he is the one in charge; he is the one who makes decisions; he is the one who picks the team; he is the one who plans the tactics; he is the one who looks at the opposition and stops them from playing; he is the one who motivates the team and the buck stops with him. Ask the host of managers in the top leagues throughout the world, when results do not go their way, do the players get fired? No. But we have seen top managers part company with clubs. Coaches are hired to do a specific job and the job of T&T’s coach was to get the team into the next round of World Cup qualification and he failed. Indeed, it is a pity but now is the time to move on.

Football in this country requires a complete overhaul so what has transpired on the field is being mirrored off the field. The constant bickering and fighting among the stakeholders will never stop. There are people who are involved in football that seek their own self-interest. In other words, what can they get out of football? Few do it for the love of the beautiful game and the love of country. T&T’s young footballers are suffering. They don’t know what the next step is and where proper training and development will be coming from. Those charged with handling football in T&T should be looking at the next crop of young people to develop them for 2026 (which may be too soon) but some effort certainly has to be made.

I await the Normalisation Committee’s post mortem on T&T’s failed World Cup campaign. It should make for interesting reading but please, don’t wait with bated breath.

Editor’s note:

The views expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of any organisation of which he is a stakeholder.


RELATED NEWS

Time to do the honourable thing Terry Fenwick
By Andre E Baptiste (T&T Express).


When Trinidad and Tobago thought they could at least smile after Saturday's coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic Ministry of Health Press Conference, things got worse. Not because of what was said, but what came after.

With further restrictions in place on Weekends going forward, from Sunday. This Saturday afternoon into the night should have been one full of smiles, laughter, happiness, the usual banter among sports enthusiasts with anticipation for yesterday's (Tuesday 8th June) showdown with St Kitts & Nevis which is dubbed the Sugar Boyz.

However by 6.51 pm on Saturday, many were left speechless or dumbfounded by what had transpired between 5 pm mayhem.

If you are still wondering what, I am speaking of, then you are a lucky soul, that you did not have to endure watching the football match, between Trinidad and Tobago and the Bahamas and what had unfolded.

Bahamas lost their three previous World Cup qualification matches (7-0 to Puerto Rico, 4-0 to Guyana and 4-0 to St Kitts and Nevis) but managed with the aid of a purposefully lethargic T&T football team to draw 0-0 and end all dreams of qualifying for the Qatar World Cup in 2022.

I have three quick questions:

Was there ever a plan, Terry?

Was there a Plan B if Plan A failed, Terry?

What was the strategy, Terry?

What happened to many of the locally-based players who were training for over six months?

In all of this, just as in the previous matches, we must find out what sort of ideas arose at halftime in the T&T's dressing room, as we witnessed only one change, immediately after the interval. This may have suggested that to everyone else other than approximately 1.3 million citizens, everything was going to plan according to the management team.

Perhaps the main question is, should we have been surprised by all of this? the score lines, the pattern of play, the formations, the style of play, the general environment of the team, the Bahamas parking the bus and eventually the final result.

In William Shakespeare’s Hamlet “to be or not to be, that is the question", has now become more relevant than ever in T&T’s football.

Those that wanted Terrence Fenwick, as national coach, since over 18 months ago whether they are named William (Not Shakespeare), Keith (Not Brutus), Lasana (Not Lady Macbeth), Colin (Not Prospero) or Allan (Not Shylock), may all be planning exit clauses, but in the minds of many, it would certainly be too late, if indeed their support was fulsome and true.

Football in this country has always encapsulated controversy, and negativity but we never witnessed the level of animosity, diatribe and total abundance of hatred and divisiveness, a lot of it attributed to social media links, where identities are generally hidden.

Many have recommended a new beginning, but how will that work, if the atmosphere, which has been described as uneasy, unfriendly and downright fistful by those, closest to the players, is allowed to permeate.

There is in history, many versions of settings, that suggest, - no time is ever good enough or bad, for change - It is the events that follow the change which is critical to any progress or improvement, and therein is the “default”. In this beautiful twin-island republic, we have heard many promises become pipe dreams never to be fulfilled, because of hunger for power.

Trust is going to be critical going forward, and therefore what needs to happen, is that coaches, players and other officials need to work with the T&T Football Association (TTFA) management team to ensure, that there is – League Football – of some kind when the sport is allowed back on the field of play.

As many turn their collective tournament direction focus onto the Gold Cup in the USA, let us hope that a plan is not only hatched but implemented for local youth football, between Secondary School league and any new Unified league.

The fact is, that since the arrival of Fenwick our football has been further divided.

