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Sports => Football => Topic started by: Tallman on September 24, 2020, 02:44:06 PM

Title: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on September 24, 2020, 02:44:06 PM
FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
FIFA.com


The Bureau of the FIFA Council today suspended the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) with immediate effect due to grave violations of the FIFA Statutes.

The suspension was prompted by the former leadership of the TTFA lodging a claim before a local court in Trinidad and Tobago in order to contest the decision of the FIFA Council to appoint a normalisation committee for the TTFA. This course of action was in direct breach of article 59 of the FIFA Statutes, which expressly prohibits recourse to ordinary courts unless specifically provided for in the FIFA regulations.

A normalisation committee was installed by the FIFA Council after it was established that the former leadership of the TTFA had engaged in various acts of serious mismanagement. The decision of the former leadership to go to a local court to contest the appointment of the normalisation committee jeopardizes not only the future of football in Trinidad and Tobago but also endangers the overall global football governance structure, which relies on the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) as the exclusive forum for resolving disputes of this nature. 

The relevant parties were initially given until 16 September to withdraw the case but failed to do so. This deadline was then extended until 23 September, which was not respected either.   

In the circumstances, the Bureau of the FIFA Council has decided to suspend the TTFA.

This suspension will only be lifted when the TTFA fully complies with its obligations as a member of FIFA, including recognising the legitimacy of the appointed normalisation committee and bringing its own statutes into line with the FIFA Statutes.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on September 24, 2020, 03:00:28 PM
Notwithstanding all of that, we could still be "banned".

BOOM!
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 24, 2020, 03:08:05 PM
pull stones, do not despair Breds, we will overcome this impasse. History will show them siding with the the den of thieves. Let's just move on. When ever I come back to TT, I will sort United TTFA, more so Keith and Sam(74 youth team). I used to bwah him wihen he was with Jack. But this time he was on the right side even though they had to give. There will be light at the end of the tunnel.th
deeks it’s not just sancho and fat boy who’s cancers in that country, but it’s the whole fraternity of so called people in positions of power. could you imagine the police raided a houses a couple of days ago found millions of dollars and gave it back to the perps without the permission of the commissioner and the minister of national security, where in the world this level of corruption takes place in the ranks of the national security apparatus?

and it’s not only them, but it’s everyone in positions of authority, just look at david nakid, that big mouth guy went on a self righteous crusade against the whole country, flew to lebanon stayed for a while, came back and then joined up with a party that stole billions from the country,not that the pnm never stole, but those thieves has since moved on and they have new leadership that is very much opposed to corruption.

but nakid joined with the same crew who pillaged and plundered the treasury. had it been stern or kenwin I wouldn’t be bothered, but mr righteous walk on water david who knows what is wrong with everything on earth, and he’s here to fix it nakid. I am not mesmerized by these world cup or passed footballers like you guys, nor any footballer for that matter, I never surprised by these fellers and what they could do, and brent sancho and mr latapy showed that when they went in search of a better life trampling all in their way.

IMO trinidad is a big salt cake glazed with a sweet strawberry frosting, pretty on the outside but filled with salt and bitterness when you bite in. it’s everyone with some authority in that country who’s failing the children and using their power for their own selfish means, from the cricket administrators to the other clueless sports authorities, they are robbing these kids of an opportunity to excel, from jack warner to azim basserat, they are all clueless.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 24, 2020, 03:12:28 PM
Who cares, they want to rub it in. football is dead in Trinidad and Tobago anyway. I wish wallace and company reopens the case.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on September 24, 2020, 03:34:10 PM
Notwithstanding all of that, we could still be "banned".

BOOM!
👏🏾👏🏾👍🏿
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Brownsugar on September 24, 2020, 04:41:19 PM
Firetruck FIFA
Firetruck Hadad
Firetruck DJW
Infantino mudder!!!

Dais all ah come to say....

Weary must be turning over in she grave.....smh.....
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: socalion on September 24, 2020, 05:37:49 PM
Ah hope de trio of DJW aka shrek ,  Brent aka de self serving bow tie  opportunist, and frog faced Johnny come lately Hadad celebrate well for now .... What a bunch snakes ! But doh worry their days will come ! Wait and see ! Who laugh last laugh best ! As for infantino de Panama papers will expose yuh And yuh gang ! De fraud squad coming ..
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Sam on September 24, 2020, 06:14:32 PM
Over to you Wallace, run T&T football now.

If you was a millionaire, yea, but now what?

I ain't not trator, but you can't fight a billion dollar corrupted company who you rely on and you BROKE with no support.

Regardless if they go on to win, Wallace don't have a penny to help he self, how can he help T&T football? Peter Miller!!!!....  :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

FIFA is they own police and thief, how can you beat them, not even Jack Warner coulda do it all de promise he promise.

Expect Brent "suck ass" Sancho to be de next TTFA president

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Sam on September 24, 2020, 06:17:43 PM
Too much ole muddaf00ckers want to run T&T football in these modern times and they can't even send a proper text.

Tim Kee, Warner, Ramesh, Hadad, Wallace, etc.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Bakes on September 24, 2020, 06:43:51 PM
TTFA get bad advice. 

Plain and simple.  People could blame Infantino and "FIFA mafia" all they want, Wallace, Look Loy et. al. shit de bed on this one.
Title: Cudjoe slams 'selfish' United TTFA for FIFA suspension
Post by: Tallman on September 24, 2020, 08:01:16 PM
Cudjoe slams 'selfish' United TTFA for FIFA suspension
By Joel Bailey (T&T Newsday)


SHAMFA Cudjoe, Minister of Sport and Community Development, has described FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA (T&T Football Association) as “a sad day for football and sport” in T&T.

On Thursday, the Bureau of the FIFA Council suspended the TTFA with immediate effect due to grave violations of the FIFA Statutes.

In a statement on its website, FIFA said, “the suspension was prompted by the former leadership of the TTFA lodging a claim before (the T&T High Court) in order to contest the decision of the FIFA Council to appoint a normalisation committee for the TTFA.”

In March, TTFA president William Wallace and his executive were removed by FIFA, due to the TTFA’s mounting debt, and a normalisation committee, headed by businessman Robert Hadad, was put in place to run the affairs of T&T football.

On Thursday evening, Cudjoe said, “I am not surprised because FIFA would have already stated its position quite early. I was trying to avoid this situation. I remembered calling a meeting in August with all the football (bodies). I think FIFA has been fair and reasonable in its dealings by giving them a deadline (of September 16) and then going the extra mile of giving them an extension (of September 23).”

Turning her focus towards the United TTFA team of Wallace, his deputies Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick, Joseph Sam Phillip, as well as TTFA members Keith Look Loy and Anthony Harford, Cudjoe said, “If they were serious about relieving T&T from this kind of stress, they would have acted on time and in a proper manner.

“FIFA had no choice but to do what they have done,” she continued. “It’s a sad day for football and a sad day for sport development in this nation. The handful of people that’s causing us this trouble, they would not suffer as much as athletes and the young people who depend on football and sports for their advancement.

“I’m also disappointed that adults who have been charged with this management of football would have the country in this position, would hold football to ransom, would hijack the development of football in this way. They did not go to their clubs (or TTFA membership) before taking on this court matter. They went on their own selfish and unreasonable journey and today we’re in this position because of them.”

Recently, Wallace hinted that, even with FIFA sanctions, domestic and schools football will still be continued in T&T, once covid19 restrictions are lifted.

But Cudjoe countered, “What does that really mean for the young person who’s looking to advance in football, who have dreams about playing in the World Cup, who was looking forward to the CONCACAF Nations League? What community football and schools football means to those young athletes who are really being affected by this?”

The Minister said, “It goes beyond that because we were benefitting from FIFA Forward Development Programme and the various courses to help various disciplines like beach football (and) women’s football. That technical assistance is gone when you’re (suspended).

“While community football and schools football is good, that’s only a drop in the bucket when you think about the full potential of the beautiful game, of our ability to participate at regional and international levels. That brings no comfort, especially knowing that this could have been avoided and that these (individuals) had so much time to turn things around. But they did what they did for their own ego, for their own time of fame. It does not make any sense. The majority of their clubs know that it didn’t make any sense.”

Cudjoe urged other local sporting bodies to “learn from this, that when you elect people to leadership of your organisations, elect proper, right-thinking people with a conscience, with a heart to truly develop the game.”

The Minister is hopeful that there will be light at the end of the tunnel for T&T football.

“I think the tone of the (FIFA) letter allows some wiggle-room, that if (the TTFA) make the necessary changes, at it relates to properly recognising the normalisation committee, and even amending the local constitution to reflect that CAS is the final court of arbitration,” she said. “I think that would allow FIFA to reconsider lifting the suspension. I’m hoping that these clubs have their voices heard and hold their so-called leaders to account.”
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 24, 2020, 09:36:31 PM
so we suspended big deal. we was suspended since DJW won the election in 2016, we didn't win a game since they beat america in that FLUKE GAME in 2017, after that they went on to lose game after game beating only the lowest ranking team in the world anguilla.

in trinidad thing have to get worst before it gets better, i don't care who's the ttfa president either, as long as it's not shrek or sancho. soceion i'm borrowing the shrek from you, hope you don't mind.

maybe we would have a bit of peace now, instead of worrying about these cruddy footballers we have.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: davyjenny1 on September 24, 2020, 10:42:35 PM
Too much ole muddaf00ckers want to run T&T football in these modern times and they can't even send a proper text.

Tim Kee, Warner, Ramesh, Hadad, Wallace, etc.


ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tiresais on September 24, 2020, 11:19:45 PM
Digusted all round. Worst of both worlds, no court case to set precedent and no membership.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on September 24, 2020, 11:21:53 PM
Cudjoe slams 'selfish' United TTFA for FIFA suspension
By Joel Bailey (T&T Newsday)


SHAMFA Cudjoe, Minister of Sport and Community Development, has described FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA (T&T Football Association) as “a sad day for football and sport” in T&T.

On Thursday, the Bureau of the FIFA Council suspended the TTFA with immediate effect due to grave violations of the FIFA Statutes.

In a statement on its website, FIFA said, “the suspension was prompted by the former leadership of the TTFA lodging a claim before (the T&T High Court) in order to contest the decision of the FIFA Council to appoint a normalisation committee for the TTFA.”

In March, TTFA president William Wallace and his executive were removed by FIFA, due to the TTFA’s mounting debt, and a normalisation committee, headed by businessman Robert Hadad, was put in place to run the affairs of T&T football.

On Thursday evening, Cudjoe said, “I am not surprised because FIFA would have already stated its position quite early. I was trying to avoid this situation. I remembered calling a meeting in August with all the football (bodies). I think FIFA has been fair and reasonable in its dealings by giving them a deadline (of September 16) and then going the extra mile of giving them an extension (of September 23).”

Turning her focus towards the United TTFA team of Wallace, his deputies Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick, Joseph Sam Phillip, as well as TTFA members Keith Look Loy and Anthony Harford, Cudjoe said, “If they were serious about relieving T&T from this kind of stress, they would have acted on time and in a proper manner.

“FIFA had no choice but to do what they have done,” she continued. “It’s a sad day for football and a sad day for sport development in this nation. The handful of people that’s causing us this trouble, they would not suffer as much as athletes and the young people who depend on football and sports for their advancement.

“I’m also disappointed that adults who have been charged with this management of football would have the country in this position, would hold football to ransom, would hijack the development of football in this way. They did not go to their clubs (or TTFA membership) before taking on this court matter. They went on their own selfish and unreasonable journey and today we’re in this position because of them.”

Recently, Wallace hinted that, even with FIFA sanctions, domestic and schools football will still be continued in T&T, once covid19 restrictions are lifted.

But Cudjoe countered, “What does that really mean for the young person who’s looking to advance in football, who have dreams about playing in the World Cup, who was looking forward to the CONCACAF Nations League? What community football and schools football means to those young athletes who are really being affected by this?”

The Minister said, “It goes beyond that because we were benefitting from FIFA Forward Development Programme and the various courses to help various disciplines like beach football (and) women’s football. That technical assistance is gone when you’re (suspended).

“While community football and schools football is good, that’s only a drop in the bucket when you think about the full potential of the beautiful game, of our ability to participate at regional and international levels. That brings no comfort, especially knowing that this could have been avoided and that these (individuals) had so much time to turn things around. But they did what they did for their own ego, for their own time of fame. It does not make any sense. The majority of their clubs know that it didn’t make any sense.”

Cudjoe urged other local sporting bodies to “learn from this, that when you elect people to leadership of your organisations, elect proper, right-thinking people with a conscience, with a heart to truly develop the game.”

The Minister is hopeful that there will be light at the end of the tunnel for T&T football.

“I think the tone of the (FIFA) letter allows some wiggle-room, that if (the TTFA) make the necessary changes, at it relates to properly recognising the normalisation committee, and even amending the local constitution to reflect that CAS is the final court of arbitration,” she said. “I think that would allow FIFA to reconsider lifting the suspension. I’m hoping that these clubs have their voices heard and hold their so-called leaders to account.”

No, Minister. 

There is something entirely dissonant with the tenor of your comments and discordant with the discretion and mandate with which your portfolio vests you.

Good on Joel Bailey for getting your comments on the record, but the comments place you as performing well within your competence, when this matter - particularly in its denouement - would have demanded more than the commentating perspective of a front row seat.

Perhaps the deficiency is that Mr. Bailey didn't exhaust his questions or ask all of the pertinent questions. But, even if he didn't ask, it seems that the moment should have compelled you to make a more comprehensive statement regarding the government's activism on this matter.

While there may be an element of incomplete journalism here - perhaps reflective of the expected scrutiny of the readership - there's also been a building narrative (no pun intended) of whether you have used your time sufficiently wisely despite your awareness of the advertised conclusion.

Your words: 'I am not surprised because FIFA would have already stated its position quite early'.

There are still questions to be answered before we should get to you reducing an element of your public comments to a personalised bashing of executive action.

Not wishing to be guilty of the same, my comments include curiosity as to Cabinet's view of the matter and extend to what, if anything, exercised the Prime Minister regarding all of the consequences which you liberally note.

It's evident that United TTFA trampled your last nerve,  but did you run the fullness of the last mile?
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on September 24, 2020, 11:48:27 PM
so we suspended big deal. we was suspended since DJW won the election in 2016, we didn't win a game since they beat america in that FLUKE GAME in 2017, after that they went on to lose game after game beating only the lowest ranking team in the world anguilla.

in trinidad thing have to get worst before it gets better, i don't care who's the ttfa president either, as long as it's not shrek or sancho. soceion i'm borrowing the shrek from you, hope you don't mind.

maybe we would have a bit of peace now, instead of worrying about these cruddy footballers we have.

We're not even close to that.
Title: Sancho believes that the membership was set-up
Post by: Tallman on September 25, 2020, 06:30:39 AM
Sancho believes that the membership was set-up
By Keith Clement (T&T Guardian)


Following news that the T&T Football Association (TTFA) has been suspended with immediate effect by FIFA and until further notice Guardian Media Sports reached out to several persons of the general membership to get responses regarding the United TTFA team failure to meet the September 23, 3:00 pm deadline set by FIFA on September 18, to withdraw their legal matter from the T&T High court.

Several of them decided that they don't want to go on record but they expressed concerns with what they deemed 'the intent of the action by the last minute as the deadline time approached to have the matter withdrawn from the T&T courts.

The embattled TTFA president William Wallace and his United TTFA executive team's decision to withdraw their controversial case against FIFA is yet to be officially recognised since the application was made and stamped at 15:23.57 (3:23 pm) on Wednesday which was after the deadline of 15:00 AST (21:00 CET) time as outlined in the FIFA letter dated September 18.

Guardian Media Sports understands that while the group's legal team filed an eight-page notice of the application to withdraw the case, in an attempt to beat FIFA's revised ultimatum of Wednesday 23, at 3:00 pm (TT Time), the matter will not be actually be withdrawn until the application is dealt with by Justice Carol Gobin, who is presiding over the case.

On Thursday, Guardian Media Sports reached out Robert Hadad, the chairman of the FIFA-appointed Normalisation Committee (NC) and asked: 'Did you, FIFA legal Team or FIFA get any documents of notice from William Wallace' legal team to date regarding the withdrawal of the legal matter in the T&T high court?'...He responded, "No".

Dr Emir Crowne, one of the attorneys from the United TTFA legal team when contacted and asked on Thursday: "If FIFA lawyers were served with the application & affidavit regarding the withdrawal he responded: "If it's about the TTFA matter, I unfortunately can't comment as it's still before the Courts."

The application which highlights 23 grounds for which the withdrawal is being made, can either be dealt with in the absence of the parties with the decision being subsequently sent by Gobin or can be dealt with on October 9, when she was expected to referee the trial of the case. The trial date could also be brought forward in order to resolve the issue.

In an affidavit which comprised ten pages and bears the court stamp and time as 15:02.03 (T&T 3:02 pm) attached to the application, which was obtained by Guardian Media Sports, Wallace sought to explain his and his team's decision to grudgingly withdraw their case.

"To ask this court for permission to withdraw this claim on the day before Republic Day (September 24), and in so doing tacitly accepting that football in T&T continues to be at the whims and fancy of the Defendant, who is bullying and coercing the TTFA into bending its knee, makes me feel physically sick," Wallace said.

"It is one of the hardest things I have ever had to do," he added.

Wallace, the former president of the Secondary School Football League (SSFL) suggested that their decision was based on feedback from TTFA stakeholders, which was solicited after he and his team noted strange developments in the sport regionally.

He said on Monday he was informed that FIFA regional affiliate CONCACAF had scheduled the draw for its 2021 Gold Cup for this weekend.

"I can say that this is unusual because the Gold Cup (held every two years) is not until July 2021 and normally the draw usually happens approximately two months before the tournament," Wallace said.

He admitted that it was this that led him and his team to call the meeting on Tuesday as a possible suspension would mean no chance of participation in the tournament.

In a separate but related press release issued yesterday, the executive expressed similar sentiments and noted that 21 stakeholders voted for them to withdraw the action, while eight voted for it to continue. Three abstained.

In his court filings, Wallace, a former national team manager, claimed that despite the vote many members agreed that FIFA was acting in bad faith by seeking to compel them to withdraw under the threat of the association and by extension, the country, being suspended and other sanctions.

"My firm view is that they are acting out of fear and not in the long-term best interests of the TTFA," he said.

On Thursday, Brent Sancho, the acting chairman of the T&T Pro League and who has been challenging the United TTFA decision to take FIFA to the T&T Courts rather than Court for Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland, believe that the general meeting called by the United TTFA on Tuesday was set-up to give the membership the impression that they (United TTFA) really wanted to get meeting's view to move forward.

Sancho said, "After the voting 21-8 to withdraw the matter; 8 to stay and fight; and 3 abstentions, the meeting asked the chairman (Wallace) what next and he did not answer. In fact, after reading the withdrawal documents it is crystal clear that eight votes are what the application and affidavit are based upon and not the 21 delegates who voted to withdraw the matter from court."

The Central FC owner pointed out that every action by the United TTFA team from September 22 to missing the deadline September 23, has been intentionally designed to get the TTFA suspended.

He said, "September 22: United TTFA last-minute “informal” member meeting to attempt to show they listened to membership and most importantly to mask their reasons for apparently withdrawing case: “to withdraw based on the will of the membership - the members voted to do it – against TTFA United’s will, and on September 23 the following happened:

1. TTFA United formally express their plans:

2. At approx.1:30 pm local time (and 1-hour ˝ before the deadline to withdraw case) they issue an official media statement:

3. At 3:02 PM (intentionally after the FIFA deadline expired) they lodge affidavits before the High Court to request that case be withdrawn. Way it is redacted shows malicious intention for it to be rejected or to claim coercion after suspension and continue with the case.

4. At 6:30 pm and through the media, Wallace tries to justify why his name is not on media release:

5. September 24, a public holiday in T&T, reason why they also kept the matter secret hoping FIFA would suspend the TTFA before any court decision was reached. This series of events clearly shows TTFA United’s plot to play victims and paint FIFA as the monster who suspended them, and while their intent is to continue with their battle.

According to a delegate who attended the meeting and spoke to us on the condition anonymity: "Without pointing fingers or casting blame, I think Trinidad and Tobago football has experienced extremely challenging times, and we have challenging times ahead of us. Football is largely political and it has gotten the better (or worst) of us. We need true unity and wholesome, inclusive dialogue with all stakeholders if we are to ever heal and move forward for the good of the game and most importantly the players of the game."

Through the lawsuit, Wallace and his three vice presidents — Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillips, and Susan Joseph-Warrick were seeking a declaration that the decision to remove them on March 17, and replace them with a committee comprising of businessman Hadad, attorney Judy Daniel, and retired banker Nigel Romano was null, void, and of no legal or binding effect.

They were also seeking a permanent injunction barring FIFA from meddling in the TTFA's affairs by allegedly seeking to circumvent the democratic process by removing duly elected executive members.

Wallace and his team initially brought proceedings against FIFA in the Court for Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in April but withdraw it in May as they could not pay the 40,000 Swiss francs (TT$276,000) in associated costs.

Their position was partly due to FIFA's policy to not pay its share of the fees and CAS's rules, which require the other party to pay the full costs when the other fails in its obligations.

After the case was filed, FIFA applied for it to be struck out as it claimed that the TTFA by virtue of its membership with FIFA agreed to forgo all legal action in local courts in favour of proceedings before the CAS.

The application was initially blanked by Gobin, who ruled on August 13, that the local courts were the appropriate forum to resolve the dispute.

FIFA appealed with a hearing set for October 21.

While the appeal was still pending, Gobin set the date for the trial of the case for October 9 and gave FIFA an extension to file its defence. FIFA failed to meet the deadline as it maintained its position that it did not accept the jurisdiction of the court in the matter.

Wallace and his team also obtained an injunction against the normalisation committee after it attempted to facilitate an extraordinary general meeting (EGM) among members to vote to withdraw the case and recognised the NC as the administrators of T&T football.

The injunction, which will remain in place until discharged by Gobin, was not opposed by FIFA and was granted.

Wallace and his colleagues are being represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Crystal Paul, and Jason Jones, while Christopher Hamel-Smith, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie are appearing for FIFA.
Title: Sancho: ‘I told you so.’
Post by: Tallman on September 25, 2020, 06:31:22 AM
Sancho: ‘I told you so.’
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express)


ACTING Pro League chairman Brent Sancho was among those not surprised by FIFA’s announcement yesterday of a ban on the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association.

“I told you so,” Sancho said, having indeed conversed with the Express earlier.

Hours before the ban, both Sancho and local football club official Michael Awai had predicted a ban on T&T and accused United TTFA of dragging on the withdrawal of a High Court action despite an impending threat to ban the association.

Representatives for the United TTFA faction of the Football Association had confirmed that an application for withdrawal of court action against FIFA had been filed earlier yesterday afternoon with the registry of the Trinidad and Tobago High Court.

“The application for permission to withdraw was filed,” stated attorney Matthew Gayle who, along with Dr Emir Crowne and Jason Jones, were representing exiled TTFA president William Wallace and three vice-presidents who had launched a legal challenge to their dismissal by FIFA in March.

Yesterday being the Republic Day holiday, the courts were closed. However, Gayle insisted that “permission for withdrawal” was filed.

“We will have to wait and see how the judge deals with the matter,” attorney Gayle had stated while also acknowledging that he had no specific time frame in which the application would be processed.

Businessman Robert Hadad, who chairs FIFA’s normalisation committee that replaced the Wallace regime, replied “not sure” via WhatsApp to Express enquiries yesterday as to whether FIFA was informed of the withdrawal of the court action.

Despite Gayle’s assertions Michael Awai, an official of the AC Port of Spain professional club, had also been convinced there were ulterior motives.

“We are going to get banned,” Awai speculated.

Sancho, a TTFA board member, had expressed suspicions about United TTFA dragging out the issues with possibly devastating consequences. “Every single event that has transpired in the past two days has been meticulously and unethically calculated by ‘TTFA United’ to obtain the following: intentionally get TTFA suspended,” Sancho had stated before news of the ban yesterday.

Sancho’s theory was that United TTFA intentionally lodged a withdrawal document minutes after the FIFA deadline and he also alleged the attachment of affidavits indicating coercion, with a hope that the judge would ignore the wish of the TTFA membership and continue with the case.

He was also suspicious of Wallace not endorsing a United TTFA media release indicating that his faction had ended its fight with FIFA. Wallace was reported as saying he was not “mentally ready” to sign the document, although not opposed to its contents.

From the ousted executive’s meeting with TTFA delegates mere hours before the FIFA deadline, to Wallace and vice-president Clynt Taylor not endorsing the United TTFA media release, Sancho believed there was cause for concern.

He said that having won sympathy, United TTFA could then “claim that even though they attempted to withdraw the case—which has not occurred—big bad FIFA will still suspend the TTFA. After suspension, continue with court cases and battle FIFA,” he suggested.

Hours later, Trinidad and Tobago was indeed banned by the Zurich-based world governing body.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: andre samuel on September 25, 2020, 08:12:14 AM
so we suspended big deal. we was suspended since DJW won the election in 2016, we didn't win a game since they beat america in that FLUKE GAME in 2017, after that they went on to lose game after game beating only the lowest ranking team in the world anguilla.

in trinidad thing have to get worst before it gets better, i don't care who's the ttfa president either, as long as it's not shrek or sancho. soceion i'm borrowing the shrek from you, hope you don't mind.

maybe we would have a bit of peace now, instead of worrying about these cruddy footballers we have.

So we suspended big deal????

Really?? FIFA owns football full stop!  This is the darkest day in TT football history. 
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Anbrat on September 25, 2020, 08:43:54 AM
Cudjoe slams 'selfish' United TTFA for FIFA suspension
By Joel Bailey (T&T Newsday)


SHAMFA Cudjoe, Minister of Sport and Community Development, has described FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA (T&T Football Association) as “a sad day for football and sport” in T&T.

On Thursday, the Bureau of the FIFA Council suspended the TTFA with immediate effect due to grave violations of the FIFA Statutes.

In a statement on its website, FIFA said, “the suspension was prompted by the former leadership of the TTFA lodging a claim before (the T&T High Court) in order to contest the decision of the FIFA Council to appoint a normalisation committee for the TTFA.”

In March, TTFA president William Wallace and his executive were removed by FIFA, due to the TTFA’s mounting debt, and a normalisation committee, headed by businessman Robert Hadad, was put in place to run the affairs of T&T football.

On Thursday evening, Cudjoe said, “I am not surprised because FIFA would have already stated its position quite early. I was trying to avoid this situation. I remembered calling a meeting in August with all the football (bodies). I think FIFA has been fair and reasonable in its dealings by giving them a deadline (of September 16) and then going the extra mile of giving them an extension (of September 23).”

Turning her focus towards the United TTFA team of Wallace, his deputies Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick, Joseph Sam Phillip, as well as TTFA members Keith Look Loy and Anthony Harford, Cudjoe said, “If they were serious about relieving T&T from this kind of stress, they would have acted on time and in a proper manner.

“FIFA had no choice but to do what they have done,” she continued. “It’s a sad day for football and a sad day for sport development in this nation. The handful of people that’s causing us this trouble, they would not suffer as much as athletes and the young people who depend on football and sports for their advancement.

“I’m also disappointed that adults who have been charged with this management of football would have the country in this position, would hold football to ransom, would hijack the development of football in this way. They did not go to their clubs (or TTFA membership) before taking on this court matter. They went on their own selfish and unreasonable journey and today we’re in this position because of them.”

Recently, Wallace hinted that, even with FIFA sanctions, domestic and schools football will still be continued in T&T, once covid19 restrictions are lifted.

But Cudjoe countered, “What does that really mean for the young person who’s looking to advance in football, who have dreams about playing in the World Cup, who was looking forward to the CONCACAF Nations League? What community football and schools football means to those young athletes who are really being affected by this?”

The Minister said, “It goes beyond that because we were benefitting from FIFA Forward Development Programme and the various courses to help various disciplines like beach football (and) women’s football. That technical assistance is gone when you’re (suspended).

“While community football and schools football is good, that’s only a drop in the bucket when you think about the full potential of the beautiful game, of our ability to participate at regional and international levels. That brings no comfort, especially knowing that this could have been avoided and that these (individuals) had so much time to turn things around. But they did what they did for their own ego, for their own time of fame. It does not make any sense. The majority of their clubs know that it didn’t make any sense.”

Cudjoe urged other local sporting bodies to “learn from this, that when you elect people to leadership of your organisations, elect proper, right-thinking people with a conscience, with a heart to truly develop the game.”

The Minister is hopeful that there will be light at the end of the tunnel for T&T football.

“I think the tone of the (FIFA) letter allows some wiggle-room, that if (the TTFA) make the necessary changes, at it relates to properly recognising the normalisation committee, and even amending the local constitution to reflect that CAS is the final court of arbitration,” she said. “I think that would allow FIFA to reconsider lifting the suspension. I’m hoping that these clubs have their voices heard and hold their so-called leaders to account.”

No, Minister. 

There is something entirely dissonant with the tenor of your comments and discordant with the discretion and mandate with which your portfolio vests you.

Good on Joel Bailey for getting your comments on the record, but the comments place you as performing well within your competence, when this matter - particularly in its denouement - would have demanded more than the commentating perspective of a front row seat.

Perhaps the deficiency is that Mr. Bailey didn't exhaust his questions or ask all of the pertinent questions. But, even if he didn't ask, it seems that the moment should have compelled you to make a more comprehensive statement regarding the government's activism on this matter.

While there may be an element of incomplete journalism here - perhaps reflective of the expected scrutiny of the readership - there's also been a building narrative (no pun intended) of whether you have used your time sufficiently wisely despite your awareness of the advertised conclusion.

Your words: 'I am not surprised because FIFA would have already stated its position quite early'.

There are still questions to be answered before we should get to you reducing an element of your public comments to a personalised bashing of executive action.

Not wishing to be guilty of the same, my comments include curiosity as to Cabinet's view of the matter and extend to what, if anything, exercised the Prime Minister regarding all of the consequences which you liberally note.

It's evident that United TTFA trampled your last nerve,  but did you run the fullness of the last mile?
I am not sure that I am getting what your point really is  ???  and I would rather not simply assume. Is it that you regard the Minister's comments as inappropriate and that government should have a role in this ongoing imbroglio? Notwithstanding, in my humble view the minister was straightforward in calling a spade a spade.



Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: LKMaryTrini on September 25, 2020, 08:47:09 AM
We all know FIFA have their corruption issues but this rubbish lies squarely on TTFA.  How could an organization not pay coaches for months?  How could we send the women's team to Concacaf games in the US with $500?  Is that FIFA's fault? NO!  The deadline was 3pm but they submitted it at 3:23pm.  That was no accident, that was sending a message that they don't give **it about TT football and the FIFA (THE GOVERNING BOARD).  Until we find someone who is more interested in the health of the game in TT and not in personal gain, we are going to watch more countries succeed and surpass us. 
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on September 25, 2020, 09:21:47 AM
Cudjoe slams 'selfish' United TTFA for FIFA suspension
By Joel Bailey (T&T Newsday)


SHAMFA Cudjoe, Minister of Sport and Community Development, has described FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA (T&T Football Association) as “a sad day for football and sport” in T&T.

On Thursday, the Bureau of the FIFA Council suspended the TTFA with immediate effect due to grave violations of the FIFA Statutes.

In a statement on its website, FIFA said, “the suspension was prompted by the former leadership of the TTFA lodging a claim before (the T&T High Court) in order to contest the decision of the FIFA Council to appoint a normalisation committee for the TTFA.”

In March, TTFA president William Wallace and his executive were removed by FIFA, due to the TTFA’s mounting debt, and a normalisation committee, headed by businessman Robert Hadad, was put in place to run the affairs of T&T football.

On Thursday evening, Cudjoe said, “I am not surprised because FIFA would have already stated its position quite early. I was trying to avoid this situation. I remembered calling a meeting in August with all the football (bodies). I think FIFA has been fair and reasonable in its dealings by giving them a deadline (of September 16) and then going the extra mile of giving them an extension (of September 23).”

Turning her focus towards the United TTFA team of Wallace, his deputies Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick, Joseph Sam Phillip, as well as TTFA members Keith Look Loy and Anthony Harford, Cudjoe said, “If they were serious about relieving T&T from this kind of stress, they would have acted on time and in a proper manner.

“FIFA had no choice but to do what they have done,” she continued. “It’s a sad day for football and a sad day for sport development in this nation. The handful of people that’s causing us this trouble, they would not suffer as much as athletes and the young people who depend on football and sports for their advancement.

“I’m also disappointed that adults who have been charged with this management of football would have the country in this position, would hold football to ransom, would hijack the development of football in this way. They did not go to their clubs (or TTFA membership) before taking on this court matter. They went on their own selfish and unreasonable journey and today we’re in this position because of them.”

Recently, Wallace hinted that, even with FIFA sanctions, domestic and schools football will still be continued in T&T, once covid19 restrictions are lifted.

But Cudjoe countered, “What does that really mean for the young person who’s looking to advance in football, who have dreams about playing in the World Cup, who was looking forward to the CONCACAF Nations League? What community football and schools football means to those young athletes who are really being affected by this?”

The Minister said, “It goes beyond that because we were benefitting from FIFA Forward Development Programme and the various courses to help various disciplines like beach football (and) women’s football. That technical assistance is gone when you’re (suspended).

“While community football and schools football is good, that’s only a drop in the bucket when you think about the full potential of the beautiful game, of our ability to participate at regional and international levels. That brings no comfort, especially knowing that this could have been avoided and that these (individuals) had so much time to turn things around. But they did what they did for their own ego, for their own time of fame. It does not make any sense. The majority of their clubs know that it didn’t make any sense.”

Cudjoe urged other local sporting bodies to “learn from this, that when you elect people to leadership of your organisations, elect proper, right-thinking people with a conscience, with a heart to truly develop the game.”

The Minister is hopeful that there will be light at the end of the tunnel for T&T football.

“I think the tone of the (FIFA) letter allows some wiggle-room, that if (the TTFA) make the necessary changes, at it relates to properly recognising the normalisation committee, and even amending the local constitution to reflect that CAS is the final court of arbitration,” she said. “I think that would allow FIFA to reconsider lifting the suspension. I’m hoping that these clubs have their voices heard and hold their so-called leaders to account.”

No, Minister. 

There is something entirely dissonant with the tenor of your comments and discordant with the discretion and mandate with which your portfolio vests you.

Good on Joel Bailey for getting your comments on the record, but the comments place you as performing well within your competence, when this matter - particularly in its denouement - would have demanded more than the commentating perspective of a front row seat.

Perhaps the deficiency is that Mr. Bailey didn't exhaust his questions or ask all of the pertinent questions. But, even if he didn't ask, it seems that the moment should have compelled you to make a more comprehensive statement regarding the government's activism on this matter.

While there may be an element of incomplete journalism here - perhaps reflective of the expected scrutiny of the readership - there's also been a building narrative (no pun intended) of whether you have used your time sufficiently wisely despite your awareness of the advertised conclusion.

Your words: 'I am not surprised because FIFA would have already stated its position quite early'.

There are still questions to be answered before we should get to you reducing an element of your public comments to a personalised bashing of executive action.

Not wishing to be guilty of the same, my comments include curiosity as to Cabinet's view of the matter and extend to what, if anything, exercised the Prime Minister regarding all of the consequences which you liberally note.

It's evident that United TTFA trampled your last nerve,  but did you run the fullness of the last mile?
I am not sure that I am getting what your point really is  ???  and I would rather not simply assume. Is it that you regard the Minister's comments as inappropriate and that government should have a role in this ongoing imbroglio? Notwithstanding, in my humble view the minister was straightforward in calling a spade a spade.





You don't need to be MoS to speak candidly. Any citizen is equipped to do that. What distinguishes the MoS from ordinary citizens is her latitude to engage her anticipation of the consequences by leveraging her good office beyond occasionally beating her head against a wall and railing against the personality of United TTFA. Any political office holder worth their salt understands that she has the capacity to weigh-in on the matter through back channel outreach. I don't have any reason to doubt the competence of the MoS, but as I've pointed out repeatedly,  the Government of Trinidad and Tobago is not a disinterested party in this outcome and therefore should act as if not a disinterested or passively connected party. Coming to the public stage and saying 'I tried to talk sense to them' is not a summation of the available parameters.

I appreciate that the MoS is constrained to a degree by the PM's view of the totality of circumstances, but there has to be more here than has been offered.

And no,  I don't regard her comments as entirely appropriate.

And,  yes, Govt's activism with Zurich can/could have occur/occurred without having/being violative of FIFA's posture regarding governmental intervention.

So, on the table is what has the MoS/PM done with respect to operating on the margins of the litigation and outreach to Zurich? Even a solitary phone call?

Participate in managing the outcome.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Trini _2026 on September 25, 2020, 10:18:04 AM
wallace made  a u turn and put the case back in court yes

 i wonder if this was planned

https://wired868.com/2020/09/25/fight-back-on-wallace-withdraws-withdrawal-in-shock-twist-to-ttfa-fifa-legal-saga/

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Trini on September 25, 2020, 11:12:25 AM
A very sad day.
Seems our sports administrators all seem to To be a personality type in the Caribbean.

We need to wake up and realise this is not only about us. Lots of countries have gotten normalization committees before. Ask Argentina.

FIFA run things. And CaS is the place to go. Thats in their rules.

HTF we believe we can circumvent their rules?

Its like you dont like a particular law in a country and you say Fk it and still break the law. There are repercussions.

Yuh made your point with the local court.

Withdraw the thing in good time nah.

Steups. 
Title: United TTFA turns to CAS to get suspension lifted
Post by: Tallman on September 25, 2020, 01:00:34 PM
United TTFA turns to CAS to get suspension lifted
By Walter Alibey (T&T Guardian)


With T&T still trying to digest FIFA's decision to suspend the T&T Football Association (TTFA) for all tournaments, events or programme anywhere in the world and until further notice on Thursday, followed by Friday's announced resignation of the TTFA second vice-president Susan Joseph-Warrick, the breaking news is that the remaining five members of the United Team have decided to continue with their legal battle against FIFA in the T&T High court.

At 7:38.08 am on Friday, the United TTFA served a "Notice of Withdrawal" on the T&T high court that it was withdrawing the application it made on Wednesday to withdraw its court matter against FIFA in an attempt to meet FIFA's ulitmatum. This recent decision means that the matter will proceed as stated on October 9 before justice Carol Gobin.

The United TTFA team also filed an application with the Court for Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Lausanne, Switzerland seeking a stay of FIFA's decision to suspend the TTFA on Thursday. The case CAS#7411/A Trinidad and Tobago Football Association v FIFA, is expected to be heard sometime within the next two days.

The application is an attempt by the United TTFA to secure T&T's place in the Concacaf Gold Cup tournament.

Guardian Media Sports has seen CAS response to the United TTFA legal team confirming that the matter will be heard.

However, Robert Hadad, the chairman of the FIFA-appointed Normalisation Committee when contacted revealed to Guardian Media Sports that T&T will be part of the Gold Tournament but with a stiuplation.

He said on Friday said: "After recent events, I hope all football stakeholders in our country will work together with the Normalization Committee for the benefit of football. We have a very difficult task ahead but we owe it to the coaches, the players, the fans and to future generations to create a well-governed and well managed TTFA. There is possible light at the end of the tunnel. I have learned last night, the Concacaf Council decided that if we meet the requirements laid down by FIFA, and if FIFA lifts the suspension by December 18th, we will be permitted to compete in next summer’s Gold Cup. However, if the suspension remains in place on that date, we will be automatically replaced. This presents us with an opportunity but only if we urgently address FIFA’s issues. I urge the membership of the TTFA and all football stakeholders in our country to get behind the Normalization Committee. Please work with us; it is the only way we can get the TTFA back on track."

Meanwhile, Susan Joseph-Warrick, the second vice president of the T&T Football Association (TTFA) and president of the Women's Football League (Wolf), has announced her resignation from all football in T&T and has become the first casualty of the legal battle between the TTFA and FIFA. Joseph-Warrick's announcement to her executive comes less than 24 hours after FIFA officially suspended the T&TFA as a member of the world governing body FIFA with immediate effect and until further notice.

The ruling means that T&T cannot participate in any FIFA tournaments, events or programme anywhere in the world until the suspension is lifted.

T&T was looking forward to participating in next year's Gold Cup tournament in the United States and the upcoming World Cup qualifiers in March 2021.

The ruling follows a decision by the former TTFA executive to challenge in court, FIFA’s right to appoint a Normalisation Committee to manage the affairs of football in T&T.

Joseph-Warrick, who was elected as WoLF president in April 2019 on a two-year term, was the lone woman on the United TTFA slate that contested the TTFA November 24, 2019 elections to form the executive and serve alongside former president William Wallace and vice presidents — Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillips.

In her resignation letter, she stated that: "This was a fight for Principle, and Justice and I felt we were well supported in our actions by the football lovers in Trinidad and Tobago. Within recent times it has become clear to me, that we are also fighting against those that we represent; The Associations, The Clubs, The Teams, Supporters and Sadly....the Players."

She added: "How and why these papers were filed after the 3 pm deadline is beyond me, and I am saddened and disappointed at the turn of events."

The quartet was removed from office by FIFA on March 17 and FIFA -appointed a Normalisation Committee on March 27 to manage the sport which led them to mount a legal challenge of FIFA's decision at the Court for Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland in April, withdraw it in May as they could not pay the 40,000 Swiss francs (TT$276,000) in associated costs claiming institutional bias in favour of FIFA. The matter was then lodged in the T&T High Court and FIFA objected claiming the TTFA has breached its statutes.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: ABTrini on September 25, 2020, 01:05:51 PM
The resulting actions by FIFA is questionable given the withdrawal of the court case. The deadline given  seems rather inconsequential and their resulting decision appears to be an effort to:
 save face
- assert power and control
- deflect from their own alleged involvement with the HoF scandal
- save another face for DJW
- an attempt to shame and ridicule

You know what? There is a statement that what does not kill you make you stronger. If I was a national player, my focus now would be on such a rigid training and development that woe to all the Caribbean nations that did not have the " frighing balls" to support TnT withah vote of solidarity. Yes let the 4ks laugh cause when this suspension is lifted we should wreck doom on all ah dem.
And to the jokers who trying to usurp and destabilize at home shame!!!!!
Our strength must come from this adversity
So I am not looking at dioom and gloom but looking at how the resilience and psyche of our players should begin approaching this game of football- let this be a lesson - no one gives you anything - all man like to kick your arse when you are down- Go practice train and come back with a lot to prove.  Internally this is the time to really focus on program and player development - get in some strength trying
- recreate some zonal rivalries - North Soth east west and Tobago
Recall in the 60's whenall the world and the mighty USA was giving Cuba blows it was Sir Eric Williams who stood up for Cuba and denounced the BS-  we have a lot to be proud of as a nation and those who are working to shame us should look in the mirror and then go hide Fk them all- now is anyone who truly is patriotism and have a love and anything to do with building the development and growth of our football to come out and organize community training sessions to mobilize our players-
All them fracking star boys like BS does only talk - some who in politics does only talk all them with overseas experience now is your time to form Community training sessions to spread hope fight and an unrelenting desire  to unleash ah force when they lift this suspension.
Let's not take this lying down like a 'drunken whore' who hast lost the ability to move.
The time is now for each player to work twice as hard for the day when this is over- is WAR on the Caribbean brethens and whomever in our path. Now we have something to prove - we engo take this lying down
And to   Fck withHoF go back to Halsey Stadium - let FIFA pay the fracking bills for HOF  liike they did for Centre of Excellence - doh beg- as a country we does. Eg too much for all things foreign- Better yet let the government take the facility and use it as a health treatment facility or a centre for therapy he or a new St Anns facility for the nutcases we have running around pretending they know how to run football in TnT
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on September 25, 2020, 01:47:07 PM
Griffith on TTFA Suspension: Give Normalisation Committee full control
By Sue-Ann Wayow (AZP News)


FOOTBALL in Trinidad and Tobago is on the verge of collapse with football’s world governing body FIFA suspending this country from all FIFA competitions.

This according to Commissioner of Police Gary Griffith who said young men’s dreams will be killed because of the actions of a few persons who had too big an ego.

Griffith who has been very vocal about the ongoing issue between FIFA and the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) told AZPNews.com that the outcome was expected given that the former leaders of TTFA did not comply with FIFA’s regulations.

Griffith said, “It was an avalanche and it was expected because egos yet again set in. Unfortunately we have been suspended. The good thing about it, is that it has happened already. We need to move on and I say when you get lemons, you make lemonade. What this has done is that it revealed a lot of persons with egos and they were not looking at the bigger picture.

“People must not have selfish intentions when they go out in service of country and especially in a position like this.”

He said FIFA had to do what they needed to do, given the situation and there was still a silver lining.

Griffith said, “In the last few lines of that letter by FIFA, it gives us that window of opportunity where it states that the suspension can be lifted at any time. Now is the time that every single club, member, footballer fan must agree that the normalisation committee should have full control, to take over. Have the normalisation committee make the request to FIFA and have this suspension lifted immediately.”

The normalisation committee led by Robert Hadad was set up in March by FIFA.

He said, “We cannot be dream killers based on our own actions. We are speaking about hundreds of young men losing the opportunity to dream, to represent their country, to get opportunities, for contracts for scholarships. If this is not dealt with we are not going to get a cent from FIFA and I do not think that the government will want to put much into an organisation that is only going to be playing sports internally.

“You are definitely not going to get a cent from the private sector.  Football is going to collapse so there is nothing to gain. We saw these individuals so eager to win a battle at the expense of losing a war. Now is the time for us to move forward and do what is required.”
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: ABTrini on September 25, 2020, 01:57:10 PM
Why the doom and gloom?
Face ent we just seized 22 mil before ah junior cop give it back?
 Think we could have pumped that into foot ball development  :cursing:

Wait nah
Is li,e he politricking tug be the new commissioner of TTFA?  Hahah well he go have Nuffield corruption yuh clean up dey too- then he could take on FIFA
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 25, 2020, 03:12:13 PM
so we suspended big deal. we was suspended since DJW won the election in 2016, we didn't win a game since they beat america in that FLUKE GAME in 2017, after that they went on to lose game after game beating only the lowest ranking team in the world anguilla.

in trinidad thing have to get worst before it gets better, i don't care who's the ttfa president either, as long as it's not shrek or sancho. soceion i'm borrowing the shrek from you, hope you don't mind.

maybe we would have a bit of peace now, instead of worrying about these cruddy footballers we have.

So we suspended big deal????

Really?? FIFA owns football full stop!  This is the darkest day in TT football history.
so what I said it, big deal! our football was suspended since your fat friend took office. we were 49th when timkee was the boss and Stevie hart was coaching, and it seemed like we were on the mend, then your ugly overly ambitious fat friend came in and steam rolled the program firing hart and waldrum and implementing his crazy ideas by sending players all over the world to be embarrassed just so that he could collect match fees, a real pimp game if you ask me.

in his term the womens team suffered and for the first time in 25 yrs the under 23 team took a back seat missing out on Olympic qualifications. I remembered that clueless jackass beating his chest claiming that we would be in for a surprise just before the u15 tournament claiming that the team was his pet project and that’s where he exhausted all his efforts and resources, only to bum out getting trampled by every team they played.

so please sir, don’t come for me, because I think i have a right to vent my frustration just like anyone else. and just like you I have to live through this suspension, but I choose not to care anymore it’s like having bad kids, after so many screw ups you throw in the towel and look the other way.

 I hope by now you know that trinidad is a problem child, and by being a supporter of anything trinidad you will get your heart broken. the heart wrenching part is that the place have so much potential, so much to offer the world, but it’s filled with problem children who can’t get it together.

I for one am happy that we got a break from all this madness, we don’t need to be in a tournament at this time either, our players are disenchanted and not focused on competitive football ATM, and instead we need to start build and preparing for the next 5 yrs.

we need a solid caring capable administration, we need solid sponsorship and equally solid development programs because our lads don’t even have good ball handling skills, and as it stands half our player could hardly dribble a ball 20 yards, nor control a ball at top speed with them having the ball glued to their boots.

our focus should be on developing a good youth league and a competitive pro league and forget rushing to go out there and be beaten by the usual suspects usa, Costa Rica, Mexico and honduras. let’s use this time to fix football instead off rushing to be seen.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 25, 2020, 03:14:25 PM
We all know FIFA have their corruption issues but this rubbish lies squarely on TTFA.  How could an organization not pay coaches for months?  How could we send the women's team to Concacaf games in the US with $500?  Is that FIFA's fault? NO!  The deadline was 3pm but they submitted it at 3:23pm.  That was no accident, that was sending a message that they don't give **it about TT football and the FIFA (THE GOVERNING BOARD).  Until we find someone who is more interested in the health of the game in TT and not in personal gain, we are going to watch more countries succeed and surpass us.
ask fat boy shrek david john apulanius williams.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on September 25, 2020, 03:21:12 PM
WATCH: SportsMax Zone discusses FIFA's suspension of Trinidad and Tobago. Guests include David Nakhid (former T&T captain and current Opposition Senator), Anil Roberts (former Minister of Sport and current Opposition Senator), Osmond Downer (VP of the Referees Association and one of the framers of the TTFA constitution), and Brent Sancho (former Minister of Sport and current Acting Chairman of the T&T Pro League)

https://www.youtube.com/v/xF-xwkwm3PU
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on September 25, 2020, 03:33:48 PM
'FIFA owns football' - Former sports minister Roberts laments fact that TTFA fought unrealistic, 'losing war'
sportsmax.tv


Former Trinidad and Tobago Minister of Sports Anil Roberts has lamented what he classifies to be a cause that was destined to be ‘a losing battle’ in wake of FIFA’s recent suspension of the TTFA from world football.

FIFA and the TTFA have been locked in a bitter dispute since March of this year, when the global football governing body appointed a normalisation committee to take over the affairs of the nation’s football, after dissolving the board.  The then four-month-old William Wallace-led executive rejected the move and refused to recognize the committee, framing the actions as an infringement on the country’s sovereignty.

In its letter, however, FIFA pointed to article 8 paragraph 2 of the FIFA Statutes, as giving them the right to appoint a normalisation committee.  The Wallace-led coalition then opted to take the case to the CAS before having issues with the cost of presenting the case and suggesting any ruling would have been biased towards FIFA.  The body instead opted to take the case before the Trinidad and Tobago High Court, a move also prohibited by the FIFA statutes.  In announcing the decision to suspend Trinidad and Tobago from international football on Thursday, FIFA pointed to violations of article 59, which states that;

“Recourse to ordinary courts of law is prohibited unless specifically provided for in the FIFA regulations. Recourse to ordinary courts of law for all types of provisional measures is also prohibited.”

According to Roberts, even if one were to submit to the fact that every argument made by the ousted TTFA officials were correct, they ignored a certain reality.

“There was no other outcome.  So, let us pretend that the TTFA was absolutely right.  Every argument they made, FIFA was being high handed, their decisions were wrong, they were using their power to suppress and oppress Trinidad and Tobago and its organisation.  Every argument was correct.  You still could not win, because the idea is you want to play football and FIFA controls football,” Roberts said in an exclusive interview with the SportsMax Zone.

Since 2003, FIFA has suspended around 24 countries for various disputes and violations of its statutes.  Antigua and Barbuda are the only other Caribbean country suspended during the period.

“FIFA owns football.  Everything we want as a country, as a territory, they control.  Whether it is through their World Cup male and female tournaments or their junior age-group World Cups.  Whether its through their ability to control club football, world club football, Champions League, CONCACAF Gold Cup, opportunities for our young players to get contracts…So this was a losing war from the onset.”
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 25, 2020, 04:06:30 PM
'FIFA owns football' - Former sports minister Roberts laments fact that TTFA fought unrealistic, 'losing war'
sportsmax.tv


Former Trinidad and Tobago Minister of Sports Anil Roberts has lamented what he classifies to be a cause that was destined to be ‘a losing battle’ in wake of FIFA’s recent suspension of the TTFA from world football.

FIFA and the TTFA have been locked in a bitter dispute since March of this year, when the global football governing body appointed a normalisation committee to take over the affairs of the nation’s football, after dissolving the board.  The then four-month-old William Wallace-led executive rejected the move and refused to recognize the committee, framing the actions as an infringement on the country’s sovereignty.

In its letter, however, FIFA pointed to article 8 paragraph 2 of the FIFA Statutes, as giving them the right to appoint a normalisation committee.  The Wallace-led coalition then opted to take the case to the CAS before having issues with the cost of presenting the case and suggesting any ruling would have been biased towards FIFA.  The body instead opted to take the case before the Trinidad and Tobago High Court, a move also prohibited by the FIFA statutes.  In announcing the decision to suspend Trinidad and Tobago from international football on Thursday, FIFA pointed to violations of article 59, which states that;

“Recourse to ordinary courts of law is prohibited unless specifically provided for in the FIFA regulations. Recourse to ordinary courts of law for all types of provisional measures is also prohibited.”

According to Roberts, even if one were to submit to the fact that every argument made by the ousted TTFA officials were correct, they ignored a certain reality.

“There was no other outcome.  So, let us pretend that the TTFA was absolutely right.  Every argument they made, FIFA was being high handed, their decisions were wrong, they were using their power to suppress and oppress Trinidad and Tobago and its organisation.  Every argument was correct.  You still could not win, because the idea is you want to play football and FIFA controls football,” Roberts said in an exclusive interview with the SportsMax Zone.

Since 2003, FIFA has suspended around 24 countries for various disputes and violations of its statutes.  Antigua and Barbuda are the only other Caribbean country suspended during the period.

“FIFA owns football.  Everything we want as a country, as a territory, they control.  Whether it is through their World Cup male and female tournaments or their junior age-group World Cups.  Whether its through their ability to control club football, world club football, Champions League, CONCACAF Gold Cup, opportunities for our young players to get contracts…So this was a losing war from the onset.”
this loud mouth jackass. tell us something we don’t know bright boy.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: gawd on pitch on September 25, 2020, 04:41:08 PM
The only ammunition that Wallace has to fight FIFA is if DJW get charged and/or Bassant get more evidence of corruption. If that happen, he might be able to prove that his removal was to hide corruption. It would be even better if Bassant come out with more damning evidence that shows Infantino and Mosengo had knowledge of the DJW deals. . Hopefully before this goes to the CAS.

For Wallace to go to the CAS now, he must have something in he back pocket. Because at this point now, he can't expect to carry a knife into a gun fight. .
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on September 25, 2020, 06:32:07 PM
The only ammunition that Wallace has to fight FIFA is if DJW get charged and/or Bassant get more evidence of corruption. If that happen, he might be able to prove that his removal was to hide corruption. It would be even better if Bassant come out with more damning evidence that shows Infantino and Mosengo had knowledge of the DJW deals. . Hopefully before this goes to the CAS.

For Wallace to go to the CAS now, he must have something in he back pocket. Because at this point now, he can't expect to carry a knife into a gun fight. .

Well, at the moment he's going to CAS with a cardboard placard that reads 'We've been wronged, both procedurally and substantively.' No knife or other presumably sharp instrument other than his elbows. He's covered more ground with the placard and elbows than many imagined.

Achieving definition regarding any supposed and alleged criminal conduct by the former president is not going to be conclusive in this matter. And, even if it would be helpful or conclusive, that matter is not going to be operating on the same acceleration as this matter. Although, it would be interesting if we chipped in and gifted DJW a trip to Panama or Caracas for Xmas.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 26, 2020, 12:30:14 AM
Wallace, TTFA resume FIFA battle.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


T&T Football Association’s (TTFA) fight with football’s world governing body-FIFA, is far from over.

Following on the heels of a FIFA suspension on Thursday evening, William Wallace, the leader of the TTFA instructed his Attorneys to file an emergency appeal in the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) to contest the suspension. And they have also withdrawn the withdrawal documents that ordered the stoppage of the TTFA vs FIFA case, which now means the TTFA will go ahead with the court matter against the FIFA in the High Court on October 9.

Wallace and his team, which has been reduced from six to five with the resignation of Susan Joseph-Warrick yesterday as second vice president at the TTFA, as the president of the Women’s League Football (WoLF) and from the TTFA Board, have been disappointed with FIFA which slapped a suspension on the TTFA, although the TTFA on Wednesday, had already filed documentation in the High Court to drop the court action with FIFA, which was a condition to prevent them from being banned. But the TTFA missed the stipulated 3 pm time and no notice was given to FIFA on the status of the matter.

TTFA has been in a tussle with the FIFA since March 17, when its elected executive was removed and ten days later replaced by a FIFA-appointment Normalisation Committee as the administrators of local football.

FIFA had on August 26 in a letter, warned the TTFA of sanctions if it did not drop the case against them by September 16. This was followed by another letter on September 18, giving the TTFA a revised deadline of September 23 to drop the case or face suspension.

Wallace said his lawyers were expected to serve the FIFA lawyers yesterday with a letter that the documents had been filed to drop the case, since Thursday was a holiday.

However, FIFA in a letter on Republic Day (September 24) told the TTFA it had been suspended with immediate effect and until further notice.

According to the FIFA, the suspension will only to be lifted if the TTFA recognise and accept the Normalisation Committee and if the TTFA statutes are in line with FIFA statutes.

Wallace responded yesterday with a letter that said: “It is also now clear that the decision to suspend the TTFA amidst the upcoming draw for the Gold Cup 2021 is meant to, amongst other things, provoke public furore against the properly and democratically elected executive of the TTFA. It is, for this reason, that last night (Thursday) I gave instructions to the TTFA Attorneys to file an emergency appeal with the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), challenging the sole issue of the suspension of TTFA in the face of illegal threats and coercive acts by FIFA.

“The attorneys were also asked to make an application for Injunctive Relief so that if successful this would allow T&T to participate in the Gold Cup draw carded for Monday 28th September 2020.”

However, a Concacaf released stated that T&T is included in Monday’s draw, but will be given until December 18, to comply with FIFA request or the country will be withdrawn from the tournament.

Meanwhile, Wallace said: “This morning (yesterday) and on my further instructions, the TTFA attorneys also filed the relevant documents to continue with the claim before the High Court of Justice since this is the only way that we can legitimise our application to CAS. The obvious question would be, why CAS?

“The answer is that the action taken against the TTFA is a disciplinary one and CAS is charged with dealing with such matters. It must also be noted that our only financial obligation in this matter is the filing fees.”

Wallace said the action FIFA was an indication that they were going to ban the TTFA whether the matter had been withdrawn or not, an action which against the principles of fair play which has been pushed by the FIFA.

RELATED NEWS

TTFA kicks up a storm after suspension
Ian Prescott (T&T Express).


Legal claim against FIFA reinstated

A DAY after submitting it, Trinidad & Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace has rescinded a notice to withdraw a legal claim against football’s world governing body FIFA in the Trinidad and Tobago High Court.

Wallace’s attorney, Dr Emir Crowne, yesterday wrote FIFA and the Switzerland-based Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) seeking a stay of execution of the decision to suspend Trinidad and Tobago from international football taken by the Bureau of the FIFA Council.

CAS’s head of arbitration, Antonio De Quesada, acknowledged receipt of Crowne’s letter.

“I acknowledge receipt of the urgent application for a stay of the decision rendered by the Bureau of the FIFA Council on 24 September 2020, filed by the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association,” Quesada stated.

“The application has been assigned to the Appeals Arbitration Division of the CAS. I note that the Applicant has requested a decision to be issued by Monday 28 September 2020 at 08h00 (2 a.m. local time) without giving any reason to justify such request.”

Wallace’s latest action came in response to FIFA’s suspension of Trinidad and Tobago from international football on Thursday’s Republic Day holiday.

The former TTFA executives had challenged FIFA’s decision to replace them with its own Normalisation Committee in March.

They took High Court action in defiance of FIFA’s statutes, which prohibit member associations from taking disputes to local courts and list suspension or expulsion as a consequence.

On Thursday, FIFA acted on an ultimatum sent from FIFA general secretary Fatma Samoura, who demanded that Wallace withdraw the matter by 3 p.m. on September 23 or the TTFA would be suspended.

New twist

As pressure from TTFA delegates mounted, Wallace’s United TTFA group filed a withdrawal application, but only after the deadline (3.02 p.m.) according to the stamp on the High Court document.

Wallace announced the new turn of events in a news release yesterday.

“This morning and on my further instructions, the TTFA attorneys also filed the relevant documents to continue with the claim before the High Court of Justice since this is the only way that we can legitimise our application to CAS,” Wallace stated.

At 7.38 a.m., attorney Jason Jones applied to the T&T Supreme Court registry to file notice of a discontinuation of the notice of application for permission to withdraw the claim, draft order and the affidavit which Wallace filed on September 23.

High Court judge, Justice Carol Gobin, will deliberate on the new motion when the matter begins on October 9.

FIFA has confirmed it will not submit a defence since it does not recognise the jurisdiction of the local court.

Wallace also explained the decision to return to the Switzerland-based CAS with a motion to suppress FIFA’s suspension.

“The obvious question would be, why CAS? The answer is that the action taken against the TTFA is a disciplinary one and CAS is charged with dealing with such matters. It must also be noted that our only financial obligation in this matter is the filing of fees.”

TTFA VP quits

With some TTFA board members already calling for his resignation, Wallace no longer has the support of one of his vice-presidents.

TTFA VP Susan Joseph-Warrick yesterday resigned, citing a breach of trust with her former United TTFA colleagues as she announced she had quit all her positions.

“Having consulted with our membership, we took the decision to give up our principled struggle for the future of Trinidad and Tobago football and moved for the withdrawal of court proceedings against FIFA.

“How and why these papers were filed after the 3 p.m. deadline is beyond me, and I am saddened and disappointed at the turn of events,” said Joseph-Warrick.

“As for me, I am done. I wish to advise of my resignation from the United TTFA, Trinidad and Tobago Women’s League Football (TT WoLF) and my elected post of second vice-president of the TTFA.”

Contacted for a response, Wallace argued that FIFA intended to take action.

“The lawyers have advised us not to speak. I just came from their office. We are doing a release.”

Wallace, in his statement at 5 p.m., maintained that the TTFA took steps to withdraw its High Court claim against FIFA.

“It is unfortunate that notwithstanding the TTFA having taken steps to withdraw the claim before our High Court, FIFA seemingly found it fit, fair and/or proper to not only take punitive steps against the TTFA but to introduce a new and further condition requiring the TTFA to ‘bring its own statutes into line with the FIFA statutes’.

“It is now clear however that FIFA intended to take punitive action against the TTFA regardless of whether or not steps were taken by the TTFA to withdraw and discontinue the claim before our High Court of Justice on the 23rd September 2020,” Wallace stated.

United TTFA returns to ‘biased’ CAS.
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (Newsday).


UNITED TTFA, after previously questioning the impartiality of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland, has returned to the Swiss court to fight FIFA.

The ousted TT Football Association (TTFA) executive on Friday sought to withdraw its withdrawal of a lawsuit against FIFA in the TT High Court. The case is set to be heard by Justice Carol Gobin on October 9.

Although the sport’s global governing body indefinitely suspended the local fraternity on Thursday, ousted TTFA president William Wallace and his regime still believe their removal and appointment of a normalisation committee, by FIFA,was “illegal”.

Wallace’s team complied with FIFA’s request and withdrew their legal fight at 3:02pm on Wednesday – two minutes over the 3pm September 23 deadline set by the world body – to escape suspension proceedings. FIFA showed no leniency as United TTFA initially had until September 16 to withdraw but FIFA had given an extension.

United TTFA will now fight the FIFA suspension at CAS and, on Thursday night, “gave instructions to the TTFA attorneys to file an emergency appeal with the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), challenging the sole issue of suspension.”

This was revealed in a document issued by Wallace, accompanied by the TTFA letterhead, on Friday, which further stated, “The TTFA attorneys also filed the relevant documents to continue with the claim before the High Court of Justice (TT) since this is the only way that we can legitimise our application to CAS.”

Ironically, CAS was shunned upon by the removed administration during the early stages of this legal battle, as their attorneys Dr. Emir Crowne and Matthew Gayle claimed that a “number of irregularities have arisen, irregularities that have caused their clients to believe their right to a fair hearing has been impinged.”

After the appointment of the normalisation committee in March, Wallace’s team of Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick, and Joseph Sam Phillip, along with TT Super League president Keith Look Loy and Northern Football Association president Anthony Harford, took FIFA to CAS.

Twelve days later, the ejected administrators turned to the TT High Court in its fight, although, according to FIFA’s Statues, this matter was mandated to be heard at CAS.

United TTFA claimed CAS showed “bias” in favour of FIFA.

Look Loy said on Friday, “We filed an injunction at the CAS against the suspension. But to ensure we had legal standing to do so, we had to have a legal matter before the local courts. Had the case been withdrawn from the court, there would be no legal standing in the local high court.

“There would be no legal standing because they have no case before the court, which means they have accepted FIFA’s imposition of the normalisation committee. We do not accept this and thus had to withdraw the withdrawal application to file such an injunction against FIFA.”

Both Look Loy and Wallace claim the first application to withdraw was done after an informal meeting of TTFA’s membership voted, on Tuesday, to end the court action against FIFA. The count revealed 21 members for, eight against and three abstaining their vote.