Fenwick has found out, that being a national coach is not as easy as he may have believed and in these circumstances, he has found himself, caught with his pants on fire at ever turn.

While there is little doubt that several of our players underperformed and look clueless at times, the buck begins and ends with the coach – Fenwick.

Unless he can prove, that he can perform miracles with the same players, then he should do the noble deed, and offer his resignation, if not, then there would be no alternative for the Normalisation Committee to terminate his services in the current environment.

And yes it will be costly, but no more, than the loss of confidence from players, the public and potential sponsors in the team, notwithstanding there is a raging school of thought that Fenwick has already lost the dressing room and when that happens is time to press the reset button.

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: davyjenny1 on June 10, 2021, 02:55:22 AM
The only unbeaten team in the group not going.
yet you all wants to fire a coach who lost one game to the regions power house, won 2 and drew 2.  I hope terry stays. we love to fire coaches in this country.

 :rotfl:

Accountability. Matters not that we were unbeaten in the series match by match because we were beaten to the next round.

Yuh never work a match problem, arrive at the correct answer and get the same # of points as "de dog ate my homework"? Nought is nought. Zilch is zilch. We get zought. So no blasted credit.

Aaand! they go want to fire future coach or coaches to! Trust me.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: maxg on June 10, 2021, 10:29:19 AM
https://m.facebook.com/blackagenda/videos/1873942626100465/?extid=NS-UNK-UNK-UNK-IOS_GK0T-GK1C&refsrc=https%3A%2F%2Fm.facebook.com%2Fwatch%2F&_rdr
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: kounty on June 12, 2021, 03:32:38 PM
i watched haiti dismantle the turks and caicos "bus" 10-0 a couple weeks ago while we were struggling with PR and BAH.
Rooting for them here against Canada but they collect 1 against the run of play - 1-0 Canada.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: pull stones on June 12, 2021, 03:39:21 PM
As i type st kitts and nevis is getting their asses handed to them, they're losing by 4-0 with less than 20 minutes left. canada leads haiti by 1-0 approaching half time.
Title: 2022 CONCACAF WC Qualifiers Thread
Post by: frico on September 04, 2021, 03:37:47 AM
Judging by the results of the first matches played last night 03-09-21,Jamaica was the only team that lost to Mexico,their winner came in the 89th minute,a very surprising result was El Salvador v USA draw,all the rest were draws.These results are not surprising because slowly,but surely the weaker teams are catching up.
   I would just like to say, we didn't do too bad in our recent failures, when you consider all the upheavals our football has gone through over the last 5 years or more.It is also safe to say that we wouldn't have had a team good enough to beat any of those teams that are presently competing in the Hex,purely because of non football issues.We must try and put a great effort in our approach to the Caribbean ChampionsTrophy,this could be a new start.I am growing older with the thought of,"how the once best football team in the Caribbean can fall so far behind the the rest",that needs some serious explanation.
Title: Re: CONCACAF WC Qualifiers 22.
Post by: Deeks on September 04, 2021, 09:51:19 AM
I agree with you Frico.

 El Salvador looking good. Hugo Perez doing a master job with them. JA was good. Unfortunately they could not hang in there. Sunday is their turn to do the flip on Mex. Good luck to them.
Title: Re: CONCACAF WC Qualifiers 22.
Post by: Sando prince on September 05, 2021, 06:48:03 AM
SAME stupid mindset we still have. Being best in the Caribbean do NOT mean much when there is a significant quality gap between the Caribbean and there Central Americans teams. How many Caribbean titles we won in the 90s and it DID not matter when facing central amaericans teams and US in world cup qualifying!
You want to beat up your little chest by saying what exactly? You better than shit teams in the Caribbean when the entire Caribbean playing shit? And as usual when you bounce up the Central teams with all this Caribbean trophy pedigree and you still end up getting your azz whopped!

The focus should be on playing teams better than Caribbean teams around the world and having our teams from (youth to senior) in touring camps in countries playing against top class football clubs to get prepared for important Concacaf tournaments and next Olympics qualifications.

But we have some old man in here who want to feel good by T&T winning a Caribbean title and really belive that will be a return to some type of 'greatness'  :D  real STUPID dinosaur old thinking mentality
.
Title: Re: CONCACAF WC Qualifiers 22.
Post by: Deeks on September 05, 2021, 04:32:39 PM
SAME stupid mindset we still have. Being best in the Caribbean do NOT mean much when there is a significant quality gap between the Caribbean and there Central Americans teams. How many Caribbean titles we won in the 90s and it DID not matter when facing central amaericans teams and US in world cup qualifying!
You want to beat up your little chest by saying what exactly? You better than shit teams in the Caribbean when the entire Caribbean playing shit? And as usual when you bounce up the Central teams with all this Caribbean trophy pedigree and you still end up getting your azz whopped!

The focus should be on playing teams better than Caribbean teams around the world and having our teams from (youth to senior) in touring camps in countries playing against top class football clubs to get prepared for important Concacaf tournaments and next Olympics qualifications.

But we have some old man in here who want to feel good by T&T winning a Caribbean title and really belive that will be a return to some type of 'greatness'  :D  real STUPID dinosaur old thinking mentality
.


Sando, I really can't understand your issue with us winning the Caribbean tournaments. It is what it is. We in Caribbean. Why denigrate the Caribbean teams which lack the resources to compete against the Central Americans.The tournaments were  there for us to play among ourselves. And to give the younger players who did not play WC and concacaf nation league an opportunity to play regional football. AT least they were playing. We don't even play anymore. The regional tournament should return as a U23 format so the young player can get match practice for nations league, CAC, PanAm games,Olympic games, GC and WC.
Title: Re: CONCACAF WC Qualifiers 22.
Post by: gawd on pitch on September 05, 2021, 06:14:41 PM
Don't give that guy your energy Deeks. 

I just watched JA lose to Panama. Jamaica was missing many of their English boys. This tells me the depth of their pool is working against them. 3 - 0 loss at home is a hard one to swallow.
Title: Re: CONCACAF WC Qualifiers 22.
Post by: gawd on pitch on September 05, 2021, 07:49:55 PM
USA 1 - 1 CAN 77th min.

Alfonso Davies - Best player in Concacaf
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Sando prince on September 06, 2021, 06:51:44 AM

Case and point big Caribbean team Jamaica get beat down at home by Panama.

Significant quality gap between Caribbean and rest of Concacaf has always existed. Caribbean tournaments have never been and continue to NOT be quality preparation for significant matches such as WC qualifying or Olympic qualifying.

As I have explained earlier T&T have won several Caribbean tournaments in the past then got our azz whipped when it matters the most in WC qualifying and Gold Cup against Central American teams and US

But continue using the same approach for preparation of our team for important Concacaf tournaments and you sure to expect the same failing results. Something these old men dinosaur heads seem to cannot understand.

But sit down and beat your little chests after winning some Caribbean tournament so you can brag to yourself  :D

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: gawd on pitch on September 06, 2021, 07:25:26 AM
JA would have at least gotten a point if they had their  players from the Gold cup. I think 6 key guys were missing, including Leon Bailey.

Since yesterday loss, they calling for Tappa head. Not an unusual reaction..

I picking these teams to go through:

MEX
USA
CAN

These teams will fight for .5 spot:

CR
HON
PAN
SAL

Jamaica has 3 of their home games at the end of the campaign. Meaning they will need to have at least 10 to 11 points before their final 3 home games to have a chance of fighting for that .5 spot.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on September 06, 2021, 08:44:43 AM
I did not see the JA game. I was surprised at the score line at their national stadium. And indeed, it appears that the English contingent were not released by the clubs seeing the state of the covid situation in JA. The covid situation hampered our preparations more than anything. Terry Fenwick got the bad luck of the draw. JA appeared to have gotten a pass by their govt for preparations  and they were able to qualify for the hex. Now covid is causing real issues. It  is hitting home now. But they still got 12 games to play. If they win their 6 homes games. I think they will be sitting pretty to qualify or play the intercontinental play-offs.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on September 06, 2021, 08:50:41 AM

Case and point big Caribbean team Jamaica get beat down at home by Panama.

Significant quality gap between Caribbean and rest of Concacaf has always existed. Caribbean tournaments have never been and continue to NOT be quality preparation for significant matches such as WC qualifying or Olympic qualifying.

As I have explained earlier T&T have won several Caribbean tournaments in the past then got our azz whipped when it matters the most in WC qualifying and Gold Cup against Central American teams and US

But continue using the same approach for preparation of our team for important Concacaf tournaments and you sure to expect the same failing results. Something these old men dinosaur heads seem to cannot understand.

But sit down and beat your little chests after winning some Caribbean tournament so you can brag to yourself  :D



Sando, when was the last time TT win that tournament. It is over 10 years, breds. Of course we beating we chest. WE IS the Caribbean champs. When TKR win the cricket, aren't we Caribbean champions even though the team has foreigners on it. The tournament is non-functional and you still harping on it. You know how many times they try to restart it and they failed. Like I said, the tournament should be re-introduced so that the yutemen and them can get match practice.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on September 06, 2021, 08:54:12 AM
USA 1 - 1 CAN 77th min.