“We put aside our political position and principles and abided by our member’s decision and submitted the said application to withdraw. By going ahead and banning TTFA, FIFA refused the wish of the TTFA membership. It was an absolutely harsh and nonsensical decision by FIFA because they got everything they asked for, whether two minutes late,” Look Loy added.

The FC Santa Rosa president believes, however, that FIFA “needed” to suspend the TTFA because of their action to challenge its global governance structure. According to him, if TTFA was not sanctioned or punished for challenging the sport’s governing body, other country associations would have also stood up against football’s bosses.

“Whether we submitted the application to withdraw or not, FIFA still wants to show us who the real boss is. Anywhere we go from here is as a result of FIFA’s refusal to accept our withdrawal,” he further stated.

Amidst the suspension and uncertainty of T&T’s football future, normalisation committee chairman Robert Hadad revealed, on Friday, that Concacaf held an “emergency meeting” hours prior stating that T&T will be included in the 2021 Gold Cup draw which is set to take place on September 28.

The Concacaf media release read, “However, they (T&T) will only participate in the competition if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is lifted by 5pm on December 18.”

If the ban is not lifted, T&T will be replaced by Antigua and Barbuda.

Strangely enough, Look Loy sees this move by the regional body as a positive sign going forward and called on football enthusiasts to remain fearless.

“Everybody in T&T could relax about the Gold Cup. Four hours after we lodged our case, Concacaf guaranteed we would be in Monday’s draw and would play in the tournament once the suspension is lifted before December 18.

“I assure you it will be lifted (suspension) because United TTFA, if we win, will call a meeting and let the membership decide if they want United TTFA or a normalisation committee. If they request the latter, we will invite FIFA to send one. They will have the authority to do that. But it will be all legal,” he noted.

In response to Joseph-Warrick’s surprising resignation as TT Women’s Football League (WoLF) president owing to FIFA’s decision to suspend TTFA, Look Loy holds no malice against his comrade.

Joseph-Warrick, in a letter disbursed on Friday morning, stated that, “it has become clear to me that we are also fighting against those that we represent: the associations, the clubs, the teams, supporters and sadly, the players.”

Look Loy said, “We love Susan and we would never hold her resignation against her. Every soldier knows how much and how long they could fight. We respect her decision and still embrace her. We have no problem with what she has done. There is no bacchanal in the United TTFA.”

From here, the ousted regime look forward to CAS’ response on their injunction and the October 9 TT High Court against FIFA.

“This could be over in two weeks,” Look Loy said.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 26, 2020, 12:35:11 AM
Eve: FIFA suspension 'a football pandemic'
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (Newsday).


NATIONAL Under-17 football coach Angus Eve believes FIFA’s indefinite suspension of the TT Football Association (TTFA) has quelled the hopes, dreams and aspirations of local youth players striving to reach their highest potential.

The 48-year-old former national midfielder and captain shunned Thursday’s climax of a seven-month legal battle between the two entities and declared T&T’s future generation of footballing prospects as the fiasco’s biggest losers.

“It’s a football pandemic. Those who have us here in this position right now are killing the dreams of young people who envision themselves to represent their country in the beautiful game. People don’t know what to do. We’re unsure what comes next,” he said.

In a statement on its website, on Thursday, FIFA stated, “The suspension was prompted by the former leadership of the TTFA lodging a claim before the TT High Court in order to contest the decision of the FIFA Council to appoint a normalisation committee for the TTFA.”

In March, TTFA president William Wallace and his executive, who took office in November 2019, were removed by FIFA, due to the TTFA’s mounting debt, and a normalisation committee, headed by businessman Robert Hadad, was put in place to run the affairs of T&T football.

The ousted administration opted to contest FIFA’s decision in the local courts with FIFA firing back declaring the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) as the only legislated entity under its by-laws where such a matter could be heard.

Wallace and his United TTFA slate of Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick, Joseph Sam Phillip, as well as Keith Look Loy and Anthony Harford, had until 3 pm on Wednesday to withdraw its case.

The affidavit of Wallace in support of the application for permission to withdraw was sent in two minutes past the FIFA deadline thus resulting in T&T immediate suspension.

However, in a strange twist on Friday – just one day after FIFA sanctioned T&T, suspending it from international football – United TTFA sought to withdraw its withdrawal of its lawsuit against the FIFA.

“Now kids don’t have the opportunity to play at a national level may it be Under-13, Under-15 and so on. If you go into something, it’s because you want to perform at the highest level. But now the highest level has been taken away from you, when you didn’t even have a chance.

“T&T is now ranked at 104th on the FIFA Rankings. It’s traumatic for young people. Young people can’t go to school and are not being allowed to play sport due to coronavirus. All hopes of returning to national duty or working towards achieving such status is now out the window,” Eve said.

One month ago, the Naparima College and Club Sando (Pro League) coach led a contingent of over 30 national coaches to TTFA’s headquarters at Ato Boldon Stadium in Couva to query their non-payment of salaries for over six months.

In early September, coaches were allowed to individually meet with Hadad concerning their outstanding salaries. After their meetings, coaches expressed satisfaction with the responses from the normalisation committee chairman.

With regards to the TTFA’s suspension and the repercussions on their salary payment, Eve opted to maintain a positive mindset.

“I’m not going to be naive to think this (suspension) is not going to affect our payment of salaries. (The TTFA) don’t have money in the bank account to pay (coaches and players), and that’s the reality. We’re dependent on FIFA funding so they can pay and run programmes. If we don’t have FIFA funding, how does anything work?

“To be fair, those talks (with Hadad) have been always ongoing and they have never been suspended. Even with this suspension, Hadad reached out to us and said that it was still on course. I don’t know, if now, he’s been working behind the scenes if he can organise it for us and the players. The players haven’t been paid for about nine matches,” he said.

On Friday, Hadad said there may be a possibility T&T can compete in the 2021 Gold Cup.

In a media release, Concacaf said it held an “emergency meeting” on Thursday night and revealed that T&T will be included in the 2021 Gold Cup draw which is set to take place on September 28.

“However, they will only participate in the competition if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is lifted by 5 pm on December 18,” the release read.

If the ban is not lifted, T&T will be replaced by Antigua and Barbuda.

Eve continued, “FIFA was still a bit lenient by giving us a suspension. Still being selected for the Gold Cup is still benign from my standpoint. But beyond those dates, I think we will be banned and removed from those 2021 tournaments.”

The Under-17 coach admitted several other national coaches were also distraught with the suspension and had some choice words for those responsible.

Newsday also contacted national women’s football coach Richard Hood for a comment on the impact of FIFA’s suspension on T&T football but he responded, “To be honest, I’d rather not say anything about that at this time. I still have to gather my thoughts on it. I won’t make any comment at this point.”

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 26, 2020, 02:19:09 AM
Ok mr William Wallace you beginning to make my head spin now. one minute you’re fighting and the next minute you're surrendering, tell us feller which one is it? because you’re beginning to confuse the crap out of me.

in all honesty i believe if you don’t have a bomb to drop on fifa that would make them listen, then please step aside and leave the people with their football, I’m begging you. I’m actually beginning to believe that you don’t know what the f**k you’re doing, and I say this with a level of frustration in my voice.

it’s very clear that fifa would not budge on their position, so if you don’t have the resources to fight them in the arbitration for sport arena, then step aside and come again in two years nah boss, but from where I stand, it seems like your trying a thing and don’t really have an iron clad plan to achieve your goal. come on chief you have to know when you’re licked.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Controversial on September 26, 2020, 02:28:56 AM
The precedent has been set, people are missing the point of this stand off, Trinidad and Tobago is the only football federation in the world to stand up to fifa and take them to local court.

It sets a dangerous precedent that fifa would rather not deal with, meaning it gives power back to the people, back to people of color.

If you’re mind is enslaved and brainwashed you will be angered. This is one of the best moments in TT football, where they actually said no more. We will govern ourselves and control our football, neo colonialism is what you are supporting if you are against Wallace and what they did.

Revolutions can start with one man or one nation. This shows that fifa is what they always were, colonials allowing you to play within their enslaved system of governance.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 26, 2020, 06:46:12 AM
FIFA nails TTFA’s coffin shut after Wallace and Look Loy posturing hits self destruct
By Paul Nicholson (Insideworldfootball).


FIFA’s patience with the former leadership of the Trinidad and Tobago FA (TTFA) has inevitably run out. The world governing body tonight suspended the TTFA “with immediate effect and until further notice”.

The announcement came following the failure of the former president William Wallace (pictured left) and his United TTFA co-conspirators – Clynt Taylor, Sam Phillip, Susan Joseph-Warrick and Keith Look Loy (pictured right) – to meet the FIFA deadline of 3pm yesterday to provide evidence that the claim against FIFA in the Trinidad and Tobago High Court had been withdrawn.

Wallace provided an affidavit two minutes after the September 23 deadline asking for the case to be withdrawn, but included in it multiple allegations that FIFA had coerced him and his colleagues into withdrawing. No judge would grant a withdrawal on that basis. Wallace was foolishly playing a game with Trinidad and Tobago football he was destined to lose.

Calling FIFA’s bluff in an attempt to regain power has proved to be playing Russian Roulette while wearing a suicide vest – you might dodge a bullet but there is still a big bang coming. There was only ever going to be one ending to this story and FIFA let them blow themselves up. Sadly they have taken the rest of Trinidad and Tobago football with them. Theirs is a football legacy like no other.

Never in the history of football administration has such a short-lived administrative tenure – just three months in their case – resulted in such apocalyptic damage to the footballing fabric and ambitions of a footballing nation.

In a letter to Normalisation Committee chairman Robert Hadad, FIFA general secretary Fatma Samoura outlined the reasons for suspension and the extensions to the deadlines they had been given to allow them time to withdraw the Trinidad High Court proceedings.

The response from Wallace and Look Loy in particular has been arrogant and contemptuous towards FIFA at every stage of the process. They believed that FIFA’s law did not apply to them and that the governing body’s money was their entitlement. An increasingly strident claim when they actually had decision-making power but drove the TTFA deeper into debt without any credible plan to resolve the crisis. Their arrogance and belief that they were the ‘real’ TTFA continued even in exile as they challenged FIFA in the Trinidad and Tobago  courts.

“The Bureau (FIFA’s top decision making body) was informed that the institution and maintenance of those proceedings by these individuals, purporting to act in the name of the TTFA, in complete disregard for the FIFA Statutes threatens the very stability of the structure of football governance, both in Trinidad and Tobago and globally,” said Samoura.

United TTFA had become not just an enemy of local football, it had become an enemy of world football and the laws that every other nation in the football world follows.

Samoura said the TTFA suspension will only be lifted when:

•The TTFA complies with the terms and conditions of its membership of FIFA as set out under the FIFA Statutes, including in particular Article 59 of the FIFA Statutes,

•The TTFA acknowledges and confirms FIFA’s power and authority to appoint a Normalisation Committee subject to the right of the TTFA to appeal such a decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport;

•The TTFA Statutes are amended to ensure that all type of disputes may only be submitted to the established dispute resolution forum at CAS

What this means immediately for the TTFA is that the opportunity to play in the US in the qualifying competition for the 2021 Gold Cup – where the country was pre-seeded – has been lost.

“.,. the TTFA will be deprived if all its rights as a member…neither the TTFA’s national teams nor its clubs will be allowed to participate in any international competitions. Additionally, this also means that TTFA and its members will not benefit from the FIFA or Concacaf financial/development programmes,” said Samoura’s letter.

Today is Republic Day in Trinidad and Tobago. On his social media Keith Look Loy has a poster saying that ‘I will celebrate Republic Day when FIFA leave my country’. FIFA has currently left, with its competitions, money and support – get the party started Keith, Wallace and the gang are on the way over. Most people would call that a wake.

RELATED NEWS

Rogue ex-TTFA bosses continue on course of destruction as they abuse member wishes with court affidavit.
By Paul Nicholson (Insideworldfootball).


September 24 – The ‘United TTFA’ missed the FIFA deadline by minutes to apply to withdraw their case against the world governing, but the rogue former TTFA officials look to have deliberately sabotaged the chances of getting a withdrawal by submitting within the affidavit by William Wallace statements that they have been “pressured” and “coerced” to withdraw.

A notice for a discontinuation of legal proceedings in Trinidad and Tobago is a short, brief affidavit. By introducing Wallace’s (pictured) longer and emotionally charged affidavit, they are setting up for ‘coercion to withdraw’, a basis on which a judge would be very unlikely grant a withdrawal of the case.

For the United TTFA it would effectively set up a hearing that would in turn give them more time to lobby FIFA member federations for support that has so far been non-existent. It appears a deliberate attempt to escalate the battle with FIFA rather than help move TTFA football forward.

It would unlikely halt the next stage of FIFA’s suspension proceedings, or investigation into the multiple irregularities surrounding Wallace and his regime.

In his affidavit Wallace says: “It is the case that the members of the Executive and myself, have been under immense public pressure to ‘withdraw’ the claim. This does not mean to suggest that there is not support for the action we have taken but people are afraid that if we do not withdraw the action, FIFA will take punitive steps against Trinidad and Tobago.”

What Wallace doesn’t say is that FIFA has no objection to his challenging of his, and his board’s, removal, but that it should be done in the globally accepted sports courts with independent arbitrators who are specialists in sports malfeasance and disputes. Wallace and the former chair of the TTFA technical committee Keith Look Loy vociferously chose to withdraw from that process, instead saying they had a better chance of success in the Trinidad and Tobago courts with local judges – in itself a strong argument for the existence of the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

Wallace says that he has been advised by Counsel, Dr Emir Crowne, “that should any punitive action be taken by FIFA in respect of the membership of FIFA because the TTFA is engaged in a legitimate action before the Trinidad and Tobago High Court, this would not withstand objective scrutiny before any competent tribunal.”

This is correct but it is also grossly misleading as the TTFA’s statutes recognise CAS as the only competent tribunal for sports disputes – and at last look, this is a sports dispute whatever nationalist spin Wallace and his team put on it. Wallace and his cronies don’t recognise CAS as it doesn’t suit their somewhat manufactured narrative and attempts to cover up the reasons they were removed from office in the first instance.

Referencing an informal meeting of TTFA stakeholders he called, he says “many members were overwhelmingly of the view that FIFA is acting in bad faith (and in concert with Concacaf) to coerce the TTFA into withdrawing the claim against the Defendant. My firm view is that they are acting out of fear and not in the long-term interests of the TTFA.”

This is one of the most remarkable of Wallace’s assertions. It is not clear what FIFA has to be afraid of, it is merely following its own well defined statutes and procedures and in this case has never pretended otherwise – statutes that Wallace and crew refuse to follow but which are in their own laws.

However, he then acknowledges that the “majority of persons” (read ‘overwhelming majority’ and not all TTFA stakeholders were present or had been invited) were of the view that Wallace should withdraw proceedings. His affidavit follows that recommendation but in reality the text of his affidavit looks deliberately designed to achieve the opposite and is an abuse of the membership request he says he agreed to.

Wallace then references the draw for the Gold Cup that he says has never been held so early. Again, it is what he leaves out that is important. He fails to mention that this is the first time there has actually been a public draw for the Gold Cup and that for major competitions it is standard practice to hold the draw in advance of the competition for multiple commercial and logistical reasons. He then, somewhat incredibly, tries to tie this in with “a substantial injection of funds from FIFA” into Jamaica, “and these matters are unlikely to be a coincidence in all of the circumstances.”

Quite what he is alluding to is unclear as it is more likely Jamaica were in compliance for a release of funds that was due to them. Or perhaps he and his group just have their somewhat entitled hands out for FIFA money – the suspicion of most football observers.

“I do not believe the claim should be withdrawn, and I believe that it is wrong to submit and withdraw the claim, in the face of being bullied to do so by the Defendant. I believe the Defendant is more afraid than ever before…” says Wallace.

Frankly, it is self-deluding of Wallace to believe he and his group have struck fear into the heart of world football as they have been removed from participating in it, and are not recognised by FIFA as football officials in any capacity.

Perhaps the most ludicrous part of his affidavit is where he says: “I believe this will be catastrophic for Trinidad and Tobago, and all small nations who may seek to challenge FIFA’s imperialistic ambitions in the future.”

Where once these islands had the dreadful and oppressive tentacles of the British Empire, now they would appear to have squadrons of FIFA attack forces massing off their beaches waiting for the greenlight to storm the House of Football, parliament, Police Commissioner Gary Griffith’s (a keen football fan) Ivory Tower, and impose house arrest and martial law on the country because it would not recognise the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) as a competent sports dispute authority.

What Wallace forgets is that this is the country that has bent over backwards – and bent its own laws backwards – to prevent the extradition of football’s Most Wanted, Jack Warner, to the US to face multiple criminal charges of extortion, money laundering, bribery and graft. Not even US Navy Seals could get their hands on him… but watch out for that FIFA invasion people.

The links Wallace and his group – in particular Sam Phillip and Keith Look Loy – have with Warner has been well documented in local media. Rumours persist that Warner is paying their legal fees, though none of the named claimants in the case have confirmed this and refuse to answer any questions from Insideworldfootball. They have been very quick to speak to their local, friendly and primed domestic media in the battle for public opinion in Trinidad and Tobago.

However public and football opinion has turned against them as the realisation that a FIFA suspension would mean the removal of Trinidad and Tobago from the upcoming Concacaf Gold Cup, World Cup qualifiers and beyond. This was seen in the Wallace-called meeting of stakeholders that unanimously asked him to drop the court case.

His affidavit is a cleverly constructed catalogue of misinformation to keep United TTFA in a game they have been removed from. It also misrepresents the informal request from his former supporters to pull out of the court action – it is hard to find anyone who was ever really behind it.

Wallace at no point addresses the fraudulent activities that characterised their own short and destructive three months in charge that inevitably led to his forced removal by a FIFA Normalisation Committee. He has never answered the accusations of false contracts, dodgy dealers, election fraud, attempted construction scams and accounting malpractice. That is what really needs to be addressed. His answer to that is to blame it on the bloke before him. That is a smokescreen no-one has been fooled by.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: trini_stallion on September 26, 2020, 07:00:57 AM
Talk about tarnishing a name. That pig DJW laughing all the way to the back. I understand and support Wallace’s stand. He has a card up his sleeve. The advantage FIFA has is $$, and that buys time....but the FBI also has money and time. Let’s see, more than likely Wallace will lose, but he will plant one hell of a seed, and that in itself is a win!
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 26, 2020, 07:04:47 AM
The precedent has been set, people are missing the point of this stand off, Trinidad and Tobago is the only football federation in the world to stand up to fifa and take them to local court.

It sets a dangerous precedent that fifa would rather not deal with, meaning it gives power back to the people, back to people of color.

If you’re mind is enslaved and brainwashed you will be angered. This is one of the best moments in TT football, where they actually said no more. We will govern ourselves and control our football, neo colonialism is what you are supporting if you are against Wallace and what they did.

Revolutions can start with one man or one nation. This shows that fifa is what they always were, colonials allowing you to play within their enslaved system of governance.
paalleeaaseee...grade A crapola. every body here from what I could see supported WW from the start, but then he started flip flopping on the issue, one minute he’s capitulating to fifa then in the same breath he’s resolute in his stance, come on mate how could anyone who’s serious about a cause be so wavering in their conviction whether to fight or stand down?

in fact it just occurred to me yesterday when I saw he’s going back to the local courts and CAS at the same time, that he is being coerced into doing these things and clearly has no strategy to fight fifa on his own. why should anyone support this rubbish when you see a man changing his position every month, especially fighting one of the most independent organization in the world, and can’t even afford court fees.

but I guess you with your childish mad brain would see this as strategy instead of indecisive wavering, and may seek to label folks who threw their hands in the air in surrender as weak and bowing to colonialism and cow-towing to massa.

have it your way mate, you could continue to supporting this if you may, I’m just tired and wants to see an end to this. it’s either we’re fighting or we’re bowing out to the pressure, I think it’s only fair to consider the fans in all this, we deserve better than to be dragged through the mud for six months not going left nor right, but instead suspended in limbo. even one of their own executives threw in the towel, because it began to border on the ridiculous!
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 26, 2020, 07:26:25 AM
Talk about tarnishing a name. That pig DJW laughing all the way to the back. I understand and support Wallace’s stand. He has a card up his sleeve. The advantage FIFA has is $$, and that buys time....but the FBI also has money and time. Let’s see, more than likely Wallace will lose, but he will plant one hell of a seed, and that in itself is a win!
wallace has no plan mate, and don’t make him out to be a genius either. he’s literally trying a thing, but the only problem with trying a thing is knowing when to call it quits especially when you pulled out all your stops and nothing is working out well for you. he should have paid the fees and went to CAS after he has gain the attention of the world these last 6 months, this is what I thought he would have done after september 18th, but instead he over played his hand.

And as it stands he’s digging his own pit, because as there’s night and day fifas next move would be suspend him indefinitely where he would not even be able to touch a football, let alone challenge for any office just like jack warner. a man has to know when he’s licked mate, and Wallace is certainly licked.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on September 26, 2020, 07:54:11 AM
Time will likely reveal that there was posturing but no flip-flopping. And I would wager that although WW would prefer to emerge on the other side of this matter unscathed, he's not in the least daunted by the prospect of a personal sanction. I would also suggest, that even if sanctioned, said sanction would not likely survive for an extensive period post-Infantino. And there will be a post-Infantino. I'm certain that Blatter and Platini are living each day with that in mind.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 26, 2020, 08:04:20 AM
Time will likely reveal that there was posturing but no flip-flopping.
what do you call dropping a case today and reopening it tomorrow, where is the strategy in that? these men knew fully well that their only chance was to make it to the congress where the matter should have been decided, and infantino knew all too well that this was not going to happen, and his best option was to wait until after the meeting to convene with his six hatchet yes men.

after they saw what happened last friday, they should have been prudent enough to call that meeting the next day and put the case in CAS, but they played right into infantino’s hands, it was too easy. trust me mate these men are being ill advised, and as it stands they are on shakey ground, just you wait. susan Warwick is the only smart one here ATM.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on September 26, 2020, 08:08:17 AM
Start here: Read between the lines. Dissect the various statements.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 26, 2020, 08:15:39 AM
Start here: Read between the lines. Dissect the various statements.
i don’t follow mate, after all I’m a very rudimentary bloke (no pun intended) so you have to hold my hand through this, I’m not good at mathematic equations but I could smell bullshit and failure a mile away.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on September 26, 2020, 08:27:19 AM
Start here: Read between the lines. Dissect the various statements.
i don’t follow mate, after all I’m a very rudimentary bloke (no pun intended) so you have to hold my hand through this, I’m not good at mathematic equations but I could smell bullshit and failure a mile away.

All I will say is don't take every pronouncement on this matter literally or on face value . Some of it is triangulated. Also,  I would argue that success in this matter is not necessarily defined by, or limited to, the re-installing of United TTFA.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 26, 2020, 08:34:13 AM
Start here: Read between the lines. Dissect the various statements.
i don’t follow mate, after all I’m a very rudimentary bloke (no pun intended) so you have to hold my hand through this, I’m not good at mathematic equations but I could smell bullshit and failure a mile away.

All I will say is don't take every pronouncement on this matter literally or on face value . Some of it is triangulated. Also,  I would argue that success in this matter is not necessarily defined by, or limited to, the re-installing of United TTFA.
there was a time when I myself thought that they must have an ace in the pocket to be so daring in the face of danger, but as it turns out that there was absolute no angle, and had fifa not suspended them this case would have gone quietly as of tuesday. sorry mate but I think these guys has shot their load and it’s only pride that has them standing. after miss Warwick resigned I knew there’s nothing left in the tank, and if anyone knows it the she does, after all she was in the drivers seat for six months.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on September 26, 2020, 10:08:14 AM
The resignation is immaterial, but the meeting was consequential (both positively and negatively).
Title: Looking forward to a new football day
Post by: Tallman on September 26, 2020, 11:28:28 AM
Looking forward to a new football day
T&T Express


WHAT we predicted in this space six days ago, on September 20, has now sadly come to pass, with FIFA suspending the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA).

As we said then, this was a clear and present threat ­facing the embattled local body after the TTFA went to court here in Trinidad and Tobago to challenge a decision by the ­international body in appointing the Normalisation Committee. This was its decision in moving to sort out the sordid mess in which our administration of the “beautiful game” has been mired.

The world governing body had given the essentially ousted “­United TTFA” until Wednesday this week to withdraw the action or face ­suspension.

William Wallace’s embattled leadership team, through its ­attorney on Thursday, said a withdrawal notice had been filed in the High Court. Clearly, however, that action failed to meet the extended deadline of ­September 23, after an original deadline of September 16 had not been met.

As reported yesterday, the local High Court action was a violation of the FIFA rules, which prohibits this route to recourse, “unless specifically provided for in the FIFA regulations”.

It went contrary to the specific provision for such matters to be ­addressed at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), established as the exclusive forum for resolving disputes of this nature.

Moving swiftly to rescue itself from this self-inflicted injury, the TTFA leadership team decided yesterday to drop the High Court matter and place its appeal before the CAS after all.

TTFA has asked for consideration of the matter to be concluded by 8 a.m. on Monday (Swiss time). This, it turns out, is the date of the draw for the Concacaf Gold Cup tournament. This is set to take place at 8 p.m. on the same day. The TTFA must now officially file its substantive appeal, with the FIFA body saying it is committed to deliver a decision in the matter by 2 p.m. that day.

The appointment of the local “Normalisation Committee” had come about as a result of the embarrassing wrangles which had been taking place for too long among those fighting for leadership of the TTFA.

Suspension of the TTFA would have represented the end of the road, after years of autocracy, infighting, and lack of accountability and ­transparency with the management of local football.

We make no apology for stating, once again, that this is the result of questionable leadership, which led to the establishment of a perverse culture of personality that has robbed the sport in this country of its lustre from earlier decades.

It remains a shame that the national game has been handed this screaming red-card, in a country in which one of its leading public figures had risen to the heights of a FIFA vice-presidency, although his leadership and ultimate management of the national game over decades have left him with questions to answer.

In the interest of good governance, however, the Normalisation Committee appears to have a role, nevertheless, in helping to sort through the mess bequeathed to it.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on September 26, 2020, 05:41:06 PM
WATCH: United TTFA continues legal fight against FIFA. Trinidad and Tobago's Commissioner of Police Gary Griffith weighs in on the matter.

https://www.youtube.com/v/s0Vxr3mSpoI
Title: A red card for uncaring TTFA
Post by: Tallman on September 27, 2020, 11:30:21 AM
A red card for uncaring TTFA
T&T Express


The ongoing dispute between FIFA (Federation Internationale de Football Association) and United TTFA (Trinidad and Tobago Football Association) represents the quest, though one might say lust, for power and control of football and its rights.

United TTFA clearly demonstrates its unfortunate belief that holding on to power is far more important than football in T&T.

Despite numerous attempts by FIFA, as well as other stakeholders, that United TTFA should forego litigation at the local courts and seek justice at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) based on the statutes of FIFA, inadvisable legal recommendations, it seems, were proffered which United TTFA hungrily grasped, to the further disadvantage of local football.

Whether FIFA is right or not, the ability to make this determination will take years and very great sums of money, which United TTFA does not have, given its estimated $100 million in debt. The current legal fees being paid to attorneys representing United TTFA may have been better spent in decreasing this debt.

FIFA may be considered corrupt or a bully or using bullying tactics, but it ­controls world football and has the ­requisite resources to control and dictate the game of football.

How important is football to T&T? Clearly, FIFA believes it is, resulting in its appointment of a normalisation committee. Hasn’t this committee been formed to address perceived corruption and mismanagement in local football? Why then are attempts being made to disregard its value? One would expect alacrity in working with any entity that FIFA appoints to address alleged corruption and bad debts which have placed local football in the doldrums.

The very poor defences of the deposed president and team of United TTFA are negatively impacting local football and resulting in apathy by the general public for such a great sport. How can there be buy-in to local football when there really is no proper leadership of it? Proficient leadership should be based on sufficient technical skills, hard work and experience to enable effective decision-ma­king, but definitely not on ego trips!

Is it any wonder then why local football is in such shambles and the senior football teams are known more for losses than wins, despite having great local ­footballers who showcase their skills and shine ­internationally?

The answer seems to lie in potential mismanagement and poor leadership. T&T’s poor football showing, primarily owing to very poor sportsmanship by past and present leaders of its football association, is made worse by its suspension from world football by FIFA.

The ongoing action by United TTFA clearly shows its disdain and disregard for local football, otherwise it could have been seeking a win-win resolution with FIFA and CAS while acceding to the wishes of FIFA to have a normalisation committee in place and while arbitration is being pursued.

It is unbelievably sad when a few people, purportedly seeking their own interests, can relegate such a beautiful sport as football to the benches, all because of false pride. Unless true leadership and responsibility are demonstrated by United TTFA, local football will continue to flounder.

As it stands, United TTFA is ­red-carded for its uncaring attitude towards local football.

Harjoon Heeralal
Carapichaima
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 27, 2020, 11:35:29 AM
Football coaches, managers label United TTFA selfish.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


'Selfish' is how some coaches and managers have described the United T&T team, the elected administrators of the T&T Football Association, saying they do not care about the country and the sport of football, only themselves.

The comments by Travis Mulraine, Randy Hagley of Guaya United, Shawn Cooper the former national youth coach and Ron La Forrest, came following a decision by the TTFA, to resume its fight against the FIFA in the High Court, just a day after the FIFA suspended them on Republic Day, September 24.

William Wallace, president of the TTFA, whose second vice president Susan Joseph-Warrick resigned on Friday as part of the fallout from the FIFA suspension, said in a release on Friday that the action by the FIFA showed that they were always going to ban the TTFA. As such, he said he instructed his attorneys to file an emergency appeal with the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), challenging the sole issue of the suspension of TTFA in the face of illegal threats and coercive acts by FIFA. The attorneys Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Crystal Paul, and Jason Jones, were also asked to make an application for Injunctive Relief so that if successful this would allow Trinidad and Tobago to participate in the Gold Cup draw carded for Monday 28 September."

Speaking to Guardian Media Sports on Saturday, the coaches and managers believe this decision to further challenge FIFA could have detrimental consequences. Both La Forrest and Mulraine said the action of the TTFA is an indication of their incompetence to run TT football in the first place. "They are on an ego trip while the entire country and the people who depend on it are suffering."

The quartet has also expressed a concern that the TTFA members are blatantly disregarding the rules of the FIFA, but yet are bold enough to challenge it. According to the coaches and managers, the United TTFA group was given a deadline which they failed to honour, and still with a revised deadline, they failed to live up to it. "That is disrespect," Hagley said.

The Guaya owner and manager noted: "The actions of the TTFA will put the country in further turmoil, rules are rules. This decision to return to court and challenge the FIFA in the CAS will make an already bad situation worse. Remember that in the T&T Super League teams cannot take the league to court also, so why do you have a member of the TTSL fighting against a similar rule in the FIFA Statutes."

Mulraine question why Wallace and company would want to return to the CAS which they initially described as bias. "They do not have the interest of the sport in this country at heart, and while all this is happening here, in the US young players are going on contracts in the Spanish League, and these are the people we will have to play against. "

Mulraine believes the decision by the FIFA to replace the TTFA with a normalisation committee was because there were people involved in the TTFA election who the FIFA did not approve of.

He calls on the delegates of the TTFA to convene an Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM) and vote out the TTFA members.

Meanwhile, Cooper is calling for answers why the TTFA is continuing its battle with the FIFA. "What would the end result be. Are they going to fight someone that they need financially and otherwise? This comes like we are fighting a war with the USA, we are taking on a fight we just cannot win, so it's time for the TTFA to study the young players."

Cooper who also coaches at Presentation College in the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) said the FIFA suspension was a slap on the wrist for the TTFA, one that they could have worked with easily.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 27, 2020, 11:37:08 AM
Griffith: All is not lost in T&T football
By Jelani Beckles (Newsday).


GARY Griffith, Commissioner of Police (CoP), said all is not lost in T&T football but said the normalisation committee must be allowed to do its job to rebuild a relationship with FIFA.

FIFA suspended the TT Football Association (TTFA) with immediate effect on Thursday after the United TTFA failed to meet the deadline in withdrawing their court case against the sport's global governing body. They needed to withdraw the case by 3 pm on Wednesday.

United TTFA has not given up the fight against FIFA who, in March, removed the executive of the United TTFA and install a normalisation committee to run local football.

In another twist on Friday, the United TTFA sought to withdraw its withdrawal of its lawsuit against FIFA.

The William Wallace-led United TTFA remains adamant that its challenge should be played out in the local courts since it is a statutory body.

Griffith, who has been outspoken about matters concerning local football, said, “It is not the end of the world. I am looking at the glass half full, it cannot get worst than this. It could only get better.”

The CoP said the United TTFA members are thinking of themselves. “I think what we would have done was learn from our mistakes. What we saw was the matter of egos trying to take precedence over the bigger picture. People were so excited to win a battle at the expense of losing a war.”

Griffith said the lives of young people will be affected. “We have to move forward. This is not just going to affect (only) football, but we are talking about young persons having the opportunity for scholarships, contracts, our exposure.”

This will also create financial problems for local football, according to Griffith. “Definitely if we stay in this situation we not going to get a cent from FIFA , the Government quite rightly is not going to want to invest much…in a sport that is not going further external to our own borders…the private sector is definitely not going to put a cent.”

Griffith said the FIFA-appointed normalisation committee (comprising chairman Robert Hadad, Judy Daniel and Nigel Romano) must be in charge of T&T football.

“One thing to make this work is for the normalisation committee to have full control and let them be the spokespersons on behalf of TT football to FIFA to give the assurance that there is no such court order, and that the normalisation committee will now have full authorisation to move our football forward.”

Griffith, in a message to the young footballers, said, “Ignore all of the issues and concerns that we are seeing outside of the field. When you get on that 100-yard by 60-yard (field) focus on your football. Do not be distracted by all of the negativity and all the concerns you have seen and heard. The administrators have let you down, but you do not let yourself down.”

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 27, 2020, 11:40:50 AM
Former captain Clayton Morris: Good can come out of Wallace’s stance
By Ian Prescott (Express).


New norm

“Whoever comes in to take up the mantle of our football has to come squeaky clean and that is what we need,” says former men’s national football team captain Clayton Morris.

Morris represented the senior team for ten years, played over 100 games and served as captain for five years. He also represented the T&T national Under-19 team from 1979 to 1981 and was national FUTSAL coach as well.

Morris believes that a lot of good has come out of the so far seven-month battle between the sidelined Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) executives and FIFA, which ultimately resulted in FIFA suspending T&T from international football on Thursday after Wallace’s United TTFA group failed to meet the 3pm deadline the world governing body had set for withdrawing its challenge of the normalisation committee from the High Court. Wallace has since restarted court action and also taken the matter of T&T’s suspension to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

Many revelations have been made over the past seven months, including an investigative documentary into the Home of Football which has prompted police enquiries.

“I believe that there is a victory somewhere along that line,” Morris said prior to FIFA’s announcement of the suspension.

Morris, who in the past criticised the way former FIFA vice-president and TTFA special advisor Jack Warner operated, felt T&T football administrators had failed both players and the sport for many generations. The proactive stance taken by stakeholders in the face of the pending international ban, he felt, indicated that they are no longer willing to stand by without objection when the overall best interest is threatened.

“I think it is healthy for our football,” Morris declared.

Morris was at last Tuesday’s meeting where the majority of delegates voted that United TTFA should cease its court action against FIFA.

Protocols observed

Morris observed protocols set as the representative of the University of Trinidad and Tobago (UTT) and voted with the majority — not to have T&T suspended. However, he does not believe the stand taken by Wallace and United TTFA is a wasted effort.

“We are happy that in respect to the accountability factor, it brought to the forefront that a police investigation is there in relation to the (alleged) misuse of funds or what have you,” said Morris, who also felt there was a bigger picture.

“Trinidad and Tobago is now recognised, not just for being the smallest country to have qualified for a (FIFA men’s) World Cup back in 2006, but as a country that decided on principle to stand up to FIFA,” he said.

“I think that is something that augers well for us going into the future. I think a lot of smaller countries like in Africa and those places, would take strength from the position that we just took against FIFA.”

Before Thursday’s FIFA sanction, Morris was not convinced that a ban would have been bad for football in the country where the game is at an all-time low at local and international level, and the Association has now been shown to be near TT$100million in debt.

He thought a couple of years without international competition might give T&T the time needed to develop young footballers. And not having to constantly direct meagre funds into competing teams might also help the Association to address its huge debt problems.

“Most times we are training our athletes for competition and missing that aspect of proper development,” said Morris.

He highlighted two national teams which had proper development — the T&T 2001 FIFA Under-17 World Championship squad involving Kenwyne Jones and the 1989 Strike Squad which was together for two years under coach Everald “Gally” Cummings.

“It shows that we need that time to really develop in the right way,” Morris said.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on September 27, 2020, 05:42:59 PM
The ball is mine - The suspension of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association by FIFA
By Farai Razano (thecentrecourtjurist.blogspot.com)


The TTFA

The TTFA was created under the Laws of Trinidad and Tobago by the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association Act No. 17 of 1982 (“the TTFA Act”). One of its objectives is to regulate and control the conduct of Football in Trinidad and Tobago under the FIFA system. It is bound by the FIFA Statutes, in particular articles 57 and 59 which require all parties involved in football to resolve their disputes outside national courts i.e. via private arbitration.

The appointment of the FIFA normalisation committee

On 24 November 2019, the TTFA elected members of the Executive Committee of the TTFA. In February 2020 FIFA sent a delegation to Trinidad and Tobago to meet with the Executive Committee of the TTFA. A month later, FIFA informed the TTFA that it had resolved to appoint a normalisation committee to take over the running of the TTFA because FIFA was concerned with the financial management and governance of the TTFA. The normalisation committee had sweeping powers which included the power to review and amend TTFA statutes (subject to approval by the TTFA congress) and organising and conducting elections of a new TTFA Executive Committee. Additionally, the normalising committee would act as the electoral committee and its decisions would be final and binding.

The aborted appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport

The appointment of the normalisation committee effectively rendered the just elected TTFA executive committee members powerless. They accused the normalisation committee of interfering with the operation of the TTFA’s bank account, and exposing the TTFA to potential lawsuits among other things. They approached the Court of Arbitration for Sport (“CAS”) appealing against the appointment of the normalisation committee.

Before the CAS hears a matter, it requires the parties to pay the advance of costs. The respondent (FIFA in this case) can nominate the appellant to pay the respondent’s share of the advance of costs. Additionally, the respondent can request that it only files its answering papers after the advance of costs has been paid in full, or the appellant has paid at least its share of the advance of costs. If the advance of costs is not paid, the appeal is deemed to have been withdrawn. FIFA generally does not, and refused in the TTFA appeal to, pay its share of the advance of costs. Furthermore, FIFA requested that the time limit to file its answering papers only start running upon payment of the advance of costs by the TTFA. The TTFA viewed FIFA's conduct as an attempt to frustrate the arbitration and withdrew its appeal before the CAS on 18 May 2020.

The claim before the High Court

After withdrawing its appeal before the CAS, the TTFA filed a claim against FIFA before the court in Trinidad and Tobago. In the claim, the TTFA challenged the enforceability of certain articles of TTFA’s Constitution, FIFA Statutes and consistency with the TTFA Act, and the legitimacy of the appointment of the normalisation committee.

FIFA opposed the claim before the court. It filed an application which essentially challenged the jurisdiction of the High Court of Trinidad and Tobago over the dispute and FIFA. It argued that the matter was a private dispute that should be dealt with by private arbitration before the CAS in terms of the FIFA Statutes. Despite the issue of the appointment of the normalisation committee being before the court, FIFA’s Council went on to ratify the decision on 25 June 2020. The court (per Madam Justice Gobin) viewed this as conduct that “… demonstrated scant regard for the judicial process and the courts of [Trinidad and Tobago]” In a well-reasoned judgement, the court dismissed FIFA’s challenge of the court’s jurisdiction for several reasons including the following:
You need my ball to play the game

The court noted FIFA's threats of “severe consequences to which TTFA [was] exposed as a consequence of [taking FIFA to court] in direct breach of the terms of its membership of FIFA…” Sensing that FIFA was that guy who owned the ball, Madam Justice Gobin, remarked that “I do not expect FIFA to walk off the field or to take its ball and go home if after full ventilation of the issues, this court were to confirm the primacy of an Act of the Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago over the FIFA Statutes.”

Extra time

On 20 August 2020, FIFA issued a statement confirming that an appeal against the decision of the court would be filed on the same day. In the same statement, FIFA issued a threat to the TTFA to withdraw the case before court or face severe consequences. FIFA initially gave the TTFA until 16 September 2020 to withdraw the case before the court. This was later extended to 23 September 2020. The TTFA, perhaps tired of that guy and his ball, did not surrender. It did not withdraw the case before the court. [NB. There are reports that the TTFA indeed withdrew the case, but outside the deadline].

Game over

FIFA, being the owner of the ball, author of the rules and referee, decided that the game was over. It took its ball and went home. FIFA suspended TTFA on 24 September 2020.

There may be merit to the financial mismanagement and poor governance within the TTFA as alleged by FIFA as the TTFA itself is no stranger to controversy. However, that is a side issue. The issue with FIFA here is, no matter how noble its normalisation committee intervention was, it wanted to have it its way only and no one would stop it. Not even the court.

The issue of the lawfulness of its intervention (interference some may argue) through the normalisation committee was still before the court. Instead of FIFA respecting the judicial process and dealing with the merits of the dispute, FIFA decided to flex its muscles (an abuse of power really) to force the TTFA to toe the line. In its statement issued on 24 September 2020, FIFA says it suspended the TTFA “due to grave violations of the FIFA Statutes.” With respect, standing up to the bully through a judicial process cannot be said to be a grave violation of the FIFA Statutes. If anything, FIFA’s attitude in this matter exposes a lack of appreciation for the rule of law. FIFA was not prepared to let the judicial process run its course. As the owner of the ball, FIFA wanted to apply its own laws of the game and choose its own referee. The TTFA resisted that.

TTFA is now out in the cold

The TTFA has now been frozen out. Just like our childhood games on the street, the rest of the team members will be angry with the person who challenged the owner of the ball. They will demand that she or he says sorry to the owner of the ball for the game to continue. When the apology is finally offered, the owner of the ball will not accept that she or he was also wrong. The answer is always “I forgive you. You see, without me there is no game. The ball is mine.”
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: ffisback on September 27, 2020, 08:49:56 PM
Look Loy sounds like a old jammit trying to make a comeback Sancho needs to form a collation to get rid of these self serving fools once and for all.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Deeks on September 27, 2020, 11:50:26 PM
Harjoon Heeralal
Carapichaima


Mr. Harjoon, where were you when DJW was f---king up the football.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 28, 2020, 12:48:40 AM
FIFA suspension was 20 years in the making.
By Jelani Beckles (Newsday).

FORMER captain Kenwyne Jones believes the decision by FIFA to suspend the TT Football Association (TTFA) has been in the making for 20 years due to years of poor governance.

Jones, who played 91 appearances between 2003 and 2017, was a member of the squad that represented at the 2006 World Cup.

Jones, speaking with Newsday about the current situation facing T&T football said, “To be honest, this is the culmination of bad governance for the last 20 years. Administratively, we’ve been lacking. I think as a federation (TTFA) and we’ve seen time and time again we’ve had unfit persons in the office of the federation.”

FIFA suspended the TT Football Association (TTFA) with immediate effect, on Thursday, after the United TTFA failed to meet the deadline in withdrawing their court case. They needed to withdraw the case at 3 pm on Wednesday.

United TTFA has not given up the fight against FIFA to remove the executive of the United TTFA and install a normalisation committee to run local football.

In another twist on Friday, the United TTFA sought to withdraw its withdrawal of its lawsuit against FIFA.

The William Wallace-led United TTFA remains adamant that its challenge should be played out in the local courts since it is a statutory body.

Jones said he is hurt after FIFA’s decision and the United TTFA’s approach was heartless. “Now that we’ve been suspended I think it is a very sad day for T&T football because this has never happened…I think they have been very callous in the way that they went about meeting deadlines and making decisions that could have affected us all.

“Their lack of concern for the generations (of footballers) and the stakeholders, mainly the youths of TT is appalling and to see that it has come to this stage where we have been suspended now it puts a lot of young people’s lives in the balance.”

Jones, who is hopeful the situation will end soon, said new blood is required in local administration.

“My message is to the younger generation, my generation of players to be educated, to get themselves involved in football (administration) in the country because it is high time that we have a changing of the guards. For far too long we have people who have been in administration of football that have been around for 30 years, 40 years, 50 years.”

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 28, 2020, 12:51:25 AM
Wallace: We’ll make right decision.
By Ian Prescott (Express).


Besieged leader of the United TTFA (Trinidad and Tobago Football Association) group, William Wallace, says he and his team will make “the right decision” concerning how they proceed with their court action against FIFA.

Wallace made the disclosure during an interview with Andre “The Fearless One” Baptiste, on his show on i95FM, on Saturday night.

“We would make the right choice over the next couple of days, over the next week... We will make the right decision,” Wallace told Baptiste.

Pressed later in the programme as to what T&T needs to do so that the ban could be lifted, Wallace said: “We would do what we have to do over the coming days. I have nothing else to say on this. We are going to act as we see fit...we are going to take whatever action we deem necessary over the coming days.”

After the United TTFA members missed FIFA’s second deadline to withdraw a High Court case against the world football’s governing body, last Wednesday at 3 p.m., FIFA announced the suspension of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) from international football, citing grave violations of the FIFA Statutes.

Wallace said after a meeting with the membership last Tuesday night, at which the overwhelming majority indicated their desire for the United TTFA to withdraw their case against FIFA, its lawyers filed the withdrawal the next day. After FIFA’s suspension announcement on Thursday, Wallace said he was “shocked” and the United TTFA quickly filed a withdrawal of their original notice of withdrawal request, then filed an injunction with the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) for a hearing, to ensure T&T would get an opportunity to be involved in the 2021 CONCACAF Gold Cup draw, scheduled for today at 8 p.m.

That point became moot after CONCACAF announced later Friday that T&T would be drawn for the 2021 Gold Cup. “However, they will only participate in the competition if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is lifted by FIFA by 5 p.m. ET on December 18, 2020,” the CONCACAF communique stated.

Wallace told Baptiste that the main reason for re-submitting their High Court case was to be in proper standing when they filed their CAS injunction so they could ensure T&T would be part of the Gold Cup draw.

Wallace and company have been challenging FIFA’s decision on March 17 to remove them and install a Normalisation Committee (NC). In their its release last Thursday, FIFA stated the suspension would only be lifted when the TTFA fully complies with its obligations as a member of FIFA, including recognising the appointed NC and bringing its own statutes into line with the FIFA statutes.

Asked if he felt the suspension could have been avoided if the United TTFA filed withdrawal documents on time, Wallace said: “Based on what I saw we were going to be banned anyway.”

He added that United TTFA acted in good faith while FIFA did not, by still suspending T&T despite the United TTFA beginning the process of withdrawal. “I did what I was supposed to do and I do not file documents to the High Court of T&T,” Wallace said.

Asked if he could understand why people would draw certain conclusions based on their urgency to resume their case, contrasted with the missed deadline to withdraw the case, Wallace said: “Well what can I say let them draw conclusions...there is nothing about that, that is difficult to understand so...based on where you are situated and what your agenda is, you can draw any conclusion you want to.”

Wallace added he was satisfied with himself and the actions that he had taken. “I am satisfied in myself in terms of standing up against something and I don’t need support to stand up. I have a mind of my own and I take a stand whatever that legacy is to people. Let it be!”

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Mad Scorpion a/k/a Big Bo$$ on September 28, 2020, 11:20:46 AM
Plenty ah allyuh is some coward f0(kaz! I backin WW all the way, right is right! F da house negro bs!  FIFA overlook all the shite DJW do and then conveniently install normalization committee when he get he kakahole break open in de elections.  Now because the fight getting difficult allyuh want to back down?!!  This is what people with resources and what they feel is unlimited power always try to do.  They will squeeze you and try to exhaust your efforts and resources until you comply.  People watching this 3pm deadline like that was something.  Where else in the world does anyone set an arbitrary time not congruent with the close of business in that region for a court matter to be handled?  Further if it was ever in good faith 23 minutes would easily be overlooked if indeed the intended purpose was for the matter to be removed from T&T High Courts.  I agree with WW that FIFA always intended to ban T&T and seized a very convenient opportunity to do so and avoid further scrutiny of their behavior.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: LKMaryTrini on September 28, 2020, 02:40:54 PM
If WW really wanted to avoid the suspension they could have submitted 23 mins before the deadline and not 23 minutes after.  Furthermore, if WW was so sure FIFA was going to ban us anyway, why bother to submit the withdrawal.  You thought they were bluffing and they lowered the boom! What exactly was the mindset behind that?  No logical thought process went into their court case.  Don't get me wrong, DJW is another fool who should never have any involvement in TT football ever again, and bears some responsibility for where we are today, but WW is the one that took us over the proverbial cliff.  WW, if you really believe that you are doing the right thing then you are either in denial or the biggest fool.  I hope that you are in denial




Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on September 28, 2020, 05:35:55 PM
Coaches are not seeing this thing clearly. It's not WW or United TTFA who are on the hook for paying you.  Why ask him the question? Was your agreement with Hadad/NC conditioned on United TTFA action? Was United TTFA at the table when that agreement was arrived at? Do tell.

In fact,  I would submit that if the coaches submitted their quarrel to litigation there would be no cloudy area regarding who the non-compliant party is.  Would you sensibly sue United TTFA? No.  Would you sensibly sue WW? No.  It's not hard to arrive at the proper conclusion if you construct the correct frame of the matter.  Asking Wallace a question just because Hadad rerouted you is to be seduced by a distraction. The reason you're not being paid is because of a lack of political will, not due to a lack of capacity to pay or breach of other form.  You are being yo-yo'ed as a pressure point. Don't go to the courts though because this matter is winding down and going to the courts would impede your interest in a GC berth and the prospect of your jobs bearing relevance . Payment is relatively imminent.  Asking Wallace was a waste of a press release ...well,  it was an e-mail that transformed into what effectively became a media release. In the context of it being a private email, it's less onerous but it's still barking up the wrong tree ... or,  perhaps barking should be happening at more than one tree trunk simultaneously.

I feel your pain doh.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Controversial on September 28, 2020, 11:54:21 PM
Plenty ah allyuh is some coward f0(kaz! I backin WW all the way, right is right! F da house negro bs!  FIFA overlook all the shite DJW do and then conveniently install normalization committee when he get he kakahole break open in de elections.  Now because the fight getting difficult allyuh want to back down?!!  This is what people with resources and what they feel is unlimited power always try to do.  They will squeeze you and try to exhaust your efforts and resources until you comply.  People watching this 3pm deadline like that was something.  Where else in the world does anyone set an arbitrary time not congruent with the close of business in that region for a court matter to be handled?  Further if it was ever in good faith 23 minutes would easily be overlooked if indeed the intended purpose was for the matter to be removed from T&T High Courts.  I agree with WW that FIFA always intended to ban T&T and seized a very convenient opportunity to do so and avoid further scrutiny of their behavior.

Finally a comment that makes sense on this damn board
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 29, 2020, 12:36:30 AM
TTFA to file CAS submissions on Oct 5
By Derek Achong (Guardian).


The determination of an application for a stay of FIFA's decision to suspend the T&T Football Association (TTFA) has been deferred.

Guardian Media Sports understands that when lawyers representing embattled TTFA president William Wallace and his remaining executive members applied to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) based in Lausanne, Switzerland, for the temporary injunction on Friday, they requested that it be determined before Concacaf's 2021 Gold Cup draw in Miami, Florida, USA at 8 pm on Monday.

However, as Concacaf subsequently agreed to hold this country's place until December 18, in the hope that the suspension is eventually lifted by then, there was no longer an urgent need for a hearing on the stay.

Sources told Guardian Media Sports, that FIFA's lawyers will now file their submissions against the stay on October 5, before it is determined by the CAS.

The date for the filing of submissions comes four days before Wallace and his team's controversial lawsuit against FIFA, which was the catalyst for the suspension, comes up for trial before Justice Carol Gobin on October 9.

Last Wednesday, Wallace and his team missed FIFA's extended 3:00 pm deadline for withdrawing the case as their application was filed at 3:23.57 pm (TT Time) which was minutes after the deadline had elapsed and was not served or determined by Gobin.

After FIFA announced the indefinite suspension (T&T Republic Day) the following day, Wallace filed another application seeking to withdraw the initial withdrawal application, in which he admitted that he was grudgingly discontinuing the case based on a majority vote during an emergency meeting between his team and stakeholders. (21 votes to withdraw; 8 to continue and 3 abstained).

The legal manoeuvre coincided with an announcement from Wallace's second vice president Susan Joseph-Warrick, that she resigned as president of the women's body and as the TTFA second vice president.

On Thursday night, Concacaf announced that its council had met and agreed to conditionally keep T&T's place in the draw.

In the event, that the suspension is not lifted by either FIFA or the CAS by 5:00 pm on December 18, T&T will be replaced by Antigua and Barbuda as the next highest-ranked team based on performances during the 2019 Concacaf Nations League.

Through the lawsuit, Wallace and his three vice presidents — Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillips, and Joseph-Warrick are seeking a declaration that the decision to remove them in March and replace them with a Normalisation Committee (NC) comprising of businessman Robert Hadad, attorney Judy Daniel, and retired banker Nigel Romano as a member, was null, void, and of no legal or binding effect.

They were also seeking a permanent injunction barring FIFA from meddling in the TTFA's affairs by allegedly seeking to circumvent the democratic process by removing duly elected executive members.

Wallace and his team initially brought proceedings against FIFA in the CAS in but were forced to withdraw in May as they could not pay the 40,000 Swiss francs (TT$276,000) in associated costs.

Their position was partly due to FIFA's policy to not pay its share of the fees and CAS's rules, which require the other party to pay the full costs when the other fails in its obligations.

Sources said that the costs associated with the application for injunctive relief, which is currently before the CAS, are considerably less than for the substantive appeal.

After the local case was filed, FIFA applied for it to be struck out as it claimed that the TTFA, by virtue of its membership with FIFA, agreed to forgo all legal action in local courts in favour of proceedings before the CAS.

The application was initially blanked by Gobin, who ruled that the local courts were the appropriate forum to resolve the dispute.

FIFA appealed with a hearing set for October 21.

While the appeal was still pending, Gobin set the date for the trial of the case on October 9 and gave FIFA an extension to file its defence.

FIFA failed to meet the deadline as it maintained its position that it did not accept the jurisdiction of the court in the matter. Its decision means that its legal team would now have limited scope to challenge the substantive case when it goes to trial before Gobin.

Wallace and his team also obtained an injunction against the normalisation committee after it attempted to facilitate an extraordinary general meeting (EGM) among members to vote to withdraw the case.

The injunction, which will remain in place until discharged by Gobin, was not opposed by FIFA and was granted.

Wallace and his colleagues are being represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Crystal Paul, and Jason Jones, while Christopher Hamel-Smith, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie are appearing for FIFA.

RELATED NEWS

Wallace tells coaches: "Bare with us two weeks again"
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


"Bare with us two more weeks again and your matter concerning salaries will be taken care off," said William Wallace, president of the now-suspended T&T Football Association (TTFA) to the coaches of this country's national teams.

The coaches expressed concerns over the none payment of their salaries from a Steering Committee comprising Angus Eve, Clayton Morris, Wayne Sheppard, Jefferson George and Richard Hood, after ongoing negotiations with Normalisation Committee chairman Robert Hadad broke down over the TTFA's decision to challenge FIFA's ban, and reinsert their legal battle in the T&T High court with FIFA.

A letter expressing the concerns of the coaches on Monday stated: "The T&T technical staff members have been locked in negotiations with the FIFA-appointed Normalisation Committee for the better part of the last month. At present, we believe that we have an understanding and agreement between both parties, of the payment amounts due to us and the mechanism by which we will be paid.

"In previous newspaper articles and interviews, you and other members of the United TTFA have indicated that you were not opposed to the office staff and coaches being paid by the FIFA or Concacaf, and would not interfere or act in any manner to negatively affect the payment of staff. On Saturday 26th September, however, we were informed by the Normalisation Committee that FIFA is unwilling to make these payments because of the reinstated court action by the United TTFA. We, the national staff members, would appreciate hearing from you on how you can assist us with regards to our remuneration in the existing circumstances."

Wallace gave the assurance that a solution will come in two weeks time, October 9, when the court is expected to rule on their fight against FIFA for the legitimacy of having the normalisation committee replace them (TTFA) as the rightful administrators of football in T&T.

Wallace said although FIFA has money set aside for the payment of coaches, his group has already started working on a way to pay the coaches if the judge rules in their favour.

"If the judge rules against us, then it would be easy, as we will drop the case against the FIFA and the normalisation committee will pay them," Wallace explained.

However, if the judge rules in their favour, then they will call an emergency meeting among their members to decide how they will move forward. He did not say where monies to pay the coaches will come from if they are recognised as the legitimate administrators of local football.

Wallace, who said he took appropriate steps to ensure that the country is not left out of the Concacaf Gold Cup Draw last night by filing an Injunctive Relief in the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) in Switzerland on Friday.

The TTFA also agreed to challenge the suspension by FIFA in the CAS, as well as reinsert the court battle with the FIFA back in the High Court.

Wallace assured they will not prevent the payment of salaries by the normalisation committee. He noted that matter is still the same way, as it was last month, as the matter is still in the court.

Wallace and his three vice presidents — Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillips, and Joseph-Warrick are seeking a declaration that the decision to remove them on March 17, and replace them with a Normalisation Committee (NC) comprising of businessman Robert Hadad, attorney Judy Daniel, and retired banker Nigel Romano as a member, was null, void, and of no legal or binding effect.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 29, 2020, 01:52:04 AM
Plenty ah allyuh is some coward f0(kaz! I backin WW all the way, right is right! F da house negro bs!  FIFA overlook all the shite DJW do and then conveniently install normalization committee when he get he kakahole break open in de elections.  Now because the fight getting difficult allyuh want to back down?!!  This is what people with resources and what they feel is unlimited power always try to do.  They will squeeze you and try to exhaust your efforts and resources until you comply.  People watching this 3pm deadline like that was something.  Where else in the world does anyone set an arbitrary time not congruent with the close of business in that region for a court matter to be handled?  Further if it was ever in good faith 23 minutes would easily be overlooked if indeed the intended purpose was for the matter to be removed from T&T High Courts.  I agree with WW that FIFA always intended to ban T&T and seized a very convenient opportunity to do so and avoid further scrutiny of their behavior.
absolute rubbish mate. wallace had our full support until he started doubting himself and flip flopping. yes he may be a great guy who wants the best for the sport, and I don’t doubt that for a minute, he has demonstrated that he would have made an excellent federation president, my only regret is that fifa favored him over DJW or that mr timkee did not meet his demise as soon as he did, just maybe his expertise would have came in handy at a time like this, but it clearly wasn’t meant to be.

WW had me until he claimed that he was about to fold then mark bassant’s story broke which gave him courage to carry on, that revelation lead me to believe that he was flying blind all along. he then kept trying to reach out to fifa to negotiate, then waited until the congress which worked against him when infantino read the play that they wanted to put fifa on the hot seat at the congress. gianni as cunning as he is did not use the opportunity to get the federations involved, instead he went to his magnificent six yes man team to do his dirty work.

from that moment he should have known that it was only a matter of time before fifa banned him and should have dropped the high court case that friday and moved it the CAS instead of calling most of the stake holders together for a meeting to drop all the cases on Tuesday, including going back to CAS by abandoning the whole fight altogether, then if that wasn’t shady enough he went back on his word to drop the case in the high court the next day following the ban reinstating his stance after a unanimous decision rendered by the football fraternity.

and here’s the icing on the cake, he never has anything decisive to tell the fans who are obviously hurting, we only get to follow along in the dark, and I say enough of this bullshit. if you’re gonna go for the ban then go for it, if you’re gonna try to save face by stepping aside and allowing the popular opinions of the stake holders to dictate the pace then fine.

but it’s ironic that no one is moved by the fact that if fifa did not ban us and accepted the truce, they weren’t even going to take the fight to CAS, that would have been it, over squashed....done, would you so called warriors have a problem or called him out for cowardice?

these people are clueless mate, and you’ll find out sooner or later. you’ll see.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on September 29, 2020, 02:29:55 AM
Mr wallace, please do yourself a favor and either take this case back to CAS or step aside and let these people do what they have to until they call a new election is called, your just delaying the inevitable. in the mean time you could be organizing yourself to come back stronger than before by getting new prospects for sponsorship on board.

I know it’s a hard pill to swallow but you have exhausted all your options and to no avail. you have not garnered support in CFU or concacaf on the whole so the next best thing would be to allow the people who you will have to go back to begging for their votes to forget and get over the bitter taste they might have for you.

please mate from here on this thing could only end bad for you, there’s nothing to be gained by this can’t you see? fifa is adamant and is not going to soften their position, if that was the case they would have done it already. even if you win in the local courts, which could be tired up for months, by the time it’s all over your term would have ended and with nothing accomplished.

Please sir, I need you to think and think hard. you're still a young man and hopefully you have many years ahead of you to make your contribution. next month would already be one year in office so just step aside and leave fifa to play themselves, there’s nothing to be gained if they ban you from ever contesting another election. Please mate be wise and just walk away and let good sense prevail.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Trini on September 29, 2020, 08:27:07 AM
Agree there above Pull Stones.

All that matters now is getting re-instated to play ball. Not just for the Senior Men Team, but the Women and different ages.

No one person, no one administration is above that.

The TTFF highest level mandate is to facilitate our football development.

Not playing is far worse than losing on the field.

This is football death. Not stagnation. Not development.

And most importantly, this is not about principle.

Wrong forum to fight this idea.

Title: Fifa bullying backfires
Post by: Tallman on September 29, 2020, 11:12:47 AM
Fifa bullying backfires
By Philippe Auclair (josimarfootball.com)


It seemed that the long-running feud between the Trinidad & Tobago Football Association (TTFA) and Fifa had come to a conclusion when, on 24 September, Fifa announced that the rebellious Caribbean FA had been suspended. The seven men of the Bureau of the Fifa Council – Gianni Infantino plus the presidents of Fifa’s six constituent confederations – explained their decision in those terms: “The suspension was prompted by the former leadership of the TTFA lodging a claim before a local court in Trinidad and Tobago in order to contest the decision of the FIFA Council to appoint a normalisation committee for the TTFA. This course of action was in direct breach of article 59 of the FIFA Statutes, which expressly prohibits recourse to ordinary courts unless specifically provided for in the FIFA regulations“.

As in the old fable, the clay pot had been no match for the iron pot: what could break did break, and what could inflict the blow had dealt it. It did not matter that the TTFA had won the case it had brought against Fifa in Trinidad & Tobago’s High Court, the supreme legal authority in their own country. In Fifa’s eyes, the rule of T&T law did not apply to Fifa, even if the TTFA had been established by an Act of Parliament in the Caribbean nation. Consequently, it did not matter that Justice Gobin had issued a judgement which expressly called into question the overarching power of Fifa over its 211 Member Associations.

Or rather, it mattered a lot, as TTFA’s victory was the first of its kind and could encourage other MAs and FAs finding themselves on the wrong side of Fifa’s decisions to contest them outside of the agreed protocol, with CAS being the sole ultimate arbiter for disputes of this kind. This was more than a challenge to Fifa’s authority; it was a challenge to the legitimacy of Fifa’s own statutes, something which Justice Gobin made absolutely clear in her first judgement at the High Court. This was too dangerous a precedent to be allowed; in fact, it was widely expected that suspension would follow, should the TTFA not agree to withdraw its case in the T&T High Court; Fifa simply could not be seen to have lost. A deadline was set, which TTFA – according to the letter of the law – failed to meet.  Suspension was swift to follow.

Yet, this was not to be the end of this complex affair. Remarkably, within 24 hours of Fifa suspending TTFA , the tables had turned again. Despite the ban, Trinidad & Tobago were among the nations included in the draw for the 2021 Gold Cup, and Fifa found itself in the dock again, not just in Trinidad and Tobago but also in Switzerland. The clay pot had, somehow, managed to mend itself, like one of those Tex Avery cartoon cats which miraculously keep on chasing mice after being blown to smithereens. It’s not all over, folks!

What follows is the scarcely believable chain of events which led to this reversal of roles and fortunes.

To the man in the Port-of-Spain street, suspension meant that the country’s national team, the Soca Warriors, wouldn’t be able to take part in the draw for the CONCACAF Gold Cup which would take place on 28 September. To those employed by the TTFA, it also meant that Fifa funds would no longer be available to anyone involved in the running of football in the Caribbean nation. This ‘anyone’ included the normalisation committee headed by local businessman Robert Haddad, despite the fact that this normalisation committee had been put in place by Fifa themselves. This was no surprise. It had remained entirely silent on this affair throughout, as if it had never really existed, or just as a fig leaf for a vacuum.

These implications posed an existential threat to a football body which is riddled with debts after years or mismanagement and worse, and, beyond that, to any kind of organised football in the country which qualified for the 2006 World Cup, one of a handful of teams from the region which managed to take part in the game’s great jamboree.