Alfonso Davies - Best player in Concacaf

The Canadian team playing some real ball. Buchanan came on and was giving the US reall trouble. But there is plenty more football to play. Let us see how they, JA and El Salvador finish.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Sando prince on September 06, 2021, 09:12:21 AM

Deeks but sorry to say if thats all you can absorb from my previous two comments you are a big duncy head man. Sorry to say  :D

Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on September 06, 2021, 03:25:52 PM

Deeks but sorry to say if thats all you can absorb from my previous two comments you are a big duncy head man. Sorry to say  :D



Cool, I appreciate you honesty!
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on September 06, 2021, 03:35:00 PM
Sando, I used to talk to the late Coops(Kenwyn Cooper). He coached the TT national in one of these Shell Cup and I think they won. He told me that he liked this tournament because it gave the younger players exposure. As a matter of fact they have lost some of the tournaments by using the B team. He was under no illusions that being Caribbean champion made them ready for the Central Americans. He bemoan the fact that they could not get some of the top English teams that used to come in the 60s and give us a run for we money. He would have liked to get South American opposition sometimes, but TTFA always had "other" plans. Which led to nowhere.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: ffisback on September 06, 2021, 03:42:02 PM
Mexico is the only team that is guarantied a spot the other 2.5 spots is up for grabs.
Canada Honduras U S A will battle it out for the other spots with Costa Rica and Panama with a outside chance of taking a spot.
El Salvador coach has added some American steal to El Salvador but he has taken away there attacking flair they are going to struggle to score goals.
Once Jamaica and TT continue to hire a bunch of local coach's they will never qualify for a WC
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on September 06, 2021, 06:28:29 PM
Mexico is the only team that is guarantied a spot the other 2.5 spots is up for grabs.
Canada Honduras U S A will battle it out for the other spots with Costa Rica and Panama with a outside chance of taking a spot.
El Salvador coach has added some American steal to El Salvador but he has taken away there attacking flair they are going to struggle to score goals.
Once Jamaica and TT continue to hire a bunch of local coach's they will never qualify for a WC

Quite true. But They still have 12 more games to play. They need their foreign stars badly. Another the next WC after Qatar will be extremely difficult to qualify. Three teams have already qualify because they will be hosts. US, Mexico an Canada will be hosting the tournament. So that means only 2 spots or 1.5 spots will be available. The NC better get their act together.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: lefty on September 06, 2021, 06:43:53 PM
Sando, I used to talk to the late Coops(Kenwyn Cooper). He coached the TT national in one of these Shell Cup and I think they won. He told me that he liked this tournament because it gave the younger players exposure. As a matter of fact they have lost some of the tournaments by using the B team. He was under no illusions that being Caribbean champion made them ready for the Central Americans. He bemoan the fact that they could not get some of the top English teams that used to come in the 60s and give us a run for we money. He would have liked to get South American opposition sometimes, but TTFA always had "other" plans. Which led to nowhere.

(https://memegenerator.net/img/instances/61033882/feeding-the-trolls-you-are-stop-it-you-must.jpg)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on September 06, 2021, 06:44:20 PM
Mexico is the only team that is guarantied a spot the other 2.5 spots is up for grabs.
Canada Honduras U S A will battle it out for the other spots with Costa Rica and Panama with a outside chance of taking a spot.
El Salvador coach has added some American steal to El Salvador but he has taken away there attacking flair they are going to struggle to score goals.
Once Jamaica and TT continue to hire a bunch of local coach's they will never qualify for a WC

When did they have that?
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: lefty on September 06, 2021, 09:57:37 PM
Mexico is the only team that is guarantied a spot the other 2.5 spots is up for grabs.
Canada Honduras U S A will battle it out for the other spots with Costa Rica and Panama with a outside chance of taking a spot.
El Salvador coach has added some American steal to El Salvador but he has taken away there attacking flair they are going to struggle to score goals.
Once Jamaica and TT continue to hire a bunch of local coach's they will never qualify for a WC

When did they have that?

come now seeker :shameonyou: don't you know that any country the even close enough to smell d air in Argentina and Brazil have attacking flair.....I cry :shameonyou: good sir
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on November 07, 2021, 07:54:49 PM
I agree with you Frico.

El Salvador looking good. Hugo Perez doing a master job with them. JA was good. Unfortunately they could not hang in there. Sunday is their turn to do the flip on Mex. Good luck to them.

Agreed. He is getting the machine oiled. Battle-ready.

Their choice of Bolivia as an opponent is the appropiate ambition at this stage of growth ... although not exactly a tactically ideal fit in anticipation of Jamaica and Panama.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on November 08, 2021, 11:45:26 PM
I agree with you Frico.

El Salvador looking good. Hugo Perez doing a master job with them. JA was good. Unfortunately they could not hang in there. Sunday is their turn to do the flip on Mex. Good luck to them.

Agreed. He is getting the machine oiled. Battle-ready.

Their choice of Bolivia as an opponent is the appropiate ambition at this stage of growth ... although not exactly a tactically ideal fit in anticipation of Jamaica and Panama.

With covid any opposition will do for the moment.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Anbrat on November 13, 2021, 01:17:25 PM
David scores in 57th minute to help Canada to 1-0 win over Costa Rica.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/sports/topstories/david-scores-in-57th-minute-to-help-canada-to-1-0-win-over-costa-rica/ar-AAQEpI3?li=AAggNb9
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on November 17, 2021, 12:32:03 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FEX4Am3XIAMIuOo?format=jpg&name=small)
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on November 17, 2021, 07:50:59 AM
Canada's renaissance is a good thing for CONCACAF. Next time let's see what can be accomplished without Arctic conditions. 👿
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: maxg on November 17, 2021, 10:52:23 AM
Canada's renaissance is a good thing for CONCACAF. Next time let's see what can be accomplished without Arctic conditions. 👿
I think more than just a revival, this is something completely new. They have never achieved such a level of of play (0 losses) and possibility of qualification. Hope they can maintain. This is not just the one child of West Indian parentage (Randy Samuel) in the whole team, but a greater proportion of 1st generation immigrant kids, Jamaica, Haiti, Trinidad, Portugal..etc.   
    Herdman is a brave and fair man to go that route, selecting the best players and not political/financial appeasements, now would the powers that be allow him stay that course, left to be seen. As we well know, Administrative committees can put a lot of pressure on managers, especially in our region.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Trini _2026 on November 17, 2021, 01:38:08 PM
Canada's renaissance is a good thing for CONCACAF. Next time let's see what can be accomplished without Arctic conditions. 👿
I think more than just a revival, this is something completely new. They have never achieved such a level of of play (0 losses) and possibility of qualification. Hope they can maintain. This is not just the one child of West Indian parentage (Randy Samuel) in the whole team, but a greater proportion of 1st generation immigrant kids, Jamaica, Haiti, Trinidad, Portugal..etc.   
    Herdman is a brave and fair man to go that route, selecting the best players and not political/financial appeasements, now would the powers that be allow him stay that course, left to be seen. As we well know, Administrative committees can put a lot of pressure on managers, especially in our region.

Yes Deeks Canada is going places. Last night staring 11  8  players were black  5 of Caribbean heritage..  and a lot more coming through the system...
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Anbrat on November 17, 2021, 08:50:33 PM
Canada's renaissance is a good thing for CONCACAF. Next time let's see what can be accomplished without Arctic conditions. 👿
I think more than just a revival, this is something completely new. They have never achieved such a level of of play (0 losses) and possibility of qualification. Hope they can maintain. This is not just the one child of West Indian parentage (Randy Samuel) in the whole team, but a greater proportion of 1st generation immigrant kids, Jamaica, Haiti, Trinidad, Portugal..etc.   
    Herdman is a brave and fair man to go that route, selecting the best players and not political/financial appeasements, now would the powers that be allow him stay that course, left to be seen. As we well know, Administrative committees can put a lot of pressure on managers, especially in our region.

Yes Deeks Canada is going places. Last night staring 11  8  players were black  5 of Caribbean heritage..  and a lot more coming through the system...
Trini _2026, I relate to your saying "5 of Caribbean heritage". Please, however, help me to understand the significance of your statement that "8  players were black".  ??? ???
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on November 18, 2021, 11:17:15 AM
Canada's renaissance is a good thing for CONCACAF. Next time let's see what can be accomplished without Arctic conditions. 👿
I think more than just a revival, this is something completely new. They have never achieved such a level of of play (0 losses) and possibility of qualification. Hope they can maintain. This is not just the one child of West Indian parentage (Randy Samuel) in the whole team, but a greater proportion of 1st generation immigrant kids, Jamaica, Haiti, Trinidad, Portugal..etc.   
    Herdman is a brave and fair man to go that route, selecting the best players and not political/financial appeasements, now would the powers that be allow him stay that course, left to be seen. As we well know, Administrative committees can put a lot of pressure on managers, especially in our region.

Yes Deeks Canada is going places. Last night staring 11  8  players were black  5 of Caribbean heritage..  and a lot more coming through the system...
Trini _2026, I relate to your saying "5 of Caribbean heritage". Please, however, help me to understand the significance of your statement that "8  players were black".  ??? ???