The gravity of the situation was such that, on Tuesday 22 September, the day before Fifa’s ultimatum ran out, the members of the TTFA agreed – not without considerable hand-wringing from all sides – that it would be better if its president William Wallace bowed to Fifa’s demands and withdrew the case lodged at the High Court. TTFA’s lawyers were then instructed to do that, something which was immediately reported in the local media. An application to withdraw was filed at the High Court.

However, 24 September being a Bank Holiday – in celebration of Trinidad & Tobago becoming a Republic in 1976 – Fifa were not notified in time, and suspension was decreed. TTFA had missed the deadline for filing the withdrawal of its case by two minutes, having done it at 15:02 rather than the 15:00 as notified for Fifa, which also happened to be the time at which the T&T High Court Civil Registry closed for the day.

Regardless of TTFA’s questionable efficiency (or feeble attempt at legal gamesmanship) – which prompted the resignation of TTFA’s vice-president Susan Joseph-Warrick – that the harshest of punishments which could be inflicted by Fifa was meted out to TTFA because of a 120 second delay had more than a hint of absurdity about it.

The T&T Minister of Sports and Community Development Shamfa Cudjoe (who had aligned her position on Fifa’s from day one of the dispute) blamed Fifa’s decision on ‘the egos and actions of a few jokers’, i.e. the TTFA board elected in November 2019; but it is fair to say that her take on the events wasn’t shared by everybody else. Quite the opposite in fact: the suspension was greeted with shock, anger and disbelief in the archipelago.

“They could have said: ‘allyuh [‘you all’ in Trinidadian English] were two minutes late but we win’”, said Keith Look-Loy, president of the TT Super League and chairman of the TTFA Technical Committee. “But that wasn’t enough for them. They wanted to put our faces in the mud and humiliate us. They wanted to show us and the rest of the world who is boss, despite the fact that we followed our membership’s wishes and Fifa’s wishes—they still went ahead with the ban.”

Reverend Dr. Iva Gloudon, herself a former international athlete, head of T&T’s women football and the Republic’s ex-High Commisionner to Jamaica, used much stronger words in an open letter to Gianni Infantino. ” What I want to say to you is that you represent the worst of what sport has become. A mighty conglomerate which is focused on making money; wielding power; and imposing your superiority and power on the athletes and fans who have now become mere pawns and no longer the central players in sport”, she wrote. “[…] So, the mighty Fifa is bigger than prime ministers, presidents, ministers of sport, athletes and, I daresay, God? Your laws, articles and clauses can be executed and applied in all situations without regard for human beings and the diversity of peoples?

Shame on you Mr Infantino!

I CANNOT BREATHE!“

What’s more, the Bureau of the Fifa Council had taken its decision a mere six days after Fifa’s 70th Congress, a virtual event which gathered all of its Member Associations. The fourth statutory item on the Agenda of the Congress was none other than: ‘suspension and expulsion of a member’.

Why then not use this opportunity to openly discuss the TTFA case and put the matter of the sanctions it could incur to the MAs which make up Fifa? Could there be a better platform to address this difficult issue in Gianni Infantino’s ‘transparent’ and ‘democratic’ Fifa 2.0? Look-Loy told Josimar that a couple of Caribbean MAs had intended to speak out if and when the matter was broached at the Congress.

The discussion never took place, however. Item 4 remained buried in the order of proceedings. Yet, less than a week later, Trinidad and Tobago had been thrown out, at least temporarily, of the ‘football family’. There would be no Gold Cup for the Soca Warriors, or so we thought. We were wrong.*

“Miami, FL (Friday, September 25, 2020) – Concacaf has noted FIFA’s decision to suspend the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA). This matter was discussed during an emergency meeting of the Concacaf Council last night, and the following was agreed: For the purposes of the 2021 Gold Cup draw, scheduled to take place on Monday September 28, at 8:00 pm ET, Trinidad and Tobago will be drawn in the Prelims as planned”.

Nobody expected this statement (*), least of them the president of the suspended TTFA William Wallace, who had lodged a last-ditch ‘application for Injunctive Relief’ to CAS, which,  “if successful, would allow Trinidad and Tobago to participate in the Gold Cup draw card for Monday 28th September 2020”. Wallace was genuinely unaware that Concacaf was about to extend an olive branch to the MA they had refused to support in any shape or form until then. Regardless of Fifa’s decision, Trinidad & Tobago were to be included in the Gold Cup draw, and were, in Pot 1, as one of ‘pre-seeded teams’.

TTFA supporters could barely conceal their surprise – and their joy – at the news. For months, they’d desperately tried to reach out to their Confederation, without success, even suspecting that CONCACAF was singing from the hymn book that Fifa had put under their nose. Fellow Caribbean FAs had been very careful not to raise their heads above the parapet, at least in public. This was different. It gave TTFA some breathing space, and at a crucial moment.

In almost perfect synchronicity with Concacaf’s unexpected statement, William Wallace had also decided to ‘withdraw the withdrawal’ of his case against Fifa at the High Court – in short, to resume his legal fight in his country’s supreme tribunal, whilst confirming that “our appeal against FIFA’s decision to suspend Trinidad and Tobago will remain before CAS”.

On 9 October, Justice Gobin would pass judgement on the second, ‘substantial’ TTFA v. Fifa case, for which the defendant had chosen not to file a defence (as it would acknowledge the legitimacy of the process in Trinidad & Tobago, and therefore undermine the supremacy of Fifa’s statutes over domestic laws). The question she’d have to answer this time would be: ‘was Fifa justified in removing the TTFA board and imposing a normalisation committee?’. Judging by the tenure of her first judgement, it was doubtful that her answer would be ‘yes’.

This was also happening shortly after The Guardian Media’s lead editor of the investigative desk Mark Bassant had published the results of a long investigation into the financial affairs of the previous TTFA administration, and particularly of its former president David John-Williams, the same John-Williams who’d been a key supporter of Gianni Infantino in the Fifa presidential election, and who’d been been supported by Infantino in return – in fulsome terms – when he vied, unsuccessfully, for re-election at the head of TTFA in November 2019. Bassant’s findings have since prompted T&T’s Fraud Squad, Anti-Corruption Bureau (ACIB) and the Financial Investigations Branch (FIB) to launch a formal investigation.

According to Bassant, who’d had access to a number of incriminating bank documents, a large proportion of the funds – well over $2m – allocated by Fifa to John-Williams’s TTFA for the purpose of building a supposedly state-of-the-art ‘Home of Football’ in Couva, south of the capital Port-of-Spain, had somehow ended in accounts directly and indirectly linked to John-Williams himself, including one in Panama. The ‘Home of Football’ had been inaugurated in great fanfare by Gianni Infantino in person days before the TTFA election; it was, however, totally unfit for purpose, as the authorities found out when they tried to use it as a facility in the fight against COVID-19 a few months later.

What was all the more embarrassing for Fifa, and particularly for Infantino’s old friend and ally Véron Mosengo-Omba, then in charge of associations in Africa and the Caribbean, was that the alleged ‘ financial mismanagement and malfeasance at the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association’ which the T&T fraud squad is now investigating had happened under their own noses, when it was their responsibility to make sure that Fifa’s money had been spent properly, and when they had the power to ensure that was the case.

This was in stark contrast to Gianni Infantino’s boast when he addressed the Fifa Congress on 18 September and said: “we have the money [to help] because in the new FIFA, the money doesn’t disappear”.

Except that, in Trinidad, it apparently had.


What follows now – until Justice Gobin’s judgement on 9 October, which could well redraw the lines of the conflict –  is almost impossible to guess. Concacaf’s decision to – de facto – ignore Fifa’s ban and include T&T in the 2021 Gold Cup draw could hint at a willingness to be used as a mediator in the dispute; or it could be read as a genuine shift of position from the confederation, following the pressure of MAs concerned by Fifa’s jackhammer tactics in its fight against TTFA; or it might simply mean that Concacaf just wished everyone to take a time-out in a quarrel that had escalated beyond what they considered reasonable. It could even be that Fifa is not too dissatisfied with Concacaf pouring some oil on choppy waters and playing the good cop while it puts the truncheon aside for a while.

The TTFA itself is not a homogenous block. Wallace’s rule, methods and actions are not beyond reproach and have been openly challenged and criticised from within. Had Fifa shown a little bit more patience and less vindictiveness in its action, it is not unlikely that Wallace could have lost much of his authority and of his fragile support at home. But when Fifa ignored Jean Cocteau’s advice (‘to know to which point it is possible to go too far’), all it achieved was to strengthen what unity there was. Former international defender Clayton Morris, for example, who collected 36 caps for the Soca Warriors, could not be described as a hardcore supporter of Wallace and his team; yet he could say: “Trinidad and Tobago is now recognised, not just for being the smallest country to have qualified for a [Fifa men’s] World Cup back in 2006, but as a country that decided on principle to stand up to Fifa. I think a lot of smaller countries like in Africa and those places would take strength from the position that we just took against Fifa”.

Which is exactly what Fifa didn’t want to happen.

(*) T&T’s participation in the 2021 Gold Cup is still subject to certain conditions: “However, they will only participate in the competition if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is lifted by FIFA by 5:00 pm ET on December 18, 2020. If the suspension imposed on the TTFA is not lifted by FIFA by 5:00pm ET on December 18, 2020, Trinidad and Tobago will be replaced in the Gold Cup Prelims by the Antigua and Barbuda Football Association as the next highest ranked team based on their 2019 Concacaf Nations League performance”.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: LKMaryTrini on September 29, 2020, 09:12:00 PM
Fifa bullying backfires
By Philippe Auclair (josimarfootball.com)

With all due respect Mr. Auclair, you really believe FiFA lost in this battle?  It is not even a war because one fighting with a machine gun and the other have a cutlass.  There was never any intention for WW and co. to remove the suit.  They were given ample time to do so and chose to submit, as you mentioned, 2 minutes after the deadline (definition - the latest time or date by which something should be completed).  It was an insult to FiFA and the footballing nation.  We all know that FiFA has their own skeletons but the rules explicitly states that the action taken by United TTFA is prohibited.  As a member of the FiFA, you signed up for all the rules that apply.  I hardly think that this action taken by United TTFA will inspire more nations to do the same when they fell wronged by FiFA.  As far as CONCACAF goes, the window is open for us to participate which appears to me as an olive branch.  Let's be honest, neither DJW nor WW did an admirable job when they were in charge.  To United TTFA..time to swallow your pride and put the advancement of our youth at the forefront. 
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Deeks on September 29, 2020, 10:41:16 PM
Let's be honest, neither DJW nor WW did an admirable job when they were in charge.

You comparing 4 months to 4 years ?
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 30, 2020, 12:44:59 AM
William Wallace: Respect our views.
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express).


NOTHING TO REGRET

Even with Trinidad and Tobago currently suspended by the world governing body because of High Court action undertaken by his United TTFA group, William Wallace has no regrets over the action they have taken since FIFA appointed a normalisation committee to look after local football in March.

Justice Carol Gobin is due to give a final judgement on October 9, as to whether elected president Wallace or the FIFA-appointed committee headed by businessman Robert Hadad has the legitimate right to conduct the affairs of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association. But since FIFA announced T&T’s suspension from football last Thursday, the United TTFA group has come under added criticism for its court action. One of its members, Susan Joseph-Warrick has since resigned as one of Wallace’s vice-presidents in the TTFA.

However, Wallace is not sorry for the stance he and his group has taken.

“I can’t say that I regret anything because the reason for taking the action has not changed. I can’t regret anything,” he told the Express on Monday.

Wallace described the takeover by the normalisation committee as “an act of total injustice, disrespect.”

And referring to his failed attempt to withdraw the case against FIFA at the behest of the majority of T&T delegates last week, he added: “My concern would have been that Trinidad and Tobago football would not be suspended and I think FIFA has acted in bad faith when they knew the matter (to withdraw the case) would have been removed from the court. Even while the matter was before the court they acted to ban Trinidad and Tobago. Again we say they acted in bad faith. There is a process for something to be removed from the court. What was the haste in making that decision (to suspend)?”

Yesterday, on TV6’s Morning Edition programme, Wallace also again responded to accusations that he and his group were on an ego trip at the expense of the local game.

“I always respect other people’s views...and I want that people respect our views,” he said, adding further that, “there are persons who are also saying that this might be best time in Trinidad and Tobago’s football in terms of resetting, in terms of starting over because we are at an extremely low ebb at this point in time.

“The persons who are making the most noise are the persons we are hearing, but there are many other sober-minded persons who are saying that this might very well be the best thing for Trinidad and Tobago football at this point in time.”

And Wallace also stated again that the seven-month old saga will have a final conclusion next month.

“One of the things we did immediately when we were suspended was to appeal the suspension at CAS (Court of Arbitration for Sport) and that suspension is still pending. I think we have received a date. We also applied for injunctive relief. I think one of those matters would come up on the fourth of October, so we would know CAS’s decision on that, and the matter in Trinidad is on the ninth, so the dates are lining up properly here, so that by the ninth we should have a clear picture as to what happens next.”

Wallace also explained what United TTFA would do once Justice Gobin rules.

“If we are unsuccessful of course, we walk away and I think we walking away with our heads held high. If not (and United TTFA is successful), then the membership would decide what happens from thereon in.”

Wallace said should United TTFA gain a successful outcome at the High Court, he would go back to the TTFA membership to decide the next step for the Association ”within ten to 12 days.”

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 30, 2020, 04:29:17 AM
Dear editor: Do Fifa appeasers want everyone to ‘shut up and dribble’?
Wired868.com


“[…] Before the Black Lives Matter movement gained global momentum, one Fox News  anchor admonished NBA star Lebron James to ‘shut up and dribble’. Put another way she meant: ‘bat in your crease’—stick to entertainment and don’t be so farse as to tell powerful people how to run ‘their’ country.

“Maybe we in Trinidad and Tobago should do the same and ‘shut up and dribble’, albeit on a football field instead of on a basketball court…”

In the following Letter to the Editor, former St Augustine Secondary principal Andre Moses shares his view on the Fifa-TTFA impasse:

A lot of injustice is and has been perpetrated by guns and violence. Paradoxically another reason for the persistence of injustice is the successful propaganda gambit of the oppressor, which is to destroy the manhood and self-esteem of the oppressed to the extent that they become unwitting but fierce defenders of the unjust status quo, while at the same time reserving their impatience and ridicule for those willing to fight for what is right.

Thanks and praises to Hy Arima, Toussaint L’Ouverture, Nelson Mandela and Muhammed Ali, who all stood their ground and swam against the tide. Their actions affirmed that Spanish decimation of the First Peoples, slavery and apartheid as well as the Vietnam War were crimes against humanity—no matter how powerful were the oppressors they faced, or how futile their resistance and advocacy may have seemed to some.

Everyone has a right to their own opinion. But someone who has devoted almost 30 continuous years to the development of youth and community football, and another who has spent a comparable two decades as an educator and a first rate administrator in two co-curricular disciplines, are cast as the heartless villains of the piece, whilst others who only remember Trinidad and Tobago exists when it suits their self-interest, get a free pass no matter what their history might be.

Before the Black Lives Matter movement gained global momentum, one Fox News  anchor admonished NBA star Lebron James to ‘shut up and dribble’. Put another way she meant: ‘bat in your crease’—stick to entertainment and don’t be so farse as to tell powerful people how to run ‘their’ country.

Maybe we in Trinidad and Tobago should do the same and ‘shut up and dribble’, albeit on a football field instead of on a basketball court.

At the end of the day it comes down to cost versus benefit and every stakeholder has the right to make their own calculation on that score. But as the young people say, ‘miss me with that BS that right is wrong and wrong is right’.

RELATED

Dr Gloudon: Fifa, I can’t breathe; Infantino take your knee off my neck!
Wired868.com


“[…] What I want to say to [Fifa president Gianni Infantino] is that you represent the worst of what sport has become.

“A mighty conglomerate which is focused on making money; wielding power; and imposing your superiority and power on the athletes and fans who have now become mere pawns and no longer the central players in sport…”

The following Letter to the Editor on Fifa’s decision to suspend the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) from the international game was submitted to Wired868 by Reverend Dr Iva Gloudon—a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago and former international athlete, sport administrator, university director of sport and former ambassador to Jamaica:

 have been in sport all of my life; from elementary school to high school to club sport, to university, as a national field hockey team member, a director of sport at the university level, an academic in sport, as the president of Women’s Football and as the president of Women’s Field Hockey in Trinidad and Tobago.

Mr Gianni Infantino, sport has been my life and much of what I have achieved has been through sport. These days, however, I am mostly focused on being a ‘woman of the cloth’ and became a Reverend in 2012. I say this as I am praying that I can be reverential in what I am about to say to the mighty Fifa.

HOW DARE YOU!

I am not even going to attempt to justify who is right and who is wrong, as I do not believe that is the issue. I am not going to even attempt to address the issue of corruption, as this would only lead me to conclude that not many have surpassed Fifa in this regard.

What I want to say to you is that you represent the worst of what sport has become. A mighty conglomerate which is focused on making money; wielding power; and imposing your superiority and power on the athletes and fans who have now become mere pawns and no longer the central players in sport.

Do you even understand the pride that a country of 1.3 million people takes in their sporting accomplishments? Do you understand the pride we have when we are able to conquer the larger countries in the world to win gold, silver and bronze medals at the Olympics or make it to the finals of the World Cup?

Do you even understand how many of us only have the pathway of sport to lift us up out of poverty and hardship?

You are trying to convince me that the only management solution that you are competent at is throwing our duly elected football executives aside, defying our local courts and sitting around your table with six other men (yes, no women) in the hallowed hallways of Fifa and throwing an entire country, yes country, under the proverbial bus?

YOUR HIGHHANDEDNESS IS MESMERIZING!

We might be a small nation, but we are a very proud people. What about all of the other paradigms that exist which allows for a less confrontational solution? One in which all parties are taken into consideration and all parties can benefit.

Good leaders do not wield power just because they have power. Good leaders do not demand that their subjects bow to their every whim and fancy.

Good leaders do not demand that we go to a court that we cannot afford and which is certainly prejudiced towards us smaller nations.

So, the mighty Fifa is bigger than prime ministers, presidents, ministers of sport, athletes and, I daresay, God? Your laws, articles and clauses can be executed and applied in all situations without regard for human beings and the diversity of peoples?

Shame on you Mr Infantino!

I CANNOT BREATHE!

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on September 30, 2020, 04:29:57 AM
‘Infantino wanted to humiliate us!’ How Fifa’s suspension backfired and what’s next for T&T football.
By Lasana Liburd (wired868).


On Wednesday evening, Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace applied to withdraw his case against Fifa for their implementation of a normalisation committee on the twin island republic.

By Friday morning, Wallace had twice as many cases running against the world governing body in as many countries.

The TTFA has not only ‘withdrawn its withdrawal’ of the substantive motion against Fifa but also filed an appeal against its international suspension at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

Wallace, in a 980-word statement, explained that his United TTFA slate—now minus second vice-president Susan Joseph-Warrick, who resigned this morning—are responding to yesterday’s ruling of the Bureau of the Fifa council, led by president Gianni Infantino, to suspend the TTFA.

(United TTFA is the slate under which Wallace successfully contested the TTFA elections on 24 November 2019.)

The local football body missed Fifa’s deadline to withdraw the High Court case by two minutes on Wednesday and did not directly notify the governing body, through its local attorneys or normalisation committee.

“I believe that the recent punitive action taken by Fifa against the TTFA because the TTFA is engaged in a legitimate action before the Trinidad and Tobago High Court, even after the TTFA filed documents to discontinue the action before the Court,” stated Wallace, “is high-handed, unreasonable, and does not accord with the principle of ‘fair play’ which lies at the heart of the sport of football; but instead is consistent with ‘fear play’.”

United TTFA member and Trinidad and Tobago Super League (TTSL) president Keith Look Loy was even more blunt.

“Fifa caused all of this,” said Look Loy. “They could have said: ‘allyuh were two minutes late but we win’. But that wasn’t enough for them. They wanted to put our faces in the mud and humiliate us.

“This would have all been done yesterday but they prolonged it because of their vindictive attitude. They wanted to show us and the rest of the world who is boss, despite the fact that we followed our membership’s wishes and Fifa’s wishes—they still went ahead and ban.”

Trinidad and Tobago has not competed in a Fifa tournament since hosting the Women’s Under-17 World Cup in 2010, while the Soca Warriors’ only Men’s World Cup appearance came at the 2006 Germany edition.

Yet, Infantino may be hearing the words ‘Trinidad and Tobago’ far too often these days, and he probably shudders every time.

Wallace explained that the TTFA filed an injunction with CAS this morning, which was meant to overturn Fifa’s suspension and safeguard the Warriors’ participation at the 2021 Gold Cup tournament.

That request became, arguably, moot at 11.55am today, when Concacaf announced that it would save a space for Trinidad and Tobago at next year’s Gold Cup—so long as they satisfy Fifa’s requirements and their international suspension is lifted by 13 December.

Had Fifa and Concacaf reversed the sequence of their respective pronouncements, Wallace and his team might have still walked. However, although grateful for Concacaf’s ‘wiggle room’, Wallace has a second wind now.

“Concacaf’s announcement this afternoon that Trinidad and Tobago will remain in the draw was welcoming news,” said Wallace, “and I have since instructed the attorneys to inform CAS that we are withdrawing the application for injunctive relief. But our appeal against Fifa’s decision to suspend Trinidad and Tobago will remain before CAS.”

Why did the TTFA return to CAS after complaining of bias and being priced out of justice by the body in May?

Look Loy noted that the new cost of the application meant it was a worth a shot. Their initial tussle with Fifa over the latter’s right to remove the TTFA’s officials carried a bill of between 40,000 to 50,000 Swiss francs (TT$277,000 – TT$366,000).

In contrast, the TTFA’s request for a second opinion on their suspension is apparently a straightforward disciplinary matter and should only cost 1,000 Swiss francs (TT$7,314).

Why resume the High Court case though? Why not deal with CAS exclusively?

“Well, if Wallace dropped his claim to be the legitimate president of the TTFA,” asked Look Loy, “under what authority could he approach CAS to stop the suspension?”

So the United TTFA can now justify using the High Court to determine whether they remain the local body’s bonafide representatives, as a means of saving Trinidad and Tobago from suspension—a suspension brought on by their late withdrawal from the very same court case.

“We can’t drop [the High Court case] because we have to have standing before CAS,” said Look Loy.

It is left to be seen what the TTFA’s member delegates make of Wallace’s new legal manoeuvre, which was again taken without consultation. Yet, simultaneously, Infantino might be facing a whisper campaign of his own within Fifa’s corridors.

Already facing criminal charges for corruption in Switzerland, Infantino has proved utterly incapable of dealing with a virtually bankrupt association in a country of 1.3 million people.

Is Infantino really the most capable person to lead a company with cash reserves estimated at US$2.7 billion?

“The decision of the former leadership [of the TTFA] to go to a local court to contest the appointment of the normalisation committee,” stated Fifa, on Wednesday, “jeopardises not only the future of football in Trinidad and Tobago but also endangers the overall global football governance structure, which relies on the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) as the exclusive forum for resolving disputes of this nature.”

Yet, the court case is back on stream now. If Wallace and the United TTFA are likely to face some backlash for it, will the same be true of Infantino?

On 9 October, High Court Judge Carol Gobin is due to rule on whether Fifa was justified in removing the TTFA’s Board. Fifa has not filed a defence and Infantino’s attempt to strong-arm the TTFA into abandoning the case has backfired spectacularly.

So what next for the TTFA?

“If Justice Gobin comes on the 9th [of October] and says Fifa had the right to bring in a normalisation committee,” said Look Loy, “then it is done and we will ride off into the sunset. The membership will then have to find a way to invite Fifa back into Trinidad and Tobago, through a normalisation committee or whatever.”

Concacaf’s extended deadline of 13 December means there would be still plenty time for the TTFA’s members to acquiesce to Fifa’s demands.

But what if Justice Gobin declares that Fifa is wrong and Wallace remains the rightful head of the TTFA?

“If Justice Gobin says we win and Wallace and his elected officers are the legitimate leaders of the TTFA,” said Look Loy, “then the elected officers will call a bonafide EGM and ask members what they would like to be done. If the members want the normalisation committee to be in charge at that point, then it will be in charge.

“By the ninth, this will be settled one way or the other and I assure you that this will be all done long before December 2020.”

Look Loy said he has already written his resignation as TTFA technical committee chairman and Super League president.

“My resignation has been pending for weeks now—from the TTFA, from the Super League, from everything,” he said. “[…] I have reached my limit. I am just waiting on the right time to send it.

“After that, whoever wants to jockey for position and so on can go right ahead, and everybody can be happy.”

At this stage, it may still be too early to guess how local football history will remember the United TTFA. But, at this rate, Fifa—and Infantino in particular—will have a hard time forgetting them.

RELATED NEWS

Wallace: ‘We won’t bow to Fifa fear play’; TTFA president explains return to CAS and resumption of case.
Wired868.com.


“[…] I believe that the recent punitive action taken by Fifa against the TTFA because the TTFA is engaged in a legitimate action before the Trinidad and Tobago High Court—even after the TTFA filed documents to discontinue the action before the Court—is high-handed, unreasonable, and does not accord with the principle of ‘fair play’ which lies at the heart of the sport of football; but instead is consistent with ‘fear play’…”

In the following press statement, Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace explains why he has taken Fifa to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) and resumed his case before the local High Court:

On Wednesday 23 September 2020, I instructed the TTFA attorneys to file the necessary documents to withdraw the claim between the TTFA and Fifa before the High Court of Justice in Trinidad and Tobago.

This followed an informal meeting held with the TTFA membership on the evening of Tuesday 22 September 2020. Many of our members were of the view that although they supported the court case in principle, the threats by Fifa on at least two occasions to take punitive action against the TTFA was too high a cost to pay for continuing with what is a legitimate action before the Trinidad and Tobago High Court of Justice.

As a result, the majority of our members indicated that they were of the opinion that the matter should be withdrawn from our court.

To this end and in accordance with the Civil Procedure Rules in Trinidad and Tobago, a Notice of Application for permission to withdraw and discontinue the claim was in fact filed on the 23rd September 2020 and was supported by my affidavit and a draft order.

However, on the 24th September 2020, as Trinidad and Tobago commemorated Republic Day, the Bureau of the Fifa Council suspended the TTFA with immediate effect and indicated that the suspension will only be lifted when: ‘the TTFA fully complies with its obligations as a member of Fifa, including recognising the legitimacy of the appointed normalisation committee and bringing its own statutes into line with the Fifa Statutes’.

It is unfortunate that, notwithstanding the TTFA having taken steps to withdraw the claim before our High Court, Fifa seemingly found it fit, fair and/or proper to not only take punitive steps against the TTFA but to introduce a new and further condition—requiring the TTFA to ‘bring its own statutes into line with the Fifa Statutes’.

With the shifting of the goal post, we don’t know exactly whether this new and further condition declared to us on our nation’s Republic Day 2020 is meant to dictate to the Trinidad and Tobago Parliament, since the TTFA is an organisation created by an Act of Parliament. This remains to be seen.

It is now clear however, that Fifa intended to take punitive action against the TTFA regardless of whether or not steps were taken by the TTFA to withdraw and discontinue the claim before our High Court of Justice on the 23rd September 2020.

It is also now clear that the decision to suspend the TTFA amidst the upcoming draw for the Gold Cup 2021 is meant to, amongst other things, provoke public furore against the properly and democratically elected executive of the TTFA.

It is for this reason that last night I gave instructions to the TTFA attorneys to file an emergency appeal with the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), challenging the sole issue of the suspension of TTFA in the face of illegal threats and coercive acts by Fifa.

The attorneys were also asked to make an application for Injunctive Relief so that, if successful, this would allow Trinidad and Tobago to participate in the Gold Cup draw carded for Monday 28th September 2020.

Concacaf’s announcement this afternoon that Trinidad and Tobago will remain in the draw was welcoming news and I have since instructed the attorneys to inform CAS that we are withdrawing the application for injunctive relief. But our appeal against Fifa’s decision to suspend Trinidad and Tobago will remain before CAS.

This morning and on my further instructions, the TTFA attorneys also filed the relevant documents to continue with the claim before the High Court of Justice since this is the only way that we can legitimise our application to CAS.

The obvious question would be, why CAS?  The answer is that the action taken against the TTFA is a disciplinary one and CAS is charged with dealing with such matters. It must also be noted that our only financial obligation in this matter is the filing fees.

I believe that the recent punitive action taken by Fifa against the TTFA because the TTFA is engaged in a legitimate action before the Trinidad and Tobago High Court—even after the TTFA filed documents to discontinue the action before the court—is high-handed, unreasonable, and does not accord with the principle of ‘fair play’ which lies at the heart of the sport of football; but instead is consistent with ‘fear play’.

Further, I do not believe that this punitive action of Fifa against the TTFA and the people of Trinidad and Tobago will withstand objective scrutiny before any competent tribunal.

I have committed my life to the development of the youth in Trinidad and Tobago as a member of the teaching service for over 30 years. I have served as president of Secondary Schools Cricket League and Secondary Schools Football League and in many other areas where the focus was on the development of our youth.

For those who do not know, these many years of service to young people in Trinidad and Tobago was all voluntary, so for those who indicate that I don’t care about our young people you need to speak to what you know.

What I do care about though is that we must stand up against injustice and as Archbishop Desmond Tutu said: “If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor. If an elephant has its foot on the tail of a mouse and you say that you are neutral, the mouse would not appreciate your neutrality.”

The duly elected executive of the TTFA now calls on all right-thinking, principled and patriotic citizens of Trinidad and Tobago to let you voices be heard as resounding as Reverend Dr Iva Gloudon’s and all the others that have spoken out against Fifa’s action.

We might be a small nation, but we are a very proud people.

Concacaf extends olive branch and fresh deadline, as TTFA-FIFA tussle enters slapstick territory.
By Lasana Liburd (wired868).


At 11.55am today, Concacaf offered an olive branch to the Soca Warriors. On Monday 28 September, Concacaf will hold its draw for the 2021 Gold Cup, which is its showcase tournament, and there will be a special arrangement for the Trinidad and Tobago Men’s National Senior Team.

Yesterday, Fifa suspended Trinidad and Tobago from international football and its secretary general Fatma Samoura warned Fifa’s 210 full member associations not to have any contact with any football teams from the twin island republic.

But, last night, Concacaf president Victor Montagliani held an emergency meeting with his executive which decided on a compromise.

“Concacaf has noted Fifa’s decision to suspend the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA),” read a Concacaf statement, just before midday. “This matter was discussed during an emergency meeting of the Concacaf Council last night, and the following was agreed:

“For the purposes of the 2021 Gold Cup draw, […] Trinidad and Tobago will be drawn in the Prelims as planned. However, they will only participate in the competition if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is lifted by FIFA by 5:00 pm ET on 18 December 2020.

“If the suspension imposed on the TTFA is not lifted by FIFA by 5:00pm ET on 18 December 2020, Trinidad and Tobago will be replaced in the Gold Cup Prelims by the Antigua and Barbuda Football Association, as the next highest ranked team based on their 2019 Concacaf Nations League performance.”

If Fifa president Gianni Infantino played the role of ‘bad cop’ yesterday, by suspending the TTFA for a late withdrawal of its High Court case—Montagliani tried to be the ‘good cop’.

The problem was, while Concacaf was deciding how to deal with the TTFA, the United TTFA members were also meeting.

And, at 7:38am today, the TTFA’s attorneys informed the High Court that Wallace and his colleagues—now minus the resigned second vice-president Susan Joseph-Warrick—wanted to resume the fight.

By the time that Concacaf offered the TTFA an olive branch at 11:55am, Wallace already had his gloves back on.

It is a scenario exacerbated, in large part, by Fifa’s refusal to communicate directly with Wallace and his team, who the governing body refers to in public statements as the ‘former officials’.

Will Wallace withdraw a second time, as a result of Concacaf’s offer? And what of the opinion of the TTFA’s member delegates?

On Tuesday night, roughly 70 per cent of the TTFA’s members asked the elected officials to end the case, so as to avoid a potential ban. It was an informal meeting and not binding, but their feedback was said to be the catalyst for Wednesday’s withdrawal.

The members were not consulted on Friday morning when the case was resumed. What does Wallace say to them now?

TTFA v FIFA timeline:

17 March: The Bureau of the Fifa Council announces that Wallace, his vice-presidents and the TTFA Board have been replaced by a normalisation committee, as a result of their massive debt and ‘extremely low overall financial management methods’.

18 March: Fifa declares that TTFA accountant Tyril Patrick, the man who oversaw the ‘extremely low overall financial management methods’ in the first place and was targeted for an internal probe, was the perfect fit to run the local body in the interim.

21 March: Patrick tells Fifa ‘thanks but no thanks’, after his appointment was quickly met by legal threats from the TTFA’s attorneys.

27 March: Robert Hadad, whose family-owned company holds the Häagen-Dazs franchise in Trinidad, accepts the job of normalisation committee chairman and is immediately on the back-foot as he unconvincingly tries to distance himself from controversial former president David John-Williams.

6 April: Wallace appeals against Fifa’s decision to implement a normalisation committee in Trinidad and Tobago at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), as permitted by Fifa’s Statutes.

7 May: Wallace realises why Fifa likes CAS that much. “We feel we are basically being set up!” he says. TTFA withdraws from the Switzerland-based CAS and turns to the local High Court itself.

18 June: Bambi has claws. Up to this point, Wallace has been painted as an innocent victim of Fifa’s machinations. Turns out that ‘Honest Wallie’ was guilty of some dodgy backroom dealing himself. Outspoken United TTFA member Keith Look Loy calls Wallace a replica of former president David John-Williams. Ouch. Still, the officials decide to remain united in the face of the Fifa threat.

13 August: High Court Judge Carol Gobin rips Infantino a new one, as she bins Fifa’s attempt to have the case moved to CAS.

“If Fifa disputes the authority of Mr Wallace and others to act on behalf of TTFA, and TTFA is under the control of the normalisation committee,” said Gobin, “how does it reconcile that with its insistence that these very persons who have no authority to file these court [documents] should commence arbitration proceedings in Switzerland?”

26 August: Infantino, sore from Gobin’s spanking, has had enough of these legal niceties. Secretary general Fatma Samoura emails Hadad and issues a public missive, which gives the TTFA’s ‘former leadership’ three weeks to drop the case. The deadline of 16 September is on the eve of a Fifa Council meeting and two days before the annual Fifa Congress.

“We firmly request the TTFA to ask the TTFA former leadership for an immediate withdrawal of the claim at the Trinidad and Tobago High Court by 16 September 2020, at the latest,” stated Samoura. “In view of the above, we deem that a failure to comply with this directive would result in the commencement of suspension proceedings via the relevant Fifa bodies.”

5 September: Hadad announces EGM on 15 September, after request from the TTFA’s member delegates. But it turns out that holding a proper EGM is not as easy as serving ice cream and Hadad’s procedural errors are immediately pointed out.

14 September: Justice Gobin endorses a requested injunction from the TTFA against the Fifa-appointed normalisation committee, which stops Hadad and his gang from holding an EGM or so much as using the TTFA’s stationery. If Infantino and Samoura had not misled the TTFA delegates about who was legally in charge of the local game, the call for an EGM might have worked. But there is no time now for that.

18 September: The Fifa Congress and Council meetings pass with nary a word about the TTFA. Was Infantino bluffing? Nope. The Congress had barely ended when Fifa sent the TTFA a new deadline of 23 September. As it turns out, Infantino does not want to put the Trinidad and Tobago impasse to a vote between 210 member nations—but he is happy to drag the TTFA before his seven member cabal, cough, Bureau.

Oh and, for the first time, Concacaf is going to hold its Gold Cup draw nine months before the tournament, on 28 September. Only non-suspended members allowed. Hint, hint.

22 September: The TTFA calls an informal meeting to hear what its members think about fighting Fifa and possibly facing a suspension. Thirty-six from 47 members attend (maybe Netflix had something too good to miss!) and 70 per cent of them ask their elected officers to shoulder arms.

23 September: United TTFA puts out a statement at 1pm confirming the withdrawal of the High Court case. Curiously, it is not signed by president Wallace or vice-president Clynt Taylor. Worse, the withdrawal is filed electronically two minutes after the close of court and not sent to Fifa’s attorney as a matter of courtesy—so Fifa has only the 1pm press statement to go by.

24 September: It is a holiday, so the courts are still closed and Fifa still has no official update to their case. In truth, Justice Gobin would still have to accept the withdrawal in any case before it became final. Peeved, Infantino calls the six families of The Fifa to a Bureau meeting, to select the perfect Republic Day present for Trinidad and Tobago.

They opt for a horse’s head. The TTFA is suspended until they not only withdraw the case but also amend its constitution, so as to presumably make it easier to be shafted in the foreseeable future. Fifa reveals the decision at 4:26pm.

As it turns out, Concacaf president Montagliani, who is also a Bureau member, got permission to play ‘good cop’. He calls a Concacaf emergency meeting that same night, which offers the TTFA roughly three months more to make Infantino happy. Badda bing badda boom. The Concacaf members decide to sleep on their decision and release it in the morning. What could go wrong?

25 September: Just when he thought he was out, they pulled him right back… Wallace decides that, with the Gold Cup dream squashed anyway, he is going to go down with his boots on. At 7:28am—yeah, they were bright and early this time!—the TTFA attorneys tell the High Court that they are withdrawing their withdrawal. We are back beeyatch!

There is one casualty though. Second vice-president Susan Joseph-Warrick says the TTFA seems to be no longer fighting for its members or players and submits her resignation at 6:49am.

At 11:55am, the Concacaf executive—presumably operating on ‘Trini time’—gets around to issuing confirmation that the Soca Warriors have a ‘bligh’ and can compete in the Gold Cup, providing that the TTFA can make Infantino smile by 5pm eastern time on 18 December 2020.

So we are all good right? Right?

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: LKMaryTrini on September 30, 2020, 12:58:25 PM
Let's be honest, neither DJW nor WW did an admirable job when they were in charge.

You comparing 4 months to 4 years ?


In 4 months, questionable contracts to Terry Fenwick (he dictated his contract), Peter Miller, Ramesh Ramdhan nd the sponsorship with AVEC (which he was the only one who knew about it).  He inherited a pile of rubbish but he added gasoline and lit the match.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: ABTrini on September 30, 2020, 05:56:58 PM
Let's be honest, neither DJW nor WW did an admirable job when they were in charge.

You comparing 4 months to 4 years ?


In 4 months, questionable contracts to Terry Fenwick (he dictated his contract), Peter Miller, Ramesh Ramdhan nd the sponsorship with AVEC (which he was the only one who knew about it).  He inherited a pile of rubbish but he added gasoline and lit the match.

Interesting take - using behaviour  technique where ones  past may indicate a lilikehood  for future behaviours then one could say what was accomplished in   Four months could have had the potential to be ten times  over if he was in there for four years
Ummm🤔🤔
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 01, 2020, 12:26:10 AM
CFU boss: FIFA not trying to hurt T&T football.
By Jelani Beckles (Newsday).


PRESIDENT of the Barbados Football Association and president of the Caribbean Football Union (CFU) Randy Harris described the situation facing T&T football as “sad,” but said that FIFA “does not want to see the back of T&T.”

FIFA suspended the TT Football Association (TTFA) with immediate effect, on September 24, after the United TTFA failed to meet its deadline in withdrawing their High Court case. They needed to withdraw the case at 3 pm on September 23, but did so minutes after the deadline.

United TTFA has not given up the fight against FIFA to remove them as the executive of the TTFA and install a normalisation committee to run local football.

In another twist on Friday, the United TTFA sought to withdraw its withdrawal of its lawsuit against FIFA.

The William Wallace-led United TTFA remains adamant that its challenge should be played out in the local courts since it is a statutory body.

United TTFA was removed by FIFA in March after only being in office for four months.

In an interview with Newsday, Harris said, “I wasn’t surprised of the decision (by FIFA) because the TTFA made a decision that was against everything that we in the football fraternity agree that we would keep things out of the ordinary courts and that we would deal with football matters at CAS (Court of Arbitration) or among ourselves.”

The CFU president says this situation may not affect the region’s football image as a whole.

“I don’t think it really hurts the region as a whole because it is a decision made by a member association. However, it is sad because T&T is one of our leading lights in terms of quality of football in the region. It is sad to know they may be affected by this kind of decision.”

Harris believes FIFA wants T&T back on the field of play, but must follow the world football body’s wishes.

“I am sure that FIFA does not want to see the back of T&T. They are merely trying to get them to withdraw the case. I think the sooner they do that FIFA will lift the ban as normal in these cases. I don’t think that they are trying to hurt T&T.”

FIFA suspended TTFA due "to grave violations of the FIFA Statutes."

TTFA was in "direct breach of article 59 of the FIFA Statutes, which expressly prohibits recourse to ordinary courts unless specifically provided for in the FIFA regulations."

Harris said it is difficult for CFU to make an intervention in a case involving FIFA.

“Basically in the football world there is no intervention to make…FIFA was being portrayed as the bad guy (and) I don’t think that we have a case to really do any sort of representation in this matter.”

Harris reiterated that when a member association takes FIFA to the ordinary court the former will suffer. “That is where the real problem is. We will just hope that good sense prevails and that T&T can be brought back into the fold of football.”

Adrian Donovan, president of Barbados football club Paradise FC, said, “We in Barbados and by extension the entire region are really saddened by this (development) here in T&T. T&T and Jamaica for years have been the leaders in the forefront of regional football.”

Donovan said administrators “run the association like it is their personal club.”

Donovan added, “They don’t want to listen to the membership and some big egos get the better of the association.”

Jamaica (Reggae Boys) were the first English-speaking Caribbean nation to qualify for the World Cup when they made an appearance at the 1998 edition in France. Eight years later it was T&T’s turn when the Soca Warriors made their debut at the 2006 World Cup in Germany.

Donovan said the region was filled with joy seeing Caribbean countries at the World Cup.

“Whoever represented…you could be rest assured the entire region is behind them. We were extremely proud to have any kind of representation.”’

Former national midfielder Russell Latapy is the current coach of Barbados.

Donovan said, “He (Latapy) is doing a wonderful job. He has all the respect from the players which I have not seen in previous coaches from all over the world.”

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 01, 2020, 12:28:41 AM
Gary Griffith advises Wallace to lay down his weapon.
By Ian Prescott (Express).


Ego trippers

“I have never seen such ego take over a situation and even at the expense of the future development of football. We have hundreds of young men and women. They are losing the opportunities for contract, for scouts, for scholarships.”

Police Commissioner and former hockey player Gary Griffith thinks that with his point now made, it’s time for battle-weary Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace to lay down his weapon — that is, pursuing court action against FIFA, international football’s governing body.

Griffith’s comments came in reaction to FIFA suspending Trinidad and Tobago from international football as a consequence of Wallace’s sidelined TTFA executive challenging their removal from office. FIFA statutes name the Switzerland-based Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) as the forum for such disputes.

With Wallace’s United TTFA group having gone to the local High Court, in contravention of FIFA’s laws, FIFA followed up by suspending T&T, giving the Association two conditions to have the ban lifted. Bowing to pressure, Wallace’s United TTFA sought to remove the matter from court in line with the FIFA ultimatum, but did not do so by the 3 p.m. deadline on September 23. Since then, United TTFA has returned to court.

However, speaking with regional broadcaster SportsMax, Griffith viewed Wallace’s action as holding the football community to ransom. Griffith thought there was no end game or win-win situation for Wallace, even if United TTFA won in the High Court. FIFA does not recognise the jurisdiction of local courts and will not make a defence when the matter comes up on October 9.

“I am always ready for battle. But there is one thing you must know: you cannot go ahead to do everything to win a battle and then lose a war,” Griffith declared.

Griffith himself is no stranger to ego accusations. However, the fiery commissioner feels that Wallace has to work for the greater good of all and not just the few members of his group.

Likewise, there are others, including T&T men’s coach Terry Fenwick, who believe that Wallace’s faction does not have the resources to run football without FIFA funding. The TTFA is approximately $100 million in debt. And in its seven-month battle with FIFA, United TTFA have been only able to raise USD 4,250 in funds, and none in four months. It has led to United TTFA abandoning its case before the Court of Arbitration for Sport, once FIFA opted not to pay its half of advance costs.

Until court proceedings are finished and the ban lifted, Fenwick’s national team, starved of FIFA funding, will not be allowed to participate in the 2021 edition of the Concacaf Gold Cup - the region’s top competition for national football teams- unless the ban is lifted by December 18.

“This is about egos. It is amazing what we are seeing here,” Griffith declared.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on October 01, 2020, 01:52:09 AM
Quote
Griffith himself is no stranger to ego accusations.


Ian Prescott delivering a ball with a line and length that can't be ignored by the batsman ... or the spectators. :)
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on October 01, 2020, 05:37:21 AM
This is why Africa and their diaspora would never develop past a former colonial state. it is seen repeatedly with black men where they sell out their values just because they stand to gain individually, now just listen to this bajan man talking of what he knows not. maybe fifa was right to suspend the ttfa, but he fails to mention anything of the normalization committee and whether or not fifa had any cause to make such over reaching steps.

no difference with jack warner another tyrant like infantino and his yes men, if blatter had decided to suspend a Caribbean nation in like manner back when batter was in the height of his reign, warner would have stood with his president and the notion of Caribbean unity would have never entered his thoughts, even though he was CFU president.

DJW is the perfect example of a black tyrant and in true african king fashion he denied the lads many opportunities just so that he could fill his greedy pockets. he wasn’t ashamed when the lads was traveling from country to country in each and every single international window taking beatings after beating, with not one game playing on home soil to recover some semblance of dignity, and only because because he collect match fees, not even warner and camps were so callous and cold hearted as this man.

randy Harris needs to know the facts, speak the truth or stay mum. no need to talk when you really don’t have to. and as much as I want WW to step aside (not because I don’t support his stance), I would never try to justify what fifa is doing. it’s just that wallace fight has no structure and it’s ill advised and in the end he would make thing near impossible for him to bounce back.

he needs to step aside and allow fifa to do their thing, and simply because he has no resources, no support from the local or regional membership and no powerful allies in or outside of the region, apart from that he is flip flopping knowing full well the real reason why fifa jumped in to stop the train.

if I was him I would have backed off, try an encourage the United States to investigate DJW, try and mend fences with the local football stake holders, go in search of sponsors, get influential people on board and launch another attack at the presidency, but the amount of bridges he burned already, I doubt if he could stand another chance with these thick headed knuckle dragging dimwits who has a say in Trinidad and Tobago football.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on October 01, 2020, 05:40:51 AM
Quote
Griffith himself is no stranger to ego accusations.


Ian Prescott delivering a ball with a line and length that can't be ignored by the batsman ... or the spectators. :)
that griffith bloke is all over the place isn’t he? my guess is that he ate a parrot’s tail as a child and can’t seem to get the taste out his mouth all this time. what a piece of work he is, my goodness.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Deeks on October 01, 2020, 09:11:42 AM
Gary, stick with security issues. That is your job. If you want to run TTFA, resign, and go and join Sancho and Hadad.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: davyjenny1 on October 01, 2020, 03:44:21 PM
Gary, stick with security issues. That is your job. If you want to run TTFA, resign, and go and join Sancho and Hadad.
Gary, stick with security issues. That is your job. If you want to run TTFA, resign, and go and join Sancho and Hadad.
Ha Ha
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 02, 2020, 03:52:11 AM
Wallace: Robert Hadad reneged on pay promise.
By Ian Prescott (Express).


Trinidad and Tobago Football Association president William Wallace is accusing normalisation committee head Robert Hadad of reneging on a deal to pay local coaches the salaries owed them by the TTFA, and of trying to blame his deposed executive for the coaches’ situation.

FIFA replaced Wallace’s executive with the committee in March. When he challenged their dismissal through the High Court FIFA funding was stopped and access to the TTFA’s bank accounts withheld from both parties by First Citizens Bank. Trinidad and Tobago was also banned from international football for breaching FIFA’s statutes.

Wallace deduces that since FIFA recognises the normalisation committee and not his executive, Hadad thus has to take all the blame for the coaches not being paid. Hadad’s committee had agreed to pay outstanding sums to 54 national coaches after recent meetings with coaching and technical staff representatives. Wallace’s comments came in a release after Hadad suggested that his recent return to the High Court was responsible for coaches not being paid. Hadad also stated he had nothing further to say on the matter.

“It is passing strange that the NC got money to pay office staff, promised coaches payment, all this while our matter is before the court and suddenly, with no change in the status quo, is now using the court matter as an excuse to justify reneging on the commitment made to coaches,” Wallace’s statement said.

“We are fully cognisant that the reason for this recent position by the NC is to continue their public pressure on us to withdraw the matter from the court. This new strategy is to add the voice of the coaches to those voices out there that are singing for their supper,” Wallace added.

The court action against FIFA is due to begin on October 9 but, not having recognised the local court’s jurisdiction, FIFA will not offer a defence. Wallace stated that he had done nothing to impede the work of the normalisation committee by going back to court, noting FIFA has clearly stated that the normalisation committee is in charge of football.

Wallace has promised to meet with the TTFA membership in the near future to decide the direction in which football heads.

“We are asking the coaches to allow us the opportunity to right a wrong and to put football back into the hands of the membership, where it belongs. We beg your indulgence over the next two weeks and whatever the outcome, what is due to you will be honoured,” Wallace wrote.

Title: FIFA vs TTFA: is there really a virtue in there?
Post by: Tallman on October 02, 2020, 05:38:18 PM
FIFA vs TTFA: is there really a virtue in there?
T&T Express


So, we are hearing feedback out there and in the newspapers that the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) is taking a principled stand against FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association), and some good may yet come out of this.

Risking the future of football is well worth the sacrifice these local administrators are taking by struggling for local control of football in T&T. I agree being shut off from the mainstream of football by FIFA may give T&T football the time to do the introspection and adaptation necessary to bring about a positive administrative approach to our football. But isn’t this also achievable with the help of FIFA and application of its standard operating procedures as applied to all other countries?

Even though this too can be considered debatable.

As a story for comparison of context, let us say FIFA is like a multinational corporation (MNC) with its subsidiaries scattered across the globe. Looking at this through the lens of the corporate world, what are the legal measures usually open to governments that no longer wish to facilitate subsidiary companies of an MNC?

These local governments seek nationalisation of their local subsidiary, to compensate the MNC for its investment, and then take charge of their local resources and operations.

In the football context, what will the local High Court be capable of doing through its adjudication?

Rule in favour of effectively nationalising local football, by restraining FIFA from setting up its normalisation committee and keep them out of T&T football per se?

Will they compensate FIFA for its investment in T&T football as well? Can they also rule on measures that will dictate how FIFA must engage T&T football in the future, and provide ultimatums or penalty and charges to FIFA if they choose to deviate their involvement in local football?

Nobody seems to want nationalised football and even not to the extent that it excludes FIFA entirely. Then what will become the position of FIFA—running world football within the boundaries set by the T&T local High Court mandates, or even within the confines of the T&T political directorate, for that matter?

Wouldn’t that be a form of imperialism by T&T upon FIFA?

Won’t we then, in effect, be trying to do to FIFA the exact thing we are already accusing them of doing to us?

For another example, take the US and its membership in the World Trade Organisation (WTO). In cases of disputes over unfair trade practices with other countries, the US will not accept any judgment imparted to it by the WTO, wherever such judgments go contrary to the desires of the US Congress.

Basically, if its governing institution disagrees or dislikes a WTO judgment then, as a trading country, the US will not be bound to accept that judgment. It is under those conditions the US eventually agreed to join the WTO.

What we are asking seems similar. FIFA must be subject to the deliberations and boundaries of our High Court before it can legally manage T&T football. Is it then we are defending T&T on the principle that we must be allowed imperialist status over FIFA?

This is the world we spent the last two centuries building, and at this juncture imperialism of this sort is mainly frowned upon. Seems to me the TTFA’s cause is more a backward one than forward-looking.

FIFA contributes millions to the operation and development of football in T&T, and this largess has become deeply coveted by a self-interested few. Could this be the real reason behind all this narcissism?

John Thompson
St James
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 03, 2020, 04:03:24 AM
TTFA vs FIFA puzzle—Pt 2: probity, perfidy and piss-poor presumptions about vows of poverty.
By Earl Best (Wired868).


Why did satisfying [Terry] Fenwick and [Peter] Miller matter so much to Mr [William] Wallace? That is the intriguing question posed by Wired868 reader Louis Carrington to which I am seeking to offer an answer.

Three more reminders: (1) This is opinion, not reportage. For my facts, I rely essentially on Wired868’s excellent, comprehensive reporting.

(2) I am not, however, impartial; In Pt 1, I asserted and argued here that Wallace, my friend of long-standing, is a decent man. He is, I contended, a ‘little unsuspecting sardine in a shark-infested ocean,’ who is guilty of errors of judgement.

I believe context and motive to be important when judging action. Which is why I reject out of hand Wired868’s classification as ‘scandals’ its revelations about Wallace’s secret unilateral signing of several contracts which emerged post-normalisation.

(3) “I thought the short-term future of T&T football was in their hands. And I thought I could trust them with it.”

I put those pithy 20-plus words into Wallace’s mouth as my answer to Carrington’s question.

All of that said, allow me now to present some of the embattled president’s own words, uttered in November 2019:

“The true mark of leadership is the willingness to take responsibility for things that go wrong, to acknowledge your mistake, to learn from it and to move on and remain focused on the job at hand.” (my italics)

None of that is just talk.

Remember how at the November launch of the United TTFA campaign, a mysterious, ‘fraudulent’ (said Wired868) letter of support from Junior Sammy was unveiled?

Do you know who provided the group with that letter? I don’t either. I just know that there was speculation about it being either the soon-to-be national coach or the soon-to-be general secretary. It was soon-to-be president Wallace who accepted full responsibility.

Fast forward to June 2020. The now president, Wired868 reveals, had unilaterally altered the contracts of both the GS and the national coach.

As Gefferson Goulart might attest, the latter bathes in the milk of human kindness. And Fenwick soon seemingly severs ties with United TTFA and finds himself a high-profile ally who talks enough for 11 XIs, let alone one coach!

But what does one hear from the two gentlemen themselves? I’m still waiting to hear from either that, in view of the circumstances, I agree to have my contract amended…

I mean, you scratched my back…

Or, alternatively, that: “I did not come to take from Trinidad and Tobago football but to give to it.”

That declaration comes instead from the under-the-gun president. And I take him at his word. He has been in the football business for three decades, Wired868, with nary a whiff of scandal.

We know—and he also now knows—that such altruism is rare. Even rarer is the candour of the PNM’s Desmond ‘All ah we tief’ Cartey and the UNC’s Brian ‘I never took any vow of poverty’ Kuei Tung.

Ditto the barefaced brazenness of former globe-trotting TTFA secretary Austin Jack Warner whose cravatious actions always spoke loudly for him, not least when a devastating earthquake hit Haiti in January 2010.

So even if you’re a leader determined to rescue national football because you’ve made a promise to your late friend, you simply cannot proceed as if everyone around you is sea-green incorruptible. In international football especially, if you’re going to err, it must be on the side of caution.

Here are three very good reasons: (1) Andrew Jennings’ 1992 Lords of the Rings, co-written with Vyv Simpson (2) Jennings’ 2007 Foul and (3) his 2017 The Dirty Game: Uncovering the Scandal at FIFA, an exhaustive study of corruption in football’s umbrella body.

But ignoring my early public warning, Wallace neglected the requisite due diligence.

Too deep in the trench? It might well be that, buried in a TT$50m hole, you simply don’t see or hear anything but offers of solid, material help. And of possible salvation.

Or it might be that, fired by reforming zeal, you focus on the job at hand to the exclusion of all else—including the machinations of those in your entourage, including but not limited to the foreigners.

“Let me reiterate here,” one reads in Wallace’s media statement, “that I didn’t think we had anything to lose by engaging Miller. If he were successful, I reasoned, the TTFA would also be successful; if he failed, then we would simply have remained in the hole that previous administrations had dug us into.”

“I didn’t think we had…” and “I reasoned…” but “we would…” From there to unilateral action is but a baby step…

Perhaps the fire of reforming zeal renders a leader blind and deaf to grammatical niceties. But does it also make him anosmic?

Long before Mark Bassant’s exposé. Wallace’s nose—and Keith Look Loy’s relentless insistence on accountability—has to have told him that something was rotten in the Home of Football. But instead of spawning extra caution, the succession of post-election discoveries about the steadily increasing depth of the debt hole seem to have merely strengthened his resolve to succeed with the rescue act he had initiated.

And such narrow focus on the job at hand meant failure to acknowledge that to his ‘if he failed, then…’ scenario, there was this massive rider:

Was Wallace’s naiveté so great as to allow him to take that for granted? Never to put that critical question to Fenwick’s friend and agent, Miller?

And, persuaded that the constitution permitted him to be the Voice of One, to speak unilaterally for the entire group, to sign on the dotted line, without a cast-iron, justiciable assurance from the horse’s mouth?

Or, alternatively, from trustworthy attorneys?

My answer, emphatically, is in the affirmative.

Because, to my mind, there is no disputing that Wallace came to perceive Miller as the goose that would lay the golden egg.

An egg, alas, made entirely of fool’s gold!

Voilŕ pourquoi, M Carrington, votre fille est malade…

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 03, 2020, 04:06:46 AM
What crisis? Wired868 explains why almost everyone’s reading the TTFA-Fifa impasse wrong.
By Lasana Liburd (wired868).


As the clock ticks on the impasse between Fifa and the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA), the future of the ‘beautiful game’ on these shores is at stake—but not for the reason that most think.

The TTFA, despite the shrill bleating of uninformed voices, is not hamstrung by a legal stalemate. Rather it is paralysed by a glaring lack of analysis.

The TTFA Constitution states that an extraordinary general meeting, which has the power to order or remove any elected officer of the local football body, must be convened within 10 to 30 days of a request by member delegates.

So why are the likes of interim Pro League chairman Brent Sancho and Men’s National Under-17 head coach Angus Eve talking about the negative impact that a suspension can bring in 2021? Why stand outside of a house screaming and hurtling abuse at the occupants when you have a key in your pocket to enter?

At present, TTFA president William Wallace is contending that the local football body’s constitution does not permit an external body—yes, even Fifa—to remove its elected officers.

But do you know what Wallace has not argued? Neither he nor anybody else has said the member delegates cannot move him.

There is no dictatorship here. Only grown men and women who seem either unwilling to read or incapable of understanding a fairly straightforward document, or who insist on sitting on their hands and waiting for an external party to fly in and solve their problems.

Article 29.2-4 of the TTFA Constitution states:

‘The Board of Directors shall convene an Extraordinary General Meeting if a majority (more than 50%) of the accredited delegates to the General Meeting make such a request in writing. The request shall specify the items for the agenda.

‘An Extraordinary General Meeting shall be held within 30 days of receipt of the request,  unless the agenda includes the election of members of the Board of Directors or the members of the Electoral Committee, in which case the Extraordinary General Meeting shall be held within 60 days of receipt of the request.

‘If an Extraordinary General Meeting is not convened within the indicated time, the delegates who requested it may convene the Extraordinary General Meeting themselves. As a last resort, the Members may request assistance from Fifa and Concacaf.

‘The Members shall be notified of the place, date and agenda at least 10 days before the date of an Extraordinary General Meeting.

‘When an Extraordinary General Meeting is convened on the initiative of the Board of Directors, the Board of Directors shall draw up the agenda. When an Extraordinary General Meeting is convened upon the request of Members, the agenda shall contain the points raised by those Members.’

The High Court is due to rule on 9 October whether Fifa can legally remove the TTFA’s elected officers, through the implementation of a normalisation committee.

If Wallace and his remaining vice-presidents Clynt Taylor and Sam Phillip lose the case, the TTFA immediately falls under the control of Fifa—with two months left before the new 18 December deadline to ‘lift’ the current suspension and be confirmed for the Concacaf 2021 Gold Cup qualifying phase.

Should Wallace prevail, he promised to immediately call a proper EGM for direction from members. He can do so within 10 days, which means if the likes of Sancho and interim Veterans Footballers Foundation president Selby Browne want to see the back of him, they can remove him between 20 October and 9 November.

Again, there would still be more than enough time for members to prostrate themselves before Fifa president Gianni Infantino if they so desire.

If it is so simple to remove Wallace and his colleagues, you might ask, why has it not been done already? Well, ask Infantino.

For the Fifa president, who is currently under criminal investigation in his homeland, Trinidad and Tobago always seemed to represent something more than a professional relationship.

Former TTFA president David John-Williams, also supposedly the target of a corruption probe, was the first Caribbean football leader to pledge support for Infantino—when he ran to replace Sepp Blatter at the helm of Fifa in 2016.

And John-Williams claimed to have Infantino’s support when, that same year, he unsuccessfully contested the position of Caribbean Football Union (CFU) presidency.

It’s a matter of public record too that Infantino refused to act on several emails from TTFA board members urging a probe into John-Williams’ handling of the Home of Football construction. And, six days before last November’s TTFA election, the Fifa president was in Couva urging stakeholders to share his faith in ‘DJW’.

All of which to say that Infantino’s investment in Trinidad and Tobago is unusual and has never been about the benefit of the twin island republic—as a cursory glance at the TTFA’s record on and off the field under John-Williams will testify.

Infantino’s curious relationship with DJW and the TTFA might help explain why, instead of having the Member Associations read the riot act to the new TTFA administration, the Fifa jefe opted for the knife of the seven-member Bureau of the Fifa Council and ‘normalisation’ instead.

That intervention did not work as smoothly as Infantino might have expected and the Fifa president repeatedly bungled attempts to ‘bring the TTFA in-line’ ever since.

Meanwhile, the TTFA’s member delegates have been passive observers of the struggle, watching with popcorn in hand and no apparent interest beyond finding out the date for their next football match. (Apart, of course, from Sancho and his frantic but thoughtless efforts to prove himself useful to Fifa.)

All the while, they ignore Infantino’s clay feet as well as their own culpability in the farce.

Accustomed only to submission, Trinidad and Tobago administrators appear to lack the clarity of thought and/or self-belief to chart their own destiny—despite having the means to do so. They are in a cage of their own ignorance, yet, ironically, talk about passing on lessons to the nation’s youth.

Who has the power to straighten out Trinidad and Tobago’s football?

On this evidence, it is neither Infantino nor Wallace. But the people running about like headless chickens, screaming to be allowed into an open house.

To paraphrase Football Referees Association vice-president Osmond Downer, the people who are letting our young footballers down are the ones who want to lead, but not to read.

If Infantino wanted regime change, he might have done so long ago by leaking information of Wallace’s own violations and giving local delegates a nudge. But, apparently, that did not suffice. He seemed to want to ‘discipline’ Trinidad and Tobago for not electing the president of his choice on 24 November 2019; and, blinded by the infinite powers he thought he had, overreached.

Somehow, six months after the Bureau announced a normalisation committee in Trinidad and Tobago, Infantino remains unable to get the better of a former school teacher in charge of a functionally bankrupt organisation who showed himself to be anything but a shrewd negotiator in his handling of TTFA business this far.

Of course, this can only end one way. Local football will be under new leadership long before Christmas. But Wallace’s court actions will ensure that his eviction is done by his compatriots and not foreigners who almost certainly do not have Trinidad and Tobago’s interests at heart.

Does that matter? Well, everyone is entitled to their own opinion on that score. However, if the aim is to bring the era of the United TTFA slate to an end, member delegates should close their mouths and use their brains.

Open question to Brent Sancho: if TTFA delegates sent a request for an EGM to Hadad, and High Court Judge Carol Gobin said it was addressed to the wrong leader; who do you think is the right person to send that motion to?

Tick tock…

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Sando prince on October 03, 2020, 06:11:08 AM
oh boy the usual drama in T&T football we have grown accustomed to all ah we life
.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: RichGFootball on October 03, 2020, 07:56:22 AM
Piece dey Lasana..... Let dem think hard about the things they are not doing.

What crisis? Wired868 explains why almost everyone’s reading the TTFA-Fifa impasse wrong.
By Lasana Liburd (wired868).


As the clock ticks on the impasse between Fifa and the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA), the future of the ‘beautiful game’ on these shores is at stake—but not for the reason that most think.

The TTFA, despite the shrill bleating of uninformed voices, is not hamstrung by a legal stalemate. Rather it is paralysed by a glaring lack of analysis.

The TTFA Constitution states that an extraordinary general meeting, which has the power to order or remove any elected officer of the local football body, must be convened within 10 to 30 days of a request by member delegates.

So why are the likes of interim Pro League chairman Brent Sancho and Men’s National Under-17 head coach Angus Eve talking about the negative impact that a suspension can bring in 2021? Why stand outside of a house screaming and hurtling abuse at the occupants when you have a key in your pocket to enter?

At present, TTFA president William Wallace is contending that the local football body’s constitution does not permit an external body—yes, even Fifa—to remove its elected officers.

But do you know what Wallace has not argued? Neither he nor anybody else has said the member delegates cannot move him.

There is no dictatorship here. Only grown men and women who seem either unwilling to read or incapable of understanding a fairly straightforward document, or who insist on sitting on their hands and waiting for an external party to fly in and solve their problems.