This is the best performing Canadian WC team since the team of the 2nd Mexico(Maradona) WC. Everything appears in sync. There is this synergy that is just rolling with them. They are strong enough to pull a point in away matches. Barring suspensions and injuries their chances look very good.

A far as the cold is concern, that is the "beauty of Concacaf. We have three types of geographic situation. Tundra, tropical and high altitude. You have to deal with it. No excuses. When they come to Trini, is 10 degree from the equator. Or if they go Guyana, Suriname, is even closer and hotter. They have to dealt with it. Concacaf is not a cakewalk as most outsiders attempt to make it to be. The flagship team in Concacaf(Mexico) is not breathing easy this time around. One more slip up and they may  be level with Panama. And if Jamaica starts winning it will make things even dicier.

By the way, US was lucky to come away with a point from JA. Last WC when we beat them, the outsiders said it was a fluke. Right!!!! In Euro Italy and Portugal on the outside looking in. I think England was lucky this time, they got an easy group. But they have some good young quality players. Losing the Euro final may be a blessing in disguise.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on November 18, 2021, 11:20:17 AM
Trini _2026, I relate to your saying "5 of Caribbean heritage". Please, however, help me to understand the significance of your statement that "8  players were black".  ??? ???

Anbrat, I don't understand. Of the 8 Black players on the team, 5 were of Caribbean descent.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on November 18, 2021, 11:23:40 AM
The US has quite a few Black,Mixed-race, Hispanic in this current crop of players. This tend to fluctuate every one or two cycle. By they way I saw Dante Sealey playing for the US youth team in a tournament in Mex. just 2 days ago.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: gawd on pitch on November 18, 2021, 12:45:55 PM
Overall 5 to 6 are JA descent. 2 Haitian descent. 1 TT descent (Atiba) Who probably could have gotten man of the match if Larin didnt score 2.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on November 18, 2021, 01:03:09 PM
...

By the way, US was lucky to come away with a point from JA. Last WC when we beat them, the outsiders said it was a fluke. Right!!!! In Euro Italy and Portugal on the outside looking in. I think England was lucky this time, they got an easy group. But they have some good young quality players. Losing the Euro final may be a blessing in disguise.

Andorra and San Marino. SMH. Harry Kane for a period impotent to find the back of the net and then emerges to distort the goals tally based on that. Steups. Should UEFA consider a tiered qualification process in which the minnows have their day in a preliminary round?
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Anbrat on November 18, 2021, 04:49:53 PM
Trini _2026, I relate to your saying "5 of Caribbean heritage". Please, however, help me to understand the significance of your statement that "8  players were black".  ??? ???

Anbrat, I don't understand. Of the 8 Black players on the team, 5 were of Caribbean descent.
Deeks, I saw and supported a Canadian team of eleven (11) on field players, the substitute bench, coach and other technical staff, all gelling harmoniously to provide a winning performance. The racial composition of the team never entered my mind hence my reaching out in an attempt to understand the significance/relevance of the comment that "8  players were black". 
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: gawd on pitch on November 18, 2021, 06:35:28 PM
Trini _2026, I relate to your saying "5 of Caribbean heritage". Please, however, help me to understand the significance of your statement that "8  players were black".  ??? ???

Anbrat, I don't understand. Of the 8 Black players on the team, 5 were of Caribbean descent.
Deeks, I saw and supported a Canadian team of eleven (11) on field players, the substitute bench, coach and other technical staff, all gelling harmoniously to provide a winning performance. The racial composition of the team never entered my mind hence my reaching out in an attempt to understand the significance/relevance of the comment that "8  players were black". 

Canada has a history of excluding the "Black"players from the MNT program. The past controllers of Canadian Soccer has always tried to manage the number of black players coming into the team. This is the first wcq campaign where the 7 sometimes 8 of the starters are of Caribbean/African extraction.
With that being said, the non black players on the team are the creme of the crop and just as SOLID. . Johnston, Eustaqio and Borjan and Vitorio.. Boss players.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on November 18, 2021, 06:51:42 PM
Trini _2026, I relate to your saying "5 of Caribbean heritage". Please, however, help me to understand the significance of your statement that "8  players were black".  ??? ???

Anbrat, I don't understand. Of the 8 Black players on the team, 5 were of Caribbean descent.
Deeks, I saw and supported a Canadian team of eleven (11) on field players, the substitute bench, coach and other technical staff, all gelling harmoniously to provide a winning performance. The racial composition of the team never entered my mind hence my reaching out in an attempt to understand the significance/relevance of the comment that "8  players were black". 

Have you been tuned out during the long ongoing social discussion in Western societies regarding inclusion, diversity, identity, representation, conceptions of the other, self, spatial markers, cultural dissonance, migration etc. ... all of which have well-documented nexus with sport ... football not excepted?
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on November 18, 2021, 11:01:43 PM
Apart from Alfonso Davis, I do like Buchanan. Real exciting player.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Anbrat on November 19, 2021, 06:51:23 AM
Trini _2026, I relate to your saying "5 of Caribbean heritage". Please, however, help me to understand the significance of your statement that "8  players were black".  ??? ???

Anbrat, I don't understand. Of the 8 Black players on the team, 5 were of Caribbean descent.
Deeks, I saw and supported a Canadian team of eleven (11) on field players, the substitute bench, coach and other technical staff, all gelling harmoniously to provide a winning performance. The racial composition of the team never entered my mind hence my reaching out in an attempt to understand the significance/relevance of the comment that "8  players were black". 

Canada has a history of excluding the "Black"players from the MNT program. The past controllers of Canadian Soccer has always tried to manage the number of black players coming into the team. This is the first wcq campaign where the 7 sometimes 8 of the starters are of Caribbean/African extraction.
With that being said, the non black players on the team are the creme of the crop and just as SOLID. . Johnston, Eustaqio and Borjan and Vitorio.. Boss players.
"Canada has a history of excluding the "Black"players from the MNT program. The past controllers of Canadian Soccer has always tried to manage the number of black players coming into the team".

Thank you for this enlightening information, gawd on pitch. I was not aware of this alleged discriminatory practice by Canada. Did/does Canada apply this practice to its other sports teams viz hockey, cricket, etc?
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Anbrat on November 19, 2021, 08:09:30 AM
Trini _2026, I relate to your saying "5 of Caribbean heritage". Please, however, help me to understand the significance of your statement that "8  players were black".  ??? ???

Anbrat, I don't understand. Of the 8 Black players on the team, 5 were of Caribbean descent.
Deeks, I saw and supported a Canadian team of eleven (11) on field players, the substitute bench, coach and other technical staff, all gelling harmoniously to provide a winning performance. The racial composition of the team never entered my mind hence my reaching out in an attempt to understand the significance/relevance of the comment that "8  players were black". 

Have you been tuned out during the long ongoing social discussion in Western societies regarding inclusion, diversity, identity, representation, conceptions of the other, self, spatial markers, cultural dissonance, migration etc. ... all of which have well-documented nexus with sport ... football not excepted?
Have you been tuned in to the evolution of the Canadian society, particularly the most populated provinces of Ontario & Quebec, over the last 50 years?
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Anbrat on November 19, 2021, 08:17:29 AM
Apart from Alfonso Davis, I do like Buchanan. Real exciting player.
I share your opinion of Buchanan who I have seen as a youth player. He is maturing into a really top notch player. Richie Laryea is also deserving of special mention.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: asylumseeker on November 19, 2021, 09:30:02 AM
Trini _2026, I relate to your saying "5 of Caribbean heritage". Please, however, help me to understand the significance of your statement that "8  players were black".  ??? ???

Anbrat, I don't understand. Of the 8 Black players on the team, 5 were of Caribbean descent.
Deeks, I saw and supported a Canadian team of eleven (11) on field players, the substitute bench, coach and other technical staff, all gelling harmoniously to provide a winning performance. The racial composition of the team never entered my mind hence my reaching out in an attempt to understand the significance/relevance of the comment that "8  players were black". 

Have you been tuned out during the long ongoing social discussion in Western societies regarding inclusion, diversity, identity, representation, conceptions of the other, self, spatial markers, cultural dissonance, migration etc. ... all of which have well-documented nexus with sport ... football not excepted?
Have you been tuned in to the evolution of the Canadian society, particularly the most populated provinces of Ontario & Quebec, over the last 50 years?

Rarely a promising sign when a question is treated with a question. Especially one that shifts the burden of response and content. But, I will indulge you.

A: Empirically only partially. Nevertheless, the favorable part adds up to about three decades + ... so that covers the piece/ period that matters sufficiently: 1986 WC to present. The rest I can intuit from viewing Kim's Convenience.  :devil:

Supplement your contribution. Include a substantive response to my question (which implicitly suggested personal knowledge).