Article 29.2-4 of the TTFA Constitution states:

‘The Board of Directors shall convene an Extraordinary General Meeting if a majority (more than 50%) of the accredited delegates to the General Meeting make such a request in writing. The request shall specify the items for the agenda.

‘An Extraordinary General Meeting shall be held within 30 days of receipt of the request,  unless the agenda includes the election of members of the Board of Directors or the members of the Electoral Committee, in which case the Extraordinary General Meeting shall be held within 60 days of receipt of the request.

‘If an Extraordinary General Meeting is not convened within the indicated time, the delegates who requested it may convene the Extraordinary General Meeting themselves. As a last resort, the Members may request assistance from Fifa and Concacaf.

‘The Members shall be notified of the place, date and agenda at least 10 days before the date of an Extraordinary General Meeting.

‘When an Extraordinary General Meeting is convened on the initiative of the Board of Directors, the Board of Directors shall draw up the agenda. When an Extraordinary General Meeting is convened upon the request of Members, the agenda shall contain the points raised by those Members.’

The High Court is due to rule on 9 October whether Fifa can legally remove the TTFA’s elected officers, through the implementation of a normalisation committee.

If Wallace and his remaining vice-presidents Clynt Taylor and Sam Phillip lose the case, the TTFA immediately falls under the control of Fifa—with two months left before the new 18 December deadline to ‘lift’ the current suspension and be confirmed for the Concacaf 2021 Gold Cup qualifying phase.

Should Wallace prevail, he promised to immediately call a proper EGM for direction from members. He can do so within 10 days, which means if the likes of Sancho and interim Veterans Footballers Foundation president Selby Browne want to see the back of him, they can remove him between 20 October and 9 November.

Again, there would still be more than enough time for members to prostrate themselves before Fifa president Gianni Infantino if they so desire.

If it is so simple to remove Wallace and his colleagues, you might ask, why has it not been done already? Well, ask Infantino.

For the Fifa president, who is currently under criminal investigation in his homeland, Trinidad and Tobago always seemed to represent something more than a professional relationship.

Former TTFA president David John-Williams, also supposedly the target of a corruption probe, was the first Caribbean football leader to pledge support for Infantino—when he ran to replace Sepp Blatter at the helm of Fifa in 2016.

And John-Williams claimed to have Infantino’s support when, that same year, he unsuccessfully contested the position of Caribbean Football Union (CFU) presidency.

It’s a matter of public record too that Infantino refused to act on several emails from TTFA board members urging a probe into John-Williams’ handling of the Home of Football construction. And, six days before last November’s TTFA election, the Fifa president was in Couva urging stakeholders to share his faith in ‘DJW’.

All of which to say that Infantino’s investment in Trinidad and Tobago is unusual and has never been about the benefit of the twin island republic—as a cursory glance at the TTFA’s record on and off the field under John-Williams will testify.

Infantino’s curious relationship with DJW and the TTFA might help explain why, instead of having the Member Associations read the riot act to the new TTFA administration, the Fifa jefe opted for the knife of the seven-member Bureau of the Fifa Council and ‘normalisation’ instead.

That intervention did not work as smoothly as Infantino might have expected and the Fifa president repeatedly bungled attempts to ‘bring the TTFA in-line’ ever since.

Meanwhile, the TTFA’s member delegates have been passive observers of the struggle, watching with popcorn in hand and no apparent interest beyond finding out the date for their next football match. (Apart, of course, from Sancho and his frantic but thoughtless efforts to prove himself useful to Fifa.)

All the while, they ignore Infantino’s clay feet as well as their own culpability in the farce.

Accustomed only to submission, Trinidad and Tobago administrators appear to lack the clarity of thought and/or self-belief to chart their own destiny—despite having the means to do so. They are in a cage of their own ignorance, yet, ironically, talk about passing on lessons to the nation’s youth.

Who has the power to straighten out Trinidad and Tobago’s football?

On this evidence, it is neither Infantino nor Wallace. But the people running about like headless chickens, screaming to be allowed into an open house.

To paraphrase Football Referees Association vice-president Osmond Downer, the people who are letting our young footballers down are the ones who want to lead, but not to read.

If Infantino wanted regime change, he might have done so long ago by leaking information of Wallace’s own violations and giving local delegates a nudge. But, apparently, that did not suffice. He seemed to want to ‘discipline’ Trinidad and Tobago for not electing the president of his choice on 24 November 2019; and, blinded by the infinite powers he thought he had, overreached.

Somehow, six months after the Bureau announced a normalisation committee in Trinidad and Tobago, Infantino remains unable to get the better of a former school teacher in charge of a functionally bankrupt organisation who showed himself to be anything but a shrewd negotiator in his handling of TTFA business this far.

Of course, this can only end one way. Local football will be under new leadership long before Christmas. But Wallace’s court actions will ensure that his eviction is done by his compatriots and not foreigners who almost certainly do not have Trinidad and Tobago’s interests at heart.

Does that matter? Well, everyone is entitled to their own opinion on that score. However, if the aim is to bring the era of the United TTFA slate to an end, member delegates should close their mouths and use their brains.

Open question to Brent Sancho: if TTFA delegates sent a request for an EGM to Hadad, and High Court Judge Carol Gobin said it was addressed to the wrong leader; who do you think is the right person to send that motion to?

Tick tock…
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Mad Scorpion a/k/a Big Bo$$ on October 05, 2020, 08:16:33 AM
Plenty ah allyuh is some coward f0(kaz! I backin WW all the way, right is right! F da house negro bs!  FIFA overlook all the shite DJW do and then conveniently install normalization committee when he get he kakahole break open in de elections.  Now because the fight getting difficult allyuh want to back down?!!  This is what people with resources and what they feel is unlimited power always try to do.  They will squeeze you and try to exhaust your efforts and resources until you comply.  People watching this 3pm deadline like that was something.  Where else in the world does anyone set an arbitrary time not congruent with the close of business in that region for a court matter to be handled?  Further if it was ever in good faith 23 minutes would easily be overlooked if indeed the intended purpose was for the matter to be removed from T&T High Courts.  I agree with WW that FIFA always intended to ban T&T and seized a very convenient opportunity to do so and avoid further scrutiny of their behavior.
absolute rubbish mate. wallace had our full support until he started doubting himself and flip flopping. yes he may be a great guy who wants the best for the sport, and I don’t doubt that for a minute, he has demonstrated that he would have made an excellent federation president, my only regret is that fifa favored him over DJW or that mr timkee did not meet his demise as soon as he did, just maybe his expertise would have came in handy at a time like this, but it clearly wasn’t meant to be.

WW had me until he claimed that he was about to fold then mark bassant’s story broke which gave him courage to carry on, that revelation lead me to believe that he was flying blind all along. he then kept trying to reach out to fifa to negotiate, then waited until the congress which worked against him when infantino read the play that they wanted to put fifa on the hot seat at the congress. gianni as cunning as he is did not use the opportunity to get the federations involved, instead he went to his magnificent six yes man team to do his dirty work.

from that moment he should have known that it was only a matter of time before fifa banned him and should have dropped the high court case that friday and moved it the CAS instead of calling most of the stake holders together for a meeting to drop all the cases on Tuesday, including going back to CAS by abandoning the whole fight altogether, then if that wasn’t shady enough he went back on his word to drop the case in the high court the next day following the ban reinstating his stance after a unanimous decision rendered by the football fraternity.

and here’s the icing on the cake, he never has anything decisive to tell the fans who are obviously hurting, we only get to follow along in the dark, and I say enough of this bullshit. if you’re gonna go for the ban then go for it, if you’re gonna try to save face by stepping aside and allowing the popular opinions of the stake holders to dictate the pace then fine.

but it’s ironic that no one is moved by the fact that if fifa did not ban us and accepted the truce, they weren’t even going to take the fight to CAS, that would have been it, over squashed....done, would you so called warriors have a problem or called him out for cowardice?

these people are clueless mate, and you’ll find out sooner or later. you’ll see.

Dude maybe you should consider that up until the Bessant piece, WW did not have the proof of as much wrongdoing as was always suspected.  Up until that point he had all the procedural malfeasance conducted by DJW that FIFA knew about and looked the other way.  So while his decision to fight was correct he wasn't completely loaded with the ammunition necessary.  In seeing the proverbial mountain and with the massively dwindling support of the stakeholders in TnT, he was prepared to go against his own conviction and fold.  Or he cleverly was playing dead to ketch Courbeaux alive.  Either way, the new information presented by Bessant which seem to be supported by tremendous investigative efforts easily would reinforce his initial conviction and fortitude to take on the Goliath that is FIFA.  You think way to linear and not seeing this for what it really is.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Deeks on October 05, 2020, 09:30:46 AM
Maybe he did know about Basant findings from early o'clock. The issue for him in the beginning was corroborating evidence.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Mad Scorpion a/k/a Big Bo$$ on October 05, 2020, 09:49:09 AM
Maybe he did know about Basant findings from early o'clock. The issue for him in the beginning was corroborating evidence.

Daiz why I say maybe he didn't have proof. If we people have any fortitude we would be backing him.  FIFA overdoing the BS and if everyone backs down when it get a lil difficult, they will continue to take advantage as they see fit.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 06, 2020, 12:51:44 AM
FIFA to pay registrar $60k by October 15.
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (Newsday).


FIFA has been ordered to pay $60,000 to the TT Supreme Court Registrar by or before October 15.

This comes as a result of a Security for Costs application filed by United TTFA attorney Matthew Gayle in the Chamber Court of the Court of Appeal, in Port-of-Spain, on Monday.

If FIFA fails to pay the sum within the stipulated time, its appeal to not have the case against the TT Football Association (TTFA) heard in the local courts will be thrown out.

“The Security for Costs application is to ensure there is some type of financial security for the applicant (United TTFA) in the event that the applicant is successful in the Court of Appeal. It won’t be a situation where FIFA, if they lose the appeal, would take their ball and run away,” said United TTFA attorney Jade Jones.

After FIFA removed the William Wallace-led executive from the helm of the TTFA in mid-March citing massive debt and financial mismanagement, the sport’s governing body appointed a normalisation committee to run T&T football affairs.

The ousted regime deemed this move by FIFA “illegal” and opted to contest the matter in the local courts. FIFA, however, maintains its stance that the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland is the only recognised path to resolve such a dispute.

Additionally, Jones believes Justice Malcolm Holdip’s decision to accept their Security for Costs application comes after FIFA’s blatant disregard towards denying the legitimacy of the TT court to hear the case.

In a media release issued in July by FIFA, it stated,

“For the avoidance of doubt, FIFA only recognises the authority and jurisdiction of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in these matters. Any dispute regarding the appointment of a normalisation committee falls squarely within the jurisdiction of the CAS, and CAS alone

Jones added, “In this case, we would have more or less said that FIFA has shown a history of indicating that they don’t intend to recognise the TT courts. So there’s a concern there that this procedural appeal (FIFA’s), which is challenging Justice Carol Gobin’s decision in August to have the case heard locally.”

He continued, “After that they said FIFA would never recognize anything but CAS, Justice Holdip paid keen attention to that statement.

“It’s really two criteria for Security of Costs. You have to show that the other party is domiciled, lives or a resident of another country. The other component is whether it’s fair and just.

“The court looked at the circumstances and submissions of both parties.

“If you have FIFA on one side saying they will never recognise the TT courts, I think that was the point that the court took this decision on. In this case, FIFA will not be prejudiced because the money is paid into the court. It’s not going to TTFA’s account.”

If FIFA does not pay the money, the procedural appeal cannot go forward and cannot be heard on October 19. This means United TTFA would win the appeal to have the case heard here.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on October 06, 2020, 01:09:01 AM
I was under the impression that the case was to be held on the 9th of october, so what's this new 19th october date is all about, did i miss something?
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on October 06, 2020, 06:08:10 AM
I was under the impression that the case was to be held on the 9th of october, so what's this new 19th october date is all about, did i miss something?

The case is on the 9th, but the appeal is on the 19th.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 06, 2020, 02:55:49 PM
FIFA issues World Cup warning to TTFA.
By Joel Bailey (Newsday).


FIFA has issued a World Cup warning to the TT Football Association (TTFA), with regards to its suspension of the local governing body on September 24.

FIFA suspended the TTFA two weeks ago for grave violation of FIFA Statutes. The former TTFA executive, led by William Wallace, missed the September 23 deadline to withdraw its legal challenge to FIFA, over FIFA’s decision to remove the TTFA hierarchy, over mounting debts, and install a normalisation committee, led by Robert Hadad.

FIFA secretary general Fatma Samoura issued a letter, via e-mail, to Hadad on Tuesday, stating that the 2022 FIFA World Cup Concacaf Zone Qualifiers are set to begin in March 2021.

“The organisation of such competition entails complex logistical and operational matters intensified by the covid19 crisis,” Samoura wrote. “In view of this, FIFA has decided that, in order to ensure that proper preparation and planning of the participant teams, if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is not lifted by 6 pm Central European Time (noon TT time) on December 18, we have no choice to exclude the TTFA from participating in the Concacaf World Cup qualifiers.”

If the suspension is not lifted by December 18, T&T will be replaced by Antigua/Barbuda at the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup qualifiers.

The normalisation committee “has necessarily ceased all operational and management functions over the TTFA” due to FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA membership.

But FIFA insisted “the only legitimate leadership of the TTFA, recognised by FIFA and Concacaf, is the one led by Hadad.”

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on October 06, 2020, 03:42:50 PM
The runway is being cleared for all sorts of new shenanigans to take off. Watch de ride.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 06, 2020, 03:54:24 PM
FIFA issues World Cup warning to TTFA.
By Joel Bailey (Newsday).


FIFA has issued a World Cup warning to the TT Football Association (TTFA), with regards to its suspension of the local governing body on September 24.

FIFA suspended the TTFA two weeks ago for grave violation of FIFA Statutes. The former TTFA executive, led by William Wallace, missed the September 23 deadline to withdraw its legal challenge to FIFA, over FIFA’s decision to remove the TTFA hierarchy, over mounting debts, and install a normalisation committee, led by Robert Hadad.

FIFA secretary general Fatma Samoura issued a letter, via e-mail, to Hadad on Tuesday, stating that the 2022 FIFA World Cup Concacaf Zone Qualifiers are set to begin in March 2021.

“The organisation of such competition entails complex logistical and operational matters intensified by the covid19 crisis,” Samoura wrote. “In view of this, FIFA has decided that, in order to ensure that proper preparation and planning of the participant teams, if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is not lifted by 6 pm Central European Time (noon TT time) on December 18, we have no choice to exclude the TTFA from participating in the Concacaf World Cup qualifiers.”

If the suspension is not lifted by December 18, T&T will be replaced by Antigua/Barbuda at the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup qualifiers.

The normalisation committee “has necessarily ceased all operational and management functions over the TTFA” due to FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA membership.

But FIFA insisted “the only legitimate leadership of the TTFA, recognised by FIFA and Concacaf, is the one led by Hadad.”


Is ok. We good - at least 'I'.  Leff we out.  Maybe later when the world crisis is in order, allyuh crisis in order and we own internal crises fix, well at least a few of them.
Let these anxious coaches chill. All the past years coaches doing the job with what they had, practically volunteering, these guys all want they pound of flesh, oops, these days , protein and regulated diet. pardon me. To much issues right now to be cleared up at all levels from management and administration to performance, can't focus on positive competition under these circumstances. Shut it down.

It's all well well and good to be in touch with the world on the internet with computer, up to date with everything, but if there is no current, and T &Tec on a internal fight  or close down, we gotta retrain our ppl, rebuild our infrastructure and come again, more resilient than before. Best to be back to play, when it suites us.


https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=319452805793440

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2719721844962604

https://sites.google.com/view/tnthardcorenews/main-menu/news-menu/all-news/news-on-trinidad-and-tobago
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Controversial on October 06, 2020, 09:35:40 PM
FIFA issues World Cup warning to TTFA.
By Joel Bailey (Newsday).


FIFA has issued a World Cup warning to the TT Football Association (TTFA), with regards to its suspension of the local governing body on September 24.

FIFA suspended the TTFA two weeks ago for grave violation of FIFA Statutes. The former TTFA executive, led by William Wallace, missed the September 23 deadline to withdraw its legal challenge to FIFA, over FIFA’s decision to remove the TTFA hierarchy, over mounting debts, and install a normalisation committee, led by Robert Hadad.

FIFA secretary general Fatma Samoura issued a letter, via e-mail, to Hadad on Tuesday, stating that the 2022 FIFA World Cup Concacaf Zone Qualifiers are set to begin in March 2021.

“The organisation of such competition entails complex logistical and operational matters intensified by the covid19 crisis,” Samoura wrote. “In view of this, FIFA has decided that, in order to ensure that proper preparation and planning of the participant teams, if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is not lifted by 6 pm Central European Time (noon TT time) on December 18, we have no choice to exclude the TTFA from participating in the Concacaf World Cup qualifiers.”

If the suspension is not lifted by December 18, T&T will be replaced by Antigua/Barbuda at the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup qualifiers.

The normalisation committee “has necessarily ceased all operational and management functions over the TTFA” due to FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA membership.

But FIFA insisted “the only legitimate leadership of the TTFA, recognised by FIFA and Concacaf, is the one led by Hadad.”


Is ok. We good - at least 'I'.  Leff we out.  Maybe later when the world crisis is in order, allyuh crisis in order and we own internal crises fix, well at least a few of them.
Let these anxious coaches chill. All the past years coaches doing the job with what they had, practically volunteering, these guys all want they pound of flesh, oops, these days , protein and regulated diet. pardon me. To much issues right now to be cleared up at all levels from management and administration to performance, can't focus on positive competition under these circumstances. Shut it down.

It's all well well and good to be in touch with the world on the internet with computer, up to date with everything, but if there is no current, and T &Tec on a internal fight  or close down, we gotta retrain our ppl, rebuild our infrastructure and come again, more resilient than before. Best to be back to play, when it suites us.


https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=319452805793440

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2719721844962604

https://sites.google.com/view/tnthardcorenews/main-menu/news-menu/all-news/news-on-trinidad-and-tobago

They send in the house negro to punish ttfa
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 06, 2020, 10:35:02 PM
Quote from: Controversial link=topic=66714.msg995580#msg995580 date=16

They send in the house negro to punish ttfa
[/quote
  ??? ??? She's doing her job, she's not doing a punishment. You rather somebody else or you rather she quit. Don't tear the lady down cause we disagree with her company current decisions, she didn't make the rules that everybody in the world sign up to, nor does she hardly dictates the boards decisions. We got to stop learning to hate ourselves regardless of our stations, man.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 07, 2020, 12:52:16 AM
FIFA warns TTFA: No qualifiers if ban not lifted.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


T&T's participation at the CONCACAF World Cup Qualifiers next year will rest heavily on the shoulders of the T&T Football Association (TTFA) being led by its elected president William Wallace, who FIFA removed from office on March 17.

Following the suspension by FIFA on September 24 for violation of the FIFA Statutes, the TTFA realistically can still enable T&T to participate at the qualifiers which begin in March if the TTFA abide by the conditions of the suspension, which means bringing the TTFA Statutes in line with that of the FIFA and dropping all court-related battles with the FIFA before December 18.

Following the suspension, Wallace responded by instructing his Attorneys to challenge the suspension of the FIFA through the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) in Lausanne, Switzerland and filing an Injunctive Relief at the CAS which would ensure that the country is allowed to participate at the CONCACAF Gold Cup. However, the Concacaf had made a concession for T&T participation in the Gold Cub which took place four days after the ban but with the condition that the country honours FIFA requests by the deadline of December 18.

However, Wallace, who was infuriated by the suspension, also ordered his attorneys to resume the court battle with the FIFA over the legitimacy of the appointment of a normalisation committee to replace them (TTFA) as the managers of football in T&T. His decision was also contrary to the vote taken by the general membership in an unofficial meeting on September 22.

on Tuesday, FIFA General Secretary Fatma Samoura, in a letter to Normalisation Committee chairman Robert Hadad, reminded him of the suspension and the possibility of missing the CONCACAF Qualifiers if the suspension is not lifted, saying: "By way of this communication, we inform you that FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 World Cup Qualifiers for the Concacaf region (hereinafter: Concacaf World Cup Qualifiers) are scheduled to begin in March 2021. The organisation of such competition entails complex logistical and operational matters intensified by the COVID-19 crisis. In view of this, please note that FIFA has decided that, in order to ensure the proper preparation and planning of the participant teams, if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is not lifted by 18:00 CET (6:00 pm TT TIme) on 18 December 2020, we have no choice but to exclude the TTFA from participating in the Concacaf World Cup Qualifiers."

The deadline is similar to the one given on September 18 in which the TTFA had until 3:00 pm TT Time on September 23 to withdraw its court matter in the T&T High court against FIFA or be suspended.

Guardian Media Sports efforts to contact Wallace yesterday for a response proved futile, but he had made it clear in a release recently that his group will only drop their matter against the FIFA if the local court rules against them on Friday and if the court rules in their favour, his group the United TTFA, will call an Emergency General Meeting among the membership to decide on how they move forward.

Samoura assured also that FIFA will only communicate and recognise the normalisation committee: "As a result of the suspension of the TTFA's membership of FIFA, the Normalisation Committee which was appointed by FIFA has necessarily ceased all operational and management functions over the TTFA. However, we want to highlight that the only legitimate leadership of the TTFA, recognised by FIFA and Concacaf, is the one led by Mr Robert Hadad. Having said this any communication from FIFA with TTFA will continue to be exclusively being with Mr Robert Hadad. We thank you for your attention to the above."

RELATED NEWS

FIFA raises stakes on Trinidad and Tobago.
By Joel Bailey (Newsday).


FIFA has raised the stakes on the TT Football Association (TTFA), via a World Cup warning, with regards to its suspension of the local governing body on September 24.

FIFA suspended the TTFA two weeks ago for grave violation of FIFA Statutes. The former TTFA executive, led by William Wallace, missed the September 23 deadline to withdraw its legal challenge to FIFA, over the world governing body’s decision to remove the TTFA hierarchy in March, over mounting debts and install a normalisation committee, led by Robert Hadad.

The global governing body has insisted that they want the case to be heard at the Switzerland-based Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) but the TTFA want the TT High Court to determine the matter.

FIFA secretary general Fatma Samoura issued a letter, via e-mail, to Hadad on Tuesday, stating that the 2022 FIFA World Cup Concacaf Zone Qualifiers are set to begin in March 2021. “The organisation of such competition entails complex logistical and operational matters intensified by the covid19 crisis,” Samoura wrote. “In view of this, FIFA has decided that, in order to ensure that proper preparation and planning of the participant teams, if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is not lifted by 6 pm Central European Time (noon TT time) on December 18, we have no choice to exclude the TTFA from participating in the Concacaf World Cup qualifiers.”

If the suspension is not lifted by December 18, T&T will be replaced by Antigua/Barbuda at the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup qualifiers.

The normalisation committee “has necessarily ceased all operational and management functions over the TTFA” due to FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA membership.

But FIFA insisted “the only legitimate leadership of the TTFA, recognised by FIFA and Concacaf, is the one led by Hadad.”

Wallace is hopeful this issue can move a step closer to a resolution by Friday when High Court judge Carol Gobin is expected to rule on the matter involving the ousted TTFA executive (Wallace and his deputies Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip) and FIFA’s Bureau Council, who replaced them with the normalisation committee.

“I think all of this will be over by Friday,” said Wallace. “Hopefully, by Friday, everything should be settled.”

Asked to elaborate, Wallace replied, “Everything that we have done, we have done in the interest of T&T football, contrary to what other people think. I think settling in a positive way.”

A week ago, Hadad insisted that he was not “in charge” of T&T football, but FIFA’s letter on Tuesday stated otherwise. Wallace said, “That is something that Hadad needs to clear up, with regards to (him) saying that he’s not in charge and FIFA saying that he’s in charge.”

Also calling for good sense to prevail in this ongoing saga was T&T men’s coach Terry Fenwick.

“It’s going on longer than anticipated, longer than necessary, in my opinion,” said Fenwick. “I want to get my backroom staff together. I need to be working on the ground and ensure we’ve got the best squad available for the competitive games coming up.

“We recognise that there is a ten-day FIFA window right now and we’re not doing anything. I need to be out on the ground with my players. At the moment, football has taken a back seat, it’s just politics here in (T&T).”

Another problem afflicting T&T football is the covid19 restrictions which have prevented contact sports from taking place.

“Covid19 actually is not helping,” said Fenwick. “There is football all over the world. I’m seeing every league all over the world playing games and we’re not. So that’s a concern, the players (and) youngsters on the ground are not playing football at any level. That is actually because of the politicking that is going on behind the scenes.”

He added, “We’re falling well-behind, even within teams in (the) Caribbean that have got development programmes up and running.”

Concerning Friday’s court matter between the TTFA and the FIFA Bureau Council, Fenwick noted, “We’ve heard those same things before and it hasn’t happened, and the fight continues.

“I would have hoped that we could have had discussions from the top people to see where they can move things forward, whether there could be indeed a collaboration, so we’re helping each other to resolve this situation. The only thing it’s damaging is the youngsters on the ground.”

Hadad, via a Whatsapp message on Tuesday, was asked to comment on the letter, as well as FIFA’s confirmation that he was the legitimate leader of T&T football. The normalisation committee head did not respond up to press time.

This story was originally published with the title "FIFA issues World Cup warning to TTFA" and has been adjusted to include additional details. See original post below.

FIFA has issued a World Cup warning to the TT Football Association (TTFA), with regards to its suspension of the local governing body on September 24.

FIFA suspended the TTFA two weeks ago for grave violation of FIFA Statutes. The former TTFA executive, led by William Wallace, missed the September 23 deadline to withdraw its legal challenge to FIFA, over FIFA’s decision to remove the TTFA hierarchy, over mounting debts, and install a normalisation committee, led by Robert Hadad.

FIFA secretary general Fatma Samoura issued a letter, via e-mail, to Hadad on Tuesday, stating that the 2022 FIFA World Cup Concacaf Zone Qualifiers are set to begin in March 2021.

“The organisation of such competition entails complex logistical and operational matters intensified by the covid19 crisis,” Samoura wrote. “In view of this, FIFA has decided that, in order to ensure that proper preparation and planning of the participant teams, if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is not lifted by 6 pm Central European Time (noon TT time) on December 18, we have no choice to exclude the TTFA from participating in the Concacaf World Cup qualifiers.”

If the suspension is not lifted by December 18, T&T will be replaced by Antigua/Barbuda at the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup qualifiers.

The normalisation committee “has necessarily ceased all operational and management functions over the TTFA” due to FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA membership.

But FIFA insisted “the only legitimate leadership of the TTFA, recognised by FIFA and Concacaf, is the one led by Hadad.”

FIFA issues reminder unless ban is lifted Gold Cup, World Cup out.
By Ian Prescott (Express).


FUNDING HALTED

FIFA FUNDING, which allows TTFA administrative staff and national coaches to be paid, has officially ceased.

This comes on the heels of a September 24 decision by FIFA’s Bureau of the Council to suspend the financially-burdened Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) due to grave violations of the FIFA Statutes.

This was declared yesterday by FIFA general secretary Fatma Samoura, who announced that Trinidad and Tobago will also soon be barred from participating in international competitions unless the conditions set by FIFA, for lifting an international suspension from football, are met.

“As a result of the suspension of the TTFA’s membership of FIFA, the normalisation committee which was appointed by FIFA has necessarily ceased all operational and management functions over the TTFA,” Samoura informed via email, yesterday.

“However, we want to highlight that the only legitimate leadership of the TTFA, recognised by FIFA and CONCACAF, is the one led by Mr. Robert Hadad. Having said this any communication from FIFA with TTFA will continue to be exclusively being with Mr Robert Hadad.”

Samoura added that unless the TTFA moves swiftly to have the suspension removed there be no 2020 CONCACAF Gold Cup or Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup qualifiers for Trinidad and Tobago.

“FIFA has decided that, in order to ensure the proper preparation and planning of the participant teams, if the suspension imposed on the TTFA is not lifted by 18:00 CET on 18 December 2020, we have no choice but to exclude the TTFA from participating in the CONCACAF World Cup Qualifiers,” Samoura informed through communication with local normalisation committee chairman Robert Hadad.

In suspending T&T from international football on September 24, FIFA, and subsequently regional body CONCACAF, left the door open for T&T to participate in the two important competitions, providing two conditions were met.

“This suspension will only be lifted when the TTFA fully complies with its obligations as a member of FIFA, including recognising the legitimacy of the appointed normalisation committee and bringing its own statutes into line with the FIFA Statutes,” the world body stated.

And yesterday, Samoura reinforced that participation in the Qatar 2022 World Cup campaign is at risk as well.

“By way of this communication, we inform you that FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 World Cup Qualifiers for the CONCACAF region (hereinafter: CONCACAF World Cup Qualifiers) are scheduled to begin in March 2021. The organisation of such competition entails complex logistical and operational matters intensified by the Covid-19 crisis,” Samoura noted.

Samoura’s notice comes two days before the local High Court rules on a claim brought in which United TTFA president Wallace and his vice-presidents are challenging their removal from office by FIFA and replacing them with its own normalisation committee, chaired by Hadad.

FIFA subsequently suspended T&T from football on September 24, a day after United TTFA were late in meeting a FIFA deadline to withdraw the matter from the T&T High Court. Bowing to a vote by the majority of TTFA members, Wallace and United TTFA initially opted to remove the matter from the court on September 23, but effectively returned to court a day later, when withdrawing its earlier withdrawal notice.

TTFA Board member Brent Sancho, a former T&T World Cup defender and Central FC club owner, is among those chastising Wallace’s decision to return to court in defiance of the wishes of the TTFA majority.

“While the rest of the world is vigorously focusing on how to jump-start football, two individuals are single-handedly managing to destroy what is left of the sport in Trinidad and Tobago,” said Sancho, a former Sport Minister.

He added: “FIFA’s patience is currently being tested, as discussions of expulsion of the TTFA have apparently been already started and could be implemented at any time. Let’s hope that Look Loy and Wallace realise how primarily our players are being harmed and how their dreams are being taken away from them.”

Title: Time to form a new football body
Post by: Tallman on October 07, 2020, 12:02:44 PM
Time to form a new football body
T&T Express


Once and for all, let us correct this imbroglio—the mismanaging of our sports. For too long in Trinidad Tobago, the West Indies, the entire world, the avaricious self-interest of the few (management) has continued to stymie the survival and best interests of hard-working, aspiring professionals who passionately love what they do—their sport.

Football in Trinidad and Tobago needs to be controlled by those who best serve its full interest. Pull the football field out from under the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA). They have compromised and paralysed the very game they purport to serve. How can they even begin to deliberately act as they are doing, full-speed ahead, so as to disrupt and to sully the very future of so many of our young men and women? Our football is bigger than this obstacle.

Have T&T football managed by competent, experienced footballers with integrity—who best so to do?️ Constitute this legally. Form a new national football body—Trinidad and Tobago Soccer Ltd. Whatever.

Even if this new body is transitional, form a new legal entity. With haste, move to ensure we are given the opportunity and support to compete successfully, internationally, now.

Leave the TTFA professional management bewildered and with nothing. Expose their vacuous shell and staunch narcissism. A team of football elders with skilled, hands-on local coaches, honest accounting and advertising experts can manage all of our respective entities. Form a new football body. This—in conjunction with FIFA, the Normalisation Committee and all other authorised football bodies—could begin a new era with skilled, passionate know-how and fresh boots to rebuild our game.

It is as plain as day that many of our secondary Intercol football teams, together with their respective coaches and management, are ready for international competition. Come on, people. Form a fresh, new, clean, unscathed national entity. Bring fresh perspectives. Even a new national coaching force can be transitional. One game (success) at a time.

Across the span of all of our sporting bodies, there are competent minds, with capable skills and honest hands. Sports brings us no end of joy. Moreso, it unites us. Our young, upcoming sporting prodigies need well-intentioned, success-driven, institutional support. Come forward, T&T. We are bigger and better than this. Let the games begin.

Jennifer Dale Reece
Maraval
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 07, 2020, 12:17:18 PM
Next time Mrs Reece, Organize your party and vote, vote , vote.

So you don’t have to be begging other ppl to do for you before or bail you out after . :duel: :idea: :idea:
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: socalion on October 07, 2020, 02:05:29 PM
Hear nah Mrs. Reece ,  the moment you come wid this change name from the ttfa to Trinidad and Tobago soccer Ltd , (whatever)statement , ah know yuh eh ready yet ! So yuh change de name , then what ?  Look nah come again !  Why didn't you ask the Fifa executives to intervene when David John Williams was running amok while he was in office that's the change that was necessary ! Point yuh fingers in the right direction to effect change , call upon Fifa and its executives to reconcile their efforts alongside / or together with  the William Wallace elected team to sit as men and women to address de issues that's of major concerns to all involved parties ! Don't you think so Mrs Reece !
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 08, 2020, 12:37:40 AM
Sancho points finger; Wallace silent.
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express).


Power play

Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) board member Brent Sancho is anticipating a long suspension from international football for this country, unless the TTFA executive, headed by president William Wallace, is steered away from its present course.

Sancho has accused Wallace of attempting to hold unto power at all costs notwithstanding there will be a price to be paid. Wallace and vice-presidents Sam Phillip and Clynt Taylor have challenged their removal by world football’s governing body, FIFA, which in March installed a normalisation committee, chaired by Robert Hadad, to take over the administration of the near-insolvent TTFA, which is $100 million in debt.

“Their true objectives are crystal clear; attempt to uphold their positions, regain control of the TTFA and its funding, and continue as if their disastrous and shady stint in charge never happened,” stated Central FC owner Sancho.

Wallace heads back to the local High Court tomorrow, where Justice Carol Gobin will rule on a claim brought against FIFA, challenging the TTFA’s dismissal. FIFA has made clear its intention not to mount a defence. In its statutes, FIFA lists the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) as the only appropriate court for resolution of such disputes and has banned T&T for breaching said regulation.

“Make no mistake, the pursuit by these individuals to remain relevant, maintain a livelihood and grip to the ways of the past, is being disguised as the fight for the sovereignty of the TTFA,” stressed Sancho.

FIFA’s Bureau of the Council suspended the TTFA on September 24, due to violations of the FIFA Statutes. However, FIFA has announced it will be willing to lift the suspension if, by December 18, the TTFA complies with its obligations as a member of FIFA, including recognising the legitimacy of the FIFA-appointed normalisation committee, and also bringing its own statutes into line with FIFA Statutes. However, Sancho doubts whether Wallace’s actions will result in these conditions being met.

On Tuesday, FIFA general secretary announced that the recent suspension of the TTFA meant the withdrawal of its normalisation committee and, consequently, the funding to pay administrative staff and coaches, as well as development funding for national youth and women’s teams.

“As a result of the suspension of the TTFA’s membership of FIFA, the normalisation committee which was appointed by FIFA has necessarily ceased all operational and management functions over the TTFA,” Samoura informed via email letter.

Asked if Samoura’s letter had confirmed that he was back in charge of TTFA football, Wallace preferred to defer comment until a later date.

“That all confusing. That is the matter before the court anyway, so I don’t want to say anything until after Friday,” said Wallace. “I prefer not to comment at this point. We have a matter before the court on Friday. Any time after Friday I am willing to talk to the press, but not before.”

Samoura had also announced that T&T will be barred from participation in qualifying for the two biggest tournaments in the region, the 2021 CONCACAF Gold Cup and 2022 Qatar Men’s World Cup.

“FIFA will never back down, as they will not ‘operate’ in a country that will place its system in jeopardy (one out of 211 by the way),” Sancho noted.

Wallace recently lost the support of second-vice president Susan Joseph-Warrick, one of the leading protagonists in their fight against FIFA. Joseph-Warrick announced her resignation as TTFA second vice-president, from United TTFA, and as president of WoLF (Women’s League Football) after T&T’s ban by FIFA on September 24.

“Within recent times it has become clear to me, that we are also fighting against those that we represent; the Associations, the clubs, the teams, supporters and sadly...the players,” Joseph-Warrick stated when she announced her resignation.

“I believe that the end must justify the means and that our present course of actions against FIFA would not redound to the benefit of Trinidad and Tobago and to the dreams and aspirations of our present and future generations of footballers,” she had said.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on October 08, 2020, 11:43:30 AM
Well with all the doom and gloom surrounding football, there's not much positives to talk about. However, President of the Veterans Football Federation of T&T Selby Browne is seeing a light at the end of the tunnel. Interestingly, he says a solution is coming closer than you think. Here's why (https://www.tv6tnt.com/news/7pmnews/browne-sees-bright-future-for-football/article_ac95574e-090e-11eb-8448-b3ded3449969.html).
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 09, 2020, 08:33:52 AM
TTFA staff seeks legal advice over job security
By Stephon Nicholas (Newsday).


The constant changing of leaders at the helm of the TT Football Association (TTFA) has left staff there nervous about their job security. In less than a year, the control of the TTFA has been passed around like a hot potato.

At the November 24, 2019 TTFA election, the William Wallace-led United TTFA slate replaced David John-Williams in control of the local football organisation.

However, on March 17, FIFA removed the TTFA executive and appointed a normalisation committee to run TT's football. FIFA said the move -- just four months into the new regime -- was necessary owing to TTFA's massive debt and extremely low overall financial management methods. The overning body said TTFA faced "a very real risk of insolvency and illiquidity."

The legality of this last transition has been challenged by Wallace's executive and is is currently before the High Court. It goes to trial on Friday and the ruling by Justice Carol Gobin could switch the reins of power once again.

The fight for control of the local football body has left TTFA office staff, in Couva, uneasy and they too will be seeking legal advice.

Speaking on the condition of anonymity, on Thursday, a TTFA employee said the office and administrative staff, totalling 17, have held Zoom meetings on a few occasions to discuss their concerns.

The source said although some members are hesitant, a group decision was made to seek legal advice.

The employee said some workers are worried they may be victimised for assisting the FIFA-appointed normalisation committee, headed by Robert Hadad. The committee has ceased operations after FIFA suspended TT on September 25.

The staff said their concerns are not paranoia as certain staff have felt vicitimised under past administrations where it was perceived that decisions made by leaders were not supported internally.

The source said apart from addressing job security, they intend to raise concerns about NIS contributions in the last couple years.

The TTFA employee added that staff have not been paid since July, making it the second time this year they have had to go four months without salary.

The source said the situation is compounded by the covid19 pandemic and the economic impact on all families.

FIFA paid TTFA office staff a lumpsum in July after they went unpaid from March to June.

The normalisation committee and Wallace's executive have been fighting over control of the TTFA's First Citizens account and TTFA letterhead.

TTFA coaches have also complained about not being paid since the normalisation committee took over in March. The United TTFA has said it would not stand in the way of the payment of TTFA employees and coaches, despite its court battle with FIFA.

Efforts to contact Wallace for a response proved futile.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 09, 2020, 08:33:56 AM
Justice Gobin set to rule on United TTFA's challenge.
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (Newsday).


WAS FIFA’s decision to remove William Wallace and his executive from the helm of the TT Football Association (TTFA), in March and install a normalisation committee a violation of TTFA’s democratically elected process? Or was it justified?

These questions are expected to be answered when attorneys representing both organisations appear before High Court judge Carol Gobin in a virtual court hearing at 9.30 am on Friday.

Justice Gobin’s ruling, if any, may return Wallace’s regime to the top of local football, although the sport’s global governing body, in a letter issued on Tuesday, insisted “the only legitimate leadership of the TTFA, recognised by FIFA and CONCACAF, is the one led by Robert Hadad,” chairman of the normalisation committee.

Gobin is not mandated to give a final decision on this matter on Friday.

FIFA’s decision to remove Wallace’s administration was due to the TTFA's mounting debt, which was TT $50 million.

On September 24, T&T was indefinitely suspended from all FIFA-sanctioned tournaments “due to grave violations of the FIFA Statutes.”

FIFA’s statement said the suspension was prompted by the ousted administration lodging a claim before a local court to contest the decision of the FIFA Council to appoint a normalisation committee for the TTFA.

“This course of action was in direct breach of article 59 of the FIFA Statutes, which expressly prohibits recourse to ordinary courts unless specifically provided for in the FIFA regulations.”

FIFA’s September 24 statement also said, “The decision of the former leadership to go to a local court to contest the appointment of the normalisation committee jeopardises not only the future of football in TT but also endangers the overall global football governance structure, which relies on the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) as the exclusive forum for resolving disputes of this nature.

“The relevant parties were initially given until 16 September to withdraw the case but failed to do so. This deadline was then extended until 23 September, which was not respected either. In the circumstances, the Bureau of the FIFA Council has decided to suspend the TTFA.”

On September 25, Wallace’s United TTFA team, after previously questioning the impartiality of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland, has returned to the Swiss-based court to fight FIFA’s suspension.

Wallace’s team initially complied with FIFA’s request but withdrew from the legal fight at 3.02 pm on September 23 – two minutes after the 3 pm deadline set by the world body – to escape suspension proceedings. FIFA, however, showed no leniency.

On Tuesday, it issued a reminder that the suspension must be lifted by noon (TT time) on December 18 or else T&T will be withdrawn from participation in the Concacaf World Cup qualifiers.

United TTFA will now fight the FIFA suspension at CAS and, on September 24, “gave instructions to the TTFA attorneys to file an emergency appeal with CAS, challenging the sole issue of suspension.”

This was revealed in a document Wallace issued on September 25, which said, “The TTFA attorneys also filed the relevant documents to continue with the claim before the High Court of Justice (TT) since this is the only way that we can legitimise our application to CAS.”

CAS was rejected by the United TTFA during the early stages of the legal battle, as its attorneys Dr Emir Crowne and Matthew Gayle claimed that a “number of irregularities have arisen, irregularities that have caused their clients to believe their right to a fair hearing has been impinged.”

After the normalisation committee was appointed in March, Wallace’s team took FIFA to CAS.

Two weeks later, the ousted executive (which includes vice-presidents Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip) turned to the High Court in its fight, although, according to FIFA’s statutes, the matter was mandated to be heard at CAS.

RELATED NEWS

Justice Carol Gobin presides over FIFA/TTFA matter today
Ian Prescott (T&T Express).


CASE BEGINS

EXILED Trinidad and Tobago Football Association president William Wallace and vice-presidents, Clynth Taylor and Sam Phillip, will finally have their day in court today.

High Court Justice Carol Gobin will, at 9.30 a.m. today, preside over a claim brought by the former TTFA officials who have challenged their dismissal in March by football’s governing body, FIFA.

After removing Wallace’s executive, FIFA appointed a normalisation committee headed by local businessman Robert Hadad to run the Association which is some $100m in debt. Today’s case is not expected to run a protracted course. FIFA has indicated it will not contest the matter, leaving the appellant — the TTFA — likely to win by default.

“Please be informed that FIFA did not file a defence in the case against the TTFA in the Trinidad High Court,” a spokesman from the Communications Division of the FIFA Media Department confirmed in response to Express enquiries last month.

“FIFA’s position remains that we do not recognise the claim at the Trinidad court, and that the CAS (Court of Arbitration for Sport) is the only correct tribunal to consider this dispute,” the FIFA spokesperson added.

FIFA’s only involvement in the case so far has been to argue jurisdiction during earlier hearings. However, on August 13, Justice Gobin ruled in Wallace’s favour by ruling that the local High Court was the appropriate venue for hearing of the TTFA’s claim. Legal representatives of both parties argued their positions during a virtual High Court hearing before Justice Gobin.

Representing the TTFA were attorneys Dr Emir Crowne and Matthew Gayle, while Christopher Hamil-Smith represented FIFA.

Hamel-Smith argued that FIFA’s statutes prohibited the TTFA from taking the matter to a local court and that the Switzerland-based CAS was the only appropriate forum to decide such disputes.

Quoting FIFA’s statutes extensively, Hamel-Smith also argued that in becoming a member of FIFA, the TTFA agreed to abide by those statutes.

“(Article) 59.3 says the Association shall insert a clause in its statutes or regulations stipulating that the association, meaning the TTFA, is prohibited to take the disputes of the association or disputes of League members and clubs to ordinary courts unless the FIFA regulations, all binding regulations, specifically provide.”

Crowne’s argument centred around the constitutional protection afforded to the TTFA by it being incorporated by an act of the Trinidad and Tobago Parliament.

He argued that such protection cannot be completely stripped away by the statutes of an outside body such as the Swiss-based FIFA.

Further, Crowne termed a key clause in FIFA’s statutes as being “unconscionable” because of the inequality in bargaining power between FIFA and its members when they join the world organisation.

“When FIFA says so, apparently the world must bend to its whim. But we submit that is not appropriate,” Crowne stated.

TTFA case reaches juncture.
By Derek Achong (Guardian).


Embattled T&T Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and his United TTFA executive team’s lawsuit against FIFA is expected to kick off on Friday with Justice Carol Gobin as referee.

During the virtual hearing, Gobin is expected to hear submissions in the case before delivering her decision or reserving it until a later date.

Guardian Media Sports understands that FIFA’s legal team attempted to make last ditched tackle on the eve of the case as they appealed to Gobin to defer her ruling earlier this week.

In correspondence to Gobin and the opposing side, attorney Cherie Gopie suggested that the expedited resolution of the case was not necessary in the circumstances as the Normalisation Committee, appointed by FIFA in March to replace Wallace and his team, had essentially ceased to function as a result of her client’s decision to indefinitely suspend the TTFA’s membership because of the case.

Gopie also reiterated FIFA’s position that active participation in the case before Gobin could compromise its position in its pending appeal over her jurisdiction to hear the substantive case on October 19.

Responding to Gopie, the TTFA’s lawyer Matthew Gayle objected to the postponement as he noted that the issues to be resolved are wider than suggested by FIFA.

He noted that FIFA had previously attempted to have the proceedings stayed on similar grounds but was denied.

Gobin eventually agreed with Gayle and rejected the proposed move.

On Monday, Appeal Court Judge Malcolm Holdip granted the TTFA’s application for security of costs for the appeal.

Holdip ordered FIFA to pay $60,000 to the court in the event that the TTFA successfully defends the appeal and is entitled to reimbursement of the legal costs incurred in defending it.

Through the lawsuit, Wallace and his three vice presidents — Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillips, and Susan Joseph-Warrick are seeking a declaration that the decision to remove them in March and replace them with a committee comprising of businessman Robert Hadad, attorney Judy Daniels, and retired banker Nigel Romano was null, void, and of no legal or binding effect.

They are also seeking a permanent injunction barring FIFA from meddling in the TTFA’s affairs by allegedly seeking to circumvent the democratic process by removing duly elected executive members.

Gobin has also been asked to decide whether FIFA’s statutes, under which the replacement was done, are in conformity with the local legislation, which established the association.

Wallace and his team initially brought proceedings against FIFA in the Court for Arbitration for Sport (CAS) but were forced to withdraw as they could not pay the 40,000 Swiss francs (TT$276,000) in associated costs.

Their position was partly due to FIFA’s policy to not pay its share of the fees and CAS’s rules, which require the other party to pay the full costs when the other fails in its obligations.

After the case was filed, FIFA applied for it to be struck out as it claimed that the TTFA by virtue of its membership with FIFA agreed to forgo all legal action in local courts in favour of proceedings before the CAS.

The application was initially blanked by Gobin, who ruled that the local courts are the appropriate forum to resolve the dispute.

While the appeal against her ruling still pending, Gobin set the date for the trial of the case as October 9 and gave FIFA an extension to file its defence. FIFA failed to meet the deadline as it maintained it position that it did not accept the jurisdiction of the court in the matter.

Wallace and his team also obtained an injunction against the normalisation committee after it attempted to facilitate a extraordinary meeting among members to vote to withdraw the case.

The injunction, which will remain in place until discharged by Gobin, was not opposed by FIFA and was granted.

Wallace and his team attempted to withdraw the case on FIFA’s extended ultimatum of September 23 but filed the application to withdraw, which still had to be determined before the case could be considered officially withdrawn, 23 minutes past the deadline (3 pm TT time).

After FIFA’s suspension the following day, Wallace and his team filed another application to withdraw the withdrawal application, in which he admitted that he was grudgingly discontinuing the case based on a majority vote during an emergency meeting between his team and stakeholders.

The legal manoeuvre coincided with an announcement from second vice president Joseph-Warrick, that she was resigning from her post and as president of the Women’s League Football (WoLF) on September 25.

The United TTFA also approached the CAS for a temporary stay of this country’s suspension to allow its participation in Concacaf’s 2021 Gold Cup draw on September 28.

The hearing of the injunction application was deferred after Concacaf announced that its council had met and agreed to conditionally keep T&T’s place in the draw.

In the event, that the suspension is not lifted by either FIFA or the CAS by 5 pm on December 18, T&T will be replaced by Antigua and Barbuda as the next highest ranked team based on performances during the 2019 Concacaf Nations League.

Wallace and his colleagues are also being represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Crystal Paul, and Jason Jones, while Christopher Hamel-Smith, SC, and Jonathan Walker are also appearing for FIFA.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on October 09, 2020, 09:08:10 AM
WATCH: Discussing the TTFA/FIFA drama with Wired868 Editor Lasana Liburd

https://www.youtube.com/v/c3i8EtG_kbg
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 09, 2020, 01:25:38 PM
So our honor said ?.....
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on October 09, 2020, 05:17:06 PM
So our honor said ?.....

October 13th.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 10, 2020, 09:32:20 AM
Judge Gobin reserves judgement in TTFA, FIFA battle
By Derek Achong (Guardian).


After months of battling off the field and in the courtroom, embattled T&T Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and his United TTFA executive team will have to wait three more days to learn the fate of their controversial lawsuit against FIFA.

High Court Judge Carol Gobin reserved her decision in the case to Tuesday at 3 pm, after hearing submissions from lawyers representing Wallace and his team during a virtual trial, yesterday morning.

Although FIFA's local legal team was present, they did not challenge or defend against the the executive members' submissions as they maintained that they had received instructions to not play a role because of their client does not accept the court's jurisdiction to hear the case.

However, Senior Counsel Christopher Hamel-Smith, who leads FIFA's legal team, opened the hearing with a request to defer the case.

Hamel-Smith pointed out that by virtue of FIFA's decision to suspend the TTFA's membership, last month, the Normalisation Committee led by businessman Robert Hadad, which was appointed by FIFA to replace the executive in March, ceased to function.

"If they want to run the TTFA, that is entirely their business. Their is certainly nothing stopping it based on FIFA's suspension," Hamel-Smith said, as he noted the FIFA's appeal over the jurisdiction to hear the case is carded for October 19.

Responding to Hamel-Smith, the executive's attorney Dr Emir Crowne suggested that FIFA had attempted the maneuver previously and failed.

"When FIFA does not get its way it does not know what to do. They are not accustomed to that," Crowne said.

Gobin questioned FIFA's claim over the executive's ability to take control of the the association as she pointed out that it maintained that it only recognises the committee.

She also criticised it for repeatedly stating that it does not recognise the jurisdiction of local courts while using the court system to challenge her decision to continue with the case before the Court of Appeal.

"It makes a mockery of our system if a party is not willing to accept the rule of law in this country," she said before rejecting the proposal.

Presenting submissions in the substantive case, Crowne claimed that FIFA's statutes, which speak to the appointment of such committees to member federations and associations, was too vague to be considered legitimately binding as they only provide for such a process in "extraordinary circumstances".

He said that at the time of the announcement FIFA claimed that the decision was based on the association's potential insolvency but provided no further information.

"There is rampant speculation but that is not evidence," Crowne said.

He said that fairness required his clients be given an opportunity to respond before the decision was taken as they have maintained that they inherited the association's dire financial situation, when they were elected in November, last year.

"As has been shown before FIFA and fairness probably do not go hand in hand," Crowne said.

In terms of compatibility with the local legislation which established the TTFA and prescribes how it should be governed, Crowne stated that Parliament did not expressly recognise the supremacy of FIFA's laws in it.

He stated that his clients did not have the remit to change the local legislation as requested by FIFA as a condition to lifting the indefinite suspension.

"It can not be that a private oganisation in Zurich, Switzerland, overrides this country's Parliament," Crowne said.

Crowne was questioned by Gobin over his clients' decision to seek an injunction from the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), also based in Switzerland, over the suspension when it challenged FIFA's claim that that body is the correct one to preside over the substantive dispute.

Crowne said that the costs for the injunction was marginal compared to the substantive case. He also noted that the suspension issue occured outside of local jurisdiction.

"It is a private arbitration body for profit. It is not a court," Crowne said.

Wallace and his colleagues are also being represented by Matthew Gayle, Crystal Paul and Jason Jones, while Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie appeared alongside Hamel-Smith for FIFA.

ABOUT THE CASE (SIDE BAR)

Through the lawsuit, Wallace and his three vice presidents — Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillips, and Susan Joseph-Warrick are seeking a declaration that the decision to remove them in March and replace them with a committee comprising of businessman Robert Hadad, attorney Judy Daniels, and retired banker Nigel Romano was null, void, and of no legal or binding effect.

They are also seeking a permanent injunction barring FIFA from meddling in the TTFA's affairs by allegedly seeking to circumvent the democratic process by removing duly elected executive members.

Gobin has also been asked to decide whether FIFA's statutes, under which the replacement was done, are in conformity with the local legislation, which established the association.

Wallace and his team initially brought proceedings against FIFA in the Court for Arbitration for Sport (CAS) but were forced to withdraw as they could not pay the the 40,000 Swiss francs (TT$276,000) in associated costs.

Their position was partly due to FIFA's policy to not pay its share of the fees and CAS's rules, which require the other party to pay the full costs when the other fails in its obligations.

After the case was filed, FIFA applied for it to be struck out as it claimed that the TTFA by virtue of its membership with FIFA agreed to forgo all legal action in local courts in favour of proceedings before the CAS.

The application was initially blanked by Gobin, who ruled that the local courts are the appropriate forum to resolve the dispute.

While the appeal against her ruling still pending, Gobin set the date for the trial of the case and gave FIFA an extension to file its defence. FIFA failed to meet the deadline as it maintained it position that it did not accept the jurisdiction of the court in the matter.

Wallace and his team also obtained an injunction against the normalisation committee after it attempted to facilitate a extraordinary meeting among members to vote to withdraw the case.

The injunction, which will remain in place until discharged by Gobin, was not opposed by FIFA and was granted.

Wallace and his team attempted to withdraw the case on FIFA's extended ultimatum of September 23 but filed the application to withdraw, which still had to be determined before the case could be considered officially withdrawn, two minutes past the deadline.

After FIFA's suspension the following day, Wallace and his team filed another application to withdraw the withdrawal application, in which he admitted that he was grudgingly discontinuing the case based on a majority vote during an emergency meeting between his team and stakeholders.

The legal maneuver coincided with an announcement from second vice president Joseph-Warrick, that she was resigning from her post.

The United TTFA also approached the CAS for a temporary stay of this country's suspension to allow its participation in

Concacaf's 2021 Gold Cup draw on September 28.

The hearing of the injunction application was deferred after Concacaf announced that its council had met and agreed to conditionally keep T&T's place in the draw.

In the event, that the suspension is not lifted by either FIFA or the CAS by 5 pm on December 18, T&T will be replaced by Antigua and Barbuda as the next highest ranked team based on performances during the 2019 Concacaf Nations League.

RELATED NEWS

Justice Gobin to rule on TTFA challenge on Tuesday.
By Jada Loutoo (Newsday).


FIFA, the world governing body for football, has been issued a yellow card by the judge who has to determine if it acted lawfully when it appointed a normalisation committee to oversee the affairs of local football.

Justice Carol Gobin on Friday suggested FIFA was making a mockery of the rule of law as it continuously cannot, through its local attorneys, say if it would accept the court’s jurisdiction and any declarations it may make.

“Has FIFA changed its position? Is it prepared to abide by any declaration this court makes?” Gobin asked.

“There should never be a question about this. It makes a mockery of the system to be engaging in this if a party will not confirm if it will abide by the rule of law, observe the rule of law and respect the rule of law in this country,” she said in response to FIFA’s attorney Christopher Hamel-Smith’s submission that he had no instructions on a change of position.

The judge’s rebuff came after she was asked to defer Friday’s trial since, according to FIFA, the normalisation committee has ceased to function now that the TTFA has been suspended from international football.

Hamel-Smith said if the TTFA wanted to run the association “that is entirely their business.”

He said there was nothing stopping Wallace and his team from doing so because of the suspension which took effect on September 24, banning TT’s national team and its clubs from participating in any international competitions.

In resisting any deferral of the trial, Dr Emir Crowne, who leads a team on behalf of Wallace and his executive, accused FIFA of constantly changing the goal post by failing to state its position on if they recognised the court’s jurisdiction.

Crowne said it appeared to be a “recurring theme” by FIFA to introduce “self-inflicted frustration” by orchestrating a change in circumstances themselves.

“It is almost as if they don’t know what they want. They say the normalisation committee has ceased all operational and management functions yet when you look at their letter, they say the only legitimately leadership of the TTFA is the one led by Robert Hadad. They are not even saying normalisation committee anymore. Now, they are saying the leadership is Robert Hadad.

“If this is a proper ground for a matter to be deferred, then any defendant can write a letter to itself and introduce material changes.”

Crowne said FIFA was accustomed to getting its way, and so “it tries every maneuver it can to achieve what it wants.”

Gobin said it appeared to be some inconsistency in FIFA’s position by coming to the court to ask it to apply the overriding objectives by deferring the matter “but you make it clear that the fact of this matter remaining for determination before this court really doesn’t make a difference to you in one way or the other.

“How can you reject the authority of the court and then ask it to apply the overriding objective. It seems contradictory. You ask me to await the outcome of an appeal… How do you justify asking me to defer this when we have a claimant who has been anxious, has complied with all the directions of the court, who has applied for injunctive relief when the matter was pending, yet you’re intent to ignore the process. Doesn’t that make a mockery of what we are doing here?” the judge questioned before hearing submissions on the United TTFA’s substantive challenge.

Gobin is expected to give her decision next week Tuesday at 3pm by e-mail.

She has been asked to determine if Wallace and his executive’s removal from the helm of the local football body in March, and appoint a normalisation committee, was justified or in violation of local laws.

FIFA has said the decision to remove Wallace’s administration in March was because of the TTFA’s mounting debt, which was TT$50 million. A normalisation committee, led by Hadad, was appointed, and then came the suspension last month after the TTFA failed to withdraw its legal action in time. FIFA said the sanction was “due to grave violations of the FIFA statutes.”

In his submissions, Crowne argued that FIFA's statutes on the appointment of a normalisation committee for a member federation was vague and had no legal certainty as it only says it would be done in “extraordinary circumstances but nothing more.”

He said FIFA only said the reason for the appointment was the “high debt and potential insolvency” but did not ask for an explanation. He added that Wallace’s administration inherited the debts and there was no evidence before the court to suggest it was proper to normalise.

“We are not entirely sure what these circumstances were,’ he said, adding that there was “rampant speculation” but no evidence.

Crowne also accused FIFA of using a hammer and chainsaw against the TTFA.

“As has been shown before, FIFA and fairness probably don't go hand in hand,” he said.

In his submissions on the TTFA Incorporation Act, Crowne said it sets out how an executive is elected and the duration of its terms. He admitted the Act did not mention TTFA’s membership in FIFA but argued that parliament did not expressly adopt FIFA statutes.

He said it could not be that a private organisation in Zurich, Switzerland, can override this country’s parliament.

Crowne argued that the change in the law in line with FIFA’s statutes and which has been advocated by FIFA for the lifting of the suspension was out of his clients’ hands and was solely the remit of Parliament.

He also said FIFA statutes were inconsistent since, on one hand, it spoke of the normalisation committee but still noted that the world governing body would only recognise duly-elected representatives from member associations.

On FIFA’s insistence that the TTFA’s complaints be heard by the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS), Crowne said that was not an option because of that tribunal’s unreasonable requirements. He also said the CAS was a private arbitration body for-profit and not a court.

Crowne also, in response to a question by Gobin, said the TTFA went to the CAS on the suspension issue.

He was questioned by Gobin over an inconsistency in his statement with the fact that TTFA went to CAS over the suspension, saying a stay application was significantly less costly there than its appeal against the normalisation committee.

The CAS was rejected by the United TTFA during the early stages of the legal battle as it claimed that a number of irregularities have arisen, irregularities that have caused the association to believe its right to a fair hearing has impinged.

After the normalisation committee was appointed in March, Wallace’s team took FIFA to CAS.

Two weeks later, the ousted executive turned to the High Court in its fight, although, according to FIFA’s statutes, the matter was mandated to be heard at CAS.

FIFA has not entered a defence in the matter.

The TTFA is also represented by attorneys Matthew Gayle, Crystal Paul, and Jason Jones.

Throws out FIFA appeal, notes authority issue ongoing
Rickie Ramdass (T&T Express).


Judge to rule on TTFA case Tuesday

BY 3 p.m. next Tuesday the High Court will deliver its ruling in a legal claim brought by William Wallace, ousted president of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) and other officials against their dismissal in March by the world’s football governing body, FIFA.

Presiding over the trial yesterday was Justice Carol Gobin, who, prior to proceeding with the matter, shot down an application by FIFA’s lead counsel Christopher Hamel-Smith, SC, for the claim to be adjourned pending the hearing of an appeal filed by his client against one of the judge’s previous rulings.

In dismissing the application, Justice Gobin said FIFA was making “a mockery” of the rule of law in Trinidad and Tobago.

One of the main bases for Hamel-Smith’s application was that subsequent to the last court hearing, when the judge set yesterday’s trial date, FIFA had taken the decision to cease all operational and management functions of the normalisation committee it had appointed to replace the TTFA board.

As a direct result of this decision, the attorney said, Williams and the rest of the former executive members were now free to regain control of the TTFA if they so desired.

Therefore, he said there was no need for the trial to proceed with any urgency.

The other limb of his application was that when the appeal comes up for hearing later this month, the Court of Appeal may very well find that the local court was not the proper forum for the dispute to be heard and settled, as FIFA is arguing.

If this happens to be the case, Hamel-Smith contended there would be no need for the claim to proceed to trial.

“The TTFA has achieved a large part of what they were seeking to achieve which is, they have gotten the normalisation committee to down their tools and they have a clear way if they choose to do sh..,” Hamel-Smith said, before Justice Gobin interjected.

“Are you serious, Mr Hamel-Smith? The TTFA have gotten them to do that? The TTFA came to the court and got a limited injunction on the last occasion but further to that and even as the correspondence of the 6th of October says, the issue as to who is in charge has not been settled. In fact, it is clear that it is ongoing for everybody else except for FIFA,” said the judge.

Pressed further by Justice Gobin, Hamel-Smith admitted that if Williams and the other former executives were to decide to re-take control of the TTFA, all of its football activities would have to take place only within Trinidad and Tobago since it would be taking place outside of the FIFA system.

However, it would not be allowed to take part in any activities outside of the jurisdiction.

Authority of the court

In response, attorney Dr Emir Crowne—one of TTFA’s attorneys—said the application should be dismissed.

He said the court had already made its decision for the trial to proceed on yesterday’s date.

“The change in circumstances is one occasioned by FIFA. If I were to draw an analogy, it would be like self-induced frustration in a contract perspective.

“FIFA themselves, it is like they don’t know what they want. They have occasioned this change in circumstances and it is improper that they can indirectly or directly interfere with these proceedings through their own acts,” he said.

Crowne went on to say the latest change of circumstances was an indication that “when FIFA does not know what to do, it tries every manoeuver it thinks is available to achieve what it wants.”

Justice Gobin continued to question Hamel-Smith.

She said one thing she has not been able to get out of her mind was the fact that on two occasions, FIFA indicated it had no intention of recognising the authority of the court.

“Has there been any change in that position because it seems to me there is an inconsistency in coming to the court and asking the court to grant indulgences to apply the over-riding objectives when at the same time you are making it absolutely clear and you continue to make clear the fact that this matter remains for determination before this court really doesn’t make a difference to you at the end of the day.”

She said a litigant cannot on one hand reject the authority of the court and then request that the same court grant applications in its favour.

In response to her question, Hamel-Smith said he did not receive any instructions from his client with regard to that issue.

Justice Gobin said there should never even be a question of the authority of the court.

“It makes a mockery of our system to be engaging in this if a party will not confirm that it is prepared to be bound by the rule of law and to observe the rule of law and to have respect for the rule of law in this country,” she said, before dismissing the application and allowing the matter to proceed to trial.

Given the ruling, Hamel-Smith said he had received instructions from FIFA to not make any submissions at trial if the court had so ruled, since to date it has not filed any defence.

Because of this, only Crowne and the TTFA’s other attorney Matthew Gayle were given the opportunity to present arguments to the court.

Following the completion of those submissions, Justice Gobin said she needed a few days to prepare her judgment.

She stated that on Tuesday, no later than 3 p.m., the judgment will be e-mailed to the attorneys for both sides.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 10, 2020, 09:37:45 AM
William Wallace vows to stick to his word.
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (Newsday).


OUSTED president of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) William Wallace has vowed to stick to his word and immediately convene an Annual General Meeting (AGM) with the TTFA membership to chart a way forward, if High Court Justice Carol Gobin rules in favour of the former TTFA executive (which includes vice-presidents Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip).

The TT Football Association (TTFA) will know on Tuesday, at 3 pm, if FIFA’s decision to remove Wallace and his executive from the helm of the local football body in March, and appoint a normalisation committee, was justified or in violation of local laws.

Justice Gobin said at a virtual hearing on Friday that she will give her decision by e-mail.

However, if Justice Gobin rules in favour of the world governing body, the FIFA-appointed normalisation committee, led by businessman Robert Hadad, assumes its role as head of the local fraternity.

A victory for FIFA, according to Wallace, would bring to an end a seven-month legal battle between the two football organisations.

Wallace said on Friday, “We are waiting Justice Gobin’s decision on Tuesday and that would determine how we go forward. As we indicated earlier, we would call an AGM immediately if we are victorious. And if the decision goes the other way, then we walk away from this. There would be no appeal by the United TTFA.”

Newsday also attempted to get a response from Hadad, on Justice Gobin’s decision, but calls to his phone went unanswered.

At the November 24, 2019 TTFA election, the William Wallace-led United TTFA slate was elected to take charge of the local football organisation.

On March 17, FIFA removed the TTFA executive and appointed a normalisation committee to run TT's football.

FIFA said the move was necessary owing to TTFA's massive debt, extremely low overall financial management methods and “a very real risk of insolvency and illiquidity.”

The legality of this last transition has been challenged by Wallace's executive with Justice Gobin set to make a judgment on Tuesday.

FIFA, though, did not file a defence in the case against the TTFA in the local court. The world governing body maintains its stance that it does “not recognise the claim at the Trinidad court, and that the CAS (Court of Arbitration for Sport) is the only correct tribunal to consider this dispute.”

RELATED NEWS

Wallace vows to call meeting of TTFA membership following ruling on Tuesday.
By Ian Prescott (Express).


‘THAT’S IT’

Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace is promising to give notice of a TTFA annual general meeting (AGM) next Wednesday, provided High Court Judge Justice Carol Gobin rules in his favour the day prior.

Yesterday, Wallace and his exiled TTFA vice-presidents, Clynt Taylor and Sam Phillip, had their day in court. They had challenged FIFA’s decision on March 17, to dismiss the Association’s executive, and then impose its own normalisation committee, headed by businessman Robert Hadad, to manage T&T’s football affairs.

In employing their course of action, FIFA cited their reason as being the TTFA’s massive debt of over $50 million, poor management, and a real risk of insolvency of the TTFA.

“Once we get the ruling on Tuesday, we will send out the notice by Wednesday,” said Wallace.

“If the matter does not go in our favour then we walk away,” he pledged.

Yesterday, Justice Gobin deferred judgment to at latest 3 p.m. on Tuesday, October 13. Gobin mainly heard submissions from Wallace’s legal team, from the New City Chambers, in the lawsuit against FIFA. Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Jason Jones and Crystal Paul represented the TTFA.

Wallace’s executive turned to the local court after withdrawing its initial challenge in the Switzerland-based Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS). Going to the local court flouted FIFA’s statutes, resulting in the TTFA being suspended from international football on September 24. FIFA has repeatedly said it does not recognise the jurisdiction of the local court.

FIFA’s position remains that it does not recognise the claim at the Trinidad court, and that the CAS is the only appropriate tribunal to consider the dispute. Therefore, while FIFA’s legal team of Christopher Hamel-Smith SC, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie, sat in on the virtual hearing, they were under instruction not to participate into subjective matter. However, at times they interjected on other matters in the proceedings.

One such moment saw Justice Gobin asking Hamel-Smith if Wallace’s executive is back in charge of the TTFA. “The TTFA is no longer part of the FIFA system,” said Hamel-Smith, adding that there was nothing stopping Wallace from assuming control of the TTFA, with FIFA having suspended the Association and withdrawn its normalisation committee.

Following yesterday’s events, Wallace told the Express that “immediately” upon Justice Gobin’s decision on Tuesday, he would accede to the wishes of the majority of the TTFA membership and call an AGM — its purpose being to dictate the future course of local football.

“If the matter is in our favour, the AGM will be called immediately. If not, and we lose, that is it. There will be no appeal or anything else,” Wallace affirmed.

Meanwhile, TTFA board member Brent Sancho said Wallace had reneged on a previous promise to heed the wishes of the majority of TTFA delegates and should either resign, or be forced out.

“The membership should be the ones calling an EGM (Emergency General Meeting) and taking away whatever power he (Wallace) feels he has because we are now going to continue to allow him to run this thing into the ground,” said Sancho. “It’s been a devastating, almost year, of his leadership, which would have caused this body (TTFA) $14 million more in debt, after the other presidents would have failed us in the past as well.”

Yesterday, Wallace gave the impression of a warrior who had fought a good fight, but in the face of insurmountable odds was now tired of the long, hard battle. He said his fight was to be given a fair hearing and the right to defend himself -- a right he felt FIFA denied when dissolving his four-month-old administration, without giving them a chance to defend themselves.

“For me, when this normalisation committee was installed, there was never an opportunity to defend ourselves, although I asked for it in writing, seven days later, in a letter to the president of FIFA,” adding, “We went to CAS thereafter for a chance to be heard. We were frustrated out of that by FIFA not cooperating, and at least I got a chance to be heard in my local court. That’s it for me.”

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 10, 2020, 10:15:16 PM
So our honor said ?.....

October 13th.
Hope Madam Justice get the correct turkey over the weekend.   :devil:
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 11, 2020, 12:48:26 AM
Fifa deferral request denied, plus mysterious new TTFA affidavits add to High Court drama.
By Lasana Liburd (wired868).


Madame Justice Carol Gobin will proceed with Friday’s High Court case between Fifa and the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA), despite a late request by the former party for a deferral.

The main issues for determination by the High Court on 9 October are:

1. Whether the purported appointment of a normalisation committee by [Fifa] on the 17th March 2020 was lawful;

2. Whether The Federation Internationale De Football Association Statute 8(2) is compatible with the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (Incorporation) Act 1982;

3. Whether in any case Fifa has complied with its own Statutes in the purported appointment of a normalisation committee. Whether there were exceptional circumstances to justify the invocation of Statute 8(2);

4. Whether on the evidence and in the circumstances of the case, the decision to appoint a normalisation committee was reasonable and made in good faith or whether it was motivated by improper reasons including a bad faith.

By Fifa’s own words, the upcoming court date is an awkward one and, after setting two deadlines, the Bureau of the Fifa Council—headed by president Gianni Infantino—suspended the TTFA for its refusal to squash the case on 23 September.

“The decision of the former leadership to go to a local court to contest the appointment of the normalisation committee,” stated the Fifa Bureau, on 24 September, “jeopardises not only the future of football in Trinidad and Tobago but also endangers the overall global football governance structure, which relies on the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) as the exclusive forum for resolving disputes of this nature…”

TTFA president William Wallace noted that his team did try to withdraw the case but was punished for being two minutes past the deadline. While, in the other camp, sources suggest Fifa’s real issue was that the the TTFA’s attorneys never officially informed its party of the ultimately short-lived withdrawal.

The TTFA, represented legally by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Jason Jones and Crystal Paul, recently asked permission from the High Court to submit documents related to its suspension by 11am today.

This request prompted Madame Justice Gobin, at midday on Monday, to ask both parties whether there were ‘any additional issues which parties consider are still left for consideration or determination’.

Fifa, represented locally by Christopher Hamel-Smith SC, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie, informed the High Court, at 3.30pm yesterday, that it ‘has necessarily ceased all operational and management functions over the TTFA’—as a result of the international suspension.

In fact, Fifa secretary general Fatma Samoura only informed normalisation committee chairman Robert Hadad on that very morning he was being put on pause.

Fifa’s attorneys suggested yesterday afternoon that, as a result of this ‘significant’ development, Justice Gobin should ‘hold her hand’ until after the Court of Appeal decides, on 19 October, whether the legal dispute ought to have instead been moved to the CAS or dismissed outright.

“In the light of this significant change of circumstances, we are respectfully of the view that there can be no pressing need which might justify proceeding with a trial of this matter on the extremely expedited basis previously directed by Her Ladyship,” stated Gopie. “Rather, we submit that it would be more proportionate and in keeping with the overriding objective to defer the hearing of this trial to a date following the determination of [Fifa’s] pending procedural appeal, which engages the issue of jurisdiction and the validity of the claim at issue.

“Since [Fifa’s] procedural appeal will be heard on 19 October 2020, a deferral of the trial such as we are suggesting would only have to be for a very short period.

“Not only would this result in the most efficient use of the Court’s (and the parties’) resources, but it will also give due consideration and weight to the fact that [Fifa] would be unable to participate substantively in the trial if it were to proceed before the Court of Appeal hears its procedural appeal—since this would risk prejudicing [Fifa’s] position on the issues raised in the procedural appeal.”

Notably, although Fifa suggested that its normalisation committee ceased operating, Samoura also stressed that: ‘the only legitimate leadership of the TTFA, recognised by Fifa and Concacaf, is the one led by Mr Robert Hadad [and] any communication from Fifa with TTFA will continue to be exclusively being (sic) with Mr Robert Hadad’.

Gayle considered the two things to be ‘contradictory’ and said his clients would much prefer to wait a few days for Madame Justice Gobin’s legal determination.

“My view is that this is a matter which is subject to the determination of the court on Friday,” Gayle told Wired868, “and I would have expected Fifa, like the claimant, to wait for the court to rule on Friday rather than attempt to predetermine the judgment.

“My understanding of the issues of the case is that it is broader than [whether or not the normalisation committee is still active]. But the judge will decide on Friday, as a matter of law, who is in charge of the TTFA.”

In response to Gopie’s suggestion, the TTFA’s legal team contended that Fifa was using arguments already dismissed by the High Court, when Madame Justice Gobin, opted to hear the substantive matter on 9 October—before the appeal against her decision to do so.

“It would appear that [Fifa], having been unsuccessful on its application for a Stay of these Proceedings and having not filed a similar Application before the Court of Appeal,” stated Jones, “is now advancing similar arguments in support of its request for a deferral of the trial date. It is the [TTFA’s] understanding that these arguments have already been properly determined by this Court.”

Madame Justice Gobin blanked Fifa’s request.

Intriguingly, TTFA’s attorneys also made a pointed reference to its international suspension by Fifa.

“[The TTFA] finds it unfortunate that [Fifa], after appointing its normalisation committee—the lawfulness of which is a matter for determination by this Court—has suspended the [TTFA’s] membership owing to [Fifa’s] instant claim,” stated Jones, “and now seeks to rely on those circumstances to further delay the trial and/or the Court’s determination of the [TTFA’s] claim.

“[Fifa’s] recent suspension of the [TTFA’s] membership on the 24th September 2020 introduced a new condition to have the suspension lifted; namely, that the [TTFA] ‘bring its own statutes into line with the Fifa Statutes’.

“It is the [TTFA’s] understanding that this new condition attends to substantive matters of law which have properly been and are yet to be determined by this Honourable Court in the instant matter and in light of [Fifa’s] conduct ought not be delayed any further.”

The High Court, according to Madame Justice Gobin, already intends to rule on whether Fifa could lawfully implement a normalisation committee in Trinidad and Tobago without violating its own statutes and the TTFA (Incorporation) Act; and whether there were indeed exceptional circumstances to justify the removal of TTFA president William Wallace—or if the decision was taken for ‘improper reasons’ or ‘bad faith’.

Is the TTFA now inviting the High Court to also look at its international suspension and the new requirements for regaining full membership rights?

Madame Justice Gobin cannot compel Fifa to change its statutes, or assure the Soca Warriors of safe haven within its umbrella. However, it is unlikely to be for nothing that Infantino was keen to preempt a ruling by the Port of Spain High Court.

(Infantino, incidentally, is the target of a criminal investigation by Switzerland courts at present and recently met with France president Emmanuel Macron to discuss opening a Fifa branch in that country.)

Wallace promised to call an extraordinary general meeting after Friday’s hearing, which would give TTFA member delegates the opportunity to weigh in on the body’s next step.

By now, it is beyond dispute that the majority of stakeholders want Wallace to stand down and allow the local body to re-enter Fifa’s fold. Wallace and United TTFA member Keith Look Loy said they are prepared to listen.

However, Wired868 understands that, despite Fifa’s threats, Wallace’s opponents may still be unable to get the required 75 per cent support from delegates to remove him as president.

Yesterday, TTFA general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan suggested that Wallace might retain control of the local body, irrespective of a Fifa ban, and get controversial English salesman Peter Miller to raise the money necessary to run the local game

Wallace told Wired868 that he does not share Ramdhan’s view.

“This is not an option,” said Wallace.

Fifa’s position is that the TTFA’s suspension ‘will only be lifted when the TTFA fully complies with its obligations as a member of Fifa, including recognising the legitimacy of the appointed normalisation committee and bringing its own statutes into line with the Fifa Statutes’.

Might Wallace’s quest for justice and legal determination lead to a ruling that complicates or hinders the TTFA’s ability to bow to Fifa upon demand? And would that be a good thing or a bad thing?

Despite Infantino and Samoura’s belittling comments towards the Trinidad and Tobago High Court, Madame Justice Gobin’s ruling on Friday is likely to be required reading across the globe by keen observers of Fifa politics.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 11, 2020, 08:55:29 AM
They coulda  grown up to be National players and champions, but now...with these dam football people.. Make ppl desert them just so, and leave them in a state. No Heart these Football people, we need get football going to help them.

https://www.facebook.com/hardcorennewsroom/videos/367151617814205
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 12, 2020, 12:56:07 AM
Gayle: FIFA illogically inconsistent.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


There seem to be more unanswered questions from FIFA's ruling on September 24, a situation that could potentially call on the sport's world governing body for clarity.

FIFA's suspension of the T&T Football Association (TTFA) came with a condition that it must first drop the court matter, and align its Statutes with that of the FIFA to regain FIFA membership. However, Matthew Gayle, one of the four TTFA lawyers believes that FIFA has been illogically inconsistent with its request and needed to be clear with what it wants since the TTFA was formed by an act of Parliament and it could be frankly audacious for them (FIFA) to ask the T&T Parliament to amend it.

Speaking to Guardian Media Sports on Sunday he said, "It makes no sense," Gayle explained, just two days before Justice Carol Gobin rules on the legitimacy of the FIFA to appoint a Normalisation Committee to replace a duly elected football administration on March 17, to manage football in T&T.

Gayle assured the TTFA constitution is perfectly in line with that of FIFA since FIFA approved it. "The only thing that is inconsistent with FIFA Statutes is the Act of Parliament and I don't think that FIFA will be so audacious to ask the Parliament to amend its act."

The aims and objects of the Association are: (a) to regulate and control the conduct of Football in T&T (under the Federation Internationale de Football Association system) and to provide playing fields and conveniences in connection therewith;

Accordingly, Article 2 (e) objectives of the TTFA constitution states: (e) to respect and prevent any infringement of the statutes, regulations, directives, and decisions of FIFA, CONCACAF, CFU, and TTFA as well as the Laws of the Game, and to ensure that these are also respected by its Members; Act item 4 states: The affairs of the Association shall be managed by a General Council whose election powers and procedures shall be as prescribed in the Constitution and Rules of the Association.

Article 7 Conduct of Bodies and Officials of the TTFA Constitution states: The bodies and Officials of TTFA must observe the statutes, regulations, directives, decisions, and the Code of Ethics of FIFA, CONCACAF, CFU and TTFA in their activities.

Last week Justice Gobin reserved her ruling in the court the for Tuesday and could well call upon FIFA's local lawyers for clarification of what is meant by asking the TTFA to bring its Statutes in line with theirs (FIFA).

Gayle said he was also confused by FIFA's claim that while the normalisation committee will cease to exist during the suspension, FIFA will only communicate with the normalisation committee concerning all T&T-football-related matters.

William Wallace, the TTFA president has said his group will drop the court battle with the FIFA if the court rules against them.

However, he maintained that if the court rules in their favour, they will convene an Emergency General Meeting to decide on the way forward for everything, inclusive of their if they will continue or drop the matters in the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) in Switzerland as well as the appeal matter in the local court which comes up for hearing on October 21.

ABOUT THE TTFA VS FIFA CASE (SIDE BAR)

Through the lawsuit, Wallace and his three vice presidents — Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillips, and Susan Joseph-Warrick (resigned on September 25) are seeking a declaration that the decision to remove them in March and replace them with a committee comprising of businessman Robert Hadad, attorney Judy Daniel, and retired banker Nigel Romano was null, void, and of no legal or binding effect.

They are also seeking a permanent injunction barring FIFA from meddling in the TTFA's affairs by allegedly seeking to circumvent the democratic process by removing duly elected executive members.

Gobin has also been asked to decide whether FIFA's statutes, under which the replacement was done, conform with the local legislation, which established the association.

Wallace and his team initially brought proceedings against FIFA in the Court for Arbitration for Sport (CAS) but were forced to withdraw as they could not pay the 40,000 Swiss francs (TT$276,000) in associated costs.

Their position was partly due to FIFA's policy to not pay its share of the fees and CAS's rules, which require the other party to pay the full costs when the other fails in its obligations.

After the case was filed, FIFA applied for it to be struck out as it claimed that the TTFA by virtue of its membership with FIFA agreed to forgo all legal action in local courts in favour of proceedings before the CAS following a vote on September 22 in which 21 members voted for the TTFA to drop the matter, 8 votes to fight FIFA and 3 members abstained.

However, the TTFA failed to meet FIFA's deadline of 3:00 pm (T&T Time) on Wednesday 23 September after filing their withdrawal application at 3:23 pm and on September 24 (T&T Republic Day) FIFA suspended the TTFA form all FIFA's activities, programmes and events until further notice.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 12, 2020, 02:46:38 PM
Look Loy's United TTFA prefers 'colonial' control from England
By Mike Berry (Guardian).


Dear Editor

Since the pre-election lies, alleged forged letters and spurious pledges from United TTFA (T&T Football Association) as reported in the media local and foreign, I have watched with horror, dismay and concern how they have in fact disunited the T&T football fraternity by their naivety, lack of business acumen and minimal transparency.

My first experience of their lack of professionalism and style was when they abruptly sacked T&T national coach Dennis Lawrence, a few weeks after their November 24, 2019 election win which although their rightful prerogative could have been handled with a bit more empathy for Lawrence, a national hero.

They hauled him before a kangaroo court of numerous individuals in Couva and bombarded him with an assault of unfair criticism and personal attacks before sacking him a few weeks later in a two minute Whatsapp call from the so-called president during the festive season.

When I informed him that the TTFA was now liable for paying him his salary/bonus arrears and the full balance of his contract within 30 days as per his contract his immediate response was that he would settle it soon and had plans organised to do so.

This of course never transpired. In spite of numerous promises and Dennis was forced to take his claim to FIFA which is not a cheap or swift process.

The lack of style, concern, honesty and professionalism shown by William Wallace and his cohorts was an insult to a national hero and compatriot who had worked tirelessly, professionally and always with integrity and dignity in spite of all the fiscal and logistical pressures he too had to endure during his three-year tenure.

To subsequently watch the soap opera of United TTFA evolve with fantasy schemes, dodgy deals, secretive contracts, downright lies and "Walter Mitty" delusional plans to reduce the massive debt burden, just confirmed to me their total unsuitability for the job.

In particular, the punitive Avec kit deal, the nonsensical Arima project and the reliance on the promises and persuasion of a proven hustler just showed how gullible and naive this gang of wishful thinking so-called “United” Board were.

It’s a pity the Normalisation Committee was not appointed the day after the election!

When Wallace eventually admitted due to Startling exposures and revelations in the media that he had kept many of his dealings secret from his board and had not told the truth about many of his actions his puppet master Keith Look Loy disowned him and threatened to have him removed via an EGM (Emergency General Meeting) as he was horrified and deplored this scandalous conduct.

Look Loy reasoned that his "pardnah" had lost the moral high ground and shown an unacceptable level of non-transparency which they had all pledged to eradicate in their pre-election diatribe. His attack on Wallace was public, damaging and reduced his credibility significantly in the eyes of the football fraternity and general public to even continue in the role of president.

Strangely, Look Loy then sidetracked the EGM on advice from lawyers and weeks later once again stood “United” shoulder-to-shoulder with “President” Wallace pontificating about making a principled and moral stand against the crooked "Colonial Masters" in Zurich, Switzerland and their lack of integrity and transparency. The hypocrisy is breathtaking from this bag of wind.

The damage that United TTFA has caused to T&T’s reputation regionally and globally in their short tenure has now culminated in a suspension that has been coming inevitably given the regular provocative and confrontational attacks on the governing body at every opportunity particularly by the Keyboard warrior from Arima who’s angry, and venomous rantings have created a hostile atmosphere at every stage and personify his character.

The anger, confrontation and hostility even made its way into the withdrawal affidavit which was the final straw for FIFA and so ironic after Look Loy on Republic day stated he would not celebrate until the "Colonial Masters" from Zurich had left the country so he must have had quite a night on the "babash" as he got his wish on the same memorable day that FIFA said au revoir!

However, I am still a little confused how he reconciles his bitter hatred of Colonial control with his support and appointment of Lawrence's replacement Terry Fenwick, Peter Miller, Phil Mepham, Christopher Wykes, Laura Hogan and not to mention his friends from Avec and Lavender who when I last looked all come from England.

Regards,
Mike Berry
England

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 13, 2020, 12:43:13 AM
Kelvin Jack: ‘United TTFA has no moral authority to risk the immediate future of T&T football’
By Kelvin Jack (Wired868).


I have chosen to publicly break my silence about the current impasse between United TTFA and FIFA. In my opinion, the atmosphere around our football reeks of toxicity.

When Fifa appointed the normalisation committee, my first reaction was one of genuine surprise. I made that known to the president William Wallace and to [United TTFA member and technical committee chairman] Keith Look Loy.

I was empathetic towards the situation they were put in. I was particularly irked because I felt they only just assumed office but were then being forced out.

Remember, I was appointed Men’s National Senior Team goalkeeping coach and assistant coach and TTFA Head of Goalkeeping by the ‘United TTFA’. I felt a sense of loyalty towards the president because they worked hard to be in the position to lead Trinidad and Tobago football.

I believe I am qualified to publicly speak about this, as I represented Trinidad and Tobago from the U-14 level all the way to World Cup qualification in 2006. I have paid my dues more than most, when you consider I was only 30 and at my peak; but was never selected again after playing against Paraguay at the 2006 World Cup.

This still rankles with me but age and the passage of time has allowed me to forgive Jack Warner and co for their malicious vindictiveness. Yes, myself and a couple of us were blacklisted for having the temerity to request our bonus contract be honoured.

Back to this impasse that has crippled football. In my opinion, the ongoing court action is nonsensical and has a debilitating effect on Trinidad and Tobago football. The court action should be discontinued immediately.

I have analysed the various arguments for the continued progression of this court action. From the supposed invasion of Trinidad and Tobago sovereignty, to no football is being played right now because of the global pandemic, to the view by some that Trinidad and Tobago wouldn’t qualify for the 2022 World Cup anyway.

These reasons are weak and incredibly disrespectful to the players, fans, potential sponsors, coaches and referees.

I have never in my life seen such a toxic atmosphere emasculating Trinidad and Tobago football. The negativity and confusion is lamentable, unnecessary and not in the interest of our young players.

The government and honourable sports minister have already made themselves clear. There shall be no funding for the TTFA if this court case continues. Sponsors will almost certainly shun us. Fifa will obviously starve us of funding.

So the question is: how will United TTFA fund football if they are ruled by the court as the legitimate leadership? We truly need to know; all 1.4 million of us.

Maybe there is a plan? How will development programmes be funded? How will salaries be paid? How will the players gain valuable international experience?

How will our  women’s team close the gap on our international rivals? How will our aspiring international referees develop?

Committed die hard fans will be starved of watching their beloved national teams play in tournaments.

The one argument I take particular exception to is the argument by some that Trinidad and Tobago will not qualify for the 2022 World Cup anyway, so a ban is not too bad. That opinion is shortsighted and myopic.

I played at the 2006 World Cup because I learned valuable lessons being involved during the qualification matches for the 2002 World Cup. Learning from the older players, observing how they prepared, learning how they dealt with high pressure situations. That experience was vital.

World Cup qualification failure in 2002 was the catalyst for success in 2006.

The uncertainty plaguing football at the moment is unacceptable. We are in the middle of a global pandemic and I’m aware there are restrictions in place to combat Covid-19. However, I am certain the government of Trinidad and Tobago would have been reasonable in allowing us to utilise the vital Fifa international friendly dates this month and next month for important preparatory games.

This could’ve been done overseas. The manager and myself have been looking at various opponents to play against. Now that is not even an option for us, as we are suspended.

There are 211 countries that adhere to Fifa statutes; we are one. If we are truly honest we must realise we cannot on one hand utilise all the provisions of Fifa—for example, receive funding and playing in international tournaments—but then frown when one of the very statutes which we agreed to, the implementation of a normalisation committee, is used by Fifa.

If we detest the role of a normalisation committee in the Fifa statutes so vociferously, why did we join Fifa in the first place? Shouldn’t we have objected to the statutes all those years ago, or at the very least inform Fifa that we do not agree with the role of a normalisation committee—as we believe our sovereignty as an independent country supersedes their statutes?

Why haven’t we openly criticised  the supposed injustices of other normalisation committees which were implemented on other football federations worldwide?

I am completely dumbfounded by the notion that suspension now is not a big thing. The United TTFA has no moral authority to risk the immediate future of Trinidad and Tobago football. I look at our U-15 National team and it borders on criminal that these kids could potentially be barred from experiencing international competition.

I need to reiterate that of course I had empathy for the manner the United TTFA were replaced. Out of respect, I informed Keith Look Loy I will be making a statement. I am certain Keith and William will have a lot to say about my statement.

However, it’s imperative they realise that I truly love Trinidad and Tobago football with the most passion imaginable. But this has now gone too far and the damage done is immense and potentially irreparable. It will take many more years  to get football back on track and at a half-decent level.

The Honourable Justice Gobin shall be making a ruling [soon]. It is my hope that the healing process is allowed to begin immediately with the discontinuation of this court case. The toxicity and disorganisation must end.

The number one priority now must be the development of Trinidad and Tobago football. All egos must be set aside. Tranquility and organisation needs to take over now.

The longer we remain suspended, the longer it will take us to become competitive on the field of play.

The stakes are far too high to continue this action. It must stop.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 13, 2020, 12:43:35 AM
Fifa ‘disrespect’, inconsistent use of CAS and a role for Rowley: TTFA and Fifa trade blows.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


Madame Justice Carol Gobin vowed to rule on the impasse between the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association and Fifa by 3pm on Tuesday 13 October, in what is arguably the biggest matter of sport law in this country’s history.

But that did not mean there was not plenty to report on, as attorneys for both parties traded metaphorical blows at this morning’s virtual High Court hearing.

The TTFA was represented legally by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Jason Jones and Crystal Paul, while Fifa’s interests were sought by Christopher Hamel-Smith SC, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie.

The main issues for determination, according to Madame Justice Gobin, are:

1. Whether the purported appointment of a normalisation committee by [Fifa] on the 17 March 2020 was lawful;

2. Whether The Federation Internationale De Football Association Statute 8(2) is compatible with the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (Incorporation) Act 1982;

3. Whether in any case Fifa has complied with its own statutes in the purported appointment of a normalisation committee. Whether there were exceptional circumstances to justify the invocation of Statute 8(2);

4. Whether on the evidence and in the circumstances of the case, the decision to appoint a normalisation committee was reasonable and made in good faith or whether it was motivated by improper reasons including a bad faith.

However, Fifa contended that Gobin acted unfairly in refusing to postpone today’s hearing until its appeal could be concluded, against her decision to proceed with the case in the High Court. The Court of Appeal is to hear Fifa’s submission on 19 October.

Fifa’s legal team did not file a defence for today’s hearing and, although they sat in, declined the chance to participate.

“I am unable to proceed with anything that involves the substantial issues of the merit of the case,” said Hamel-Smith.

But that did not mean Fifa’s local attorneys failed to contribute to the legal drama. In fact, Hamel-Smith was first to the floor, as he gave a lengthy plea as to why Gobin should overrule herself, for a second time, and postpone today’s hearing—even after it had already begun.

“It seems to be a recurring theme that My Lady makes decisions,” said Crowne, “and my colleague is unhappy with them and re:raises objections in different words… Our primary point is, this has already been decided.”

Whether out of professional courtesy or personal curiosity, Gobin allowed Hamel-Smith leeway to press his case, which she stress tested.

Hamel-Smith said the reason the matter was before the High Court in the first place is due to contention about which party is ‘running the TTFA’.

He suggested that Fifa’s letter to its normalisation committee chairman Robert Hadad on Wednesday 7 October, which stated that ‘the normalisation committee […] ceased all operational and management functions over the TTFA’, meant the matter of who had control of the local football body was no longer in question.

“Is the [TTFA president William Wallace] back in charge?” asked Gobin.

“The TTFA is no longer part of the Fifa system,” said Hamel-Smith. “[…] So yes, there is nothing stopping them from [exercising that daily management and control over the administration of the affairs of the TTFA].”

The High Court Judge was unconvinced and pointed to another excerpt from Fifa’s missive on Wednesday:

‘[…] We want to highlight that the only legitimate leadership of the TTFA, recognised by Fifa and Concacaf, is the one led by Mr Robert Hadad. Having said this, any communication from Fifa with TTFA will continue to be exclusively being (sic) with Mr Robert Hadad.’

“It seems to me that even after the suspension, Fifa is still issuing orders to the normalisation committee,” said Gobin. “So I don’t think one can really say as far as Fifa is concerned that is the end of that, let [the TTFA] run it as it likes.”

Hamel-Smith attempted to stand his ground.

“Well, in terms of domestic activities […], the normalisation committee has stood down,” he said.

Crowne described the so-called closure of Fifa’s normalisation committee as ‘self-induced frustration’ meant to ‘directly or indirectly interfere with these proceedings through its own acts’.

“If this is a proper grounds [for a deferral] then any defendant can write a letter to itself and introduce material changes [to a case],” said Crowne.

Gobin leaned forward in her chair.

“The defendant has brought about a change in circumstances which you are asking me to use as a case for the deferral for the trial?” she asked Hamel-Smith.

“Yes,” replied the counsel for Fifa.

“Well, let’s move on,” said Gobin. “I don’t think that can justify the deferral.”

But Hamel-Smith did not yield. He appeared convinced in the validity of his request. After all, as stressed, he sought only ‘a short adjournment of just over 10 days’.

Gobin suggested that Fifa had an alternative to haranguing her.

“Is there any reason why you did not go to the Court of Appeal and ask for an expedited hearing?” she asked.

“There was no reason to go to the Court of Appeal [for an expedited hearing],” said Hamel-Smith. “[…] It never occurred to me that it was a possibility that this [request for a deferral] would be rejected…”

Nothing if not tenacious, the senior counsel persisted that there was now diminished urgency for the ‘fast tracking’ of today’s High Court hearing.

“In my respectful submission, the claimants have achieved a large part of what they were seeking to achieve,” said Hamel-Smith. “They have got the normalisation committee to down their tools…”

“Are you serious Mr Hamel-Smith?” retorted Gobin. “The TTFA has gotten them to do that? The issue of who is in charge has been settled? It is clear that [the matter of who is the rightful leader of the TTFA] is an ongoing matter for anyone but Fifa!”

And, on that note, Madame Justice Gobin brought up Fifa’s recent behaviour and referenced ‘two proclamations by Fifa that it has no intention to recognise this Court’. Such pronouncements, she suggested, were inconsistent with Hamel-Smith’s pleadings.

“How can you on the one hand object to the authority of the Court and then ask for indulgences from the same Court?” she asked. “[…] Doesn’t that make a mockery of what we are doing here, Mr Hamel-Smith? Has Fifa changed its position?

“[…] Can you say this morning if Fifa is prepared to abide by any declaration that the Court is going to make?”

Hamel-Smith spluttered.

“I have no answer,” he said.

“There should not even be a question of that—that should be a rhetorical question,” Gobin replied, as she lamented the perceived disrespect shown by the Switzerland-based body. “[…] As far as I am concerned, the trial will proceed.”

As Hamel-Smith and his team opted not to contribute to the substantive hearing, Crowne and Gayle had control of the floor. Their case against Fifa was largely two-pronged.

First, they argued that the relevant Fifa Statute which permitted use of a normalisation committee was so badly written, it did not qualify as a law at all.

Fifa Statute article 8.2: ‘Executive bodies of member associations may under exceptional circumstances be removed from office by the Council in consultation with the relevant confederation and replaced by a normalisation committee for a specific period of time.’

Crowne narrowed in on the phrase: ‘exceptional circumstances’.

“We submit that that provision in the Fifa Statutes lacks any legal certainty to qualify as a law,” he said. “Our first position is the way it is drafted—and in the absence of any guidance from the Fifa Statutes whatsoever—we don’t expressly know what those exceptional circumstances are.”

He quoted from a recent ruling by Justice Seepersad in a sedition hearing involving the late Sat Maharaj:

‘Every citizen in a sovereign democratic society should not be subject to punishment unless that law is sufficiently clear and certain…

‘Where laws are vague, their interpretation is then delegated to functionaries […] and in such circumstance it is undesirable as the interpretation can be cut by subjective and arbitrary considerations.’

He cited too a ruling by the late Lord Kenneth Diplock in which he stated: ‘Absence of clarity is destructive of the rule of law; it is unfair for those who wish to preserve the rule of law. It encourages those who wish to undermine it.’

Crowne suggested that Fifa president Gianni Infantino, who heads the Bureau of the Fifa Council that ejected the TTFA’s elected officials on 17 March and then suspended the local body on 24 September, was using ‘an extremely vague provision’ as ‘an absolute hammer’ to abuse the TTFA.

Second, even if article 8.2 of the Fifa Statutes was accepted at face value, Crowne said the implementation of it lacked ‘procedural fairness’.

“There is no evidence other than Fifa’s indelicate press release to the world—not TTFA; the world received it before Wallace and his elected executives received it—that there are ‘extremely low overall financial management methods, combined with a massive debt, [which] have resulted in the TTFA facing a very real risk of insolvency and illiquidity’,” said Crowne. “And to date, no further details have been provided; none to this court or anybody… One would have hoped that, at a minimum, Fifa would have made those circumstances known for the public’s benefit and the TTFA’s benefit.

“[…] And even if there were evidence of these extremely broad and sweeping statements that Fifa put out in the press release; at a minimum, procedural fairness would have required Fifa to give the outgoing executive the chance to respond to it.

“[…] But that of course is assuming that Fifa intended to be fair all along; but as has been shown, Fifa and fairness probably don’t go hand in hand.”

Crowne noted that section three of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (Incorporation) Act 1982 states: ‘The aims and objectives of the Federation are: (a) to regulate and control the conduct of Football in Trinidad and Tobago (under the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (Fifa))…’

He suggested that the Trinidad and Tobago Parliament choose not to go so far as to expressly say the TTFA was subservient to Fifa decree. Further, as a statutory body formed by an Act of Parliament for the benefit of the people of Trinidad and Tobago, he said the TTFA cannot simply relinquish that responsibility to a foreign entity.

“It cannot be that a private company in Zurich can override an Act of Parliament,” said Crowne.

It is likely to be a crucial point in the near future, since Fifa insist the TTFA will only be allowed re-entry to its fold if it approves an unspecified amendment to its constitution.

Hamel-Smith did not—or could not—illuminate the hearing as to the constitutional amendment that Fifa is seeking.

Gobin noted that the TTFA Constitution practically mirrors Fifa’s Statutes already, while, as Crowne reiterated, Fifa approved the local football body’s current constitution in 2015.

“We genuinely don’t know what more the TTFA can do to bring its documents in line with what Fifa wants,” said Crowne.

“It would seem to me that [the requested amendment] is a matter for Parliament, if it so chooses,” said Gobin. “This is out of the TTFA’s hands.”

Will Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley be required to instruct his Parliament to give Fifa unfettered control over the TTFA and football within the twin island republic? And should he?

(The TTFA was formed in 1908 and only joined Fifa in 1944—some 36 years later.)

Madame Justice Gobin asked whether the TTFA’s decision to contest its recent suspension at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) was not inconsistent with its acrimonious exit from that venue for the ongoing legal manner.

The TTFA’s legal team previously accused CAS of bias towards Fifa. However, today, Gayle and Crowne offered different explanations for their return to the sport arbitration body in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Crowne noted that the cost for contesting the implementation of a normalisation committee before CAS was 40,000 Swiss francs (TT$298,000), while it is a mere 1,000 Swiss francs (TT$7,443) to dispute the TTFA’s suspension.

Crowne referred to a ruling of the Canadian Supreme Court which stated that: ‘when arbitration is realistically unattainable [financially], it amounts to no dispute resolution at all’.

“Forty thousand Swiss francs to access justice is unconscionable […] for most member associations and certainly the TTFA,” said Crowne.

Gayle claimed that there was an important difference in the TTFA’s two legal challenges against Fifa.

“[Fifa] sees itself as the overarching body of which the [TTFA] is a subsidiary member,” said Gayle. “In fact My Lady, [Fifa] is an organisation made up of several organisations around the world. Obviously, self-evidently, that organisation must have its rules in relation to the members of the organisation; but that is quite separate and apart from the rules and laws that govern individual associations…”

In short, Gayle suggested that the TTFA’s international suspension relates to its membership rights within Fifa; and, as such, CAS is a suitable form since it is the agreed venue for resolving disputes between two private parties under Fifa’s umbrella.

However, he said the management of the TTFA’s daily affairs is set out in Section 4 of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (Incorporation) Act, and is therefore a matter for the local High Court.

Next Tuesday, Madame Justice Gobin will rule on Fifa’s exertion of its perceived rights within the twin island republic via its normalisation committee.

Infantino, via secretary general Fatma Samoura, has already said that, irrespective of the pending judgment, Fifa intends to have the final word on Trinidad and Tobago’s future within the global organisation.

One way or the other, an Act of Parliament under the government of then Prime Minister George Chambers on 16 August 1982 serves as a potential stumbling block to Fifa’s interest.

Will Rowley’s Parliament get involved?

WATCH: Discussing the TTFA/FIFA drama with Wired868 Editor Lasana Liburd (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3i8EtG_kbg&feature=emb_title)

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 13, 2020, 12:44:53 AM
United TTFA expects positive ruling from judge Gobin.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


It will be a day of reckoning for T&T when it comes to football.

Justice Carol Gobin will on Tuesday deliver a ruling on whether the T&T Football Association (TTFA), which is being led by president William Wallace and his group of vice presidents Joseph Sam Phillip and Clynt Taylor, will be the legitimate managers of football in T&T. However, it is unlikely to ease the pain of a FIFA suspension as well as a return to the fold of the FIFA membership for the TTFA.

With FIFA pulling out of the court battle, speculations are ripe for Gobin to rule in favour of the TTFA. If this happens, Wallace said he will put into the hands of the general football membership, the future of the sport via an Emergency General Meeting (EGM).

The membership has twice before made it clear they desire to drop the court battles and avoid a suspension, which is now unachievable.

FIFA handed the TTFA a suspension on Republic Day (September 24) for violation of the FIFA Statutes, with a condition that the bring its Statutes in line with theirs (FIFA) to rejoin the FIFA membership. This request though has been easier said than done, as lawyers, football experts and the football fraternity confused with the request.

TTFA Attorney Matthew Gayle said he is unsure of what the FIFA is asking for since the TTFA constitution and statutes were approved by the FIFA back in 2015. Osmond Downer, renown TTFA constitutional expert said, not only doesn't he know what the FIFA is asking for, but described the TTFA constitution as the best in the Caribbean.

Like Gayle, he said the TTFA statutes were approved in 2014 and it is very similar to that of the United States and Australia. Downer, a former FIFA referee made it clear that no member association can bring their statutes in line with the FIFA's own fully, but rather the FIFA Standard Statutes, which form the backbone of an Association, regulating its activities and how it is organised.

Associations were asked to ensure its statutes fully comply with the provisions of the FIFA Statutes, and for this reason, the FIFA compiled the standard statutes in 2001 and launched a wide-ranging policy of modernisation of the statutes of its members to improve the governance of football in each country, as well as to strengthen the principles contained in the FIFA Statutes.

Following the suspension, Wallace and his team ordered their attorney to resume the court battle it had with the FIFA, and also sought to file a challenge against the suspension in the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Under the orders of Wallace, the TTFA attorneys also filed an Injunctive Relief in the CAS, which would allow the country to participate at the CONCACAF Gold Cup. But even if these matters are dropped it is uncertain if T&T will be a member of the FIFA again with the request for its statutes to mirror that of the sport's world governing body.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Trini _2026 on October 13, 2020, 06:24:04 PM
what  was the ruling ?
Title: Judge rules on TT football impasse: Red card for FIFA
Post by: Tallman on October 13, 2020, 08:43:21 PM
Judge rules on TT football impasse: Red card for FIFA
By Jada Loutoo (T&T Newsday)


IT's a foul for FIFA.

The world governing body for football received a red card from High Court judge Carol Gobin on Tuesday.

In a late-night decision, Gobin ruled that the removal of the TT Football Association’s (TTFA) duly-elected executive was illegal, null, and void and of no effect.

She also declared that the appointment of a normalisation committee to “interfere in the affairs of the TTFA” was also null, void, and of no effect and that the FIFA statute which allowed the appointment was inconsistent with the provisions of the TTFA Act of 1982.

In her decision, which was e-mailed to attorneys just before 9 pm, Gobin declared the decision of FIFA to appoint the normalisation committee was made in bad faith and “for an improper and illegal motive.”

In March, FIFA removed the William Wallace executive (which includes vice-presidents Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip) because of the TTFA’s increasing debt, which was $50 million.

The TTFA began legal action against FIFA, but then withdrew the matter at 3.02 pm (TT time) on September 23, two minutes after FIFA’s final deadline. FIFA has insisted that the TTFA’s dispute should be heard before the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS).

FIFA suspended T&T from international competitions (both club and country) on September 24 for grave violations of the FIFA statutes, and the TTFA, in return, decided to reignite its legal challenge against the global governing body.

Wallace was elected TTFA president on November 24, 2019.

In her ruling, Gobin said the TTFA’s coming to the court for redress “was perhaps the only appropriate response which avoided capitulating to the demands of FIFA and thereby elevating the status of FIFA statutes above the laws passed by our Parliament.”

She also said the repercussions of FIFA’s suspension were “worrying,” as she listed what they were.

“One can therefore sympathise with the views of the many persons who believe that such far-reaching consequences should be avoided, perhaps at all costs.

“The wisdom of the challenge by the claimants of the actions of FIFA is not for the court. But it has to be said that the law expects the TTFA to do what its statutory duty requires even in the face of unlawful pressure.”

She said she was not insensitive to the anguish that the saga had wreaked on T&T.

“Our government, all sports administrators, clubs, players, aspiring footballers, young people, fans, I daresay the entire population is rightly concerned about the future of the sport.

“The request for the EGM identified the following grave and devastating consequences that the members who requested the meeting feared the fraternity would suffer if TTFA did not withdraw the action.”

However, Gobin did not accede to a request by the TTFA to find that FIFA’s interventions were orchestrated by its agents to undermine the matter before the court.

She also said of a plea by Sports Minister Shamfa Cudjoe, “I am not prepared to ascribe improper motives to the honourable minister for her intervention to “find a way forward” nor indeed to the delegates who requested the EGM. These were concerned parties who would not have been cognisant of the negative legal implications of their actions, which I do believe were well-intended.

“The same cannot be said for Mr Hadad. On the evidence, I am however left in no doubt that Mr Hadad, as FIFA’s appointee, was actively encouraging the campaign of pressure on the claimant, and this gentleman’s conduct is harder to ignore.

“I find that he, in his role as chairman of the normalisation committee, deliberately engaged in conduct that was calculated to subvert the adjudication of the claimant’s claim. His actions prompted the claimant to seek injunctive relief. FIFA did not resist the application.”

Gobin also noted that FIFA’s threats throughout were widely publicised and it encouraged, from many quarters, pressure and clamour for Wallace and his team to comply with the demands of the international body.

She also said there was a sustained unrelenting campaign against the TTFA, “the overt aim of which was to force, as a litigant before the courts of this country, to withdraw its case. Its threats were pointed. It is well settled that conduct which is calculated to impair access to the court is punishable as a contempt of court.”

She said the TTFA rules, which FIFA was aware of, already mirrored FIFA statutes and by its appointment of the committee to have it amend its rules to “bring it in line with FIFA statutes” were threats which the TTFA could not deliver.

The only amendment that can produce the result that FIFA command is an amendment to the TTFA Act, and if it insists on blocking access to our courts in favour of the CAS, then it should be put on notice there might be constitutional hurdles.

She again gave FIFA a dress down for its apparent derision of the local court’s jurisdiction.

“Throughout these proceedings, FIFA has persistently paraded its disdain for the authority of our local courts. In doing so it has demonstrated a disregard for the rule of law.

“The defendant’s conduct regrettably calls into question the sincerity of its vaunted commitment to achieving its objectives to promote integrity, fair play, and friendly relations in society for humanitarian objectives as well as its commitment to respecting internationally recognised human rights and striving to protect them. Disregard for the rule of law is inconsistent with these objectives.“

She also added, “If it is the case as FIFA continues to insist that it will not accept the jurisdiction of the court of any member country, and that CAS is the only dispute resolution forum that it will recognise then, given what the evidence has disclosed and which it has not denied, that FIFA generally does not comply with a basic rule regarding the payment its share of the costs of arbitration, even when its non-compliance can have the effect of denying parties access to the arbitration process, (as it did in this case) then there is every danger that FIFA will become a law unto itself if it hasn’t already become one,’ she said.

FIFA was ordered to pay the TTFA’s costs.

Wallace, in a Newsday report on Friday, vowed to stick to his word and immediately convene an annual general meeting with the TTFA membership to chart a way forward if Gobin’s decision goes in favour of the TTFA.

Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Jason Jones and Crystal Paul were the legal team for the TTFA, led by ousted president William Wallace. The FIFA’s lawyers were Christopher Hamel-Smith, Jonathan Walker, and Cherie Gopie.

RELATED NEWS

Judge Gobin rules in United TTFA favour vs FIFA
By Derek Achong (Guardian).


Embattled T&T Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and his United TTFA executive team have won their controversial lawsuit against FIFA.

Delivering her judgement in the case, late last night, High Court Judge Carol Gobin ruled that FIFA’s move to appoint a Normalisation Committee led by businessman Robert Hadad to replace Wallace and his team was illegal, null and void and of no effect.

Gobin said: “The Court declares that the decision of the Defendant dated 17/3/20 to appoint a normalisation committee was made in bad faith and for an improper and illegal motive.”

She also ruled that FIFA’s Statutes which speak to the appointment of such committees did not conform with the local legislation which incorporated the TTFA and prescribes how it is governed.

Yesterday’s legal victory for Wallace and his team is only the first leg in their battle against FIFA.

Next Monday, the Court of Appeal is expected to hear an appeal from FIFA over Gobin’s jurisdiction to hear the case.

In the event, FIFA is successful in its appeal and Wallace and his team does not successfully challenge that decision in the Privy Council, Gobin’s decision would be rendered academic.

If Wallace and his team eventually emerge victorious, it would mean that FIFA’s indefinite suspension of the association, due to its pursuit of the case, would remain in place.

In her judgement, Gobin considered FIFA’s Statutes on the committee which state that it is to be appointed to member federations in “extraordinary circumstances”.

“The rule essentially gives FIFA a free hand. The absence of a definition does not however limit my ability to consider the circumstances of it and to determine the lawfulness of FIFA’s actions,” she said.

“I have considered the evidence and have come to the conclusion that the decision to invoke the normalisation was unwarranted and indefensible,” she added.

She said that FIFA attempted to usurp the power of the local legislation by directing the committee to arrange fresh elections.

In terms of FIFA’s insistence that all legal disputes between it and federations should be dealt with by the Court for Arbitration for Sport (CAS), Gobin noted that she already ruled that while courts usually defer to such arbitration clauses, they can make exceptions.

She also took the opportunity to criticise FIFA for its apparent disdain for the local courts through its actions in repeatedly refusing to recognise their jurisdiction for cases within the country.

“The defendant’s conduct regrettably calls into question the sincerity of its vaulted commitment to achieving its objectives to promote integrity, fair play, and friendly relations in society for humanitarian objectives as well as its commitment to respecting internationally recognised human rights and striving to protect them. Disregard for the rule of law is inconsistent with these objectives,” she said.

While Gobin said she recognised the effect of the case on the sport in this country, she suggested that it could be considered warranted in the circumstances.

“The TTFA’s actions in seeking redress before the Court was perhaps the only appropriate response which avoided capitulating to the demands of FIFA and thereby elevating the status of FIFA Statues above the laws passed by our Parliament,” Gobin said.

Gobin also considered the roles of TTFA members, Sports Minister Shamfa Cudjoe and Hadad in setting up a meeting of the TTFA to discuss the case.

While she ruled that Cudjoe and the stakeholders had good intentions, she said that Hadad did not and was seeking to further FIFA’s action.

She also noted that FIFA demand for local laws to be changed to conform with its in order to lift the suspension was unreasonable as only Parliament could do so.

FIFA was ordered to pay the executive’s legal costs for bringing the lawsuit.

Wallace and his colleagues were represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Crystal Paul, and Jason Jones, while Christopher Hamel-Smith, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie appeared for FIFA, which did not participate in the trial.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: socalion on October 13, 2020, 09:35:21 PM
Properly worded decision by judge gobin !  Fifa clearly demonstrated from the very unset  arrogance , disrespect and bad faith in its handling of this entire situation ! Full stop
Title: Rowley on TTFA victory
Post by: Trini _2026 on October 14, 2020, 06:26:51 AM
(https://static.wired868.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/rowley-ttfa-fifa.jpeg)
Title: Re: Rowley on TTFA victory
Post by: pull stones on October 14, 2020, 07:17:47 AM
Mr PM, I’ve supported you from the time you took office until today, and as much as I like you as a man of deep thought and vision, today I have to respectfully disagree with you, not only disagree, but I’ll have have to say that you should stick to politics and leave football to those who really follow football for the past 20 years.

today you have spoken out of time and did not get the point of the ttfa’s complaint, it was never about winning a war, but rather to set a precedent and to show other nations around the globe that football don’t belong to fifa to do as they please, and they could be challenged, and it was high time someone stood up for TT football after 40 years of abusive leadership which was facilitated by FIFA, be it bastard eric, thieving vengeful jack or conniving fat david, we had enough, we don’t want no more of the same ole, in other words we want real change, and if that means no football until further notice, then so be it!

as prime minister of this country, aren’t you tired of seeing our boys being embarrassed all over the world just because our administrators really could care less about football? for the past three years football was non existent in TT where no money was spend on the sport, aren’t you ashamed to pump all that money into cricket and showed a keen interest while football sailed down the drain mr PM?

please man, stop talking out of turn and get an advisor to bring you up to date on the matters that you are less versed on, you’ll only anger true supporters who actually know what the real deal is. maybe you should call shaka Hislop or ato bolden, even your boy brian, they might be able to fill you in on the real situation. but in the mean time sir, stop jumping the gun, it’s not a good look for a world leader.
Title: Re: Rowley on TTFA victory
Post by: socalion on October 14, 2020, 07:30:57 AM
What irony dr Keith rowley , are you making a mockery of the decision handed down by  the honourable high judge gobin ? Or is it one of your silly talking points . Provided you have nothing better to say  or  to add please spare us your Greek quotes . ! So Dr keith rowley please it is my hope you will at least be mindful of what is needed more now than ever are words of inspiration , Enough of the ugly divisiveness .
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on October 14, 2020, 07:35:11 AM
I’m willing to make a wager that as of next week the whole United ttfa board would have resigned, if not sooner. I think from here on in football in TT would be in the hands of self serving puppets like brent and selby, and that’s if we’re lucky.

all we could hope for now is that some unlikely hero like shaka Hislop might be inclined to step in and give football administrating a try, but it’s abundantly clear that fifa has always had a keen interest in keeping CFU members in its place, and that’s under some tyrant hungry belly lap dog who’s even scared to bark for his or her supper, and unfortunately so, the Caribbean is in no short supply of those prototypes.
Title: Re: Rowley on TTFA victory
Post by: pull stones on October 14, 2020, 07:43:42 AM
What irony dr Keith rowley , are you making a mockery of the decision handed down by  the honourable high judge gobin ? Or is it one of your silly talking points . Provided you have nothing better to say  or  to add please spare us your Greek quotes . ! So Dr keith rowley please it is my hope you will at least be mindful of what is needed more now than ever are words of inspiration , Enough of the ugly divisiveness .
correct is right. it’s time politicians got involved in sports and spend some money on development, like why don’t we even have a national academy for football in every region?

why didn’t the good doctor spoke up when fat david had football by the balls? the fact that everybody and their dog knows about this dispute with fifa and the ttfa is clear evidence that WW and company did more for football in TT their whole 11 months in office than all the federation presidents combined.

Thanks to them standing up there are people around the world who are now willing to take another look at mr infantino’s tenure and has been versed on his unwillingness to be benevolent. who knows how far and wide this might impact, for all we know, this stance might have far reaching consequences, maybe it might snow ball into bringing down the mighty fifa for a second time.
Title: Re: Rowley on TTFA victory
Post by: maxg on October 14, 2020, 07:54:00 AM
Now we have time to build something solid, learn from our mistakes, making our football about fun, sport and development, instead about money and power and embarassment. Little successes tend to have went to our heads and turned us down a wrong path.
 Agree with Mr Stones. If you want to help because YOUR people may be affected, then Mr Rowley contribute something positive like assigning a management consultant team to assist the local organization with ideas of funding and adminstration. If you cannot contribute to helping YOUR people as PM as far as this LOCAL initiative is concerned, stfu. and see about something else that you can more positively contribute too.
Fifa advantaging your elected adminstrations for football had no comparasion to Slavery, Greeks and Romans wars, had nothing to do with Europe & Germany wars, nothing to do with America & Britian wars, nor Guatamala and Honduras war, and any other unassociated reference than unfairness to YOUR people. Act accordingly or at least diplomatically.


https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/254547
https://theundercoverrecruiter.com/develop-your-team-steps/
https://mikecardus.com/16-steps-to-developing-the-individuals-on-the-team/
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: socalion on October 14, 2020, 07:56:05 AM
Nah stones ah cyar wager now , in any case,  doh even mention Brent sancho nor Selby brown names for leadership position in any administration , dem guys are major sell outs I will not want dem on any frontline as comrades to fight , they'll abandone you in a whisper , leaving you  in harms way to battle on your own ! All in all stones whatever decision mr Wallace and crew makes I can only wish them the very best , I supported their stance against an unreasonable bully Fifa .  As you mention it will be interesting if Shaka hislop comes the in mix to lend a hand .
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Trini _2026 on October 14, 2020, 09:35:40 AM
So will wallace call a meeting with members ....
Title: Re: Rowley on TTFA victory
Post by: soccerman on October 14, 2020, 10:36:40 AM
Well said pull stones, socalion and maxg :beermug:
Title: Re: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on October 14, 2020, 11:08:18 AM
Rowley jeers at United TTFA's victory in court
By Stephon Nicholas (T&T Newsday)


Tuesday evening's victory for United TTFA against FIFA in the High Court seemed to have left the Prime Minister restless as he pondered the future of Trinidad and Tobago's football.

Justice Carol Gobin ruled on Tuesday night that FIFA's removal of William Wallace's TTFA executive and implementation of a normalisation committee, after just four months in office, was illegal.

In a Facebook post around 1am on Wednesday, Dr Rowley said the goal scored by the reinstated TTFA president against the Gianni Infantino-led FIFA was no cause to celebrate.

In fact, Rowley strongly suggested it might have been an own goal that condemns TT's football to defeat. The TTFA remains banned by FIFA for taking the matter to the local court.

Gobin's ruling had Rowley remembering lessons from his schooldays and weighing the collateral damage of the victory, which he described as pyrrhic.

"Another such victory and we shall be utterly ruined,” he posted, quoting Pyrrhus, King of Epirus, 2,000 years ago.

He added, "Thank God I was taught some Greek history and Latin at Bishop('s) High School. Otherwise I would have never been able to understand that adventure. I think we all now need to study the 2000-year events of the Pyrrhic wars to figure out how it all might end."Pyrrhos was indeed king of the Molossians and also of Epirus. However, Rome still stands so what does the future hold? Success that comes at such a high price and at other people’s expense sometimes results in the price of the 'victory' proving too costly to have been worth it. In that case, what happens when the powerful King wins the battle but the thousands of subjects lose."

Jeering from the stands, Rowley argued there was no winner coming out of Tuesday's judgment, especially for TT's footballers.

"So now United TTFA has 'won' and FIFA has lost. The matter is settled in local court. We are now free of the 'colonial' FIFA. We, boys and girls, men and women, are free to play by ourselves and against ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us."Oh. That’s it! I finally understand it. That means we can never lose and will always win because we will only be playing by ourselves. Brilliant!"
Title: Re: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: socalion on October 14, 2020, 11:34:47 AM
Disheartening to say the least that an entrusted leader of the populace instead of displaying respect and humility at a time when much dependent on each of us to be exemplary in our conduct has chosen to think it's cute or some kind of ridiculous humour to seemingly taunt yesterday's by the honourable judge on ttfa's behalf  .. Let me remind those who may tend to forget that this is the same court or judge that may someday be called upon to adjudicate cases involving said persons . Be aware   
Title: Re: Rowley on TTFA victory
Post by: lefty on October 14, 2020, 12:56:17 PM
I think the PM is wrong on this, but feel UTTFA burn ah bridge when dey very publicly dumped on d HOF, a project that d govt again was very public tied to.

I think, they, rightly or wrongly felt very "shat on" and now are acting more out of embarrassment and anger than actual good sense. I am starting to think that like some had suggested d HOF issues might have been best handled out of e public eye

Hindsight is ah bitch, but maybe not having d gov't now presenting itself as an adversary in this battle would been sensible.......to an extent

Pursuing the Arima project with HOF still tied up was stupid or thoughtless at best
Title: Re: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on October 14, 2020, 04:52:02 PM
WATCH: United TTFA talks about the court ruling against FIFA.

https://www.youtube.com/v/UTpmuFLdYiA
Title: Re: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on October 14, 2020, 08:55:13 PM
WATCH: SportsMax Zone and United TTFA lawyer Dr. Emir Crowne discuss the result of the court battle between TTFA and FIFA.

https://www.youtube.com/v/am07z0QxWpU
Title: Re: Rowley on TTFA victory
Post by: Controversial on October 14, 2020, 10:31:43 PM
(https://static.wired868.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/rowley-ttfa-fifa.jpeg)

Well versed in Greek history but not in African history...

This is what happens when they elect a house negro to the highest office that sells out the people...

Remember I told all the hard headed people on here that the pnm are sell outs and the current govt supports fifa..

Pull stones you wake up yet or you still sleeping?

Title: Re: Rowley on TTFA victory
Post by: Controversial on October 14, 2020, 10:39:51 PM
Amanirenus the one eyed Queen of Kush who opposed Rome and won...

Would be a better story to be told Mr.Rowley ... But I doubt African history is in your heart tbh..



Title: Re: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Cocorite on October 14, 2020, 11:37:20 PM
WATCH: United TTFA talks about the court ruling against FIFA.

https://www.youtube.com/v/UTpmuFLdYiA

Couldn't be more proud of Clint Taylor, William Wallace and Keith Look-Loy.

By Fazeer's and Rowley's reasoning and that of many, Mandela was a waste of time, MLK a waste of time, Ghandi a waste of time. What they were up against was too powerful, too much money, had all the guns Bla, Bla, Bla. They should just have accepted colonialism, apartheid, and slavery.

Thank God for people like Gobin and United TTFA who, although imperfect, are willing to promote the dignity of justice.

By-the-way it's not merely principle. It's Freedom to be all that God intended for us to be. Imagine going along with another man being your master . . .waaaaay sah.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 15, 2020, 12:50:26 AM
PM bemused at TTFA's hollow victory over FIFA.
T&T Guardian Reports.


Trinidad and Tobago Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley has reacted to the High Court decision in favour of embattled T&T Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and his United TTFA executive team in their controversial lawsuit against wold governing body FIFA.

Delivering her judgement in the case late Tuesday night, High Court Judge Carol Gobin ruled that FIFA's move to appoint a Normalisation Committee led by businessman Robert Hadad to replace Wallace and his team was illegal, null and void and of no effect.

Gobin said: "The Court declares that the decision of the defendant dated 17/3/20 to appoint a Normalisation Committee was made in bad faith and for an improper and illegal motive."

In response, the Prime Minister seemed more than displeased as he wrote on his Facebook page: "Another such victory and we shall be utterly ruined,” Pyrrhus, King of Epirus, 2,000 years ago.

Thank God I was taught some Greek History and Latin at Bishop High School. Otherwise, I would have never been able to understand that adventure. I think we all now need to study the 2000-year events of the Pyrrhic wars to figure out how it all might end.

Pyrrhos was indeed the king of the Molossians and also of Epirus. However, Rome still stands so what does the future hold?

Success that comes at such a high price and at other people’s expense sometimes results in the price of the “victory” proving too costly to have been worth it. In that case what happens when the powerful King wins the battle but the thousands of subjects lose.

So now United TTFA has “won” and FIFA has lost. The matter is settled in local court. We are now free of the “colonial” FIFA.

We, boys and girls, men and women, are free to play by ourselves and against ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us.

Oh. That’s it! I finally understand it. That means we can never lose and will always win because we will only be playing by ourselves.

Brilliant!"

On Monday, the Court of Appeal is expected to hear an appeal from FIFA over judge Gobin's jurisdiction to hear the case.

In the event FIFA is successful in its appeal and Wallace's team does not successfully challenge that decision in the Privy Council, Gobin's decision would be rendered academic.

RELATED NEWS

Rowley jeers at United TTFA's victory in court.
By Stephon Nicholas (Newsday).


Tuesday evening's victory for United TTFA against FIFA in the High Court seemed to have left the Prime Minister restless as he pondered the future of Trinidad and Tobago's football.

Justice Carol Gobin ruled on Tuesday night that FIFA's removal of William Wallace's TTFA executive and implementation of a normalisation committee, after just four months in office, was illegal.

In a Facebook post around 1am on Wednesday, Dr Rowley said the goal scored by the reinstated TTFA president against the Gianni Infantino-led FIFA was no cause to celebrate.

In fact, Rowley strongly suggested it might have been an own goal that condemns TT's football to defeat. The TTFA remains banned by FIFA for taking the matter to the local court.

Gobin's ruling had Rowley remembering lessons from his schooldays and weighing the collateral damage of the victory, which he described as pyrrhic.

"Another such victory and we shall be utterly ruined,” he posted, quoting Pyrrhus, King of Epirus, 2,000 years ago.

He added, "Thank God I was taught some Greek history and Latin at Bishop('s) High School. Otherwise I would have never been able to understand that adventure. I think we all now need to study the 2000-year events of the Pyrrhic wars to figure out how it all might end."Pyrrhos was indeed king of the Molossians and also of Epirus. However, Rome still stands so what does the future hold? Success that comes at such a high price and at other people’s expense sometimes results in the price of the 'victory' proving too costly to have been worth it. In that case, what happens when the powerful King wins the battle but the thousands of subjects lose."

Jeering from the stands, Rowley argued there was no winner coming out of Tuesday's judgment, especially for TT's footballers.

"So now United TTFA has 'won' and FIFA has lost. The matter is settled in local court. We are now free of the 'colonial' FIFA. We, boys and girls, men and women, are free to play by ourselves and against ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us."Oh. That’s it! I finally understand it. That means we can never lose and will always win because we will only be playing by ourselves. Brilliant!"

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 15, 2020, 12:53:14 AM
Look Loy: TTFA to hold EGM 'immediately'
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (Newsday).


TT Super League president Keith Look Loy expects the extraordinary general meeting (EGM) of the TT Football Association (TTFA) to be held on October 24 or 25.

The hosting of this critical EGM comes as a result of Tuesday’s decision by Justice Carol Gobin that FIFA's removal in March of the TTFA’s duly-elected executive and its installation of a normalisation committee to run its affairs illegal, null, and void and of no effect.

The promised EGM, according to reinstated TTFA president William Wallace, will be held to chart a way forward for TT football.

On Gobin's ruling, Look Loy commented, “The court’s judgment is a validation of the position that we took from day one. Justice Gobin’s decision is an entire validation of what we have said over the past seven months.”

Before Gobin’s judgment, Wallace vowed to “immediately convene an EGM” once the court ruled in favour of the TTFA.

Having won the legal battle against FIFA, Look Loy predicts the EGM will be held within the next ten days.

He said the TTFA membership should make a decision at the EGM on its recent appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) to challenge FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA.

The 13 TTFA board members must meet and agree unanimously, or by a majority, on a date for the EGM.

The board members are the three officers (Wallace, Taylor and Phillp), one representative each from the five associations and one each from the TT Pro League, TT Super League, Women’s League Football, Secondary Schools Football League and the Referees Association.