And go on the record as to why the mention of the ethnic composition of the players lit a fire under your seat.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: maxg on November 19, 2021, 09:43:59 AM
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=198491785681902&id=102736457855402&ref=sharing&_rdr
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Deeks on November 19, 2021, 10:39:20 AM
Apart from Alfonso Davis, I do like Buchanan. Real exciting player.
I share your opinion of Buchanan who I have seen as a youth player. He is maturing into a really top notch player. Richie Laryea is also deserving of special mention.

Yes, I also fail to mention Laryea. If they continue at this level and Canada qualifies, I would be surprise if Buchanan, Laryea and other members do not get contracts to play in Euro.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: maxg on November 19, 2021, 11:14:45 AM
Apart from Alfonso Davis, I do like Buchanan. Real exciting player.
I share your opinion of Buchanan who I have seen as a youth player. He is maturing into a really top notch player. Richie Laryea is also deserving of special mention.

Yes, I also fail to mention Laryea. If they continue at this level and Canada qualifies, I would be surprise if Buchanan, Laryea and other members do not get contracts to play in Euro.
Buchanan is signed to Club Brugge and is on loan to New England til MLS season end, as far as I know.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Anbrat on November 19, 2021, 08:47:49 PM
Trini _2026, I relate to your saying "5 of Caribbean heritage". Please, however, help me to understand the significance of your statement that "8  players were black".  ??? ???

Anbrat, I don't understand. Of the 8 Black players on the team, 5 were of Caribbean descent.
Deeks, I saw and supported a Canadian team of eleven (11) on field players, the substitute bench, coach and other technical staff, all gelling harmoniously to provide a winning performance. The racial composition of the team never entered my mind hence my reaching out in an attempt to understand the significance/relevance of the comment that "8  players were black". 

Have you been tuned out during the long ongoing social discussion in Western societies regarding inclusion, diversity, identity, representation, conceptions of the other, self, spatial markers, cultural dissonance, migration etc. ... all of which have well-documented nexus with sport ... football not excepted?
Have you been tuned in to the evolution of the Canadian society, particularly the most populated provinces of Ontario & Quebec, over the last 50 years?

Rarely a promising sign when a question is treated with a question. Especially one that shifts the burden of response and content. But, I will indulge you.

A: Empirically only partially. Nevertheless, the favorable part adds up to about three decades + ... so that covers the piece/ period that matters sufficiently: 1986 WC to present. The rest I can intuit from viewing Kim's Convenience.  :devil:

Supplement your contribution. Include a substantive response to my question (which implicitly suggested personal knowledge).

And go on the record as to why the mention of the ethnic composition of the players lit a fire under your seat.
asylumseeker, your question was treated with a question to localize the focus instead of applying a broad brush approach by your reference to "western societies". Rarely a promising sign when the 1 cap fits all is applied. Au contraire, in respect of your assertion "shifts the burden of response and content", my question was intended to lend proper perspective to the topic at hand.

Incidentally, I would certainly not describe the mention of the racial (not "ethnic") composition as having "lit a fire under your seat". My response was casual in nature and by no means antagonistic, but simply seeking an understanding of its relevance. Nothing more, nothing less.

"A: Empirically only partially. Nevertheless, the favorable part adds up to about three decades + ... so that covers the piece/ period that matters sufficiently: 1986 WC to present. The rest I can intuit from viewing Kim's Convenience.  :devil:"

I am sorry but I am at a loss in my endeavors to intuit this aspect of your communication.
Title: Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
Post by: Anbrat on November 24, 2021, 08:08:21 PM
Trini _2026, I relate to your saying "5 of Caribbean heritage". Please, however, help me to understand the significance of your statement that "8  players were black".  ??? ???

Anbrat, I don't understand. Of the 8 Black players on the team, 5 were of Caribbean descent.
Deeks, I saw and supported a Canadian team of eleven (11) on field players, the substitute bench, coach and other technical staff, all gelling harmoniously to provide a winning performance. The racial composition of the team never entered my mind hence my reaching out in an attempt to understand the significance/relevance of the comment that "8  players were black". 

Canada has a history of excluding the "Black"players from the MNT program. The past controllers of Canadian Soccer has always tried to manage the number of black players coming into the team. This is the first wcq campaign where the 7 sometimes 8 of the starters are of Caribbean/African extraction.
With that being said, the non black players on the team are the creme of the crop and just as SOLID. . Johnston, Eustaqio and Borjan and Vitorio.. Boss players.
"Canada has a history of excluding the "Black"players from the MNT program. The past controllers of Canadian Soccer has always tried to manage the number of black players coming into the team".

Thank you for this enlightening information, gawd on pitch. I was not aware of this alleged discriminatory practice by Canada. Did/does Canada apply this practice to its other sports teams viz hockey, cricket, etc?
.................gawd on pitch? Are you still there? ???