Look Loy explained, “What we are seeking to do today (Wednesday) is to get the board to call that meeting. We want to call the EGM in under the minimum time, which is within ten days, according to the TTFA constitution.

“We’re looking at October 24 or 25. Then the membership will have its say and make the decision on how we are to proceed into the immediate future. Only the board can confirm when this will be held.”

Look Loy is a member of Wallace’s United TTFA slate, which removed David John-Williams as local head at the November 2019 elections.

RELATED NEWS

FIFA battle not over for Wallace and Co.
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (Newsday).


ATTORNEYS representing the reinstated TT Football Association (TTFA) executive have now shifted focus to Monday’s hearing at the Court of Appeal.

Since FIFA’s removal of the William Wallace-led administration, in March, and installation of a normalisation committee to run TT’s daily football affairs, the ousted executive opted to legally challenge this decision.

Wallace and his vice-presidents Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillip and Susan Joseph-Warrick (now resigned) made an appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland, saying the decision was a breach of the TTFA’s constitution.

The team later indicated it did not believe CAS would give a “fair hearing” as they encountered runarounds during the process. Instead, on May 18, they appealed to have the matter heard at the local High Court.

In June, FIFA filed an injunction in the TT High Court to stop it from hearing any matter relating the ongoing dispute. It insisted that CAS was the only acceptable forum.

On August 13, Justice Gobin denied FIFA’s request to have the dispute remitted back to the CAS and ruled that the local officials were not bound by an arbitration clause with the CAS and could take the world governing body to court in TT.

One week later, FIFA appealed Justice Gobin’s decision to have the matter dealt with locally.

Monday’s hearing at the Court of Appeal, however, ironically comes after Tuesday’s ruling by Justice Gobin who declared FIFA’s removal of TTFA’s duly-elected executive and its installation of a normalisation committee “null and void”.

Declaring Tuesday’s decision a win for the Wallace administration, TTFA’s legal team of Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Jason Jones and Crystal Paul have now shifted focus to Monday’s hearing.

“The Court of Appeal is on Monday and from a legal perspective that’s where our eyes are set. That Court of Appeal decision is to really challenge whether Justice Gobin or the TT High Court has the jurisdiction in the way to even make a decision that was delivered on Tuesday.

“This is regarding FIFA’s appeal to overrule the hearing of the case in TT. We’re mainly focused on that going ahead,” said Jones on Wednesday.

Additionally, after previously questioning the impartiality of the CAS, the TTFA has returned to the Swiss court to fight FIFA’s August 24 decision to indefinitely suspend TT.

According to Jones, their written submissions on this matter are also due on Monday.

“The whole question of us being suspended and the decision to suspend TT is not concluded. We have some submissions due on Monday also to submit to CAS. That’s not a hearing, it’s more of making written submissions and then FIFA will have to make theirs. That is also in the pipeline and we have a deadline in terms of the documentation or the written advocacy at CAS. We have the oral advocacy at the Court of Appeal and the written advocacy for CAS,” he added.

Jones adjudged TTFA’s victory in the local court, on Tuesday, as “resembling a David and Goliath battle” and Justice Gobin’s decision as a “well-considered judgment”.

He particularly drew reference to paragraph 56 of Justice Gobin’s ruling which stated, “In the circumstances, the TTFA’s actions of seeking redress before the Court was perhaps the only appropriate response which avoided capitulating to the demands of FIFA and thereby elevating the status of FIFA statutes above the laws passed by our Parliament.”

“When you look at judgement in various parts, you see the evidence in terms of credibility. It’s really the form and fashion of FIFA’s appointment of the normalization committee was really at the centre of the judgment. What was even more fundamental was that paragraph 56.

“It really takes the whole thing home and I think that particular paragraph speaks to the legal, moral and ethical paradigm of the entire dispute between the parties. This culminates the case because it vindicates the duly-appointed executives, their legitimacy and their cry for recognition of that legitimacy, not just in law, but in terms of the governance of the TTFA,” stated Jones. Newsday also reached out to FIFA lawyer Christopher Hamel-Smith for a comment on Justice Gobin’s ruling. He, however, indicated that, “I don’t really talk to the media about court cases. You’d have to get in touch with FIFA’s media department. I cannot comment on that.”

Title: Re: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on October 15, 2020, 01:55:35 AM
WATCH: SportsMax Zone and United TTFA lawyer Dr. Emir Crowne discuss the result of the court battle between TTFA and FIFA.

https://www.youtube.com/v/am07z0QxWpU
my goodness this emile crown guy is such a prick. it's unbelievable how easily he became unravelled like a spoiled child who hates being challenged. how fragile an ego he has. as a trini i'm extremely appalled  by his conduct.
Title: Re: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on October 15, 2020, 03:37:37 AM
Regarding the timing of the Prime Minister's comment, Crowne is absolutely correct.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Rastaman on October 15, 2020, 08:21:05 AM
WATCH: SportsMax Zone and United TTFA lawyer Dr. Emir Crowne discuss the result of the court battle between TTFA and FIFA.

https://www.youtube.com/v/am07z0QxWpU
my goodness this emile crown guy is such a prick. it's unbelievable how easily he became unravelled like a spoiled child who hates being challenged. how fragile an ego he has. as a trini i'm extremely appalled  by his conduct.
Disagree....I would have walked away....That guy is a kakahole
And that Trini Girl on the show is a disgrace to TnT....only pushing their agenda. They believe the TTFA is wrong and it shows in everything they say and do.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 15, 2020, 11:16:56 AM
WATCH: SportsMax Zone and United TTFA lawyer Dr. Emir Crowne discuss the result of the court battle between TTFA and FIFA.

https://www.youtube.com/v/am07z0QxWpU
my goodness this emile crown guy is such a prick. it's unbelievable how easily he became unravelled like a spoiled child who hates being challenged. how fragile an ego he has. as a trini i'm extremely appalled  by his conduct.
Disagree....I would have walked away....That guy is a kakahole
And that Trini Girl on the show is a disgrace to TnT....only pushing their agenda. They believe the TTFA is wrong and it shows in everything they say and do.
So because ah asshole in Britian make ah asshole comment is ok for we PM make ah asshole comment, and everybody tryin to defend all dey asshole comments , and going off on all kinda xxxxxlery points ...didn't want to repeat mehself  :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:


add: these ppl real have we heads in ah mess, we can't even think straight of for ourselves...we have to operate by their laws, their statutes, their rules...their lives

oh yes: Dr Crowne didn't handle them well. Had no right discussing nothing but the case, niether Rowley's comments nor his own. He wasn't prepared for these antagonistic clowns. There are professionals and there is environment.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on October 15, 2020, 12:55:52 PM
Cudjoe slams 'selfish' United TTFA for FIFA suspension
By Joel Bailey (T&T Newsday)


SHAMFA Cudjoe, Minister of Sport and Community Development, has described FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA (T&T Football Association) as “a sad day for football and sport” in T&T.

On Thursday, the Bureau of the FIFA Council suspended the TTFA with immediate effect due to grave violations of the FIFA Statutes.

In a statement on its website, FIFA said, “the suspension was prompted by the former leadership of the TTFA lodging a claim before (the T&T High Court) in order to contest the decision of the FIFA Council to appoint a normalisation committee for the TTFA.”

In March, TTFA president William Wallace and his executive were removed by FIFA, due to the TTFA’s mounting debt, and a normalisation committee, headed by businessman Robert Hadad, was put in place to run the affairs of T&T football.

On Thursday evening, Cudjoe said, “I am not surprised because FIFA would have already stated its position quite early. I was trying to avoid this situation. I remembered calling a meeting in August with all the football (bodies). I think FIFA has been fair and reasonable in its dealings by giving them a deadline (of September 16) and then going the extra mile of giving them an extension (of September 23).”

Turning her focus towards the United TTFA team of Wallace, his deputies Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick, Joseph Sam Phillip, as well as TTFA members Keith Look Loy and Anthony Harford, Cudjoe said, “If they were serious about relieving T&T from this kind of stress, they would have acted on time and in a proper manner.

“FIFA had no choice but to do what they have done,” she continued. “It’s a sad day for football and a sad day for sport development in this nation. The handful of people that’s causing us this trouble, they would not suffer as much as athletes and the young people who depend on football and sports for their advancement.

“I’m also disappointed that adults who have been charged with this management of football would have the country in this position, would hold football to ransom, would hijack the development of football in this way. They did not go to their clubs (or TTFA membership) before taking on this court matter. They went on their own selfish and unreasonable journey and today we’re in this position because of them.”

Recently, Wallace hinted that, even with FIFA sanctions, domestic and schools football will still be continued in T&T, once covid19 restrictions are lifted.

But Cudjoe countered, “What does that really mean for the young person who’s looking to advance in football, who have dreams about playing in the World Cup, who was looking forward to the CONCACAF Nations League? What community football and schools football means to those young athletes who are really being affected by this?”

The Minister said, “It goes beyond that because we were benefitting from FIFA Forward Development Programme and the various courses to help various disciplines like beach football (and) women’s football. That technical assistance is gone when you’re (suspended).

“While community football and schools football is good, that’s only a drop in the bucket when you think about the full potential of the beautiful game, of our ability to participate at regional and international levels. That brings no comfort, especially knowing that this could have been avoided and that these (individuals) had so much time to turn things around. But they did what they did for their own ego, for their own time of fame. It does not make any sense. The majority of their clubs know that it didn’t make any sense.”

Cudjoe urged other local sporting bodies to “learn from this, that when you elect people to leadership of your organisations, elect proper, right-thinking people with a conscience, with a heart to truly develop the game.”

The Minister is hopeful that there will be light at the end of the tunnel for T&T football.

“I think the tone of the (FIFA) letter allows some wiggle-room, that if (the TTFA) make the necessary changes, at it relates to properly recognising the normalisation committee, and even amending the local constitution to reflect that CAS is the final court of arbitration,” she said. “I think that would allow FIFA to reconsider lifting the suspension. I’m hoping that these clubs have their voices heard and hold their so-called leaders to account.”

No, Minister. 

There is something entirely dissonant with the tenor of your comments and discordant with the discretion and mandate with which your portfolio vests you.

Good on Joel Bailey for getting your comments on the record, but the comments place you as performing well within your competence, when this matter - particularly in its denouement - would have demanded more than the commentating perspective of a front row seat.

Perhaps the deficiency is that Mr. Bailey didn't exhaust his questions or ask all of the pertinent questions. But, even if he didn't ask, it seems that the moment should have compelled you to make a more comprehensive statement regarding the government's activism on this matter.

While there may be an element of incomplete journalism here - perhaps reflective of the expected scrutiny of the readership - there's also been a building narrative (no pun intended) of whether you have used your time sufficiently wisely despite your awareness of the advertised conclusion.

Your words: 'I am not surprised because FIFA would have already stated its position quite early'.

There are still questions to be answered before we should get to you reducing an element of your public comments to a personalised bashing of executive action.

Not wishing to be guilty of the same, my comments include curiosity as to Cabinet's view of the matter and extend to what, if anything, exercised the Prime Minister regarding all of the consequences which you liberally note.


It's evident that United TTFA trampled your last nerve,  but did you run the fullness of the last mile?
I am not sure that I am getting what your point really is  ???  and I would rather not simply assume. Is it that you regard the Minister's comments as inappropriate and that government should have a role in this ongoing imbroglio? Notwithstanding, in my humble view the minister was straightforward in calling a spade a spade.





You don't need to be MoS to speak candidly. Any citizen is equipped to do that. What distinguishes the MoS from ordinary citizens is her latitude to engage her anticipation of the consequences by leveraging her good office beyond occasionally beating her head against a wall and railing against the personality of United TTFA. Any political office holder worth their salt understands that she has the capacity to weigh-in on the matter through back channel outreach. I don't have any reason to doubt the competence of the MoS, but as I've pointed out repeatedly,  the Government of Trinidad and Tobago is not a disinterested party in this outcome and therefore should act as if not a disinterested or passively connected party. Coming to the public stage and saying 'I tried to talk sense to them' is not a summation of the available parameters.

I appreciate that the MoS is constrained to a degree by the PM's view of the totality of circumstances, but there has to be more here than has been offered.

And no,  I don't regard her comments as entirely appropriate.

And,  yes, Govt's activism with Zurich can/could have occur/occurred without having/being violative of FIFA's posture regarding governmental intervention.

So, on the table is what has the MoS/PM done with respect to operating on the margins of the litigation and outreach to Zurich? Even a solitary phone call?

Participate in managing the outcome.

Under a charitable analysis, one could argue that the PM sought to render public comment in a manner that would categorise the opinion as his personal view.

Based on reaction to his FB post, it is unlikely that there is significant buy-in to the notion that Dr. Rowley's arguably personal/private view has not coalesced with, or acquiesced in/informed, official action/inaction.

Those who agree with what he asserted won't care much about how/when his comments were asserted - although they should.

None of that is to assert that the PM is not entitled to hold a personal opinion as a citizen. It is that the dispensing of that opinion should be managed ... beyond its content.

Place, time, manner.

I would add ... especially since the Gov't has been largely meaningfully silent even considering the various "offerings" of the Minister of Sport.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Thomo on October 15, 2020, 01:20:56 PM
Expulsion is on the horizon sadly
Title: Sovereignty reigns - United TTFA 1, FIFA 0
Post by: Tallman on October 15, 2020, 01:34:37 PM
Sovereignty reigns - United TTFA 1, FIFA 0
By Colin Murray (T&T Guardian)


Believe it or not, I was about to start my column on the stunning victory of the Los Angeles Lakers over the Miami Heat in the NBA finals. Since the visit of the legendary Kareem Abdul-Jabbar to T&T’s shores, I have always been a fan of the Lakers.

I had prepared how my entry into basketball came about etc., but then I was stopped in my tracks and made aware of another victory - one that is being referred to as “victory to the independent and sovereign people of T&T”.

Quite a number of people may be confused as victory and T&T football seem to be two combinations that haven’t co-existed for quite some time. Perhaps “we are banned for sure now” is one view while some may counter, “So what? We can’t even beat St Kitts & Nevis”.

Whatever your point of view, it doesn’t really matter as Justice Carol Gobin handed down her 23-page judgement on Tuesday night in favour of the United TTFA against the mighty and powerful FIFA. To be open and honest, I expected her to hand down this judgement considering some of the facts which were set out in her previous ruling in the matter.

Since I am not an attorney, there is little need for me to deal with the 23 pages of her judgement and before I address the conclusion, as that is the most important part of the ruling, I must pay respect to the United TTFA members for the fortitude they have exhibited in the face of staunch criticism.

They must be some of the most vilified individuals in football in recent memory - they have been maligned, called names, cast as liars, accused of not caring about youths, not caring about football in T&T and probably sworn at face-to-face by individuals who thought that their motive was downright selfish. Yet, they ignored the criticism, fought and stood up for what they believed in.

Admittedly, I have grown to admire them for their resilience to withstand all the pressure for the stance they have taken. In a zoom meeting in which I was a part of, I congratulated Osmond “Mr Constitution” Downer for a question he tabled by inquiring who exactly is FIFA suing since the United TTFA is not recognised by FIFA and as far as FIFA was concerned, (William) Wallace and company had no standing in T&T’s football.

Before I informed the meeting about my own club’s football committee’s decision, I congratulated the United TTFA in my personal capacity for the principled stance that they were adopting. But I honestly thought they would have backed down. It takes individuals of real steel to withstand what they have gone through in the last couple of months but it also says that when you are not in a fight and in someone else’s shoes, you really would not understand how they feel. In other words, you have to be part of the movement to understand the fight.

From day one, I said what FIFA did to our duly elected executive was wrong. In fact, everyone, including those persons against the stance that Wallace and company was taking, agreed with me.

However, there was always a “but” followed by “we will get banned by FIFA unless we take this matter out of court”. The fear of T&T being banned was definitely a huge factor that influenced why many individuals and clubs backed down. I recall from early on the thought process was that FIFA can’t do this to a democratically elected body and fight them we must.

When FIFA realised what was happening to their case, suddenly panic set in and the one weapon they had was to threaten little T&T with being banned. Nobody in their right mind (including me) wants to see us get banned, but at the end of the day, where do you draw the line? While the point has been made to think about the youths and their future, sometimes, one has to make some harsh decisions. I remember Wallace was severely chastised for saying there might be collateral damage and based on this latest judgement, there will be collateral damage.

Three things stand out for me with the judgement and I did not need a court of law to guide me. 1 - “The Court declares that the removal of the duly elected executive on 17/3/20 by the defendant is illegal null and void and of no effect”.

I preached that months ago - FIFA was wrong after three and a half months following a democratic election of the TTFA to remove the elected officers. 2 - “The Court declares that the appointment of a normalisation committee to interfere in the affairs of the TTFA is null and void and of no effect”. I preached that months ago as to where did this normalisation committee come from? What was their standing in the football fraternity and who did they represent? FIFA?

Thirdly and certainly the most damning, “The Court declares that the decision of the Defendant dated 17/3/20 to appoint a normalisation committee was made in bad faith and for an improper and illegal motive”.

Dear me! That one hit hard but is it surprising? Any right-thinking individual knew that FIFA acted in bad faith and the feeling was that there was some ulterior motive behind FIFA’s actions. If you are around the football circles, you would hear all sorts of reasons but trust me, there are those who know exactly why FIFA removed the executive and moved in with their normalisation committee.

So where do we go from here? I expect the next move will be from FIFA, but I also expect that Wallace and company will also make some moves of their own. The Prime Minister’s history lesson on social media last night comparing the court victory of the United TTFA against FIFA to a Pyrrhic victory can only be described as naive. Is the PM suggesting for a moment that T&T is too little and insignificant to take a principled stance against FIFA for fear of backlash?

This period of uncertainty may very well give us the opportunity to rebuild our football from the grassroots level as now will not be the time to turn our backs on football. I would expect the Ministry of Sports would step forward and even corporate T&T to try to build our football, our leagues, associations, clubs etc so when we do get back on the international stage, we will be ready. Let's stand as one for our nation just as our motto taught us - together we aspire, together we achieve.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 15, 2020, 02:05:54 PM
Sancho: Can Wallace run a ‘broke’ TTFA?
Ian Prescott (Express).


NOW WHAT?

WILLIAM WALLACE is restored as Trinidad and Tobago Football Association president following Justice Carol Gobin’s landmark verdict in the Trinidad and Tobago High Court which, late Tuesday, rendered FIFA’S March 17 decision to dismiss the Wallace-led executive and impose a normalisation committee to run local football null and void.

But can Wallace now run a broke TTFA without FIFA and Government funding, following T&T’s suspension from international football as a consequence of the legal action? TTFA board member Brent Sancho believes Wallace has many questions to answer from the wider TTFA membership.

Following Justice Gobin’s favourable ruling, Wallace has stated he is prepared to walk away with his head held high—even if his High Court challenge ends with TTFA members removing him from office.

“If this is all that we would have achieved, I would be happy,” stated Wallace yesterday on TV6’s Morning Edition hosted by Fazeer Mohammed.

Wallace used an excerpt of Gobin’s 23-page judgment to illustrate his point. “In the circumstances, the TTFA’s actions of seeking redress before the Court was perhaps the only appropriate response which avoided capitulating to the demands of FIFA and thereby elevating the status of FIFA statutes above the laws passed by our Parliament,” Gobin noted in point 56 of her judgment.

“If it is only that we have done, defended the laws of Parliament, then I walk away with my head held high,” added Wallace.

Sancho also felt Tuesday’s verdict was predictable, given the judge’s earlier utterings and also given that FIFA did not contest the proceedings. He also felt the repercussions may be far reaching. Sancho warned that if taken lightly, the situation can become worse if a FIFA suspension turns into expulsion.

‘I’m not surprised in any way at what has transpired,” said Sancho. “In terms of the judgment, it was always heading that way.” Sancho, though, believes Wallace would have difficulty convincing the majority of TTFA delegates that his action was justified. and said Wallace now needs to indicate how he intends to run football, given the dire state of the TTFA’s finances, more so having been cut off from FIFA funding, arising from its suspension from international football

“They are back in charge. They fought for it, albeit it is a hollow victory,” Sancho declared. “Now, I want to know how they going to run football.

“What are their plans? How are they going to manage their $70-plus million debt and the contracts that they signed? How are they going to pay the TTFA staff and the coaches they owe?” questioned Sancho, who believes United TTFA’s time in charge of the Association had been as disastrous as past administrations.

“They were never fit for office,” Sancho declared, referring to questionable contracts and Wallace’s action during four months in charge.

“They are the ones who on their own decided to go to court, knowing what the ramifications would be. These men have gone about things in a selfish, power-grabbing manner. And now they want to meet with the membership! Why they didn’t meet with the membership three months ago?”

In making her judgment, Justice Gobin noted her deliberations were made strictly within the laws of Trinidad and Tobago although referring to the implication of the judgment to involved parties.

“The wisdom of the challenge by the Claimants of the actions of FIFA is not for the Court. But it has to be said that the law expects the TTFA to do what its statutory duty requires even in the face of unlawful pressure,” Gobin noted, adding, “The repercussions are worrying. One can therefore sympathise with the views of the many persons who believe that such far reaching consequences should be avoided, perhaps at all costs.”

RELATED NEWS

Wallace promises TTFA EGM within ten days
By Ian Prescott (Express).


Membership to decide

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION (TTFA) president William Wallace promised to convene an Emergency General Meeting (EGM) with his membership within ten days following the ruling of Justice Carol Gobin.

Wallace appeared on yesterday’s Morning Edition programme hosted by presenter Fazeer Mohammed and indicated that a meeting is being planned for the membership to decide how they want to proceed.

“Yes definitely that is on the cards (calling EGM in 10 days time with the accredited TTFA members),” Wallace responded directly to Mohammed’s question, “I have already spoken with the general secretary so he is going to advise the Board and members and the agenda for the meeting once we get the green light from the Board, the meeting will definitely be called and basically this is in the hands of the membership and let the membership decide how they want to go forward.”

Wallace added he would bide by whatever decision the membership takes in a constitutionally-convened meeting.

Asked if the ruling in his favour in the local court had been worth it, since this country remains suspended by world football’s governing body, FIFA, Wallace said: “If the quest for justice has a price then so be it. But we should never, ever stop looking for justice. If we have to go back to the times when might was right, if we have to go back to the times when rules are not important under particular circumstances, then I think we are in a really, really sad place and for me taking this action, was an action that I think was necessary.”

He continued: “And what I think it (the court action against FIFA) did was it has opened up Trinidad and Tobago for scrutiny and probably this is good for us in terms of our growth. This is probably a very good thing for us.”

Outspoken Trinidad and Tobago Super League (TTSL) president Keith Look Loy, also party to the law suit, said their intention was not to deny the will of the TTFA membership

“You have to remember that an effort was made to withdraw this matter on the suggestion guidance of informal meeting on August 22. But FIFA decided to play hard-ball for two minutes, and it is FIFA who scored an own-goal. We have defended the sovereignty of T&T and now FIFA has to deal with consequences of their actions,” Look Loy contended.

He added FIFA has never been concerned with Trinidad and Tobago football since the TTFA joined the global body in 1964, but are primarily focused on their global system of dominating world football.

He said it is now up to the Government to change the Act 10 of 1992 and for the membership to decide if they want to bow to the dictates of FIFA.

TTFA vice-president Clynt Taylor said their group stood on the principle of not being removed unjustly, adding the Wallace slate was elected to lead and make decisions.

Taylor was confident they would be remembered favourably by history. “It will be proven that the steps that we took would, and has already began, to make significant changes around the world,” he said, without identifying those changes.

Title: TTFA membership pins hope on Appeals court to overrule Gobin
Post by: Tallman on October 15, 2020, 06:28:43 PM
TTFA membership pins hope on Appeals court to overrule Gobin
By Walter Alibey (T&T Guardian)


It is a bitter-sweet moment for T&T football where support seems to be split unequally in two. Now, however, the sport's membership will have the opportunity to make things right, if this saying can be a reality at this point in time.

Justice Carol Gobin's ruling to accept T&T Football Association president William Wallace and his team of Joseph Sam Phillip, Susan Joseph-Warrick, and Clynt Taylor as the legitimate administrators of T&T football instead of the FIFA-appointed Normalisation Committee has been embraced by some as a triumph in certain quarters, but being seen as detrimental in others.

Following Tuesday night's ruling, T&T's Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley, referencing a Greek lesson from his alma mater Bishop High School many years ago, said, “Another such victory and we shall be utterly ruined,” Pyrrhus, King of Epirus, 2000 years ago.

He noted: "Thank God I was taught some Greek History and Latin at Bishop High School. Otherwise, I would have never been able to understand that adventure. I think we all now need to study the 2000-year events of the Pyrrhic wars to figure out how it all might end. The success that comes at such a high price and at other people’s expense sometimes results in the price of the “victory” proving too costly to have been worth it."

Clearly disappointed by the ruling of the court, the Prime Minister ended by saying: "So now United TTFA has “won” and FIFA has lost. The matter is settled in the local court. We are now free of the “colonial” FIFA. We, boys and girls, men and women, are free to play by ourselves and against ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us. Oh. That’s it! I finally understand it. That means we can never lose and will always win because we will only be playing by ourselves."

The Prime Minister was not standing alone with his discourse and was joined by Brent Sancho, the acting T&T Pro League chairman who will be among the deciding members, and Jameson Rigues, a vice president at the T&T Super League Board.

On Wednesday, Guardian Media Sports made several attempts to contact Wallace yesterday but were unsuccessful.

However, both Rigues and Sancho are hoping for Justice Gobin's ruling to be overturned when the Court of Appeal adjudicates on the matter on Monday. FIFA agreed to appeal a ruling by Gobin for the local court to be the jurisdiction to settle the case but later refused to file a defence. According to both administrators, while they understand the reasons for such a ruling, an overturning of it by the Appellate judges will put T&T in a better position to negotiate with the FIFA, the sport's world governing body, who, on September 24, suspended the TTFA for a violation of their Statutes.

An opportunity for sympathy by the FIFA is expected to come soon, following Wallace's decision to allow the membership to decide on the way forward for the sport, once his group gets favour from Gobin.

Rigues said: "The membership can write to the FIFA seeking clarity on what is needed for the country to be spared extended suspension or even expected expulsion. This situation is hurting the country and if Wallace and his team are serious about giving the membership the opportunity to make the decision, then an opportunity exists for us to seek sympathy," Rigues explained.

TTFA's suspension came with conditions that re-entry into the FIFA fold would require dropping a court battle in the High Court and bringing its (TTFA) Constitution in line with FIFA's.

On September 22 at Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM) called by Wallace and the United TTFA, the membership voted (21 For, 8 Against and 3 Abstentions) to withdraw the matter from the courts but the United TTFA missed FIFA's September 23 deadline which resulted in T&T being suspended on September 24 until further notice.

However, TTFA constitutional expert Osmond Downer, Wallace and his lawyer Matthew Gayle said they are unsure of what the FIFA is requesting since the TTFA's constitution had been updated in 2015, and was approved by FIFA.

It is being speculated that this change in the TTFA Statutes hinges on amending the Act of Parliament which is responsible for the incorporation of the TTFA.

Downer said for this to be a reality, Wallace will first have to summon his Board of Directors to a meeting and the Board will call an Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM). Though Sancho questioned if the Wallace-led administration would allow the membership to make such a decision, he believes it would be an opportunity for the membership to lobby the Government for any necessary changes, a call that was supported by Rigues.

"I believe FIFA will change its position based on the fact that a ruling has been made against them, now they may want to be more severe against the TTFA. But there is the opportunity to sympathise if the membership writes to them. There is also a need to get that ruling out of the court," Sancho explained.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 16, 2020, 02:48:14 AM
Sancho: TTFA's EGM carries no merit.
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (Newsday).


WILLIAM WALLACE’S broken promise to withdraw from the legal battle against FIFA before 3 pm on September 23 – resulting in the indefinite suspension of the TT Football Association (TTFA) on the following day – should serve as a clear indication that the reinstated administration should not be trusted at the forthcoming Emergency General Meeting (EGM).

This was the sentiment shared by TTFA board member Brent Sancho, who expressed grave distrust in the reappointed executive of president Wallace and vice-presidents Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip, after Tuesday’s court ruling by Justice Carol Gobin saw their powers restored at the helm of local football.

On September 22, Wallace’s team held an informal online meeting with the TTFA membership to decide if they should continue pursuit of their lawsuit against FIFA’s March 17 removal of the executive and installation of a normalisation committee, headed by Robert Hadad, to run its daily affairs.

The majority of members voted to end TTFA’s court action and Wallace assured he would follow through with their decision.

The then-ousted executive, however, missed the deadline to withdraw its claim by two minutes and, as a result, was indefinitely suspended by FIFA. Originally, the TTFA had been given until September 16 to withdraw the action, but FIFA had given an extension until September 23.

This action, Sancho believes, went against the membership’s request and has now seen T&T indefinitely banned from all FIFA-sanctioned tournaments and international matches.

He questioned, “Who is going to trust Wallace? He had an informal meeting with the membership. The members clearly stated they wanted nothing to do with the court case and he went and did the opposite. Why would I trust somebody like that?

“Why would I trust someone who makes unilateral decisions with coaches and higher people and put in further debt? Wallace believes the players are collateral damage. I don’t trust that person.”

Prior to Justice Gobin’s ruling, on Tuesday, which returned to removed executive to control of the TTFA, Wallace stated, once victorious in the legal fight, he would convene an immediate EGM to chart a way forward.

After attaining a favourable result in the local court, the renewed TTFA president vowed to stick to his word and host the EGM.

Before a date is set, the TTFA board members must meet and agree unanimously, or by a majority, on a date for the EGM. It’s expected to be held by October 24 or 25 and will once again, comprise the TTFA membership.

According to TT Super League president and Wallace’s United TTFA slate member, Keith Look Loy, on Wednesday, “The membership will have its say and make the decision on how we proceed into the immediate future.”

Reflecting on Wallace’s inability to stand by his word to the membership to withdraw the case on September 23, Sancho is unconvinced the reinstated executive would choose differently this time around.

“That EGM carries no merit. It’s shambolic. It’s too late. Why are you coming to meet with the members now? Why not three months ago before you went to court? He lied to the membership. I wouldn’t trust a word coming out of his mouth.

“I would like to see the members call their own meeting. Let them discuss and ventilate. Let them, not Wallace –he could partake – but let the members be the ones (to have the final say), and maybe even a nationwide discussion. Football impacts everyone,” he added.

The former TT football team defender and Sports Minister also highlighted an array of shady deals conducted by Wallace’s team during their four-month tenure (December 2019 – March 2020).

National men’s coach Terry Fenwick was originally approved, by the board, to be paid US$17,500 over a two-year period with perks. However, it was revealed that the Englishman had officially signed for US$20,000 with the option to increase the duration of contract dependant on his successes at the CONCACAF Gold Cup.

Wallace was also one of two signatories to a $25 million sports apparel contract, without board approval, which required the embattled football association to purchase Ł125,000 in uniforms and other replicas if the country's national teams were to be outfitted after the first year.

Additionally, TTFA general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan was given a two-year contract, although it was agreed by the board, that he only could have gotten a one-year term.

Sancho continued, “They’ve made countless poor decisions. They’ve told the membership that FIFA can’t suspend us. We’ve had instances where they’ve lied to us about contracts and situations where they lied to the membership about who was going to court. They told members it was United TTFA but lo and behold, it was the TTFA.

“Now we face a situation where we may not be able to play international football for quite some time. The sad thing about it is that the persons this will impact the most are the players and not the people who have made these decisions. T&T football is being put in a position where we could be further sanctioned and possibly expelled

“We certainly have dug a big hole for ourselves. I think many of the members’ plight was the ability to have a say, and that was never afforded to them. It is ironic that a group of men are talking about rights and justice and never allowed the membership to have a say on whether or not they should have go to court,” he concluded.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on October 16, 2020, 03:37:47 AM
In light of the meeting that took place yesterday between the PM and the UNITED/TTFA, almost every critique to which the MoS and the PM have been features on this thread has been confirmed - for anyone who doubted - as having been other than  dead on arrival.
Title: A venture into no man’s land
Post by: Tallman on October 16, 2020, 07:05:53 AM
A venture into no man’s land
By Rabindra Moonan (T&T Express)


THE recent ruling by Justice Carol Gobin in the matter between the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation (TTFA) and FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association) certainly generated a lot of interest in the national community. Differing views were expressed by those who looked at the narrow confines of the concept of the rule of law and others who looked at the broader and more practical picture of the implications of the ruling for local football.

The Express editorial yesterday (Page 12) surmised that the judgment against FIFA has kicked T&T football into no man’s land without an exit strategy. The editorial went on to say that it was a classic case of the mouse that roared and the resounding victory in winning the battle very likely means losing the war with dread consequences for local football, its players and legions of fans.

Perhaps the most assertive comments came from Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley who was at pains to remind us of his knowledge of Greek history. The PM quoted Greek King Pyrrhus who had said “Another such victory and we shall be utterly ruined”. Dr Rowley, in his usual cryptic style, reminded us that a pyrrhic victory is one that is offset by devastating losses. He added “we, boys and girls, are free to play by ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us. That means we can never lose.’’

If one had read Dr Rowley’s comments without knowledge of the TTFA/FIFA imbroglio, one could have easily believed that he was referring to the upcoming internal elections in the United National Congress (UNC). Here we have a leader who is using the letter of the UNC constitution to offer herself once more to lead the party, notwithstanding a series of electoral defeats.

The leader is surrounded by boys and girls who are free to play by themselves because nobody is allowed into the inner cabal. They were absolutely abysmal during the budget debate, reflecting ineptitude and childish incompetence but saved by blind loyalty. They continue to play in Parliament with their new devices, some more suited to be a poster girl for a popular brand of mattress while another can be seen as a bouncer outside places of ill repute. The boys and girls indulge in selfies showing off their arrival into the halls of the highest court of the land while some walk past their new vehicle bought with funds given as a birthday gift. These are the protectors of the leader, all out of touch with reality.

Dr Rowley, perhaps unwittingly reminded us of the powerful queen who wins the battle but the thousands of subjects lose.

Sadly this is the outcome of the UNC internal elections as the queen wins and the party is utterly ruined. A pyrrhic victory indeed as they venture into no man’s land without an exit strategy!

Brilliant.

Rabindra Moonan
San Fernando
Title: Preserve egos, kill local football
Post by: Tallman on October 16, 2020, 08:35:59 AM
Preserve egos, kill local football
By Harjoon Heeralal (T&T Express)


The great English writer Charles Dickens in his book Oliver Twist, said the “…the law is a a** — a idiot”. This is not illustrative of what transpired in the courts of Trinidad & Tobago regarding the T&T Football Association (TTFA) nor an indictment on the learned High Court Judge’s ruling on the matter between Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), and the TTFA but rather an illustration of what occurs when egos overwhelm common sense and refuge is sought in the courts.

Theoretically, the constitution of Trinidad and Tobago is the supreme law of the land and no other entity, including FIFA should believe its law is superior. However, whilst it may be construed that FIFA is trying to subvert the constitution, it is the world-governing body responsible for football and has very considerable influence over this game regardless of country, its size or status.

Regardless of the intentions of FIFA, not only does it provide financial resources to support local football, which has been in debt, from “time immemorial” it seems but it provides a world stage for our footballers to showcase their talents in competition with other world-ranked teams. Having “won the battle” but seem certain to “lose the war”, how will the TTFA survive? How will local football survive, having faced continuous financial obstacles over the years, made worse by FIFA potentially banning T&T from all FIFA-sanctioned competitions? Would local football be relegated to only competitions amongst local clubs? How will these games be funded with the very real lack of attendance by the population? Does this not spell the death of local football? Of what value then would there be need for a TTFA?

The High Court has ruled. However, notwithstanding the learned Judge’s utterances regarding the potential impact that the ruling will have on local football, one would have expected that having ruled on the constitutionality of the case, common sense would have jumped to the defence of said ruling and demanded alternate dispute resolution in the interests of preserving Trinidad and Tobago’s football. This can still occur if egos are relegated to the sidelines.

As a leader, one has to take responsibility for the actions of his subordinates, whether they communicate with him or not. Taking responsibility when things go wrong is a key quality of leadership because it builds trust, confidence and earns self-respect from others, especially the team. Without these, team members “do their own thing”, as there is no defined focus. How can there be buy-in to local football when there really is no proper leadership of it?

It is not too late for the TTFA to acknowledge its principled and constitutional win, step down from all positions and revert to FIFA through dispute resolution because FIFA acted “high and mighty” when it removed the duly-elected TTFA leadership and appointed a Normalisation Committee, without proper dialogue and worse yet, after the leadership was elected. Such a principled stand by TTFA will allow FIFA to preserve local football, regardless of its “forced errors.”

Will TTFA be the “mouse that roared” against the FIFA giant and put the nails in local football’s coffin? Or, will unbelievable egos bow to common sense in the interests of local football?

Harjoon Heeralal
Carapichaima
Title: Re: A venture into no man’s land
Post by: ABTrini on October 16, 2020, 09:07:21 AM
A venture into no man’s land
By Rabindra Moonan (T&T Express)


THE recent ruling by Justice Carol Gobin in the matter between the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation (TTFA) and FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association) certainly generated a lot of interest in the national community. Differing views were expressed by those who looked at the narrow confines of the concept of the rule of law and others who looked at the broader and more practical picture of the implications of the ruling for local football.

The Express editorial yesterday (Page 12) surmised that the judgment against FIFA has kicked T&T football into no man’s land without an exit strategy. The editorial went on to say that it was a classic case of the mouse that roared and the resounding victory in winning the battle very likely means losing the war with dread consequences for local football, its players and legions of fans.

Perhaps the most assertive comments came from Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley who was at pains to remind us of his knowledge of Greek history. The PM quoted Greek King Pyrrhus who had said “Another such victory and we shall be utterly ruined”. Dr Rowley, in his usual cryptic style, reminded us that a pyrrhic victory is one that is offset by devastating losses. He added “we, boys and girls, are free to play by ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us. That means we can never lose.’’

If one had read Dr Rowley’s comments without knowledge of the TTFA/FIFA imbroglio, one could have easily believed that he was referring to the upcoming internal elections in the United National Congress (UNC). Here we have a leader who is using the letter of the UNC constitution to offer herself once more to lead the party, notwithstanding a series of electoral defeats.

The leader is surrounded by boys and girls who are free to play by themselves because nobody is allowed into the inner cabal. They were absolutely abysmal during the budget debate, reflecting ineptitude and childish incompetence but saved by blind loyalty. They continue to play in Parliament with their new devices, some more suited to be a poster girl for a popular brand of mattress while another can be seen as a bouncer outside places of ill repute. The boys and girls indulge in selfies showing off their arrival into the halls of the highest court of the land while some walk past their new vehicle bought with funds given as a birthday gift. These are the protectors of the leader, all out of touch with reality.

Dr Rowley, perhaps unwittingly reminded us of the powerful queen who wins the battle but the thousands of subjects lose.

Sadly this is the outcome of the UNC internal elections as the queen wins and the party is utterly ruined. A pyrrhic victory indeed as they venture into no man’s land without an exit strategy!

Brilliant.

Rabindra Moonan
San Fernando


How did this article go from TTFA to UNC leadership? - what  an analogy? The opposition leader  could not come close to be seen as a " queen" or winning any thing of significance at this time  that internal election is mere fodder for the blind leading the blind- venturing into no mans land- well that's a good one- still waiting  for a definition of 'Blank man ' 😊
Title: Of pyrrhic victories and the rule of law
Post by: Tallman on October 16, 2020, 09:39:38 AM
Of pyrrhic victories and the rule of law
By Clyde Weatherhead (T&T Express)


I have noted the response of the Honourable Prime Minister to Monday’s ruling of the High Court in the TTFA v FIFA matter in which the PM said, among other things: “So now United TTFA has ‘won’ and FIFA has lost. The matter is settled in local court. We are now free of the ‘colonial’ FIFA. We, boys and girls, men and women, are free to play by ourselves and against ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us. Oh. That’s it! I finally understand it. That means we can never lose and will always win because we will only be playing by ourselves.”

I, however, find it difficult to share in the enthusiasm of others who gleefully welcome the obvious sarcasm of the PM’s comments.

Let me state two points before I am accused of bias or worse.

Firstly, I would have thought the FIFA appeal against the jurisdictional ruling of the court, which is imminent, would have been sufficient for this ruling to be postponed pending the Appeal Court’s ruling.

Secondly, I hold no brief for William Wallace or the TTFA executive, and my criticism of their handling of this issue (as others have said) is that they failed, as leaders, to fully involve their members in what is the most significant action they were embarking on.

However, I think it is important to note the TTFA (unlike many other football associations elsewhere) is a statutory organisation created by our Parliament by an act.

In Monday’s judgment, the court noted: “FIFA has now taken to making repeated demands accompanied by threats to TTFA, most recently through its Normalisation Committee to amend its rules to ‘bring them in line with FIFA Statutes’.

“There is no lacuna. The futility of these threats and demands should by now have become obvious. TTFA simply cannot deliver. The only amendment that can produce the result that FIFA commands is an amendment to the TTFA Act, and if it insists on blocking access to our courts in favour of the CAS (Court of Arbitration for Sport), then it should be put on notice there might be constitutional hurdles.”

This aspect of the ruling should be of concern to any lawmaker in our nation’s Parliament. What it points to is that FIFA is, in effect, seeking to direct our nation’s Parliament on what to do with an act of Parliament which it passed to give life to the TTFA.

I am sure that the Honourable PM must be concerned about this.

A statutory body as the TTFA decided, when its approach to CAS was treated by that court with bias toward FIFA, allowing FIFA to refuse to pay its share of the cost of arbitration, for example, to approach the court of the land.

That is its right, like that of any citizen, to seek redress in the courts of this country.

The judgment points out: “The wisdom of the challenge by the (TTFA officials) of the actions of FIFA is not for the court (to decide)... But it has to be said that the law expects the TTFA to do what its statutory duty requires even in the face of unlawful pressure.

“(...) In the circumstances, the TTFA’s actions of seeking redress before the court was perhaps the only appropriate response which avoided capitulating to the demands of FIFA; and thereby elevating the status of FIFA Statutes above the laws passed by our Parliament.”

Again, any lawmaker who has sworn to uphold the Constitution and the law, and who holds the rule of law as a pivotal constitutional principle of our governance, must be concerned that any person (citizen or corporate) should be facing pressure from anyone, worse the defendant in a claim before our courts to abandon their claim, including threats as FIFA has not only made, but, put into action.

The judgment quotes the following from an English case (R v Coventry City Council) on the issue of public authorities and responding to unlawful threats: “Tempting though it may sometimes be for public authorities to yield too readily to threats of disruption, they must expect the courts to review any such decision with particular rigour—this is not an area where they can be permitted a wide measure of discretion.”

The fact that our Parliament, at the instance of the Government, may eventually have to decide what to do with the TTFA Act should impress the seriousness of this situation as a matter of the rule of law.

This is not merely a matter of whether “we will only be playing by ourselves”, as the Honourable PM ended his comment on the judgment. This is a matter of whether the rule of law in our country will be respected by an international sporting body.

I am not aware of any other international sporting body attempts to deny citizens their right to approach the courts of our land (or any other), or even to tell any country what to do with its laws.

This is a profoundly serious matter for the principles of our nation’s governance, its sovereignty and whether a non-governmental body’s rules can be regarded as superior to the law of our land. It is that serious.

To successfully defend our governance against external pressure, as our country has done on several occasions in the past and recently, can never be a pyrrhic victory.

—Clyde Weatherhead describes himself as A Citizen Fighting for Good Governance
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Rastaman on October 16, 2020, 10:32:31 AM
Of pyrrhic victories and the rule of law
By Clyde Weatherhead (T&T Express)


I have noted the response of the Honourable Prime Minister to Monday’s ruling of the High Court in the TTFA v FIFA matter in which the PM said, among other things: “So now United TTFA has ‘won’ and FIFA has lost. The matter is settled in local court. We are now free of the ‘colonial’ FIFA. We, boys and girls, men and women, are free to play by ourselves and against ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us. Oh. That’s it! I finally understand it. That means we can never lose and will always win because we will only be playing by ourselves.”

I, however, find it difficult to share in the enthusiasm of others who gleefully welcome the obvious sarcasm of the PM’s comments.

Let me state two points before I am accused of bias or worse.

Firstly, I would have thought the FIFA appeal against the jurisdictional ruling of the court, which is imminent, would have been sufficient for this ruling to be postponed pending the Appeal Court’s ruling.

Secondly, I hold no brief for William Wallace or the TTFA executive, and my criticism of their handling of this issue (as others have said) is that they failed, as leaders, to fully involve their members in what is the most significant action they were embarking on.

However, I think it is important to note the TTFA (unlike many other football associations elsewhere) is a statutory organisation created by our Parliament by an act.

In Monday’s judgment, the court noted: “FIFA has now taken to making repeated demands accompanied by threats to TTFA, most recently through its Normalisation Committee to amend its rules to ‘bring them in line with FIFA Statutes’.

“There is no lacuna. The futility of these threats and demands should by now have become obvious. TTFA simply cannot deliver. The only amendment that can produce the result that FIFA commands is an amendment to the TTFA Act, and if it insists on blocking access to our courts in favour of the CAS (Court of Arbitration for Sport), then it should be put on notice there might be constitutional hurdles.”

This aspect of the ruling should be of concern to any lawmaker in our nation’s Parliament. What it points to is that FIFA is, in effect, seeking to direct our nation’s Parliament on what to do with an act of Parliament which it passed to give life to the TTFA.

I am sure that the Honourable PM must be concerned about this.

A statutory body as the TTFA decided, when its approach to CAS was treated by that court with bias toward FIFA, allowing FIFA to refuse to pay its share of the cost of arbitration, for example, to approach the court of the land.

That is its right, like that of any citizen, to seek redress in the courts of this country.

The judgment points out: “The wisdom of the challenge by the (TTFA officials) of the actions of FIFA is not for the court (to decide)... But it has to be said that the law expects the TTFA to do what its statutory duty requires even in the face of unlawful pressure.

“(...) In the circumstances, the TTFA’s actions of seeking redress before the court was perhaps the only appropriate response which avoided capitulating to the demands of FIFA; and thereby elevating the status of FIFA Statutes above the laws passed by our Parliament.”

Again, any lawmaker who has sworn to uphold the Constitution and the law, and who holds the rule of law as a pivotal constitutional principle of our governance, must be concerned that any person (citizen or corporate) should be facing pressure from anyone, worse the defendant in a claim before our courts to abandon their claim, including threats as FIFA has not only made, but, put into action.

The judgment quotes the following from an English case (R v Coventry City Council) on the issue of public authorities and responding to unlawful threats: “Tempting though it may sometimes be for public authorities to yield too readily to threats of disruption, they must expect the courts to review any such decision with particular rigour—this is not an area where they can be permitted a wide measure of discretion.”

The fact that our Parliament, at the instance of the Government, may eventually have to decide what to do with the TTFA Act should impress the seriousness of this situation as a matter of the rule of law.

This is not merely a matter of whether “we will only be playing by ourselves”, as the Honourable PM ended his comment on the judgment. This is a matter of whether the rule of law in our country will be respected by an international sporting body.

I am not aware of any other international sporting body attempts to deny citizens their right to approach the courts of our land (or any other), or even to tell any country what to do with its laws.

This is a profoundly serious matter for the principles of our nation’s governance, its sovereignty and whether a non-governmental body’s rules can be regarded as superior to the law of our land. It is that serious.

To successfully defend our governance against external pressure, as our country has done on several occasions in the past and recently, can never be a pyrrhic victory.

—Clyde Weatherhead describes himself as A Citizen Fighting for Good Governance
Finally......somebody with sense.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 16, 2020, 11:17:04 AM
If all this money fifa gives us and all the money government put in, how come we couldn’t pay players, coaches, staffers, teams, meet deadlines, contractors..etc we owed as far back as bertille, win, Bernie , players, govnernment bailed out.. so how all of ah sudden we going to miss fifa money , when it never reach who it was supposed to reach too.  Ok. Our players won’t be seen. Tell me. Who was watching them. I don’t even think we was watching them over the last 4games, Farless 4 years. 14 YEARS.  Never before. Maybe Never again - this lifetime . Who we play again tomorrow don’t matter, may have to skip a WC for 1st time due to a unknown pandemic.

All could talk outta ass looking for the usual easy piece of the pie, but the football or FIFA never give the people of TT money, like many other dealings it gives certain privilege ppl of Tt benefits and they rally others to make them believe they actually get a benefit, blinded by love. Similar situation for Carnival band-leaders for years.

We can’t play in FIFA tournaments, because they were smart enough to own the rights to the business of the game , but doesn’t mean we can’t play nobody. It’s not the end of footballl, but for some in the know, they seeing the end of dollars, and it hurts. Oh God, what we go do. Here’s what, we go learn to do something and play football. Allyuh go and make money off somebody else or each other.

written on phone...
Title: Cudjoe: I tried to warn them
Post by: Tallman on October 16, 2020, 11:19:25 AM
Cudjoe: I tried to warn them
By Jelani Beckles (T&T Newsday)


MINISTER of Sport and Community Development Shamfa Cudjoe echoed the sentiments of the Prime Minister that the United TT Football Association (TTFA) had won the battle against FIFA, but will lose the war in the end as the country’s footballers will suffer.

Cudjoe, who has criticised the United TTFA’s battle against world football body FIFA, told Newsday on Thursday that she agreed with Dr Rowley’s comments.

On Tuesday, Justice Carol Gobin’s ruling said FIFA’s decision to appoint a normalisation committee to run local football was “illegal”.

On March 17, FIFA removed the TTFA executive led by William Wallace and appointed the normalisation committee mainly because of the TTFA’s $50 million debt.

Wallace and his executive were only in power since November 24, 2019 and inherited most of the debt.

In a Facebook post on Wednesday at 1.18 am, Rowley said, “Success that comes at such a high price and at other people’s expense sometimes results in the price of the 'victory' proving too costly to have been worth it. In that case, what happens when the powerful King wins the battle but the thousands of subjects lose."

Rowley said that the country’s footballers will only be allowed to match their skills against each other.

"So now United TTFA has 'won' and FIFA has lost. The matter is settled in local court. We are now free of the 'colonial' FIFA. We, boys and girls, men and women, are free to play by ourselves and against ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us. Oh. That’s it! I finally understand it. That means we can never lose and will always win because we will only be playing by ourselves. Brilliant!"

Cudjoe said, “I think it is the same thing that I had been warning TTFA about since earlier this year. When I called the meeting on August 27 to meet with the different clubs it was to find out what is really their (United TTFA) plan and the way forward in this matter (and) if they really want to go down this road. It was pretty much warning them against winning the battle and losing the war.”

At the August 27 meeting the Sport Ministry invited local football stakeholders to discuss the way forward for TT football.

It was reported that Wallace and the former executive did not attend.

Cudjoe said the footballing community will feel the pain. “So you (United TTFA) have won the battle and the young people in TT, the players, the whole football fraternity, even the fans now have to suffer based on the actions of a handful.”

She added, “It is just unfortunate, another sad day for TT and I agree 100 per cent with what Prime Minister would have said.”

In her ruling, Gobin said the Sport Minister’s intervention could have legal “implications”.

Gobin said, “I am not prepared to ascribe improper motives to the honourable minister for her intervention to 'find a way forward' nor indeed to the delegates who requested the EGM (extraordinary general meeting). These were concerned parties who would not have been cognisant of the negative legal implications of their actions, which I do believe were well-intended.”

Cudjoe said she was not trying to impede the judicial process from unfolding.

“TTFA would have asked her to rule on the fact that I would have called a meeting of the membership to determine the way forward. She said that she cannot fault me for that. At the end of the day the judiciary has its work to do and the executive has its work to do. Justice Gobin has her work to do and I have mine. I don’t get in the way of her work…my reason for calling the meeting is I stand in defence of the young players, the people who are going to be affected by this.”

The United TTFA plans to have an EGM (Emergency General Meeting) with the TTFA membership by October 25 to continue charting a way forward.

Cudjoe is hoping the TTFA members get to air their concerns.

“I hope that in (the EGM), his membership have the opportunity to stand up and really have their voices heard and they try to redeem this thing in whatever way it could possibly be redeemed and do what is best in the best interest of football.”
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Storeboy on October 16, 2020, 01:25:13 PM
Describing the verdict of Judge Gobin is not, in my opinion, a jeer of the TTFA or a criticism of the Judge's decision but a realistic description of where we are. Judge Gobin has made a decision based on law. Unfortunately, the deep corruption of FIFA and its desire to manipulate and control it's member associations, even at the risk of violating the sovereignty of independent countries is the deeper problem. Is playing football more important than legal independence and national sovereignty? Only will determine what price we are willing to pay. A pyrrhic victory indeed. To use local saying, this victory by Wallace may be "sweet in the belly but sour in the bambam!
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: socalion on October 16, 2020, 01:51:08 PM
Minister Shamfa cudjoe we are well aware of your haste and quick tempered responses In the midst of the Tffa struggle / fight for justice against Fifa  brutal and arrogant behaviour on a democratically elected body ! So your warnings  according to you have come to pass , does it justify the means or make you a prophet now ? Do you recall it is you also who  explicitly threatened no funding will given to the ttfa led by William Wallace by your ministry , do you recall that miss cudjoe ? In order words you began dancing to Fifa's disrespectful threats ,  so let me quote your boss brilliant !
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on October 16, 2020, 02:13:13 PM
Minister Shamfa cudjoe we are well aware of your haste and quick tempered responses In the midst of the Tffa struggle / fight for justice against Fifa  brutal and arrogant behaviour on a democratically elected body ! So your warnings  according to you have come to pass , does it justify the means or make you a prophet now? Do you recall it is you also who  explicitly threatened no funding will given to the ttfa led by William Wallace by your ministry , do you recall that miss cudjoe ? In order words you began dancing to Fifa's disrespectful threats ,  so let me quote your boss brilliant !

Big up yuh chest, socalion! The part in bold is especially resonant.

She was dancing like a bridesmaid at a funeral. I thought her previous renditions were lacking but this last one coming after the PM's comment and after having sat down with Wallace and Sam P. strikes me as particularly intemperate.

Too many reactionaries in charge. Where are the visionaries?
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 16, 2020, 02:27:12 PM
So could someone explain to me, how "thousands of our subjects" will now be losing. I can't seem to understand. Maybe I a little slow. Explain to me, how things were going fine with National teams, management, exposure, putting TT on the world stage etc, saving government money etc.. explain to me how young men and women was getting a little food and travel and support regular and on time, and coaches encouraged, over the years, cause I wasn't seeing it, I was watching long time...we had 4 or 5 guys... we have more people in Acting and Entertainment...maybe I miss-understood the Waldrum fiasco begging for our girls, and Nakhid causing a stir etc...oh btw, where are the girls now...Do they have a room at the Home of Football ? How many young men we have out playing the big football, making the big development strides, setting a path for the rest, as and while FIFA was developing us so wonderfully...oh God, we going to really dead now they gone eh..  So everybody FIFA ban they dead ? Everybody who don't play in worldcup or FIFA tournaments can't play football or produce footballers ? I must be really confused.


add: The just concerned now, cause some ppl will actually have to do their job and not just clock in.. but for many, those who really was helping the youths and the people, it will just be business as usual.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: socalion on October 16, 2020, 03:11:16 PM
Meh chest eh big enough seeker ah is a skinny fella breds :) 
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 16, 2020, 10:59:32 PM
If only we (concacaf) wasn’t so divided and we ourselves weren’t so divisive

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bbc.com/sport/amp/football/48506641


We need way more time than that doh.
Title: Re: A venture into no man’s land
Post by: asylumseeker on October 17, 2020, 05:31:52 AM
A venture into no man’s land
By Rabindra Moonan (T&T Express)


THE recent ruling by Justice Carol Gobin in the matter between the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation (TTFA) and FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association) certainly generated a lot of interest in the national community. Differing views were expressed by those who looked at the narrow confines of the concept of the rule of law and others who looked at the broader and more practical picture of the implications of the ruling for local football.

The Express editorial yesterday (Page 12) surmised that the judgment against FIFA has kicked T&T football into no man’s land without an exit strategy. The editorial went on to say that it was a classic case of the mouse that roared and the resounding victory in winning the battle very likely means losing the war with dread consequences for local football, its players and legions of fans.

Perhaps the most assertive comments came from Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley who was at pains to remind us of his knowledge of Greek history. The PM quoted Greek King Pyrrhus who had said “Another such victory and we shall be utterly ruined”. Dr Rowley, in his usual cryptic style, reminded us that a pyrrhic victory is one that is offset by devastating losses. He added “we, boys and girls, are free to play by ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us. That means we can never lose.’’

If one had read Dr Rowley’s comments without knowledge of the TTFA/FIFA imbroglio, one could have easily believed that he was referring to the upcoming internal elections in the United National Congress (UNC). Here we have a leader who is using the letter of the UNC constitution to offer herself once more to lead the party, notwithstanding a series of electoral defeats.

The leader is surrounded by boys and girls who are free to play by themselves because nobody is allowed into the inner cabal. They were absolutely abysmal during the budget debate, reflecting ineptitude and childish incompetence but saved by blind loyalty. They continue to play in Parliament with their new devices, some more suited to be a poster girl for a popular brand of mattress while another can be seen as a bouncer outside places of ill repute. The boys and girls indulge in selfies showing off their arrival into the halls of the highest court of the land while some walk past their new vehicle bought with funds given as a birthday gift. These are the protectors of the leader, all out of touch with reality.

Dr Rowley, perhaps unwittingly reminded us of the powerful queen who wins the battle but the thousands of subjects lose.

Sadly this is the outcome of the UNC internal elections as the queen wins and the party is utterly ruined. A pyrrhic victory indeed as they venture into no man’s land without an exit strategy!

Brilliant.

Rabindra Moonan
San Fernando


How did this article go from TTFA to UNC leadership? - what  an analogy? The opposition leader  could not come close to be seen as a " queen" or winning any thing of significance at this time  that internal election is mere fodder for the blind leading the blind- venturing into no mans land- well that's a good one- still waiting  for a definition of 'Blank man ' 😊

Moonan is probably the only person in the land that has been able to exploit the PM's comments for political benefit and he is spot on. What he contends is not novel, but he has aptly seized the moment to add to KPB's indictments.

Ah know you get rabid when you see "UNC" in print :), but perhaps you should defer to Moonan's authority on this particular topic. Look at it this way: cannibalistic outcomes within the UNC potentially accrue to the PNM.

How yuh feel about that?  :P
Title: Wallace, PM hold 'fruitful' talks on TTFA future
Post by: Tallman on October 17, 2020, 07:52:17 AM
Wallace, PM hold 'fruitful' talks on TTFA future
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (T&T Newsday)


DEPENDING ON the outcome of the TT Football Association (TTFA) extraordinary general meeting (EGM) on October 25, the reinstated executive may consider approaching the Government to help chart a way forward.

This was discussed during Thursday’s meeting between restored TTFA president William Wallace, the Prime Minister, Minister of National Security Stuart Young and Minister of Sport and Community Development Shamfa Cudjoe.

The impromptu meeting came as a result of Tuesday’s ruling by Justice Carol Gobin, which deemed null and void the removal in March of Wallace’s team from the helm of local football and installation of a normalisation committee to run the TTFA’s affairs.

Justice Gobin’s judgement returned control of the TTFA to the ousted administration, although TT remains indefinitely banned from participating in all FIFA-sanctioned tournaments.

Wallace said Dr Rowley asked to meet with him to verify the executive’s plans going forward.

But he said the future of TT football lies in hands of the membership at the EGM.

The EGM will be held virtually and is expected to attract all 47 members of the TTFA, who, after discussion, will vote on the administration’s next step.

“Decisions will be made based on what direction the membership wants us to go in. If the Government can help in any way, then we’d come back to the PM at that point. He (Rowley) was concerned about us (TTFA) being suspended and what they (Government) can probably do to help.

“Of course he was made aware of what FIFA was asking on the issue of TTFA’s statutes, and from all legal opinions, the statute they seem to be targeting is the Act of Parliament (The Act 17 of 1982 which be cited as The TT Football Association (Incorporation) Act, 1982).

"If it’s that what FIFA wants, then it’s out of the TTFA hands and would be up to the Government to make those decisions with that,” he said.

At the meeting, Rowley also asked Wallace to remove all TTFA matters from the local court. Wallace reiterated that the local fraternity does not have any pending matters before the court.

FIFA has a hearing at the Court of Appeal on Monday.

The TTFA has contested, at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), the global governing body’s decision to suspend it.

The pursuit of TTFA’s appeal at CAS will also depend on the membership’s decision to continue or withdraw the matter from the Switzerland-based court.

“The TTFA has no matters in the local court, because FIFA is the one that brought the appeal, and I explained that.

"The CAS appeal will also be put to the membership at the EGM. If they decide to vote to withdraw that from CAS, then so be it.

“As I said, it is up to them. If they want it to remain at CAS and want us to take our chances with that, if they have another way of trying to help or satisfy FIFA, they can say it at the meeting. Once the members agree and they vote to that, then so shall it be,” Wallace added.

TTFA’s debt of approximately $50 million was also discussed,with Wallace admitting this was a “serious issue”.

He said he was never given a fair chance to have his projected plans come to life, since after just four months as TTFA head, he was dethroned by FIFA, owing to the “massive debt.”

“I did discuss TTFA’s debt with the PM. But regardless of who is in charge of football in TT, that the debt would be a serious issue to deal with. He (PM) recognised that, and I don’t know how that will be dealt with.

"We had our plans. They were never given any chance to materialise. They were maligned and shut down and FIFA came in,” Wallace said.

The TTFA boss also told the PM and his fellow ministers that, “If normalisation meant coming in and paying off the debt, then I would have walked away from this whole thing a long time ago. But that is not what normalisation meant, It mean that we remain normal. We still had to treat with everything that existed.”

Wallace also welcomed suggestions and support from the security and sport ministers.

He concluded, “What the PM wanted out of this was,‘How do we go forward?’ As he said, at the end of it all, there’s nothing much that we can do. We can talk, but if the EGM and membership’s decision is crucial to all of this, then we would have to wait on that.”
Title: Wallace’s last stand Move afoot to remove TTFA president, executive
Post by: Tallman on October 17, 2020, 10:01:01 AM
Wallace’s last stand Move afoot to remove TTFA president, executive
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express)


WILLIAM WALLACE may yet pay the ultimate price for not complying with the wishes of Trinidad and Tobago Football Association delegates when he decided upon continuing with a Trinidad and Tobago High Court challenge against FIFA, the international governing body for world football.

Yesterday, TTFA Board Member and Eastern Football Association (EFA) president Kieron Edwards wrote an official letter to Wallace, demanding that the agenda of an October 25 Emergency General Meeting (EGM) also include removal of Wallace’s administration and installation of FIFA’s normalisation committee as administrators of local football.

“In relation to the Extraordinary General Meeting of TTFA scheduled for 9:00 AM on Sunday 25th October 2020 we would like to add the following item to the agenda: “The removal of the current TTFA executive which includes the president (Wallace), vice-presidents and other Board Members and the installation of the normalisation committee as appointed by FIFA to be the new Executive of TTFA,” Edwards wrote.

Speaking to the Trinidad Express yesterday, Wallace seemed resigned to let the membership determine what course they would take. He said that while he remains in office he will keep to his promise to hold the upcoming EGM. The TTFA boss took solace in the fact that his defiant battle against FIFA was a “principled stand;” that the High Court ruled in his favour; and that FIFA’s action towards his four-month-old executive was exposed as being high-handed.

“The judge also made the point about us standing up and not capitulating to FIFA’s statutes which would have basically given their statutes precedence over our act of Parliament. And for me, those things are important, and the people that opposed that, we will see from here,” Wallace said.

Wallace was reinstalled as TTFA president when Justice Carol Gobin ruled on October 13 that FIFA’s replacement of his executive on March 18 by its own normalisation committee—headed by local businessman Robert Hadad—was null and void.

His decision to take the issue to the High Court, contravened FIFA’s statutes which list suspension or expulsion as a consequence of such actions. His United TTFA executive had bowed to pressure from the majority of its membership and initially agreed to withdraw the case but missed filing the application by a September 23 deadline. A day later, FIFA suspended the TTFA and in a strange twist, United TTFA revived the case before the T&T court.

“This suspension was a result of Mr William Wallace instituting legal action against FIFA when the agreed procedure was to take the matter to CAS. This action also contravenes Article 15, part B of the TTFA constitution. The president and his associates, known as the ‘United TTFA’ elected to take this action without seeking the approval of the Board Of Directors or the members of TTFA and the action resulted in the suspension of TTFA and by extension Trinidad and Tobago,” stated Edwards.

He added that Wallace and United TTFA had “perpetuated the expulsion of the TTFA from FIFA through the violations of FIFA statutes” and as such, he should be removed for failing to uphold the TTFA’s constitution, adding that TTFA members had no other choice.

“FIFA has stipulated that the suspension of TTFA would only be removed if the current court case is withdrawn, the normalisation committed is recognised as the legitimate executive of TTFA and the current TTFA constitution is amended to agree with the FIFA constitution. Therefore, for the suspension to be lifted the current executive must be removed and the normalisation committee appointed as the new Executive of TTFA.”
Title: Re: Wallace’s last stand Move afoot to remove TTFA president, executive
Post by: asylumseeker on October 17, 2020, 10:17:19 AM
Wallace’s last stand Move afoot to remove TTFA president, executive
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express)


WILLIAM WALLACE may yet pay the ultimate price for not complying with the wishes of Trinidad and Tobago Football Association delegates when he decided upon continuing with a Trinidad and Tobago High Court challenge against FIFA, the international governing body for world football.

Yesterday, TTFA Board Member and Eastern Football Association (EFA) president Kieron Edwards wrote an official letter to Wallace, demanding that the agenda of an October 25 Emergency General Meeting (EGM) also include removal of Wallace’s administration and installation of FIFA’s normalisation committee as administrators of local football.

“In relation to the Extraordinary General Meeting of TTFA scheduled for 9:00 AM on Sunday 25th October 2020 we would like to add the following item to the agenda: “The removal of the current TTFA executive which includes the president (Wallace), vice-presidents and other Board Members and the installation of the normalisation committee as appointed by FIFA to be the new Executive of TTFA,” Edwards wrote.

Speaking to the Trinidad Express yesterday, Wallace seemed resigned to let the membership determine what course they would take. He said that while he remains in office he will keep to his promise to hold the upcoming EGM. The TTFA boss took solace in the fact that his defiant battle against FIFA was a “principled stand;” that the High Court ruled in his favour; and that FIFA’s action towards his four-month-old executive was exposed as being high-handed.

“The judge also made the point about us standing up and not capitulating to FIFA’s statutes which would have basically given their statutes precedence over our act of Parliament. And for me, those things are important, and the people that opposed that, we will see from here,” Wallace said.

Wallace was reinstalled as TTFA president when Justice Carol Gobin ruled on October 13 that FIFA’s replacement of his executive on March 18 by its own normalisation committee—headed by local businessman Robert Hadad—was null and void.

His decision to take the issue to the High Court, contravened FIFA’s statutes which list suspension or expulsion as a consequence of such actions. His United TTFA executive had bowed to pressure from the majority of its membership and initially agreed to withdraw the case but missed filing the application by a September 23 deadline. A day later, FIFA suspended the TTFA and in a strange twist, United TTFA revived the case before the T&T court.

“This suspension was a result of Mr William Wallace instituting legal action against FIFA when the agreed procedure was to take the matter to CAS. This action also contravenes Article 15, part B of the TTFA constitution. The president and his associates, known as the ‘United TTFA’ elected to take this action without seeking the approval of the Board Of Directors or the members of TTFA and the action resulted in the suspension of TTFA and by extension Trinidad and Tobago,” stated Edwards.

He added that Wallace and United TTFA had “perpetuated the expulsion of the TTFA from FIFA through the violations of FIFA statutes” and as such, he should be removed for failing to uphold the TTFA’s constitution, adding that TTFA members had no other choice.

“FIFA has stipulated that the suspension of TTFA would only be removed if the current court case is withdrawn, the normalisation committed is recognised as the legitimate executive of TTFA and the current TTFA constitution is amended to agree with the FIFA constitution. Therefore, for the suspension to be lifted the current executive must be removed and the normalisation committee appointed as the new Executive of TTFA.”

What kind of fantasy land are you in? The NC can't become the new executive.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 17, 2020, 10:32:22 AM
Cudjoe: I tried to warn them.
By Jelani Beckles (Newsday).


MINISTER of Sport and Community Development Shamfa Cudjoe echoed the sentiments of the Prime Minister that the United TT Football Association (TTFA) had won the battle against FIFA, but will lose the war in the end as the country’s footballers will suffer.

Cudjoe, who has criticised the United TTFA’s battle against world football body FIFA, told Newsday on Thursday that she agreed with Dr Rowley’s comments.

On Tuesday, Justice Carol Gobin’s ruling said FIFA’s decision to appoint a normalisation committee to run local football was “illegal”.

On March 17, FIFA removed the TTFA executive led by William Wallace and appointed the normalisation committee mainly because of the TTFA’s $50 million debt.

Wallace and his executive were only in power since November 24, 2019 and inherited most of the debt.

In a Facebook post on Wednesday at 1.18 am, Rowley said, “Success that comes at such a high price and at other people’s expense sometimes results in the price of the 'victory' proving too costly to have been worth it. In that case, what happens when the powerful King wins the battle but the thousands of subjects lose."

Rowley said that the country’s footballers will only be allowed to match their skills against each other.

"So now United TTFA has 'won' and FIFA has lost. The matter is settled in local court. We are now free of the 'colonial' FIFA. We, boys and girls, men and women, are free to play by ourselves and against ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us. Oh. That’s it! I finally understand it. That means we can never lose and will always win because we will only be playing by ourselves. Brilliant!"

Cudjoe said, “I think it is the same thing that I had been warning TTFA about since earlier this year. When I called the meeting on August 27 to meet with the different clubs it was to find out what is really their (United TTFA) plan and the way forward in this matter (and) if they really want to go down this road. It was pretty much warning them against winning the battle and losing the war.”

At the August 27 meeting the Sport Ministry invited local football stakeholders to discuss the way forward for T&T football.

It was reported that Wallace and the former executive did not attend.

Cudjoe said the footballing community will feel the pain. “So you (United TTFA) have won the battle and the young people in T&T, the players, the whole football fraternity, even the fans now have to suffer based on the actions of a handful.”

She added, “It is just unfortunate, another sad day for TT and I agree 100 per cent with what Prime Minister would have said.”

In her ruling, Gobin said the Sport Minister’s intervention could have legal “implications”.

Gobin said, “I am not prepared to ascribe improper motives to the honourable minister for her intervention to 'find a way forward' nor indeed to the delegates who requested the EGM (extraordinary general meeting). These were concerned parties who would not have been cognisant of the negative legal implications of their actions, which I do believe were well-intended.”

Cudjoe said she was not trying to impede the judicial process from unfolding.

“TTFA would have asked her to rule on the fact that I would have called a meeting of the membership to determine the way forward. She said that she cannot fault me for that. At the end of the day the judiciary has its work to do and the executive has its work to do. Justice Gobin has her work to do and I have mine. I don’t get in the way of her work…my reason for calling the meeting is I stand in defence of the young players, the people who are going to be affected by this.”

The United TTFA plans to have an EGM (Emergency General Meeting) with the TTFA membership by October 25 to continue charting a way forward.

Cudjoe is hoping the TTFA members get to air their concerns.

“I hope that in (the EGM), his membership have the opportunity to stand up and really have their voices heard and they try to redeem this thing in whatever way it could possibly be redeemed and do what is best in the best interest of football.”

RELATED NEWS

Wallace, PM hold 'fruitful' talks on TTFA future.
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (Newsday).


DEPENDING ON the outcome of the TT Football Association (TTFA) extraordinary general meeting (EGM) on October 25, the reinstated executive may consider approaching the Government to help chart a way forward.

This was discussed during Thursday’s meeting between restored TTFA president William Wallace, the Prime Minister, Minister of National Security Stuart Young and Minister of Sport and Community Development Shamfa Cudjoe.

The impromptu meeting came as a result of Tuesday’s ruling by Justice Carol Gobin, which deemed null and void the removal in March of Wallace’s team from the helm of local football and installation of a normalisation committee to run the TTFA’s affairs.

Justice Gobin’s judgement returned control of the TTFA to the ousted administration, although TT remains indefinitely banned from participating in all FIFA-sanctioned tournaments.

Wallace said Dr Rowley asked to meet with him to verify the executive’s plans going forward.

But he said the future of TT football lies in hands of the membership at the EGM.

The EGM will be held virtually and is expected to attract all 47 members of the TTFA, who, after discussion, will vote on the administration’s next step.

“Decisions will be made based on what direction the membership wants us to go in. If the Government can help in any way, then we’d come back to the PM at that point. He (Rowley) was concerned about us (TTFA) being suspended and what they (Government) can probably do to help.

“Of course he was made aware of what FIFA was asking on the issue of TTFA’s statutes, and from all legal opinions, the statute they seem to be targeting is the Act of Parliament (The Act 17 of 1982 which be cited as The TT Football Association (Incorporation) Act, 1982).

"If it’s that what FIFA wants, then it’s out of the TTFA hands and would be up to the Government to make those decisions with that,” he said.

At the meeting, Rowley also asked Wallace to remove all TTFA matters from the local court. Wallace reiterated that the local fraternity does not have any pending matters before the court.

FIFA has a hearing at the Court of Appeal on Monday.

The TTFA has contested, at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), the global governing body’s decision to suspend it.

The pursuit of TTFA’s appeal at CAS will also depend on the membership’s decision to continue or withdraw the matter from the Switzerland-based court.

“The TTFA has no matters in the local court, because FIFA is the one that brought the appeal, and I explained that.

"The CAS appeal will also be put to the membership at the EGM. If they decide to vote to withdraw that from CAS, then so be it.

“As I said, it is up to them. If they want it to remain at CAS and want us to take our chances with that, if they have another way of trying to help or satisfy FIFA, they can say it at the meeting. Once the members agree and they vote to that, then so shall it be,” Wallace added.

TTFA’s debt of approximately $50 million was also discussed,with Wallace admitting this was a “serious issue”.

He said he was never given a fair chance to have his projected plans come to life, since after just four months as TTFA head, he was dethroned by FIFA, owing to the “massive debt.”

“I did discuss TTFA’s debt with the PM. But regardless of who is in charge of football in TT, that the debt would be a serious issue to deal with. He (PM) recognised that, and I don’t know how that will be dealt with.

"We had our plans. They were never given any chance to materialise. They were maligned and shut down and FIFA came in,” Wallace said.

The TTFA boss also told the PM and his fellow ministers that, “If normalisation meant coming in and paying off the debt, then I would have walked away from this whole thing a long time ago. But that is not what normalisation meant, It mean that we remain normal. We still had to treat with everything that existed.”

Wallace also welcomed suggestions and support from the security and sport ministers.

He concluded, “What the PM wanted out of this was,‘How do we go forward?’ As he said, at the end of it all, there’s nothing much that we can do. We can talk, but if the EGM and membership’s decision is crucial to all of this, then we would have to wait on that.”

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 18, 2020, 12:48:51 AM
TTFA Act misinterpreted
By Gyasi Merrique (Guardian).


Judge Carol Gobin may have given more weight than is due to the T&T Football Association (TTFA) Incorporation Act, No 17 of 1982 when she awarded victory to the TTFA in its lawsuit against FIFA in the T&T High Court on October 13.

The TTFA executive officers of president William Wallace as well as vice presidents Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick, who resigned her post on September 25, and Joseph Sam Phillip were seeking a declaration from the court that FIFA’s action to remove its executive from office in March of this year and appoint a Normalisation Committee was incompatible with the TTFA Act and therefore illegal void and no effect.

FIFA did not enter a defense in the matter, maintaining its view that state courts of its member associations do not enjoy to hear disputes of this nature and prefers those disputes to be taken to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland in keeping with article 59 of its statutes.

According to Sports Lawyer Tyrone Marcus, however, Judge Gobin may have misinterpreted the intent of the TTFA Act and therefore essentially ruled that the TTFA was absolved from abiding by FIFA’s statutes. All member associations are automatically bound by FIFA regulations upon gaining membership and the TTFA has been a member of FIFA since 1964.

Marcus said, “That type of Act of Parliament has a particular goal and objective, which is just to give a sporting association legal personality, to give it legal status. And the benefits of this would be things like entering into contracts, owning property, being able to sue in the name of the organisation etcetera.”

At the hearing of the lawsuit on October 9 the matters to be determined were as follows:

1. Whether the purported appointment of the Normalisation Committee was lawful.

2. Whether FIFA Statute 8(2) is compatible with TTFA Act No 17 of 1982.

3. Whether in any case FIFA has complied with its own statutes in the purported appointment of the Normalisation Committee. Whether there were exceptional circumstances to justify the invocation of FIFA Statute 8(2).

4. Whether on the evidence in the case the decision to appoint a Normalisation Committee was reasonable and made in good faith.

In her determination on points one and two, Judge Gobin drew the conclusion that the TTFA could be considered a ‘corporation created by special act and for a public purpose.’

Her judgment further explained, ‘This protects the public interest because a corporation created for a specific purpose by an act of the legislature ought not to have the power to do things not in furtherance of that purpose. This principle is more applicable to the TTFA Act.’

However, in an interview with Guardian Media Sports, Marcus disagreed.

“Justice Gobin may have given a certain level of weight to the Act of Parliament that I am not too sure she should have,” he said. “She mentions that the TTFA has been incorporated by an Act of Parliament from 1982 and that makes it a statutory corporation. To me that’s too big of a jump.”

Marcus added, “That, to me, is where there may be some issues with the judgement and some of the conclusions that would have been drawn because of the status that she gave it (TTFA). I am not of the view that the TTFA is a statutory corporation. It is still a body that is run privately by its members, it is not government controlled and its decisions are made by the ordinary day-to-day decisions of its members. So, it is very much operating like a private body and like any other one of our sporting associations who were not incorporated by an Act of Parliament.”

Marcus noted that it was not the first time that a local judge has interpreted a parliamentary act in a similar manner, where a sporting body which ordinarily operates as a private entity was given public status, including previous matters involving the TTFA.

“It's not the first case that one of our local judges in a sports dispute has elevated a private body to the status of a public body,” he said.

“And what it does is, if you are a public authority and you bring a challenge against a decision then it brings in questions like judicial review and what not, which is really reserved for public authorities. So, when Keith Look Loy took the TTFA to court, judicial review came up. Thema Williams back in 2016 when she took the Gymnastics Federation to court, judicial review came up again. And in my own view, I’ve been thinking to myself ‘I don’t agree with our judges.’”

On the issue of what needs to be done in order to make the TTFA compliant to FIFA’s statutes as is one of the conditions demanded by the global body before T&T’s current suspension can be lifted, Marcus says that in his interpretation, the Act of Parliament is no hindrance.

He said, “From where I sit, you don’t need to touch that Act of Parliament because it had a very limited goal and that goal has been achieved. Give the TTFA legal status – that was the goal, that was accomplished.”

“The TTFA’s day-to-day running does not depend on that piece of legislation, it depends on what the (TTFA) constitution says. Which is why when FIFA says bring your constitution in line with ours then what ever the gaps are, if any, then the TTFA needs to do that.”

In her judgement, Judge Gobin noted the irony that FIFA has refused to recognised the local court and legal system but demands an alignment of the two governing documents.

Marcus rebutted by saying, “In fairness to her if she concludes that the TTFA is a statutory corporation then that (adjustments of Act No 17 of 1982) is a reasonable outcome. I am saying if we were to take it back a bit the outcome would be different if she had a different assessment of the TTFA’s status. So to me the TTFA can comply without having to touch the legislation.”

FIFA has a pending appeal of Judge Gobin’s decision to allow the case to proceed in the state court which comes up for hearing on Monday October 19. If that appeal is successful, the Gobin’s ruling of October 13 will be voided and FIFA’s normalization Committee will be automatically recognized as the body at the helm of the TTFA.

If the decision is upheld, the TTFA’s executive may remain in charge. Wallace and his Board of Directors have already called and Extraordinary General Meeting carder for October 25 where he will face his membership to decide the direction for the beleaguered body. It is anticipated that members will vote in favour of recognising the Normalisation Committee and taking steps to have the TTFA’s constitution and statutes adjusted as demanded by FIFA.

The TTFA has been given until December 18 of this year to adhere to FIFA’s demands or face lengthened suspension which would see the association forfeit its right to contest CONCACAF Gold Cup 2021 as well as FIFA World Cup 2022 qualifiers which are both scheduled to be held next year.

List of T&T Sporting Bodies incorporated by Parliamentary Act

Act No. Short Title

14 of 1956 Arima Race Club (Incorporation)

25 of 1967 T&T Motor Racing Club (Incorporation)

32 of 1968 Hunters Association of T&T (Incorporation)

30 of 1973 South Trinidad Darts Association (Incorporation)

27 of 1975 Trinidad Rifle Association (Incorporation)

44 of 1975 T&T Yachting Association (Incorporation)

39 of 1977 T&T Wrestling Association (Incorporation)

29 of 1979 T&T Netball Association (Incorporation)

17 of 1982 T&T Football Association (Incorporation)

13 of 1991 T&T Special Olympics (Incorporation)

18 of 1995 San Francique Sports, Educational and Cultural Council of T&T (Incorporation)

19 of 1995 T&T Secondary Schools Football League (Incorporation)

29 of 1995 Olympic Committee (Incorporation)

34 of 1997 Quarry Superstars Sports and Cultural Club

Editor's note:

Tyrone Marcus is a lawyer specialising in sports Law for 15 years.

He is the author of the book Sports Law in Trinidad and Tobago (2019) and co-author of Commonwealth Caribbean Sports Law (2019).

Marcus has also been adjunct lecturer in sports law at the University of the West Indies, St Augustine, Trinidad for the past eight years and former Senior Legal officer at the Ministry of Sport and Youth Affairs.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 18, 2020, 12:50:50 AM
Wallace: Systemic reform needed
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (Newsday).


Systemic reform of T&T’s youth development programmes and professional league is the only solution to facilitate a smoother transition of younger players into world-class footballers.

Reinstated TT Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace believes last-minute preparations ahead of major international tournaments and unsatisfactory financial incentives on the local pro circuit serve as major detractors to this nation’s potential footballers.

Wallace reassumed his role at the helm of local football on Tuesday after Justice Carol Gobin ruled FIFA’s March removal of the TTFA executive and installation of a normalisation committee null and void.

He has already begun formulating strategies to chart a way forward.

However, many of his plans rely on the outcome of TTFA’s extraordinary general meeting (EGM),on October 25, when the restored executive reconnects with the 47-delegate membership to discuss the future of TT football and its legal quandary with the sport’s global governing body, FIFA.

Looking ahead, Wallace said, “I would like to see that we do some introspection and soul-searching to reassess football in T&T. We need to be honest and look at where our football has gotten to over the last four or five years. Then it means that whatever we had been doing over that duration, that we cannot continue doing that and expect to improve.”

Wallace insists more emphasis must be placed on the holistic development of youngsters as they search for avenues to elevate their playing careers. He admitted that participating in major youth (U13 – U21) international competitions is necessary for athlete growth.

But, he said. a lack of preparation ahead of tournaments of this calibre, backed by shoddy performances owing to these deficiencies, only serves as discouragement for a budding footballer.

“We cannot continue to halfway prepare teams just to enter competitions.

"The better thing might be to sit down and properly put some development programmes in place for our young people so that they can develop their game properly. This goes against running into competition at every minute.

"When this happens, the players emerge disillusioned. This is one way of disenfranchising youths. If the only thing that people could think that because we are suspended, that this is the only thing that can disenfranchise youths, then they are not being honest.”

Wallace was also critical of the TT Pro League, which he believes has been significantly non-progressive for the past five to six years. While he is aware the covid19 pandemic has had a negative impact on sport investment, both locally and internationally, the stipends paid to players by domestic clubs are minuscule.

These shortcomings, the former Secondary Schools Football League president said, are also a deterrent to potential players working towards securing pro contracts.

“We have a professional league in TT that has not really grown in any significant way. If our youths in T&T are intent on going into pro football and all they can see is playing for $1,200 or $3,000 per month, that is not an incentive for young footballers.

“Our systems need to be realigned and reassessed. What is really the motivation for a young man who wants to develop his game to be asked to play professional football in T&T? If he plans to do that, the money is insufficient. He cannot live on these stipends.

"These are the things that we have to be honest with. We’re talking about pro footballers.”

After being elected to run T&T football in November 2019, Wallace and his three vice-presidents – Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillip and Susan Joseph-Warrick (resigned) – were removed from their post by FIFA on the grounds of financial mismanagement and massive debt.

A normalisation committee, led by businessman Robert Hadad, was set up by the governing body to run the FA’s daily affairs.

Wallace then contested FIFA’s decision to remove his executive and shift power to Hadad in the local court. Tuesday’s judgment by Gobin returned Wallace, Taylor and Phillip to the helm of T&T football.

Although he is pleased to have won against the mighty FIFA, T&T still remains indefinitely banned by the Gianni Infantino-led organisation, “for grave violations of the FIFA Statutes,, and still runs the risk of missing out on 2022 World Cup qualifiers.

On August 13, Gobin denied FIFA’s request to have the previous dispute remitted to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) and ruled that the local officials were not bound by an arbitration clause with the CAS and could take the world governing body to court in T&T.

One week later, FIFA appealed the decision to have the matter dealt with locally. FIFA’s hearing at the Court of Appeal is set for Monday. Additionally, after previously questioning the impartiality of the CAS, the TTFA returned to the Swiss court to fight FIFA’s August 24 decision to indefinitely suspend T&T.

The pursuit of this matter in Zurich will be decided at the upcoming EGM, where members will decide whether to drop or continue the case. Depending on the outcome of this meeting, the Government may consider stepping in to assist the still-embattled Wallace-led TTFA unit.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 18, 2020, 12:51:25 AM
Fifa’s political neutrality claim ‘patently false’; why Infantino’s woes won’t disappear—even if TTFA officials do.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


On 24 September 2020, even as Fifa president Gianni Infantino flexed the awesome muscles of the billion dollar global sport body that he heads, he revealed its Achilles heel.

It was the day that Bureau of the Fifa Council, headed by Infantino, suspended the Trinidad and Tobago Football Football Association (TTFA) from the international game for the first time. And the implications arguably extended well beyond the fate of besieged TTFA president William Wallace.

“The decision of the former leadership to go to a local court to contest the appointment of the normalisation committee,” stated the Fifa release, “jeopardises not only the future of football in Trinidad and Tobago but also endangers the overall global football governance structure, which relies on the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) as the exclusive forum for resolving disputes of this nature.”

Ever since 17 March 2020, and arguably before, Infantino has tried to be rid of Wallace—a retired Carapichaima East Secondary vice-principal. The two men have never spoken.

Infantino convinced his colleagues on the bureau that the appropriate tool for eliminating this ‘fly’ was a hammer. And, on 24 September, he might have overplayed his hand.

By turning the TTFA’s nightmare into reality, Infantino had released Wallace from his only remaining fear. The football official had nothing left to lose and, although Fifa hoped for the opposite outcome, a courtroom showdown had just become inevitable.

Yesterday, Fifa’s knickers were inspected by the High Court. And although there is little surprise that Madame Justice Carol Gobin caught a whiff of something unsettling, her judgment went further than the usual pontificating newspaper column.

The root of the angst between both parties is the Bureau of the Fifa Council’s decision on 17 March to disband the TTFA Board and remove its elected officials, due to ‘extremely low overall financial management methods, combined with a massive debt’ which put the TTFA in ‘a very real risk of insolvency and illiquidity’ and, as such, ‘corrective measures need to be applied urgently’.

It is worth noting here that ‘Bureau of the Fifa Council’ is the snazzy new name for what was once the ‘Fifa Emergency Committee, under previous presidents. Article 38.1 of the Fifa Statutes mandates the Bureau to ‘deal with all matters within the competence of the Council requiring immediate decision between two meetings of the Council’.

Article 8.2 of the Fifa Statutes states: ‘Executive bodies of member associations may under exceptional circumstances be removed from office by the Council in consultation with the relevant confederation and replaced by a normalisation committee for a specific period of time’.

But the Fifa Council has never taken the initiative on the issues affecting the TTFA, as its responsibility in the statutes. Instead, the Bureau declared the TTFA’s financial state to be an ‘emergency’ requiring urgent address, and ruled on the twin island republic itself.

The Fifa Council is a 37-member body with wide representation from each of football’s six confederations. The Bureau of the Fifa Council, in contrast, is comprised of Infantino and six other members.

The declaration that the TTFA’s finances had become an emergency was particularly odd since the local body’s last financial statement was submitted to Fifa in the previous year under Wallace’s predecessor, David John-Williams. (In fact, Wallace did not stay in office long enough to hold an audit of his own tenure.)

And here is what Infantino said about John-Williams at the opening of the controversial TTFA Home of Football on 18 November 2019—six days before he was democratically replaced by Wallace:

“I came to Trinidad and Tobago, and I was not believing to find somebody like [David John-Williams] in Trinidad and Tobago. I have to say the truth. Because the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association was more or less in the same state as Fifa at that time. David was saying ‘shambles’, I say shambles was maybe a compliment for the state you found.

“We found a federation which was under the earth. TTFA, Trinidad and Tobago football, very sadly, was in the headlines for other reasons than football, even though linked to football. Today, we are here, and proud to be here, because today, Trinidad and Tobago is the capital of the world of football.”

The Home of Football, incidentally, is still unfinished and is now the centre of a police investigation for corruption. It is an investigation that Wallace and his general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan initially vowed to instigate and share their findings—even if it implicated Fifa officials including Fifa Chief Member Associations officer Veron Mosengo-Omba.

Mosengo-Omba attempted to justify Fifa’s intervention in a 15 June affidavit, which Gobin referenced.

“In 2018, the TTFA was randomly selected for the central review programme [and] coming out of that audit, Fifa was concerned by the high level of debt that the TTFA had accumulated,” stated Mosengo-Omba, “and was of the view that there were serious governance issues at the TTFA. However, the TTFA was due to hold elections for a new executive committee and Fifa’s general practice is to not interfere in governance matters involving member associations during electoral years, so as to avoid giving the impression that Fifa is taking the side of any candidate for the position of president of that member association.

“In keeping with this general practice, Fifa therefore held its hand on taking any action so as to allow an opportunity for those elections to take place and for any new executive committee to begin to address these serious issues.”

So the ‘emergency’ that Infantino decided to address actually existed for two years under John-Williams, who the Fifa president urged TTFA members to re-elect—rather than remove.

Note too that, although Infantino’s Bureau met on 17 March, the Fifa Council convened on 20 March. Was the TTFA matter so pressing that it could not wait three days to be discussed by the proper body meant to oversee the governing body’s affairs?

On 16 August, Fifa secretary general Fatma Samoura gave Wallace and his United TTFA slate until 16 September to withdraw the High Court case, at the threat of initiating proceedings to suspend the local football body.

Wallace did not not comply. On 17 September, the Fifa Council met and dispersed without repercussions for the TTFA. Similar occurred on 18 September, when all 211 Fifa member nations convened for its annual congress.

Immediately after the Fifa Congress, though, the TTFA’s court case became an emergency again, as Samoura offering a new deadline of 23 September—before the matter would again be sent to Infantino’s seven-member committee.

Is Infantino misusing the Bureau of the Fifa Council to further his own agendas, rather than for legitimate emergencies?

Gobin did not buy Fifa’s line about the ‘exceptional circumstances’ that justified the removal of the TTFA’s elected officials.

“If these were exceptional circumstances in Fifa’s assessment then they were not brought about by the actions of the new board,” stated Gobin. “As a matter of basic fairness, the new board ought not to have been penalised with so extreme an action as removal, because of a situation which it inherited, when Fifa was at all times well aware of the history.

“Mr Mosengo-Omba’s explanation as to why it waited until after the election to take action and then to move against the new Board, is unconvincing… The timing of the removal of the new board—after the troubling financial management had been allowed to continue and fester even with Fifa’s annual audits and oversight—makes Mr Mosengo-Omba’s claim that Fifa held its hand until after November elections to allow an opportunity for the incoming board to address the serious issues even less credible.

“On any assessment it clearly did not allow a sufficient opportunity if it moved to normalise after a mere four months.”

The High Court judge scoffed at Mosengo-Omba’s claim that Fifa was trying to avoid  improper interference in the TTFA’s operations.

“When Mr Mosengo-Omba’s explanation is viewed against the claimant’s evidence, it has to be rejected,” said Gobin. “If, as he claims, Fifa held its hand in taking action so as to avoid giving the impression that it was taking the side of any candidate ‘in an electoral year’, then the haste with which it moved to unseat the new board established the opposite.

“[…] On the evidence, I find that the decision to activate the normalisation was improper and made in bad faith. The conclusion that it was a contrivance to subvert the outcome of the 24 November elections is in my view inescapable.

“In the end, it defeated the will of the persons who had elected the new board into office. In the circumstances Fifa’s claim that it remains neutral in matters of politics (within the sport) is demonstrated to be patently false.”

But while Gobin found the specific matter of the attempted overthrow of the TTFA’s elected officers to be ‘unwarranted and indefensible’, she also looked at the Fifa Statutes which emboldened Infantino’s cabal in the first place.

In her judgment on 13 August, Gobin said that since the TTFA was formed by an Act of Parliament, it is outside its jurisdiction to ‘agree to submit to foreign law as FIFA Statutes prescribe’ in accepting its normalisation committee.

However, she also noted that Fifa’s claimed right to eject the elected officers of any member association—on the vague of justification of ‘exceptional circumstances’—ran counter to article 19.2 of its statutes, which states: ‘Each member association shall manage its affairs independently and without undue influence from third parties’.

“What was telling was that [Fifa’s normalisation notice] indicated among the tasks included in the normalisation committee’s mandate was: ‘to organise and conduct elections of a new TTFA executive committee for a four year mandate’,” said Gobin. “The TTFA Act provides for the elections of officers. Fifa has no power to interfere with or override our sovereign Laws. The [normalisation committee] mandate however put paid to its claim that Fifa does not interfere in governance matters during electoral years.

“This action of arrogating an invasive power to essentially direct the holding of fresh elections in violation of the provisions of the TTFA Act, established that contrary to its declared position, [Fifa] was directly engaging in the governance of the TTFA by seeking to remove the newly elected board.”

In essence, there is a contradiction in Fifa’s Statutes which ought to set alarm bells ringing among the other 210 member associations that make up the governing body.

Article 59.2 of the Fifa Statutes states: ‘Recourse to ordinary courts of law is prohibited unless specifically provided for in the Fifa regulations. Recourse to ordinary courts of law for all types of provisional measures is also prohibited’.

However, Gobin insisted that this clause does not provide Fifa with the protection Infantino thinks. Fifa’s legal position appears to be built on bluff and bullying instead.

“If this policy of Fifa’s is to be effective, then it can only mean that Fifa does not recognise the courts and the judicial systems in any of its 212 (sic) member states,” stated Gobin. “This is, in the courts’ view, an astonishing position for any entity, however powerful, to adopt—especially one that has control over world football, or for that matter, any other sport.

“As for its insistence on submission to the CAS in accordance with its rules, Fifa assumes wrongly that statute 59 effectively blocks all access by its members to courts in their sovereign states… By such agreements, parties do not deny the jurisdiction of the courts and the rule of law, rather they agree that the courts would generally hold the parties to the agreement and the courts generally decline jurisdiction.

“But there are some cases in which the court will not hold the parties to their agreement, and I have already decided that this is one of them.”

If Fifa cannot force members to use the Court of Arbitration for Sports, then it ought to convince them that justice can be served in that arena. The High Court judge said that, in the TTFA’s case, Fifa failed to demonstrate it was ‘ready and willing to do all things necessary to the proper conduct of the arbitration’.

“Fifa refused to pay its share of costs of appeal upfront and the CAS administrators allowed it to flout the rules,” stated Gobin. “Indeed [CAS] indicated that it was not Fifa’s practice to pay its share of the costs.

“[…] If it is the case, as Fifa continues to insist, that it will not accept the jurisdiction of the court of any member country, and that CAS is the only dispute resolution forum that it will recognise; then, given what the evidence has disclosed and which it has not denied—that Fifa generally does not comply with a basic rule regarding the payment its share of the costs of arbitration, even when its non-compliance can have the effect of denying parties access to the arbitration process (as it did in this case)—then there is every danger that Fifa will become a law unto itself, if it hasn’t already become one.”

As such, Fifa’s ‘disregard for the rule of law’ in Trinidad should not trouble local football stakeholders only. It should be a concern to all member associations, as well as the sponsors and patrons of ‘the beautiful game’.

“[Fifa’s] conduct regrettably calls into question the sincerity of its vaunted commitment to achieving its objectives to promote integrity, fair play, and friendly relations in society for humanitarian objectives,” said Gobin, “as well as its commitment to respecting internationally recognised human rights and striving to protect them.

“Disregard for the rule of law is inconsistent with these objectives.”

Gobin noted Fifa’s sustained ‘unrelenting campaign against the TTFA, the overt aim of which was to force it a litigant before the courts of this country to withdraw its case’—all while ‘it remained ensconced in its home in Zurich and as a result will probably manage to escape the consequences of its unlawful behaviour’.

Most bullies, deep down, are cowards. Gobin hinted that Infantino and his gang might be no different.

The High Court judge admitted that the ‘repercussions’ of defying Fifa are ‘worrying’ and sympathised with the players, coaches, and administrators who ‘believe that such far reaching consequences should be avoided, perhaps at all costs’.

However, she did not find fault in Wallace’s legal stance.

“It has to be said that the law expects the TTFA to do what its statutory duty requires, even in the face of unlawful pressure,” said Gobin. “[…] In the circumstances, the TTFA’s actions of seeking redress before the court was perhaps the only appropriate response, which avoided capitulating to the demands of Fifa and thereby elevating the status of Fifa Statutes above the laws passed by our Parliament.”

Over the past eight months, Wallace and the United TTFA failed to win the support of a single Fifa member association, let alone the 25-member Caribbean Football Union (CFU). And the former Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) president can no longer boast of majority support even within local football circles.

From here on, the court cannot help Wallace, even though normalisation committee chairman Robert Hadad is at least temporarily taken off the chess board.

Wallace’s critics are yet to formally request an extraordinary general meeting. It gives the TTFA president the chance to draw up the agenda and call it himself—and he is hardly likely to propose his own removal. As such, if he is to depart soon, it will be on his own terms.

Will he quit and pass the responsibility for the local body back to the members? Would he attempt to carry on regardless—as Ramdhan suggested recently?

Or, since he is already contesting the TTFA’s suspension in CAS, might he try to fight for an unlikely reinstatement within the Fifa umbrella against the odds?

Whatever happens now, Fifa’s governance issues are laid bare again. The ramifications of Gobin’s judgment are unlikely to disappear with Wallace.

RELATED NEWS

‘We’re free to play […] against ourselves… Brilliant!’ Dr Rowley appears to mock TTFA court win.
Wired868.com.


Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley appeared to mock a landmark High Court ruling won yesterday by Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and vice-presidents Clynt Taylor and Sam Phillip, as he suggested it was no more than a Pyrrhic victory.

The TTFA officials successfully defied Fifa president Gianni Infantino’s attempt to replace them with a normalisation committee, just four months into their term. In her verdict, Madame Justice Carol Gobin suggested Wallace had defended the integrity of body formed by an Act of Parliament.

“The wisdom of the challenge by the [TTFA officials] of the actions of Fifa is not for the Court [to decide],” stated Gobin, in her 23-page ruling. “But it has to be said that the law expects the TTFA to do what its statutory duty requires even in the face of unlawful pressure.

“[…] In the circumstances, the TTFA’s actions of seeking redress before the Court was perhaps the only appropriate response which avoided capitulating to the demands of Fifa; and thereby elevating the status of Fifa Statutes above the laws passed by our Parliament.”

However, Dr Rowley, on his personal Facebook page, began his response to the High Court decision with a quote from Pyrrhus, King of Epirus: ‘Another such victory and we shall be utterly ruined’.

“Thank God I was taught some Greek History and Latin at Bishop High School, otherwise I would have never been able to understand that adventure,” stated Dr Rowley. “I think we all now need to study the 2000-year events of the Pyrrhic wars to figure out how it all might end. Pyrrhos was indeed king of the Molossians and also of Epirus. However, Rome still stands so what does the future hold?

“Success that comes at such a high price and at other people’s expense sometimes results in the price of the ‘victory’ proving too costly to have been worth it. In that case what happens when the powerful king wins the battle but the thousands of subjects lose?”

Although the High Court ruled that Wallace remains the legitimate president of the TTFA, Dr Rowley copied Infantino in referring to the successful claims as the ‘United TTFA’—which is the slate that was elected by local football delegates on 24 November 2019.

“So now United TTFA has ‘won’ and Fifa has lost; the matter is settled in local court,” stated Dr Rowley. “We are now free of the ‘colonial’ Fifa. We, boys and girls, men and women, are free to play by ourselves and against ourselves, because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us.

“Oh. That’s it! I finally understand it. That means we can never lose and will always win because we will only be playing by ourselves. Brilliant!”

Ironically, Madame Justice Gobin criticised Fifa’s repeated disrespect to the local courts in her decision yesterday and said it was illegal to hand over control of a statutory body

“Throughout these proceedings, Fifa has persistently paraded its disdain for the authority of our local courts,” said the High Court judge. “[…] Normalisation effectively permits the removal of a body elected in accordance with the provisions of the Act, and the transfer of powers vested under statute to a committee through a process which is outside of the election process established by the statute.

“It is illegal. In its operation, normalisation necessarily requires TTFA to contract out of its duties and responsibilities under the TTFA Act and under its rules.

“There is a well established principle that a public right is not overridden by the agreements of private persons.”

(Full statement by Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley)

“Another such victory and we shall be utterly ruined,” Pyrrhus, King of Epirus, 2000 years ago.

Thank God I was taught some Greek History and Latin at Bishop High School. Otherwise I would have never been able to understand that adventure. I think we all now need to study the 2000-year events of the Pyrrhic wars to figure out how it all might end.

Pyrrhos was indeed king of the Molossians and also of Epirus. However, Rome still stands so what does the future hold?

Success that comes at such a high price and at other people’s expense sometimes results in the price of the ‘victory’ proving too costly to have been worth it. In that case what happens when the powerful King wins the battle but the thousands of subjects lose.

So now United TTFA has ‘won’ and FIFA has lost. The matter is settled in local court. We are now free of the ‘colonial’ FIFA.

We, boys and girls, men and women, are free to play by ourselves and against ourselves because nobody will be allowed to play with or against us.

Oh. That’s it! I finally understand it. That means we can never lose and will always win because we will only be playing by ourselves.

Brilliant!

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: ZANDOLIE on October 18, 2020, 06:08:34 AM
With all due respect to the Prime Minister...Pyrrhus of Epirus presented Hellenistic Greece with the last opportunity to curb Roman military expansion. His efforts were lost largely due to bickering, infighting, and insular 'eat-ah-food' self-interest of the Greek city states in the face of the Roman colossus. Sound familiar Mr. Rowley?
Title: Disillusionment
Post by: Tallman on October 19, 2020, 08:05:20 AM
Disillusionment
By Fazeer Mohammed (T&T Express)


So let’s say come next Sunday’s emergency meeting the vote, as is expected, goes overwhelmingly against William Wallace and his executive.

Let’s say they resign en masse in response, then next Monday morning Robert Hadad gets an email from general secretary Fatma Samoura reinstating the normalisation committee, returning him as the interim head of the game here, welcoming the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association as a member of the global football family once more, which means the money starts flowing again from Zurich.

And just to ensure such an excommunication never happens again, the members of the shameless, disgraceful organisation known as the PNM and the unelectably corrupt, arrogant institution that is the UNC come together to amend the relevant legislation so that in future, when it comes to football, we remain forever subservient to the will of FIFA but apparently more importantly, part of the global game.

After all that, what? Football in this country will be on a progressive track thereafter? And I suppose you believe in Santa Claus too, or that there is no police and soldier cover-up in the Drugs Sou Sou.

To be clear, if it were to transpire that — miracle of miracles — the Wallace executive gets a vote of confidence to continue the legal wrangle with FIFA, then it will just be a different version of the same bacchanal, because unauthorised alterations to contracts for coach Terry Fenwick and general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan, along with the re-floating of the ubiquitous marketing man Peter Miller, together with one or two other questionable deals mean Wallace on his own may struggle to survive this latest episode of turbulence in the nation’s most popular sport.

There is ample evidence across more than four decades (and no doubt even further back for those with the knowledge and memories to recall) to confirm that football governance here is an accurate reflection of the greed, corruption and, at best, misdirected priorities which define life in this twin-island republic.

So warped in our thinking are we that even historic experiences of unprecedented national unity and fervour under the umbrella of the beautiful game — from the 1989 “Road to Italy” campaign to the Germany 2006 experience to a full house at the Hasely Crawford Stadium in December 2014 supporting the women’s bid for World Cup glory — disintegrate into bitterness and acrimony in the obscene scramble for money and influence.

Sorry, it’s obscene for countries with a culture of transparency and accountability. Here, crabs in a barrel behaviour is normal, normal. Maybe it’s wrong to just give up, to believe that our experiences will forever be a recycling of the consequences of an absence of integrity with only dates and names changed. But where is the hope, or more precisely, what is the hope based on?

This disconcerting disconnection from reality extends across the region. Just last Tuesday I was involved in a discussion on West Indies cricket on commentator Andrew Mason’s radio show in his native Barbados, focussing on the squad to be selected and the team’s chances on the tour of New Zealand.

Just listening to the tenor of the dialogue you would think that the generally routine act of naming 15 players for the campaign was the start of a new era in the Caribbean game, as if picking so-and-so player or players will magically repair 25 years of struggle in Tests. One contributor even prefaced his opening statement by suggesting gone are the days when the West Indies went to New Zealand and regularly trounced their opponents 4-0 or 5-0, which is as disconnected from reality as you can get because that has never happened even once.

Look, I get that this all sounds very negative (and I am by nature a pessimist) but if someone can point to something real – something beyond “hoping” and “thinking positive” – upon which to base optimism then I would be happy to listen.

Maybe it’s a combination of advancing years and experiencing the same blimming thing over and over and over again, but impatience at seemingly perpetual outrage after outrage is intensifying. Outrage like racism, outrage like sanitising cheating, which have contributed to a decision to ease away from supporting Liverpool after 43 years and to make last Saturday’s 2-2 draw at Everton as the final English Premier League game I will actually sit down to watch in its entirety.

Space is running out today but suffice it to say that, in the context of the greater awareness brought on by the “Black Lives Matter” movement, Liverpool Football Club’s history of racism when combined with contemporary and broader football issues like players faking injuries and fouls, and the intrusion of VAR technology, make Liverpool and the EPL only worthy of occasional interest now.

Sport should be about joy, not constant controversy.
Title: TTFA ready to go to CAS if FIFA pays half the cost
Post by: Tallman on October 19, 2020, 04:17:56 PM
TTFA ready to go to CAS if FIFA pays half the cost
By Jada Loutoo (T&T Newday)


THE T&T Football Association’s (TTFA) legal troubles are not over despite a judge’s recent ruling that the appointment of a normalisation committee by world governing body FIFA, to run the affairs of local football, was illegal.

Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice of Appeal Nolan Bereaux are, on Friday, expected to rule on a preliminary jurisdiction issue in an appeal by FIFA which can see the TTFA’s victory –which some have described as an own goal – last week being invalidated.

The appellate court has been asked to reconsider its application to set aside service and stay the proceedings in the local courts for the TTFA’s dispute to be heard before the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS.) FIFA has stuck to its position the only body to determine a dispute between it and member federations is the CAS.

The application was made before Justice Carol Gobin in May, but she denied FIFA’s request to have the dispute remitted back to the CAS and proceeded to trial, despite FIFA having lodged an appeal.

At Monday’s hearing of the appeal, Dr Emir Crowne, one of the attorneys representing the TTFA, said there was no dispute to send to the CAS since FIFA chose to frustrate its appeal by suspending T&T and the TTFA.

He said FIFA should not have suspended the TTFA until the appeal court ruled on the jurisdiction point.

“But by FIFA taking the extraordinary step to suspend while its own appeal was pending, they introduced their own frustration of the matter,” he submitted.

“There is no dispute left because of its own actions,” Crowne submitted.

However, he said if FIFA agreed to lift the suspension and agree to pay half the costs of the arbitration, then the TTFA would withdraw its appeal at the CAS and have the dispute over the legality of the appointment of the committee resolved in the Switzerland-based court.

At Monday’s hearing, Crowne, TTFA attorney Matthew Gayle and Senior Counsel Christopher Hamel-Smith, who represents FIFA, were questioned extensively on the CAS arbitration process by Archie and Bereaux.

Archie posed the question on FIFA paying half the cost of arbitration and on lifting the suspension since, according to him, “I am assuming the TTFA wants to retain its relationship with FIFA.”

“If these two things were to happen what would be FIFA’s position?” he asked.

Hamel-Smith said while he saw no reason why FIFA would not abide by its assurance to pay half the costs of arbitration, since he suggested it to the body, he said he could not speak to FIFA’s position on the suspension, pointing out that even if the suspension were to be lifted and the normalisation committee reintroduced, there was last week’s judgment of Justice Carol Gobin which prevented them from doing so.

Both teams were urged by Archie to explore the issue amongst themselves before they give their decision on Friday at 3 pm.

However, in response to a possible reintroduction of the normalisation committee which would lead to arbitration before the CAS, Crowne submitted added that to return to the arbitration process would be unconscionable. He urged the judges to protect the sovereignty of the local courts since, according to the TTFA's attorney's , external interference in a statutory body must be subject to the courts of T&T.

On March 17, FIFA removed TTFA’s president William Wallace and his executive (deputies Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick and Joseph Sam Phillip) who were elected in November 2019. FIFA said the decision was made because of the association’s financial woes and “massive debt.”

But in April, the ousted executive appealed to the CAS, saying the decision was a breach of the TTFA’s constitution.

The team later indicated it did not believe CAS would give a “fair hearing”. Instead – on May 18 – they appealed to the local High Court.

Crowne said the main reason why the TTFA withdrew the proceedings before the CAS was because FIFA said it would not pay half the costs. He accused FIFA of mandating member federations to go to the CAS, but refusing, on policy, to pay part of the fees.

He said by doing so, the TTFA was being denied access to justice.

“They are saying ‘you must go to CAS but we won’t pay our share of the arbitration cost’ especially in a case where a federation is mismanaging its funds,” said Crowne.

However, he said he did not see an issue with the impasse being heard and resolved at the CAS

Earlier in the proceedings, Hamel-Smith said Gobin was wrong when she found the High Court had the jurisdiction to hear the matter, adding that it was clear that under the TTFA’s constitution, disputes of this nature would be taken to the CAS.

He pointed out that the TTFA Act incorporated the FIFA statute that called for such a move when disputes arise.

“This does not mean that FIFA is above the law.

“CAS has exclusive jurisdiction. The TTFA cannot ignore the terms of its own Constitution,” he said.

Hamel-Smith pointed out that if the TTFA wished to remove that restriction, then it would have to amend its constitution to give effect to it, but said if that was done, it would mean that TTFA no longer wished to operate under a FIFA constitution.

“As long as the TTFA has not amended its constitution, it has committed itself to go to the CAS… It is not good enough for individuals to get up one day and say ‘we want to try this in the T&T court in the face of what its own Constitution say,’” he said.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 20, 2020, 12:39:29 AM
Appeal Court to render ruling on FIFA/TTFA dispute Friday
By Rickie Ramdass (T&T Express).


Decision delayed

IF FIFA were to agree to lift the suspension imposed on the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) and agree to pay its half of arbitration costs, then the TTFA has no issue with having the dispute between it and the world’s football governing body heard and resolved at the Court of Arbitration (CAS) in Switzerland.

This was indicated yesterday by Dr Emir Crowne, one of the attorneys representing the TTFA in an appeal brought by FIFA against the decision of Justice Carol Gobin who found that the local court had the jurisdiction to hear the dispute.

The appeal did not challenge Justice Gobin’s final ruling that was delivered last Tuesday in which she found the removal of the TTFA’s board by FIFA and the appointment of a normalisation committee was illegal, void and of no effect. In fact, the appeal at hand was filed prior to the judge delivering her final ruling.

Should the Appeal Court find in favour of FIFA on the issue of jurisdiction, then Justice Gobin’s ruling will be overturned. Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice Nolan Bereaux said they will be delivering their ruling on the issue by 3 p.m., on Friday.

During the proceedings, Crowne submitted that the main reason why the TTFA pulled out of arbitration proceedings at the CAS and filed action at the High Court was because FIFA indicated it would not be paying its half of the arbitration fees. He said it was only following this did FIFA move to have it suspended on September 24.

Crowne said FIFA “has devised a scheme” where, by way of its statute it is calling on its membership to go to the CAS for dispute resolution when they arise, but are, at the same time, refusing to pay its part of the arbitration fees, at least in this instance.

By doing so, Crowne said the TTFA was being denied access to justice since it is currently facing financial difficulties and FIFA knows this all too well.

“They are saying ‘you must go to CAS but we won’t pay our share of the arbitration cost’ especially in a case where a federation is mismanaging its funds,” said Crowne.

However, he said he did not see an issue with the impasse being heard and resolved at the CAS if FIFA was willing to pay its part of the cost.

“Perhaps FIFA can indicate that it would lift the suspension and indicate its intention to pay its half of the arbitration fees and we can go to the CAS and have the matter heard within a week or two,” he said.

Archie commended the position taken, but noted that the court would not be imposing any obligation on the TTFA to do so. “Well that is something that you and FIFA can consider but we do not want to seem to be pressing anyone,” said the Chief Justice.

Earlier in the proceedings, senior counsel Christopher Hamel-Smith said Justice Gobin was plainly wrong when she found the High Court had the jurisdiction to hear the matter. He argued it was abundantly clear that constitutionally the TTFA voluntarily imposed on itself that disputes of this nature would be taken to the CAS.

This was so, he said, because in its own constitution, the TTFA incorporated the FIFA statute that called for such a move when disputes arise.

“This does not mean that FIFA is above the law,” he said, making reference to last Tuesday’s criticism of FIFA by Justice Gobin. “CAS has exclusive jurisdiction. The TTFA cannot ignore the terms of its own Constitution,” he said.

Hamel-Smith pointed out that if the TTFA wished to remove that restriction, then it would be required to have it removed from its Constitution, but this would mean that the TTFA would effectively be taking the position that it no longer wished to operate under the FIFA Constitution.

“As long as the TTFA has not amended its constitution, it has committed itself to go to the CAS… It is not good enough for individuals to get up one day and say ‘we want to try this in the Trinidad and Tobago court in the face of what its own Constitution say,’” said the attorney.

RELATED NEWS

FIFA jurisdiction appeal decision on Friday
By Derek Achong (T&T Guardian).


The Court of Appeal is scheduled to determine FIFA's appeal, over High Court Judge Carol Gobin's decision to hear a case brought by embattled T&T Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and his United TTFA executive team, on Friday at 3 pm.

Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Appellate Judge Nolan Bereaux reserved their judgement on the appeal after finishing hearing submissions from the two parties in a virtual hearing, this afternoon.

In the appeal, the panel has been asked to determine whether Gobin had the jurisdiction to hear the case, which she eventually decided in Wallace and his team's favour, last week.

On Monday, FIFA contended that under its constitution, the TTFA agreed to forgo litigation in local courts in favour of arbitration before the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

It also contends that the Act of Parliament, which incorporated the TTFA, did not preclude it from choosing CAS over local courts in its constitution.

The TTFA's lawyers have contended that the constitution could not oust the jurisdiction of the local courts.

They also claimes that FIFA frustrated their client's attempt to challenge its (FIFA) decision to replace them with a normalisation committee by refusing to pay its share of the 40,000 Swiss Francs required for an appeal before the CAS.

If FIFA wins the appeal, Gobin's ruling on the substantive case would become null and void.

Delivering her judgement in the case, last week, Gobin ruled that FIFA's move to appoint a Normalisation Committee led by businessman Robert Hadad to replace Wallace and his team was illegal, null and void and of no effect.

Gobin said: "The Court declares that the decision of the Defendant dated 17/3/20 to appoint a normalisation committee was made in bad faith and for an improper and illegal motive."

She also ruled that FIFA's Statutes which speak to the appointment of such committees did not conform with the local legislation which incorporated the TTFA and prescribes how it is governed.

In her judgement, Gobin considered FIFA's Statutes on the committee which stated that it is to be appointed to member federations in "extraordinary circumstances".

"The rule essentially gives FIFA a free hand. The absence of a definition does not however limit my ability to consider the circumstances of it and to determine the lawfulness of FIFA's actions," she said.

"I have considered the evidence and have come to the conclusion that the decision to invoke the normalisation was unwarranted and indefensible," she added.

She said that FIFA attempted to usurp the power of the local legislation by directing the committee to arrange fresh elections.

She also took the opportunity to criticise FIFA for its apparent disdain for the local courts through its actions in repeatedly refusing to recognise their jurisdiction for cases within the country.

"The defendant's conduct regrettably calls into question the sincerity of its vaulted commitment to achieving its objectives to promote integrity, fair play, and friendly relations in society for humanitarian objectives as well as its commitment to respecting internationally recognised human rights and striving to protect them. Disregard for the rule of law is inconsistent with these objectives," she said.

While Gobin said she recognised the effect of the case on the sport in this country, she suggested that it could be considered warranted in the circumstances.

"The TTFA's actions in seeking redress before the Court was perhaps the only appropriate response which avoided capitulating to the demands of FIFA and thereby elevating the status of FIFA Statues above the laws passed by our Parliament," Gobin said.

Wallace and his colleagues are being represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Crystal Paul, and Jason Jones, while Christopher Hamel-Smith, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie appeared for FIFA.

Title: Re: Disillusionment
Post by: pull stones on October 20, 2020, 01:45:56 AM
Disillusionment
By Fazeer Mohammed (T&T Express)


So let’s say come next Sunday’s emergency meeting the vote, as is expected, goes overwhelmingly against William Wallace and his executive.

Let’s say they resign en masse in response, then next Monday morning Robert Hadad gets an email from general secretary Fatma Samoura reinstating the normalisation committee, returning him as the interim head of the game here, welcoming the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association as a member of the global football family once more, which means the money starts flowing again from Zurich.

And just to ensure such an excommunication never happens again, the members of the shameless, disgraceful organisation known as the PNM and the unelectably corrupt, arrogant institution that is the UNC come together to amend the relevant legislation so that in future, when it comes to football, we remain forever subservient to the will of FIFA but apparently more importantly, part of the global game.

After all that, what? Football in this country will be on a progressive track thereafter? And I suppose you believe in Santa Claus too, or that there is no police and soldier cover-up in the Drugs Sou Sou.

To be clear, if it were to transpire that — miracle of miracles — the Wallace executive gets a vote of confidence to continue the legal wrangle with FIFA, then it will just be a different version of the same bacchanal, because unauthorised alterations to contracts for coach Terry Fenwick and general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan, along with the re-floating of the ubiquitous marketing man Peter Miller, together with one or two other questionable deals mean Wallace on his own may struggle to survive this latest episode of turbulence in the nation’s most popular sport.

There is ample evidence across more than four decades (and no doubt even further back for those with the knowledge and memories to recall) to confirm that football governance here is an accurate reflection of the greed, corruption and, at best, misdirected priorities which define life in this twin-island republic.

So warped in our thinking are we that even historic experiences of unprecedented national unity and fervour under the umbrella of the beautiful game — from the 1989 “Road to Italy” campaign to the Germany 2006 experience to a full house at the Hasely Crawford Stadium in December 2014 supporting the women’s bid for World Cup glory — disintegrate into bitterness and acrimony in the obscene scramble for money and influence.

Sorry, it’s obscene for countries with a culture of transparency and accountability. Here, crabs in a barrel behaviour is normal, normal. Maybe it’s wrong to just give up, to believe that our experiences will forever be a recycling of the consequences of an absence of integrity with only dates and names changed. But where is the hope, or more precisely, what is the hope based on?

This disconcerting disconnection from reality extends across the region. Just last Tuesday I was involved in a discussion on West Indies cricket on commentator Andrew Mason’s radio show in his native Barbados, focussing on the squad to be selected and the team’s chances on the tour of New Zealand.

Just listening to the tenor of the dialogue you would think that the generally routine act of naming 15 players for the campaign was the start of a new era in the Caribbean game, as if picking so-and-so player or players will magically repair 25 years of struggle in Tests. One contributor even prefaced his opening statement by suggesting gone are the days when the West Indies went to New Zealand and regularly trounced their opponents 4-0 or 5-0, which is as disconnected from reality as you can get because that has never happened even once.

Look, I get that this all sounds very negative (and I am by nature a pessimist) but if someone can point to something real – something beyond “hoping” and “thinking positive” – upon which to base optimism then I would be happy to listen.

Maybe it’s a combination of advancing years and experiencing the same blimming thing over and over and over again, but impatience at seemingly perpetual outrage after outrage is intensifying. Outrage like racism, outrage like sanitising cheating, which have contributed to a decision to ease away from supporting Liverpool after 43 years and to make last Saturday’s 2-2 draw at Everton as the final English Premier League game I will actually sit down to watch in its entirety.

Space is running out today but suffice it to say that, in the context of the greater awareness brought on by the “Black Lives Matter” movement, Liverpool Football Club’s history of racism when combined with contemporary and broader football issues like players faking injuries and fouls, and the intrusion of VAR technology, make Liverpool and the EPL only worthy of occasional interest now.

Sport should be about joy, not constant controversy.
how these guys ever made the cut to have to opportunity to write an article in the news paper is beyond me. i've seen about a thousand articles on this issue, and no one ever gets to the bottom line, it's just the same ole the united ttfa was replaced by the NC on such and such a date, and this, that and the other transpired in between.

it's amazing to see that no one ever mention's jack warner's input in all this, or how DJW single handedly robbed the office for his own gain, and how he went behind the scenes and manipulated a further onslaught on football, and why this united TTFA put up such a fight and for reasons being, and how fifa was severely heavy handed and unfair, and what could be the reason for their heavy handedness....or collusion.

all this writing by fazeer (and i know he means well) to say what? all this writing to say what countless journalist has already said? come on mate, i'm sure you can delve deeper into the mud pile than your multiple attempts suggest.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: vb on October 20, 2020, 04:34:47 AM
Disillusionment
By Fazeer Mohammed (T&T Express)


So let’s say come next Sunday’s emergency meeting the vote, as is expected, goes overwhelmingly against William Wallace and his executive.

Let’s say they resign en masse in response, then next Monday morning Robert Hadad gets an email from general secretary Fatma Samoura reinstating the normalisation committee, returning him as the interim head of the game here, welcoming the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association as a member of the global football family once more, which means the money starts flowing again from Zurich.

And just to ensure such an excommunication never happens again, the members of the shameless, disgraceful organisation known as the PNM and the unelectably corrupt, arrogant institution that is the UNC come together to amend the relevant legislation so that in future, when it comes to football, we remain forever subservient to the will of FIFA but apparently more importantly, part of the global game.

After all that, what? Football in this country will be on a progressive track thereafter? And I suppose you believe in Santa Claus too, or that there is no police and soldier cover-up in the Drugs Sou Sou.

To be clear, if it were to transpire that — miracle of miracles — the Wallace executive gets a vote of confidence to continue the legal wrangle with FIFA, then it will just be a different version of the same bacchanal, because unauthorised alterations to contracts for coach Terry Fenwick and general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan, along with the re-floating of the ubiquitous marketing man Peter Miller, together with one or two other questionable deals mean Wallace on his own may struggle to survive this latest episode of turbulence in the nation’s most popular sport.

There is ample evidence across more than four decades (and no doubt even further back for those with the knowledge and memories to recall) to confirm that football governance here is an accurate reflection of the greed, corruption and, at best, misdirected priorities which define life in this twin-island republic.

So warped in our thinking are we that even historic experiences of unprecedented national unity and fervour under the umbrella of the beautiful game — from the 1989 “Road to Italy” campaign to the Germany 2006 experience to a full house at the Hasely Crawford Stadium in December 2014 supporting the women’s bid for World Cup glory — disintegrate into bitterness and acrimony in the obscene scramble for money and influence.

Sorry, it’s obscene for countries with a culture of transparency and accountability. Here, crabs in a barrel behaviour is normal, normal. Maybe it’s wrong to just give up, to believe that our experiences will forever be a recycling of the consequences of an absence of integrity with only dates and names changed. But where is the hope, or more precisely, what is the hope based on?

This disconcerting disconnection from reality extends across the region. Just last Tuesday I was involved in a discussion on West Indies cricket on commentator Andrew Mason’s radio show in his native Barbados, focussing on the squad to be selected and the team’s chances on the tour of New Zealand.

Just listening to the tenor of the dialogue you would think that the generally routine act of naming 15 players for the campaign was the start of a new era in the Caribbean game, as if picking so-and-so player or players will magically repair 25 years of struggle in Tests. One contributor even prefaced his opening statement by suggesting gone are the days when the West Indies went to New Zealand and regularly trounced their opponents 4-0 or 5-0, which is as disconnected from reality as you can get because that has never happened even once.

Look, I get that this all sounds very negative (and I am by nature a pessimist) but if someone can point to something real – something beyond “hoping” and “thinking positive” – upon which to base optimism then I would be happy to listen.

Maybe it’s a combination of advancing years and experiencing the same blimming thing over and over and over again, but impatience at seemingly perpetual outrage after outrage is intensifying. Outrage like racism, outrage like sanitising cheating, which have contributed to a decision to ease away from supporting Liverpool after 43 years and to make last Saturday’s 2-2 draw at Everton as the final English Premier League game I will actually sit down to watch in its entirety.

Space is running out today but suffice it to say that, in the context of the greater awareness brought on by the “Black Lives Matter” movement, Liverpool Football Club’s history of racism when combined with contemporary and broader football issues like players faking injuries and fouls, and the intrusion of VAR technology, make Liverpool and the EPL only worthy of occasional interest now.

Sport should be about joy, not constant controversy.
how these guys ever made the cut to have to opportunity to write an article in the news paper is beyond me. i've seen about a thousand articles on this issue, and no one ever gets to the bottom line, it's just the same ole the united ttfa was replaced by the NC on such and such a date, and this, that and the other transpired in between.

it's amazing to see that no one ever mention's jack warner's input in all this, or how DJW single handedly robbed the office for his own gain, and how he went behind the scenes and manipulated a further onslaught on football, and why this united TTFA put up such a fight and for reasons being, and how fifa was severely heavy handed and unfair, and what could be the reason for their heavy handedness....or collusion.

all this writing by fazeer (and i know he means well) to say what? all this writing to say what countless journalist has already said? come on mate, i'm sure you can delve deeper into the mud pile than your multiple attempts suggest.

Nah man, look this journalist do it here. ;-)

https://www.hail-caribbean-sport.com/
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on October 20, 2020, 08:18:54 AM
I see you’re a very modest man VB, instead of alluding to oneself you chose to remain anonymous. good article though verseen but I wasn’t alluding to journalist like you who writes for a weekly publication, I was merely speaking to big newspaper journalist in Trinidad and Tobago who don’t take the time to do proper research and really use the opportunity to comprehensively enlighten John public in a meaningful way.

Those jokers write these flimsy dime a dozen articles and throw it to public like hungry fowls pecking away at dirt, and could care less about what’s true and what’s not, truth is, they’re only in it for a pay check. as for the prime minister, please mate you can’t really put him in fifa’s corner that conveniently even though he did speak foolishly of the process, and I believe he’s not a fan of fifa simply because at the opening ceremony of the HOF, the PM was very harsh on fifa and infantino in particular to the point of embarrassment.

in all honesty I believe that william wallace and company did themselves no favors from the very beginning when they side stepped the government to go it alone, and it was only when they got in a bind with fifa that they sought help from the MOS.

for instance regarding the HOF, they could have went to the government for help in getting it up to standard, but instead chose to build another facility in arima claiming that the HOF was unfinished and unusable. they also dropped the ball when they went to the local courts. I honestly thought they squandered an opportunity when the minister of sports begged them to go back to CAS, they could have bargained their way to CAS by having the MOS pay the court cost.

and though the PM talked out of sorts regarding the case, he probably was never really verse on the matter which also gave these men another opportunity to sit with the powers that be in the country and bring an awareness to the situation, IMO they dropped the ball all the way and was ill advised on handling this situation.

Now today it all came to nought, fifa played them well like a fine tuned fiddle. ms Warwick resigned, look loy resigned, and I’m sure the rest will follow, or they could be ousted by losing the trust of the stake holders, instead of bringing them on board  fro the very beginning with full support for their cause. again, all that effort for nought.

don’t get me wrong i was all for their cause when they stayed focused, but they lost me when they flip flopped on many occasions, from CAS to the high court, then back to the stakeholders, then dropping the case only to reopen it again the next day after already consulting with the stakeholders and agreeing on a way forward, this was a bit too wishy washy for me and many others who previously supported the stand off, and in the end what did they accomplish? I’m sorry but it was all for nought. i can’t, I just can’t.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Rastaman on October 20, 2020, 09:41:43 AM
Excellent article VB.....it is astounding to me how other people cannot see this
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 20, 2020, 05:45:21 PM
Excellent article VB.....it is astounding to me how other people cannot see this
Oh they see it. The resulting thoughts process and eventual outcomes generated from those visions do not align with those individuals alternate various agendas. All of which may have one common thread, pull on it, they all come unraveled.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Deeks on October 20, 2020, 10:03:19 PM
Good going VB. Blessings.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: vb on October 21, 2020, 02:18:28 AM
Excellent article VB.....it is astounding to me how other people cannot see this
Oh they see it. The resulting thoughts process and eventual outcomes generated from those visions do not align with those individuals alternate various agendas. All of which may have one common thread, pull on it, they all come unraveled.

 :beermug: :beermug: :beermug:
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 21, 2020, 03:56:02 PM
Dear Editor: Dr Rowley must not put Fifa above our laws—even if it is foreign, white, powerful and rich.
Wired868.com.


“[…] I note that in response to Mr [William] Wallace’s indication that Parliament can change our law if it wants, the prime minister responded by saying that he is willing to help wherever he can.

“I trust that that help will not include an official, parliamentary setting aside of our constitution and placing a private corporation, and its rules, above the powers of our Parliament or the sovereignty of our country—even if that corporation is foreign, white, powerful and rich…”

In the following Letter to the Editor, David Christopher Benjamin, a consultant and community activist, responds to Nigel Scott’s legal view of the battle between the TTFA and FIFA:

I saw a letter to the editor on Wired868 titled ‘A legal view’. It seems to try to explore some of the technicalities of legal process according to Fifa’s rules. The title would suggest that it is exploring all the legal aspects of this issue.

For some reason, however, it doesn’t. It takes the position of starting with Fifa’s contractual rules and asking why the TTFA, having contracted, has not followed them.

By now, we have heard of Justice Carol Gobin’s judgment in which she pointed out that a contract between private parties cannot override statutory obligations—a point I have made here quite clearly before.

She went on to point out that such contractual provisions with respect to arbitration are in fact quite normal in many areas (such as construction). And in none of them are they meant to preempt completely, recourse to the courts, despite the primacy given to arbitration.

We have had enough experience with Cricket West Indies to know the dangers of a body that is accountable to no one. So why are we not starting from the point of the legislation in this jurisdiction where TTFA exists and asking why Fifa has made no attempt to be consistent with it?

The answer may simply be that each person, having looked at the overall situation, the risks involved and the possible ultimate result, has decided—based on his own appetite for risk—what position he supports. That is very evident here.

This is reasonable and very personal. I understand that the same thing applies to me and the positions I have taken. And I cannot expect anyone else to replicate my desire for justice or my appetite for risk, including the sacrifice that may have to go with the hope of achieving positive long-term change in the international system.

Which brings me back to a comment I saw made by a friend who analysed both sides of this matter. What struck me was the last sentence of his comment. It simply said ‘there are no legal answers to be had here’. And I suspect that he is right.

Legal options have played themselves out; or, at least, soon will. The outstanding issue of achieving justice finally (and by ‘finally’ I mean at an international level that influences Fifa to do the right thing) will require the intervention of parties who have the power to influence Fifa.

The contradictions that exist between the Fifa contract and the local legislation cannot be resolved by anything other than parties deciding which one they will follow, and hopefully coming to some agreement between themselves.

Maybe the local powers can seek to assist the TTFA in their justified ‘negotiations’ with the international power that is Fifa.

I note that in response to Mr Wallace’s indication that Parliament can change our law if it wants, the prime minister responded by saying that he is willing to help wherever he can.

I trust that that help will not include an official, parliamentary setting aside of our constitution and placing a private corporation, and its rules, above the powers of our Parliament or the sovereignty of our country—even if that corporation is foreign, white, powerful and rich.

Changing the law in a way that will force the TTFA to simply comply with whatever Fifa says at any time, and in a way which removes the recourse that TTFA has to justice in their own country, will be a massive step backward for a black country.

It was interesting that Mr Wallace pointed out that the United Kingdom is one of the countries whose constitution and contract with Fifa mirror the status in Trinidad. The UK is the jurisdiction which gave the world ‘the beautiful game’ and which passed the (global governance) ball to Fifa in 1904.

Can you imagine, years later, the UK being told by Fifa that they have to go to their Parliament to give up their sovereignty in order to ensure that Fifa can dictate all aspects of football without fetter ? I would want to be a fly on that wall.

Of course in the end, what is required here is for the world to find a way to ensure that Fifa—and CAS—operate in a businesslike, non-corrupt manner with efficient and fair processes, which are subject to accountability and transparency.

And that Fifa operates at all times in the interest of the people that they serve and not see these people as subjects, or as enemies to be fought and destroyed at every disagreement.

Operating in the interest of its membership requires a mindset that honours, as a duty, collaborative interaction among equals.

How did we get here ? Had Fifa taken the collaborative approach to the Trinidad and Tobago matter, we would not be here at all.

RELATED NEWS

Rowley ready to help! Wallace meets PM and sets EGM date, as TTFA targets Fifa deadline.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace will convene an extraordinary general meeting on Sunday 25 October with member delegates of the local football body.

And the agenda will deal specifically with ‘the way forward’ for the TTFA and the current Fifa suspension.

Wallace confirmed the date and agenda to Wired868 last night. As promised, the embattled administrator contacted his board within 24 hours of Tuesday’s High Court win, with the majority of directors agreeing to the meeting.

The TTFA has until 3pm on Friday 18 December to satisfy Fifa’s terms, or they could miss out on the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup as well as the Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifying series. Fifa gave the TTFA until 3pm CET (Central European Time), which would be 9am here. Concacaf’s deadline is 3pm Eastern Time, which is the same as T&T’s local time.

Football fans will hope the rift with Fifa is patched up before then, although the cost of doing so remains uncertain.

On 24 September, the Bureau of the Fifa Council, which is headed by Fifa president Gianni Infantino, said: ‘this suspension will only be lifted when the TTFA fully complies with its obligations as a member of Fifa, including recognising the legitimacy of the appointed normalisation committee and bringing its own statutes into line with the Fifa Statutes’.

Thus far, Fifa has not clarified what amendments are required, although it is presumed to be something that will allow the governing body to treat the TTFA’s elected officials as replaceable employees, rather than partners with some level of autonomy.

The TTFA’s legal team challenged the Fifa suspension at the Court of Arbitration (CAS) for Sport on 25 September but are yet to get a hearing date. Wallace said they have asked for an expedited hearing. However, if one is not granted before the 25 October EGM, then the local body’s 47 member delegates will decide if to allow the case to continue, or if to withdraw it.

“The priority is trying to get the Fifa suspension lifted because the 18 December is right ahead,” said Wallace. “We don’t want to linger.”

Yesterday, Wallace and third vice-president Sam Phillip met Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley, Minister of National Security and Minister in the Office of the Prime Minister Stuart Young, and Minister of Sport and Community Development Shamfa Cudjoe from 2pm at the Diplomatic Centre in St Ann’s.

The meeting was arranged at the request of the prime minister and, ironically, it was the first time that Dr Rowley met Wallace since he was elected TTFA president on 24 November 2019.

Young did not even acknowledge Wallace’s emails, a few months ago, when the TTFA president thanked him for an upgrade at the Home of Football and subsequently enquired about footballers stranded in El Salvador. Instead, the Port of Spain North/St Ann’s West MP dealt exclusively with Fifa-appointed normalisation committee chairman Robert Hadad at the time.

Cudjoe repeatedly derided Wallace’s legal battle with Fifa in the press, while Dr Rowley mocked the administrator’s legal win on Wednesday morning.

Wallace said Dr Rowley’s social media post did not come up in the meeting. And, although nobody congratulated him on Madame Justice Carol Gobin’s High Court ruling, the football president said the discussion itself was cordial and calm.

“The prime minister wanted to know if we want to continue playing football under Fifa,” Wallace told Wired868. “If we did not, then he wanted to know our plan going forward; and if we do, then he wanted to know what we have to do to remain playing as a part of Fifa.”

Wallace informed the prime minister that the TTFA does want to remain a member of Fifa, and the way forward from here on will be discussed with the membership on 25 October.

“I also told him that, based on the court’s interpretation of our statutes, the Parliament may very well have a part to play in that,” said Wallace, in reference to the yet unspecified constitutional amendment demanded by Fifa. “[Dr Rowley] said in whatever way they can help, they are willing and ready to help.”

Wallace noted that Trinidad and Tobago are not the only member association within Fifa which is incorporated by an Act of Parliament. The same is also true of England, Portugal, Australia and the United States of America, among others.

“If they are asking Trinidad and Tobago alone to change, then we will have a real issue with that,” said Wallace.

But he insisted that the general meeting will decide. Unlike their previous meeting with members, the 25 October conclave will be a formal one with the president obliged to follow the guidance of his membership.

Does Wallace want to remain in charge of the TTFA after that meeting? Does he see himself at the helm come December?

“I am not answering that yet,” he said. “I want to show the members the respect of talking to them first.”

Wallace said he has no regrets about his seven months of struggle with Fifa, which led to a provisional suspension from the football body but also vindication in the court.

“It has to be said that the law expects the TTFA to do what its statutory duty requires, even in the face of unlawful pressure,” stated Gobin, in her judgment on 13 October. “[…] In the circumstances, the TTFA’s actions of seeking redress before the court was perhaps the only appropriate response, which avoided capitulating to the demands of Fifa and thereby elevating the status of Fifa Statutes above the laws passed by our Parliament.”

Wallace said it was his favourite excerpt from the ruling.

“If that is the only thing that we accomplished, then to me it is a major accomplishment—who wants to move that [Parliamentary protection] after, it is their problem,” he said.

He suggested it was not so much that Fifa did not defend themselves in court as they could not defend their actions.

“Remember Fifa provided affidavits upfront from Veron Mosengo-Omba and I was able to respond to every one, it just did not make sense,” said Wallace. “And the judge cited those affidavits in her judgment and came to the same conclusion. It is not that they were not involved, because they paid to take part in the Court of Appeal hearing, so you can’t be participating in part of the court and not the other part.

“The reason they did not try to defend themselves [on Tuesday] is because they could not defend the indefensible.”

Wallace said he reached out to Fifa on eight occasions for mediation, but was snubbed each time.

“Even a condemned man is given a chance to be heard,” he said.

In the end, Wallace said he is saddened that his legal stance has so divided his countrymen.

“For me, there were so many lessons in this,” he said. “This wasn’t just about football and what happens on the field of play… Our sovereignty was being threatened by a foreign entity; we were right to defend that. It was bigger than just football.

“I have no regrets.”

Wallace said he shared some of the issues involving the local game with the prime minister. Chief among them is a debt estimated at between TT$50 to $80 million, which he described as a ‘stranglehold on the local game’.

“I told the prime minister that regardless of who is running Trinidad and Tobago’s football, that debt is a major problem,” he said. “If normalisation would have meant Fifa paying that off, I would have gladly walked away there and then.

“The prime minister’s response was that taxpayers’ money can’t be used to deal with it and I agree with that—not in this time at least, when people are suffering and losing their jobs and so on.”

The TTFA’s problems will not be solved merely by re-entry to Fifa and, possibly, normalisation. Wallace suggested introspection is needed, rather than noise.

“We need to reset Trinidad and Tobago’s football,” he said. “We cannot continue doing the same things over and over with half-prepared teams. We need to start properly developing our players so they can have a real chance.

“Everybody’s talking about missing out on this and missing out on that but we should be focusing on building up our players, so they can go out there and perform. Instead we have been taking a little bit of money and running into competitions and coming back out early, running in and coming back out again.”

The TTFA entered just one tournament under the Wallace-led administration. The Women’s National Under-20 Team finished as quarterfinalists at the Concacaf 2020 competition under head coach Richard Hood.

It was a significant improvement from a bunch of players who were humiliated at Under-15 level under coach Marlon Charles—they lost 22-0 to USA and 15-0 to Mexico—and failed to even reach the final Caribbean Under-17 qualifying round under Jamaal Shabazz.

However, within weeks of the Women’s Soca Warriors credible showing, the Bureau of the Fifa Council stepped in to remove Wallace. Revelations about a secret contract handed to marketing director Peter Miller and deals with Soca Warriors head coach Terry Fenwick and general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan that did not match terms agreed to by the board, weakened Wallace’s moral authority too.

Arguably, Gobin’s judgment offered a touch of redemption to the former Carapichaima East Secondary vice-principal, who was voted into office with a largely unblemished record from his time as Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) president.

Even with the High Court win under his belt—once it is not snatched away by the Court of Appeal on Monday—Wallace would surely need a CAS miracle to survive at the helm of the TTFA. That is particularly ironic considering his team’s acrimonious departure from the Swiss-based sport arbitration body in May.

At this stage, though, Wallace’s fate still remains in his own hands.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 23, 2020, 12:52:40 AM
Football membership wants Wallace to answer questions.
T&T Guardian Reports.


William Wallace, the embattled president of the T&T Football Association (TTFA), is being asked to equip himself to answer several questions at Sunday's Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM) which was called to decide on a way forward for local football.

Two of the questions required him to say how a long-standing debt of now $70 million, will be cleared, and how he proposes to pay the salaries of coaches, office staff and other contracted officials, such as Peter Miller, the TTFA's marketing representative?

The sport's general membership intends to pose 19 questions to Wallace, who along with his vice-presidents Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillip and Susan Warrick-Joseph, who has now resigned her post, to challenge FIFA's appointment of a Normalisation Committee to replace them on March 17.

FIFA's decision came after a visit here in February that discovered the sport on the brink of insolvency, with little or no plans to revive it. However, the TTFA's decision to challenge FIFA at the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) in Switzerland before withdrawing the matter and taking it to T&T High Court in Port-of-Spain, which breached FIFA's Statutes.

Despite calls from the general membership, the Board of the TTFA, Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley and Minister of Sports and Community Development Shamfa Cudjoe, for Wallace and his team to drop the court action against FIFA and prevent the country from being banned. FIFA, on Republic Day (September 24), suspended the TTFA for violation of its Statutes.

The suspension though came with a condition that the TTFA align its Statutes with that of the FIFA and drop all court matters.

Yesterday, a week after invitations were sent out for an October 25 date for the EGM with the agenda, the membership issued a release with the questions.

Guardian Media Sports questioned three members why the questions were sent out when Wallace had already said he would allow the membership to decide on the way forward for the sport, the members said they did not believe him.

Eastern Football Association (EFA) president Kieron Edwards said earlier attempts to make additions to the agenda was denied Wallace, who on Andre Errol Baptiste I95.5FM Programme on Saturday, told him the agenda would be broad so it will facilitate any concerns.

Edwards in his response said: "Because the agenda is so broad the discussion could go anywhere and any time. The reason for an agenda being placed for a meeting is to control the meeting and the direction of it. For example, an AGM has a set amount of agenda items to ensure that it goes a particular way."

He added: "They should have paid a little bit more attention to the agenda and have it more specific but that, having not happened, we saw it fit from the East Zone, to send these questions so at least at the starting of the EGM, these questions will be answered."

The membership is planning to block the TTFA from continuing with its decision to challenge the suspension via CAS. The membership also wants the Injunctive Relief filed in the CAS on September 25 to be dropped as well.

Edwards and company are also set to call for the removal of the Wallace executive and order the return of the FIFA-appointed normalisation committee, led by businessman Robert Hadad.

The EFA boss also believes an emerging problem of how secret voting can take place at the meeting, saying it is a problem that has to be addressed.

Contacted yesterday by Guardian Media Sports, Wallace said all questions concerning the future of T&T football will be answered on Sunday.

Today, the Court of Appeal is scheduled to determine FIFA's appeal over High Court Judge Carol Gobin's decision to hear a case brought by the United TTFA.

Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Appellate Judge Nolan Bereaux reserved their judgment on the appeal after hearing submissions from the attorneys representing both parties in a virtual hearing on Monday.

QUESTIONS:

1. How are you going to pay the coaches and technical staff that you hired within the first four months of your term? Most notably the contract of the Head Coach Terry Fenwick who you agreed to pay over twenty thousand US dollars per month?

2. How are you going to pay Peter Miller with whom you signed a contract for US$25,000 per month?

3. How are you going to pay the administrative staff at the TTFA’s offices? Most notably the contract of the General Secretary who you agreed to pay eight thousand US dollars per month?

4. How are you going to pay the TTFA debt of approximately $70 million without FIFA and Government financial support?

5. Is the TTFA going to honour the contracts of Terry Fenwick, Peter Miller and Ramesh Ramdhan even though they were not approved by the TTFA Board of Directors and they were executed by you personally without proper authorization?

6. As per your promise, how are you going to operate and finance the local football leagues in T&T? Particularly, Tier one, Tier two and zonal football?

7. How are you going to operate and finance the women’s football league in T&T?

8. How are you going to repair the public image of the TTFA given the suspension of TT&T from all international football, which has never happened before?

9. How are you going to repair the relationships with FIFA and the Government?

10. Can you explain the path for our senior men’s national team and youth national team to compete in the World Cup and Gold Cup qualifiers and tournaments?

11. Can you explain the path for our referees to referee in international tournaments?

12. How are you going to attract corporate sponsors when T&T are not allowed to compete in international tournaments?

13. How are you going to operate the association when you and the other members of the United TTFA and banned by FIFA permanently?

14. Please explain your contravention of Article 1 item 3 of the TTFA constitution? “Article 1 Name, headquarters, legal form 3 TTFA is a Member of FIFA, CONCACAF and CFU.”

15. Please explain your contravention of Article 15 item b and c of the TTFA constitution? Article 15 states: “Expulsion 1 The General Meeting may expel a Member if: it fails to fulfill its financial obligations towards TTFA; it seriously violates the Statutes, regulations, directives or decisions of FIFA, CONCACAF, CFU and TTFA; it brings a dispute to an Ordinary Court, except in cases where the FIFA, CONCACAF or TTFA regulations or binding legal provisions specifically provide for or stipulate recourse to Ordinary Courts;

16. Please explain why the TTFA membership should retain you as president when you admitted freely in the press that you signed multimillion-dollar contracts in excess of amounts approved by of the Board of Directors. You also admitted to signing contracts that you specifically hid from the TTFA board Of Directors and this is clearly an oversight on your part?

17. Please explain, why you have blatantly ignored the wishes of the members of TTFA as a significant majority of members have communicated informally with you to cease the court action and you have refused to do so.

18. Please explain, why the prime minister and minister of sports have also tried to persuade you and your associates known as the United TTFA to cease your court action and to comply with the requests of Fifa but here too you have ignored the highest authority in Trinidad and Tobago?

19. Please explain why you have breached Article 39.d of the TTFA constitution which states as follows: ‘The president […] is primarily responsible for: d) relations between TTFA and its members, Fifa, Concacaf, Cfu, political bodies and other organisations.’

1. The President represents TTFA legally.

2. He is primarily responsible for:

a) implementing the decisions passed by the General Meeting and the Board of Directors through the General Secretariat;

b) ensuring the effective functioning of the bodies of TTFA in order that they achieve the objectives described in this Constitution;

c) supervising the work of the General Secretariat;

d) relations between TTFA and its Members, FIFA, CONCACAF, CFU, political bodies and other organisations.

RELATED NEWS

Questions for Wallace.
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express).


“Please explain why the TTFA membership should retain you as president, when you admitted freely in the press that you signed multi-million-dollar contracts, in excess of amounts approved by of the Board of Directors.”

This is among questions Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) board member and Eastern Football Association (EFA) president Kieron Edwards hopes to put to TTFA president Williams Wallace at Sunday’s virtual TTFA Emergency General Meeting (EGM).

Wallace has kept a promise to allow the TTFA’s 47 delegates to point the future direction of football via an EGM, after winning a legal claim in the TTFA High Court challenging FIFA’s decision to replace his executive in March with a normalisation committee. Wallace has promised to abide by the decision of TTFA delegates.

Justice Carol Gobin’s October 19 decision deemed FIFA’s normalisation committee illegal and re-installed Wallace as TTFA president. However, en route to that decision, FIFA suspended the TTFA as a result of Wallace’s group violating FIFA statutes by taking the matter to local court rather than the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

Edwards has made it known, that he favours the lifting of FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA, via the removal of the current TTFA executive and the installation of FIFA’s normalisation committee to run local football. Edwards had also asked that removal of Wallace’s executive be specifically set as an EGM agenda item. This was denied, but the broad nature of the meeting gives Edwards another the chance to still raise the challenge.

Wallace will be called upon to explain why he returned to court to pursue legal action against FIFA, specifically against the wishes of the majority of TTFA delegates and with the TTFA suspended and barred from accessing FIFA funding, Wallace will be called upon to explain how he plans to manage the upwards of $70 million of TTFA debt and the host of pending litigation against the Football Association. Without FIFA funding, Wallace will also be asked to explain how he will cover daily operations and service debts.

“How are you going to pay the coaches and technical staff that you hired within the first four months of your term? Most notably the contract of the head coach Terry Fenwick, who you agreed to pay over twenty thousand US dollars per month?

“How are you going to pay the administrative staff at the TTFA’s offices? “ Edwards asks. “Is the TTFA going to honour the contracts of Terry Fenwick, Peter Miller and Ramesh Ramdhan, even though they were not approved by the TTFA Board of Directors.

“As per your promise, how are you going to operate and finance the local football leagues in Trinidad and Tobago? Particularly, Tier one, Tier two and zonal football? How are you going to operate and finance the women’s football league in Trinidad and Tobago?”

Edwards summises that the failure of Wallace to adequately answer probing question will convey a lack of confidence in his ability to hold the post of TTFA president.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 23, 2020, 01:11:17 AM
Chief Justice Archie, Justice Bereaux to rule on TTFA/FIFA issue.
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express).


APPEAL DECISION TIME

The Appeal Court will today make its decision on FIFA’s appeal of Justice Carol Gobin’s October 19 ruling giving the Trinidad and Tobago High Court jurisdiction to hear a claim between the executive of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) and the international governing body for world football.

Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice Nolan Bereaux will be delivering their ruling by 3 p.m. today, after initially hearing the matter on October 19. Should the Appeal Court find in favour of FIFA on the issue of jurisdiction, then Justice Gobin’s ruling will be overturned.

Justice Gobin’s October 13 High Court final ruling determined that FIFA’s appointment of a normalisation committee was illegal, void and of no effect. Her ruling effectively facilitated the re-installation of president William Wallace and his executive, which FIFA replaced with its own normalisation committee on March 17, 2020.

Representing FIFA in the Appeal Court, senior counsel Christopher Hamel-Smith argued that Justice Gobin’s decision giving the local High Court jurisdiction to hear the matter was wrong. He argued that according to the TTFA’s own constitution, disputes of the nature between the TTFA and FIFA should be taken to the Lausanne, Switzerland-based Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

“CAS has exclusive jurisdiction. The TTFA cannot ignore the terms of its own constitution,” Hamel-Smith said.

“This does not mean that FIFA is above the law,” he said, making reference to last Tuesday’s criticism of FIFA by Justice Gobin.

Hamel-Smith pointed out that on its own, the TTFA could ­remove that restriction from its constitution, but this would mean that the TTFA would be taking a position that it no longer wished to operate under the FIFA Constitution.

Wallace’s attorney, Dr Emir Crowne, blamed FIFA’s action for forcing the matter to the local court.

Crowne submitted that the main reason why the TTFA pulled out of arbitration proceedings at the CAS in May and filed action at the High Court was because FIFA indicated it would not be paying its half of the arbitration fees.

Crowne said FIFA “has devised a scheme” where, by way of its statute, it is calling on its membership to go to the CAS for dispute resolution when the need arises, but is, at the same time, refusing to pay its part of the arbitration fees, at least in this instance. By doing so, Crowne said the TTFA was being denied access to justice since it is currently facing financial difficulties and FIFA knows this all too well.

“They are saying ‘you must go to CAS but we won’t pay our share of the arbitration cost’ especially in a case where a federation is mismanaging its funds,” said Crowne.

Crowne said he did not see an issue with the impasse being heard and resolved at the CAS if FIFA was willing to pay its part of the cost.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 23, 2020, 10:11:52 AM
Wallace willing to take FIFA case to Privy Council.
By Narissa Fraser (T&T Newsday).


TT Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace is not ruling out the possibility of taking his ongoing battle against world football body FIFA all the way to the Privy Council if he has to.

Wallace told Newsday on Thursday the idea of taking the case to the London courts – TT’s highest appellate court – if the Court of Appeal’s decision is not in his favour, is something he “cannot disagree with.”

It is now nearly eight months since Wallace began his legal battle against FIFA after it removed his administration and appointed a normalisation committee to run the affairs of local football, on March 17.

FIFA insisted the move was not victimisation and that the decision was made because of “a massive debt” and financial woes.

It also refused to acknowledge TT’s High Court as a legitimate option for the hearing after Wallace appealed. It said the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland is the only court it recognises for such disputes.

Initially, Wallace and his attorneys – Dr Emir Crowne and Matthew Gayle – appealed to the CAS but withdrew, moving to TT’s High Court, as they believed they would not get a “fair hearing” from the Swiss court.

Wallace and his team persisted, but this led to the association’s suspension on September 24. They have since appealed this decision at the CAS.

Last Tuesday, Justice Carol Gobin ruled that FIFA’s removal of the TTFA executive and implementation of the committee, after the executive had been in office for just four months, was illegal.

While some described this victory as an “own goal,” and it led to jeers on social media from the Prime Minister, Wallace told Newsday he still believed it was a “real win.

“It was a ruling based on the facts presented. I am extremely happy and satisfied with it. It indicated every single thing we have been trying to say, and it was always about getting the chance to be heard.

“It was also saying it was injustice, based on the facts and all those things. That for me is enough; that in itself is a win. And in addition to that, I think we would have planted some seeds within the football fraternity both locally and internationally.”

On Monday, at the Court of Appeal hearing, Crowne told Chief Justice Ivor Archie the team would be willing to return to the CAS if FIFA pays its half of the cost – which it had previously refused to. The total fee is 40,000 Swiss francs which is approximately TT$299,000.

Archie posed the question, saying, “I am assuming the TTFA wants to retain its relationship with FIFA.”

But Wallace later told online news blog Wired868 he was not willing to return to CAS and “start all over,” and that he had come to the end of his battle against FIFA. He did not speak with any other local media on the matter.

Asked if he had contacted any of the attorneys before speaking to Wired868, he said no.

He told Newsday, “The information in that article is accurate. If an option is presented to go back to CAS with a substantive matter or the initial matter, that is not something I am willing to do.”

Crowne told the Appeal Court even if FIFA agreed to pay half the costs of appealing to CAS, there was nothing to appeal, since the normalisation committee ceased to function when FIFA suspended TT from international football.

He said FIFA would have to lift the suspension, which could possibly lead to a reinstatement of the normalisation committee, and then they would have something to argue before the CAS.

FIFA’s attorney, Christopher Hamel-Smith, said he knew his client would agree to paying half the costs since he suggested it to them, but he could not say what its position would be on lifting the suspension.

On Sunday, the TTFA will host its extraordinary general meeting (EGM) to continue charting a way forward. The members of the TTFA will decide whether it will drop the appeal to CAS on its suspension.

FIFA has previously indicated the temporary suspension may be lifted once the membership complies with its demands.

And Concacaf gave the TTFA until December 18 to determine whether it will be able to participate in the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup. If the suspension is not lifted by 5 pm on that day, TT will be replaced by Antigua and Barbuda.

Archie and Justice of Appeal Nolan Bereaux are expected to give a ruling on Friday at 3 pm. If this does not go in favour of Wallace, which will render Gobin’s ruling null and void, Wallace said it may not necessarily be the end.

“I have been getting feedback from not just the Caribbean but international feedback that this is something that should be settled at the Privy Council. I cannot disagree with that point – they are making a statement I cannot disagree with.”

He said one local businessman offered to pay the required legal fees in full if he decides to take that route.

But he added, “As to whether we are going with it, that is another story…”

If he loses in the end, what does his future in T&T football look like?

Well, he said, “No word on that yet.”

Asked about the possibility of the case being taken to the Privy Council, Crowne told Newsday, “Depending on the Court of Appeal’s ruling, and subject to any instructions we may receive from our client, the decision may well be appealed to the Privy Council, especially given the global significance of the issues at play.”

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on October 23, 2020, 02:34:27 PM
The unanimity of two Justices pronouncing on the matter - in the absence of a third Justice is - less than compelling. London calling.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: LKMaryTrini on October 23, 2020, 04:48:55 PM
The majority of the questions that will posed to WW has one commonality\, funding.  FIFA already says it's going to withhold funding so where is the money going to come from to address all these concerns?  Who will sponsor a football team that has been ostracized by the governing board of football?  I applaud anybody who stands for principle, but when the outcome is detrimental to the current and future of our football, it is time to rethink, and live to fight another day.  2006 feels like a lifetime ago, sadly.
Title: FIFA wins appeal
Post by: Tallman on October 23, 2020, 04:50:30 PM
FIFA wins appeal
By Derek Achong (T&T Guardian)


FIFA has been given the green light to retake control of the the T&T Football Association (TTFA).

Delivering a judgement during a virtual hearing, yesterday afternoon, Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Appellate Judge Nolan Bereaux ruled that the lawsuit, brought by embattled TTFA president William Wallace and his United TTFA executive team, contravened the TTFA's constitution.

The decision means that FIFA is free to reintroduce the normalisation committee which they replaced Wallace and his team with in March.

With such a move, FIFA may also chose to lift the TTFA's indefinite suspension, which it applied after Wallace and his team failed to withdraw the lawsuit by its extended ultimatum in September.

FIFA has previously indicated that the lifting of the suspension was contingent on the withdrawal of the lawsuit and modification of the TTFA's legislation and Constitution to prevent similar legal action in the future, however, based on the Appeal Court's findings the latter may be unnecessary.

Wallace and his team may still have a life line if they desire to pursue the case to its fullest as they can still appeal the Court of Appeal's ruling to the Privy Council.

They are also free to pursue a case before the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

Bereaux, who wrote the substantive judgement, noted that the Constitution prescribes that all disputes between the TTFA and FIFA should be dealt with by the CAS.

"The fact that such a provision is enshrined in the TTFA's Constitution means that the TTFA and its executive are bound to comply. The result is that the filing of these proceedings was a breach of the TTFA's Constitution," Bereaux said.

He also said that High Court Judge Carol Gobin, who heard the case despite FIFA's jurisdictional protest and found in Wallace and his team's favour, was wrong to rule that the FIFA's Statutes, which deal with the appointment of normalisation committees to member federations, were inconsistent with the Act of Parliament, which incorporated the TTFA.

Bereaux said the legislation gave the TTFA the power to adopt FIFA's laws and policies in its Constitution.

"Having made its choice and having bound itself by its own Constitution to comply, it cannot now act outside of its provisions," Bereaux said, as he ruled that the CAS was the more appropriate forum as it is comprised of sporting experts.

Bureaux also stated that Gobin should have stayed the case, as requested by FIFA, and referred it to arbitration.

While Archie merely gave his nod to Bereaux's written judgement, he decided to weigh in on Gobin's handling of the case.

"It was neither prudent case management nor an economical deployment of judicial time and resources to attempt to finally determine the substantive issues and to deliver a judgement less than a week before the scheduled hearing of the interlocutory appeal...Zeal is commendable but it must not obscure the need for caution," Archie said.

In the judgement, the Appeal Court also ruled that the litigation contravened the Judiciary's Civil Proceedings Rules as it was served on FIFA via email, when Swiss law does not permit such a method for service of a lawsuit.

Despite the ruling, Bereaux said that Wallace did have the authority of the bring the case as all that was required was the approval of the board.

In addition to declaring Gobin's judgement null and void, the Appeal Court also ordered Wallace and his team to pay FIFA's legal costs for defending the lawsuit.

Wallace and his colleagues were represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Crystal Paul, and Jason Jones, while Christopher Hamel-Smith, SC, Jonathan Walker, and Cherie Gopie appeared for FIFA.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 23, 2020, 09:59:58 PM
The majority of the questions that will posed to WW has one commonality\, funding.  FIFA already says it's going to withhold funding so where is the money going to come from to address all these concerns?  Who will sponsor a football team that has been ostracized by the governing board of football?  I applaud anybody who stands for principle, but when the outcome is detrimental to the current and future of our football, it is time to rethink, and live to fight another day.  2006 feels like a lifetime ago, sadly.
The majority of the questions that will posed to WW has one commonality\, funding.  FIFA already says it's going to withhold funding so where is the money going to come from to address all these concerns?  Who will sponsor a football team that has been ostracized by the governing board of football?  I applaud anybody who stands for principle, but when the outcome is detrimental to the current and future of our football, it is time to rethink, and live to fight another day.  2006 feels like a lifetime ago, sadly.
What funding ? And for what ? Certainly not for players, they weren't paid, not for coaches or tech directors, whose contracts were not honoured, not for staff who regular work months with payment. Not For international competitions, presently suspended. So how much funding the administrators require for their personal projects to still end up in debt ? Anyway, back to to the Circle of ever Dependence that we may drink from the fountain of stagnation and regression as those around us forge ahead. It's what we have grown used to. I guess there is some measure of comfort in the devils that we know.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on October 23, 2020, 11:47:44 PM
so there we go again, more flip flopping from william wallace again after he vowed that whatever the outcome he's going to accept the judges ruling and allow the membership to decide going forward, now he's changed his tune again by thinking of going to the privy council. well well well, this man is certainly bloody clueless and by now the whole football fraternity knows it.

and for all who's watching, i hope you know that this is a clear sign of a power hungry bloke. if this man cared anything for trinbago football he would have walked away the first time he held the meeting to decide on the way forward in september, instead he reopened the case and made a mess of things.

i don't know who was advising him but he got some really foolish advise and fifa had him all the way through without him even knowing it. he should have paid the court fees and went the cas and took his chances, and if he had loss the case then at least he stood a good chance of going back for reelection,

but instead he tossed around until he tossed himself into a corner following stupid advice, good going mate, now make it that no body in TT football would ever want to hear your name again. go back on your word and go to the privy council you nitwit. remember a man's word is all he's got. this guy is full of shit. you all could support bullshit if you want, not me they have made a mess of this process.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 24, 2020, 01:49:08 AM
TTFA membership holds key to football future.
By Walter Alibey (T&T Guardian).


FIFA's Normalisation Committee will return as the managers of local football.

This after the Court of Appeal judges, Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Appellate Judge Nolan Bereaux on Friday overturned the ruling by High Court Judge Carol Gobin last Tuesday, thereby throwing the future of United T&T Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and his vice presidents Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip into limbo.

The lawsuit, brought by embattled TTFA president William Wallace and his United TTFA executive team, which also included vice president Susan Joseph-Warrick before she resigned the post on September 25, contravened the TTFA's Constitution, which prescribes that all disputes between the TTFA and FIFA should be dealt with by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), the Appellate judges concluded.

The Appeal Court has also ordered the cash-strapped TTFA to pay the legal cost of FIFA also.

The ruling has also put in doubt Sunday's Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM) called to decide on the future of the sport in T&T, following a suspension by the FIFA and a demand by the sport's world governing body to get the TTFA Statutes in line with theirs if the suspension is to be lifted.

The decision yesterday stems from a move by the FIFA on March 17 to appoint a Normalisation Committee to replace the TTFA on the basis that local football face a possibility of becoming insolvent, with no means of clearing huge debt that crippled the TTFA under Wallace and his team.

TTFA challenged the decision, by first going to the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) in Switzerland in May. They then withdrew the matter and filed it in the T&T High Court in Port-of Spain, a decision that violated FIFA's Statutes.

Wallace, who, in a newspaper report on Friday, said he was not ruling out considering going to the Privy Council, told Guardian Media Sports soon after that the court has ruled and they will respect the ruling of the court. However, quizzed on whether he was any closer to deciding if an appeal will be filed, he said: "This is final for me. This is final for me."

The embattled football association president who guided the Secondary Schools Football League to its highest point of sponsorships, development and marketability, said based on the ruling he was unsure if Sunday's crucial meeting will come off, noting that he will have to seek legal advice before offering a response to that.

Coincidentally, one of Wallace and the TTFA's Attorneys, Matthew Gayle said he will wait to see if his client wants to pursue anything further.

"I will have to look at the ruling to see what our next position will be and what the TTFA wants to do. I will have to reach out to the TTFA. It appears to be a binary ruling but it can be multi-dimensional," Gayle said.

Wallace, whose consideration of an appeal was hinted by members of the international football fraternity, said he took comfort that their concerns were heard under Justice Gobin.

"As far as I am concerned, Justice Gobin's ruling will always be very important to me, whether it was struck out based on the matters heard before, or based on jurisdiction, it was heard, fate allowed that, and there was enough in that for me. I am happy with that so now we move on," said Wallace.

Known constitutional expert Osmond Downer and Eastern Football Association (EFA) president Kieron Edwards gave different accounts on why tomorrow's meeting can go on as planned.

According to Downer, when a court rules it gives the other party time to appeal.

"This, I have to find out more about, if FIFA's Attorneys intend to lodge an appeal, or if in the ruling a timeframe was given for an appeal. During this timeframe, the TTFA members will still be considered the legal officers, which means Sunday's crucial EGM will be held."

Downer, one of the men who drafted the Constitution of the TTFA, believes tomorrow's meeting has crucial significance in deciding whether any court matter against FIFA will be dropped.

The United TTFA, which was recently reduced by three members also following the resignations of the group's key founder Keith Look Loy, who held the position of Chairman of the Technical Committee and former Northern Football Association president Anthony Harford, currently has two matters against FIFA in the CAS.

One, a challenge against FIFA's suspension on September 24 and the other an Injunctive Relief which was filed to ensure the country took part in the CONCACAF Gold Cup.

TTFA, on September 25, was given an ultimatum by CONCACAF to settle the court matter with the FIFA by December 18 or be left out of the Gold Cup. As it is, however, the country was allowed to be part of the Gold Cup draw on September 28, which saw it draw Montserrat in the preliminary round of the tournament next year.

Edwards, the author of 19 questions to be posed to Wallace at tomorrow's EGM, said the meeting was constitutionally called and therefore will go on as planned.

"It is a meeting of the general membership, a body of people that will exist whether the normalisation committee is here or not. It was called by the Board of the TTFA before the ruling, so it is legitimate," said the EFA boss, adding that it is important that Wallace and the TTFA are blocked from going to the Privy Council and all court matters that currently exist against FIFA are dropped.

RELATED NEWS

Appeal Court overturns judge's TTFA ruling.
By Derek Achong (T&T Guardian).


FIFA president Gianni Infantino has been given the green light to retake control of the T&T Football Association (TTFA).

Delivering a judgement during a virtual hearing yesterday, Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Appellate Judge Nolan Bereaux ruled that the lawsuit brought by embattled former president William Wallace and his United TTFA team had contravened the TTFA’s constitution.

The decision means that FIFA is free to reintroduce the Normalisation Committee which they replaced Wallace’s team with in March.

With such a move, FIFA may also choose to lift the TTFA’s indefinite suspension, which it applied after Wallace and his team failed to withdraw the lawsuit by its extended ultimatum in September.

FIFA had previously indicated that the lifting of the suspension was contingent on the withdrawal of the lawsuit and modification of the TTFA’s legislation and constitution to prevent similar legal action in the future. However, based on the Appeal Court’s findings the latter may now be unnecessary.

Wallace and his team may still have a lifeline if they desire to pursue the case to its fullest, as they can still appeal the Court of Appeal’s ruling to the Privy Council. They are also free to pursue a case before the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

However, Wallace told Guardian Media yesterday that he was throwing in the towel on the matter.

“The court has ruled and we respect the ruling of our courts. As I said before, this is final for me. This is final for me. I am not going beyond this,” Wallace said moments after the ruling.

“I said we would have stated our case and as far as I am concerned, Justice Gobin’s decision would always be very important to me, whether it was struck out based on the application of the law or jurisdiction.

“It was heard. Fate allowed that and there was enough in that decision for me. So now we move on.”

Justice Bereaux, who wrote the substantive judgement yesterday, noted that the TTFA constitution prescribes that all disputes between itself and FIFA should be dealt with by CAS.

“The fact that such a provision is enshrined in the TTFA’s constitution means that the TTFA and its executive are bound to comply. The result is that the filing of these proceedings was a breach of the TTFA’s constitution,” Bereaux said.

He also said that High Court Judge Carol Gobin, who heard the case despite FIFA’s jurisdictional protest and found in Wallace’s team’s favour, was wrong to rule that FIFA’s statutes, which deal with the appointment of normalisation committees to member federations, were inconsistent with the Act of Parliament which incorporated the TTFA. Bereaux said the legislation gave the TTFA the power to adopt FIFA’s laws and policies in its constitution.

“Having made its choice and having bound itself by its own constitution to comply, it cannot now act outside of its provisions,” Bereaux said, as he ruled that the CAS was the more appropriate forum as it is comprised of sporting experts.

Bereaux also stated that Gobin should have stayed the case as requested by FIFA and referred it to arbitration.

While Archie merely gave his nod to Bereaux’s written judgement, he decided to weigh in on Gobin’s handling of the case.

“It was neither prudent case management nor an economical deployment of judicial time and resources to attempt to finally determine the substantive issues and to deliver a judgement less than a week before the scheduled hearing of the interlocutory appeal...Zeal is commendable but it must not obscure the need for caution,” Archie said.

In the judgement, the Appeal Court also ruled that the litigation contravened the Judiciary’s Civil Proceedings Rules, as it was served on FIFA via email when Swiss law does not permit such a method for service of a lawsuit.

Despite the ruling, Bereaux said Wallace did have the authority of the bring the case as all that was required was the approval of the board.

In addition to declaring Gobin’s judgement null and void, the Appeal Court also ordered Wallace and his team to pay FIFA’s legal costs for defending the lawsuit.

Wallace and his colleagues were represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Crystal Paul and Jason Jones, while Christopher Hamel-Smith, SC, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie appeared for FIFA.

ABOUT THE CASE

William Wallace and vice-presidents Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillips and Susan Joseph-Warrick pursued legal action after they were removed in March and replaced with a committee comprising of businessman Robert Hadad, attorney Judy Daniels and retired banker Nigel Romano.

Wallace’s team initially brought proceedings against FIFA in the CAS but were forced to withdraw as they could not pay the 40,000 Swiss francs (TT$276,000) in associated costs. Their position was partly due to FIFA’s policy to not pay its share of fees and CAS’s rules which require the other party to pay the full costs when the other fails in its obligations.

After the case was filed, FIFA applied for it to be struck out as it claimed the TTFA, by virtue of its membership with FIFA, agreed to forgo all legal action in local courts in favour of proceedings before the CAS.

The application was initially blanked by Gobin, who ruled the local courts were the appropriate forum to resolve the dispute.

With the appeal against her ruling still pending, Gobin set the date for the trial and gave FIFA an extension to file its defence. FIFA failed to meet the deadline, as it maintained the position that it did not accept the jurisdiction of the local court.

Wallace’s team also obtained an injunction against the Normalisation Committee after it attempted to facilitate an extraordinary meeting among members to vote to withdraw the case. The injunction was not opposed by FIFA and was granted.

Wallace’s team attempted to withdraw the case on FIFA’s extended ultimatum of September 23 but filed the application to withdraw past the deadline.

After FIFA’s suspension the following day, Wallace’s team filed another application withdrawing the withdrawal application, in which he admitted he was grudgingly discontinuing the case based on a majority vote during an emergency meeting between his team and stakeholders.

The legal manoeuvre coincided with an announcement from second vice-president Joseph-Warrick that she was resigning from her post.

The United TTFA also approached the CAS for a temporary stay of this country’s suspension to allow its participation in Concacaf’s 2021 Gold Cup draw on September 28. The hearing of the injunction application was deferred after Concacaf agreed to conditionally keep T&T’s place in the draw.

If the suspension is not lifted by either FIFA or CAS by 5 pm on December 18, T&T will be replaced by Antigua and Barbuda as the next highest-ranked team based on performances during the 2019 Concacaf Nations League.

In her judgement last week, Gobin ruled that FIFA’s statutes which prescribe the appointment of committees to member federation was too broad to be considered lawful. She also said the executive was not given an opportunity to respond to FIFA’s decision before they were replaced.

Appeal Court quashes TTFA's court victory.
By Jada Loutoo (T&T Newsday).


THE TT Football Association’s complaint about the imposition of a normalising committee by world governing body FIFA should have gone to the Swiss-based Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

In a decision delivered just after 3 pm on Friday, Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice of Appeal Nolan Bereaux overturned two rulings of the TT High Court, delivered in August and October, on the local court’s jurisdiction to hear the TTFA’s complaint and its challenge of the imposition of the normalisation committee in March.

Both appellate court judges agreed that the filing of proceedings in the local courts by TTFA’s president William Wallace and his executive was a breach of the local football body’s Constitution which provides that any dispute against a decision by FIFA must be heard by the CAS.

As a result of their decision, the TTFA’s early victory delivered by Justice Carol Gobin, which some described as an own-goal, was short-lived as her decisions and declarations were set aside and quashed.

Gobin had ruled that the removal of Wallace and his executive was illegal and that the appointment of the normalisation committee “to interfere in the affairs of the TTFA” was also of no effect since the FIFA statute which allowed the appointment was inconsistent with the provisions of the TTFA Act of 1982.

“That trial proceeded ex parte. FIFA took no part in it. But the judge’s decision remains valid and subsisting and is binding on FIFA, at least in Trinidad and Tobago, and must be set aside.

“TTFA by proceeding with the trial while this appeal was pending must bear the costs of what is now a wasted trial,” the judges ruled as they ordered the TTFA to pay FIFA’s legal costs.

Gobin was also faulted for refusing to stay the proceedings before her so that the matter could be resolved at the CAS.

“We are concerned here with the exercise of a judicial discretion,” the judges held.

The judges also ruled that the purported service by e-mail of the TTFA’s legal claim to FIFA was against both Swiss law and the local civil proceeding rules.

Both judges gave a unified decision, but each had something to say on the case.

Archie spoke of the managing of the case by the judge. “As any experienced practitioner will know, service of the originating process is an arcane area of procedural law that is littered with pitfalls. Many a claim has floundered at the first hurdle,” he said, adding that the court had no choice but to allow for the appeal for this and other reasons. He said it would be a “recipe for chaos” for a court to invest a process outside the court rules.

Bereaux focused on the arguments advanced by FIFA. “It is a matter of public notoriety that TTFA has been in straitened circumstances for quite some time,” he noted, acknowledging that the TTFA said it was in the process of coming to terms with the mess they inherited and were formulating a plan to address its parlous financial state.’

He said the terms and conditions of membership for the 211 affiliated associations, which FIFA supported financially and logistically, were set out in the world governing body’s statutes.

FIFA’s contribution is 60 per cent of TTFA’s total revenue. Bereaux pointed out that as a condition to its FIFA membership, the TTFA undertook in its constitution to be bound by its statutes, which includes the mandatory recognition of the CAS and the appointment of the committee.

In March, FIFA appointed a normalisation committee to run the affairs of local football, removing Wallace and his administration.

FIFA said the move was because of “massive debt” and financial woes plaguing the local football body.

It resisted the option of the TTFA’s complaint heard in the TT High Court, insisting that the CAS was the only court it recognised in keeping with its statutes.

Wallace and his executive initially filed an appeal before the CAS but withdrew, saying they did not think they would get a fair hearing from the Swiss court because it condoned FIFA’s refusal to pay half the costs of the challenge.

Wallace and the others had already paid the relevant fees – 1,000 Swiss francs or TT$7,000 – for the appeal in which they say the appointment of the normalisation committee was “exclusively disciplinary in nature” since it had the effect of removing them from their duly elected offices.

After failing to meet a deadline to withdraw its legal challenge in the local courts, T&T was suspended from international football by FIFA. The TTFA has since appealed this decision at the CAS.

However, even if FIFA agreed to pay half the costs of appealing to CAS, there is nothing to appeal since the normalisation committee ceased to function when FIFA suspended T&T from international football. FIFA would have to lift the suspension which could lead to the reinstatement of the normalisation committee for the TTFA to have something to argue at the Swiss court.

At the trial and before the appeal court, the TTFA has argued that the world body for football was not above the laws of T&T since the TTFA was a body incorporated by an act of Parliament.

In her ruling last Tuesday, Gobin ruled that FIFA’s removal of the TTFA executive and implementation of the committee, after it had only been in office for four months, was illegal.

In his reasons, Bereaux held that section 67 of the TTFA’s Constitution was unambiguous that any appeal of a decision of FIFA is heard by the CAS.

“The filing of these proceedings was, therefore, ultra vires Article 67, null, void and of no effect and must be struck out,” he held.

In looking at the matter afresh, the judges found that FIFA had met the threshold required to trigger the court’s discretion under the Arbitration Act and was satisfied “that there was no reason why the matter should not have been referred to arbitration” when FIFA “was ready, willing and able to conduct the arbitration.”

He said the arbitration clause was the typical garden variety one in which parties agree to forego the civil jurisdiction of the High Court for a tribunal with expertise.

Bereaux admitted that he did entertain some concern about the CAS’s impartiality and what appeared to be a cozy relationship with FIFA but said these were not sufficient reasons why the dispute should not go to arbitration.

“CAS’ reaction to FIFA’s request to forego its share of upfront costs appeared to be reflexive with no apparent independent consideration being given to it.”

On whether Wallace had the authority to file the proceedings, Bereaux said there was not enough evidence to show he did not.

On Thursday, Wallace told Newsday he was not ruling out taking the challenge to the Privy Council.

The TTFA was represented by attorneys Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Jason Jones, and Crystal Paul while FIFA was represented by Christopher Hamel-Smith, SC, Jonathan Walker, and Cherrie Gopie.

This story has been adjusted to include additional details. See original post below.

THE TT Football Association’s complaint about the imposition of a normalising committee by the world governing body FIFA should have gone to arbitration before the Swiss-based Court of Arbitration (CAS) for Sport.

In a decision delivered just after 3 pm on Friday, Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice of Appeal Nolan Bereaux both agreed that the filing of proceedings in the local courts by TTFA’s president, William Wallace, and his executive, was a breach of the local football body’s Constitution which provides that any dispute against a decision by FIFA must be heard by the CAS.

As a result of their decision, the decisions of Justice Carol Gobin in August and October were set aside.

Gobin was also faulted for refusing to stay the proceedings before her so that the matter could be resolved at the CAS.

“There was no reason it should not have proceeded to arbitration,” Archie said of TTFA’s dispute.

The judges also ruled that the purported service by e-mail of the TTFA’s legal claim to FIFA was against both Swiss law and the local civil proceeding rules.

In March, FIFA appointed a normalisation committee to run the affairs of local football, removing Wallace and his administration.

FIFA said the move was because of “massive debt” and a "real risk of insolvency and illiquidity" facing the local football body.

The world governing body resisted the option of the TTFA’s complaint being heard in the High Court, insisting that the CAS was the only court it recognised in keeping with its statutes.

Wallace and his executive initially filed an appeal before the CAS but withdrew, saying they did not think they would get a fair hearing from the Swiss court.

After failing to meet a deadline to withdraw its legal challenge in the local courts, TT was suspended from international football by FIFA on September 24. The TTFA has since appealed this decision at the CAS.

In her ruling last Tuesday, Gobin ruled that FIFA’s removal of the TTFA executive and implementation of the committee, after it had only been in office for four months, was illegal.

On Thursday, Wallace told Newsday he was not ruling out taking the challenge to the Privy Council.

The TTFA was represented by attorneys Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle Jason Jones and Crystal Paul while FIFA was represented by Christopher Hamel-Smith,SC, Jonathan Walker and Cherrie Gopie.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 24, 2020, 01:54:02 AM
TTFA Sunday GM in doubt.
By Jelani Beckles (T&T Newsday).


THE validity of Sunday’s Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM) involving the TT Football Association (TTFA) membership is now in question as it is unclear who is in charge of local football.

On Friday, the Court of Appeal ruled that the imposition of a normalisation committee by FIFA should have gone to arbitration before the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice of Appeal Nolan Bereaux both agreed that the filing of proceedings in the local courts by TTFA’s president, William Wallace, and his executive, was a breach of the local football body’s Constitution which provides that any dispute against a decision by FIFA must be heard by the CAS.

As a result of their decision, the decisions of Justice Carol Gobin in August and last week were set aside. In her ruling last Tuesday in the High Court, Gobin ruled that FIFA’s removal of the TTFA executive and implementation of the normalisation committee, after it had only been in office for four months, was illegal.

The normalisation committee was appointed in March by FIFA because of TTFA’s massive debt. On Friday, the TTFA was also ordered to pay the legal fees of the High Court and the Court of Appeal.

In an interview with Newsday following Friday’s ruling, Wallace responded to the order that TTFA must pay the legal fees. “I respect the decision of our courts.” Discussing the amount that TTFA will have to pay, Wallace said, “That has not been quantified. I don’t know.” Wallace said the membership will decide on the future of local football after Friday’s ruling. Discussing the TTFA EGM scheduled for Sunday at 9 am, Wallace said that may now be out of his hands.

“That also at this point in time I am not sure of. I need to have that conversation with the legal team…from my point of view I think that any meeting would have to be called now will have to be called by the normalisation committee.”

TTFA board member and former national defender Brent Sancho said he is also of the understanding that the normalisation committee is in charge again.

Sancho, who believes members may still attend Sunday’s EGM, said Wallace needs to make it clear who is going to pay the legal costs.

Sancho said the validity of Sunday’s meeting “comes under severe questioning.” He added, “I highly suspect that this meeting from a legal point of view and the persons that called it is now deemed illegal. I could only suspect that.”

Chairman of the normalisation committee Robert Hadad, asked for a comment on the latest ruling, said, “No comment yet.”

Minister of Sport and Youth Affairs Shamfa Cudjoe said she was not “too surprised” by the ruling as TTFA is part of FIFA and certain statutes must be followed.

RELATED NEWS

Appeal Court quashes Justice Gobin’s ruling in TTFA/FIFA dispute.
By Rickie Ramdass (T&T Express).


ROUND THREE?

THE aggregate score between the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) and world football’s governing body FIFA now stands at 1-1.

As of yesterday evening, FIFA was back on level terms with the TTFA after the Appeal Court ruled in its favour in a legal challenge mounted against a previous High Court decision in which the TTFA had at first emerged victorious.

With the latest ruling, FIFA now has the all-clear to retake control of the cash-strapped TTFA and reintroduce a normalisation committee after Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice of Appeal Nolan Bereaux quashed a preliminary ruling handed down by Justice Carol Gobin.

But the Appeal Court ruling is not final unless the TTFA decides it will not be pursuing the issue further to the Privy Council in London, England. If on the other hand it decides to take the proceedings to this country’s final Court of Appeal, then the British Law Lords will have the final say in the dispute.

The issue that was in contention was the ruling of Justice Gobin who held on August 13, that the local courts had the jurisdiction to hear the challenge mounted by embattled TTFA president William Wallace and his United TTFA executive.

A decision had been made by FIFA on March 17 to replace the executive on with a normalisation committee headed by businessman Robert Hadad due to the executive’s mismanagement of funds and consequently finding itself to be millions of dollars in debt.

On the day of her preliminary ruling, Justice Gobin denied an application by FIFA to have the proceedings struck out. She also refused another application to stay the proceedings pending the hearing of FIFA’s appeal against her decision.

FIFA argued that, the only place such a dispute could have been heard was at the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) in Switzerland. But Justice Gobin disagreed.

In her final ruling delivered on the night of October 13, Justice Gobin found that the replacement of the executive with the normalisation committee was made in bad faith and for an improper and illegal motive. Even though the latter ruling was not appealed, it automatically fell by the wayside after Justices Archie and Bereaux found that the High Court did not have the jurisdiction to hear the matter in the first place.

During a virtual hearing yesterday, the Chief Justice summarised the 23-page judgment written by Justice Bereaux. He said they both agreed that Wallace and United TTFA acted in contravention of the TTFA’s Constitution by which it is bound by bringing the proceedings in the local court.

“The filing of these proceedings was a breach of Article 67 of TTFA’s Constitution by which the TTFA is bound. We are of the view that Article 67 is unambiguous and any appeal against a final and binding finding passed by FIFA must be heard by the Court of Arbitration for Sport,” said Archie.

Therefore, the Chief Justice said the filing of the proceedings was null, void and of no effect and must be struck out. The judges also held that Justice Gobin was plainly wrong in refusing to stay the proceedings in favour of arbitration before the CAS.

“We find that FIFA has met the threshold requirements to trigger the court’s discretion under section 7 of the Arbitration Act. It therefore satisfied that there was no reason why the matter should not have been referred to arbitration and that FIFA was ready, willing and able to conduct the arbitration,” he stated.

Additionally, Archie and Bereaux agreed that the service of the proceedings by the TTFA on FIFA by way of e-mail was a breach of the laws of Switzerland and that it was also a breach of Part 7.8(2) of the Civil Proceedings Rules (CPR).

“Due regard and respect must be paid, as a matter comity, for the laws of other nations. A court is committed to uphold the rule of law and cannot give effect or be seen to give effect, to a form of service of process which is unlawful under the law of another country in which the proceedings have been served.

“If the proceedings are to have effect in Trinidad and Tobago, they must not be tainted by illegality, especially an illegality in the country of one of the parties to the dispute who will be expected to observe any order which the Trinidad and Tobago court makes,” Archie said.

If losing the legal claim was not enough, the TTFA was also ordered to pay the legal cost incurred by FIFA in bringing the application at the High Court as well as the cost of the appeal.

TTFA was represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Jason Jones and Crystal Paul, while Christopher Hamel-Smith, SC, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie appeared on behalf of FIFA.

Title: Re: Wallace’s last stand Move afoot to remove TTFA president, executive
Post by: asylumseeker on October 25, 2020, 03:24:00 AM
Wallace’s last stand Move afoot to remove TTFA president, executive
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express)


WILLIAM WALLACE may yet pay the ultimate price for not complying with the wishes of Trinidad and Tobago Football Association delegates when he decided upon continuing with a Trinidad and Tobago High Court challenge against FIFA, the international governing body for world football.

Yesterday, TTFA Board Member and Eastern Football Association (EFA) president Kieron Edwards wrote an official letter to Wallace, demanding that the agenda of an October 25 Emergency General Meeting (EGM) also include removal of Wallace’s administration and installation of FIFA’s normalisation committee as administrators of local football.

“In relation to the Extraordinary General Meeting of TTFA scheduled for 9:00 AM on Sunday 25th October 2020 we would like to add the following item to the agenda: “The removal of the current TTFA executive which includes the president (Wallace), vice-presidents and other Board Members and the installation of the normalisation committee as appointed by FIFA to be the new Executive of TTFA,” Edwards wrote.

Speaking to the Trinidad Express yesterday, Wallace seemed resigned to let the membership determine what course they would take. He said that while he remains in office he will keep to his promise to hold the upcoming EGM. The TTFA boss took solace in the fact that his defiant battle against FIFA was a “principled stand;” that the High Court ruled in his favour; and that FIFA’s action towards his four-month-old executive was exposed as being high-handed.

“The judge also made the point about us standing up and not capitulating to FIFA’s statutes which would have basically given their statutes precedence over our act of Parliament. And for me, those things are important, and the people that opposed that, we will see from here,” Wallace said.

Wallace was reinstalled as TTFA president when Justice Carol Gobin ruled on October 13 that FIFA’s replacement of his executive on March 18 by its own normalisation committee—headed by local businessman Robert Hadad—was null and void.

His decision to take the issue to the High Court, contravened FIFA’s statutes which list suspension or expulsion as a consequence of such actions. His United TTFA executive had bowed to pressure from the majority of its membership and initially agreed to withdraw the case but missed filing the application by a September 23 deadline. A day later, FIFA suspended the TTFA and in a strange twist, United TTFA revived the case before the T&T court.

“This suspension was a result of Mr William Wallace instituting legal action against FIFA when the agreed procedure was to take the matter to CAS. This action also contravenes Article 15, part B of the TTFA constitution. The president and his associates, known as the ‘United TTFA’ elected to take this action without seeking the approval of the Board Of Directors or the members of TTFA and the action resulted in the suspension of TTFA and by extension Trinidad and Tobago,” stated Edwards.

He added that Wallace and United TTFA had “perpetuated the expulsion of the TTFA from FIFA through the violations of FIFA statutes” and as such, he should be removed for failing to uphold the TTFA’s constitution, adding that TTFA members had no other choice.

“FIFA has stipulated that the suspension of TTFA would only be removed if the current court case is withdrawn, the normalisation committed is recognised as the legitimate executive of TTFA and the current TTFA constitution is amended to agree with the FIFA constitution. Therefore, for the suspension to be lifted the current executive must be removed and the normalisation committee appointed as the new Executive of TTFA.”

What kind of fantasy land are you in? The NC can't become the new executive.

1. What I contended above seems now to be better understood in the context of editorial discourse and public feedback that has been responsive to the Court of Appeal ruling.

The assertion holds true even if FIFA subsequently names the same individuals to a Normalization Committee. However, it is under no obligation to return a NC as previously constituted.

Where the NC is regarded as having been deconstituted, at best Robert Hadad is a FIFA liaison in Trinidad and Tobago with respect to matters TTFA. He is not properly the Chairman of a non-existing body - although in FIFA's private construction he may be the Chair of an NC in-waiting.

2. FIFA directorate's email communications may reflect that Hadad and Daniel and Romano remain as liaisons in private communication despite the import of FIFA's October 6 public declarations. However, even so, in the interim Hadad would be the liaison that has been vested to act in any semblance of a public capacity.

3. Anyone who may be preoccupied with the issue of what disbanded the Normalization Committee should look no further than the cessation of operational and management of the TTFA decree of the entity that originally generated and announced the NC's activation.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on October 25, 2020, 07:29:47 AM
i so want this bullshit to be over, it's like a never ending nightmare. i hope today they resolve this bloody issue.
Title: Wallace faces 'No confidence motion"
Post by: Tallman on October 25, 2020, 09:19:19 AM
Wallace faces 'No confidence motion"
By Keith Clement(T&T Guardian)


After suffering a massive blow in the T&T Appeal Court to his presidency of the T&T Football Association (TTFA), William Wallace will be called upon Sunday to survive a 'Vote of No-confidence' when the membership meet in a virtual Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM) this morning.

However, in the latest twist to this football saga which has been going on since March, the embattled president will not be present. He issued a letter to the sports membership on Saturday advising them that he and his two remaining vice president Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip will not be attending the EGM which he trigged on October 15. He said in the latter that: "We shall not stand in your way."

Kieron Edwards, the president of the Eastern Football Association (EFA) said that the membership had requested answers to 19 questions sent to the president on Thursday so he could prepare the answers for the membership at the meeting.

He said two of the questions that Wallace will need to provide answers for are: How the TTFA debt $70 million, will be cleared, and how he proposes to pay the salaries of coaches, office staff and other contracted officials, such as Peter Miller, the TTFA's marketing representative?

Guardian Media Sports understands that office staff has not been paid since July, while the coaches have not been paid since their appointments in December 2019 and January this year.

On Friday, the Court of Appeal judges, Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Appellate Judge Nolan Bereaux ruled in FIFA favour and overturned the ruling by High Court Judge Carol Gobin made on October 13, thereby throwing the future of United T&T Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and his vice presidents Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip into limbo.

The lawsuit, brought by embattled TTFA president William Wallace and his United TTFA executive team, which also included vice president Susan Joseph-Warrick before she resigned the post on September 25, contravened the TTFA's Constitution, which prescribes that all disputes between the TTFA and FIFA should be dealt with by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), the Appellate judges concluded.

The Appeal Court, the highest court in T&T, also ordered the cash-strapped TTFA to pay the legal cost of FIFA.

In fact, in his summary of the decision, Judge Bereaux stated that: "There is no evidence that William Wallace was not authorised by the Board to bring this action. That there cannot, therefore, be established." which means that the cost is the responsibility of the TTFA.

TTFA board member and the T&T Pro League acting chairman Brent Sancho told Guardian Media Sports that: "Just like the financial burden that is coming out of the unilateral contracts signed by Wallace which is possibly costing the FA close to $14 million and of course the immense fall out the TTFA is experiencing because of him and his egotistical cronies charge towards the high courts of Trinidad and Tobago, all without board approval. This is yet again an example of a man that seems to believe he is a lord onto himself. There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that the membership will be actively looking at taking a legal course for breach of fiduciary duties. It is a must."

Another board member Richard Quan Chan of the Southern Football Association said: "The membership need to take legal action against the United TTFA team for the legal cost which the court ordered the TTFA to pay FIFA. The decision to take legal action against FIFA was a United TTFA decision and not a TTFA Board decision. The TTFA should not be saddled with that cost since it was never informed, gave approval or was involved in such a decision."

On May 18, the United TTFA withdrawing the matter from the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Lausanne, Switzerland, and the same day the group of Wallace, vice presidents Taylor, Phillip and Joseph-Warrick with supporters Keith Look Loy, the president of the T&T Super League and Anthony Harford, the former president of the Northern Football Association (NFA) filed proceedings in the T&T High Court seeking principally a declaration that the decision of FIFA to appoint a normalisation committee and purporting to remove the TTFA’s duly elected officers was null and void and of no effect.

However, Friday's ruling has also put in doubt today's EGM to decide on the future of the sport in T&T since it squashed Judge Gobin's ruling on October 13, but FIFA's September 24 suspension to date remains in effect and FIFA has also demanded that the TTFA Statutes comes in line with FIFA's own before the suspension is lifted.

The membership will first discuss the status and legality of today's meeting before proceeding with the lone agenda item — 1. Discussions re: the way forward - FIFA suspension.
Title: We shall not stand in your way — Wallace
Post by: Tallman on October 25, 2020, 09:30:30 AM
We shall not stand in your way — Wallace
T&T Guardian


The embattled president of the T&T Football Association (TTFA), William Wallace on Saturday issued a letter to the sports membership advising them that he and his two remaining vice president Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip will not be attending Sunday's virtual Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM). The meeting is to decided on the future of T&T football.

Dear Members,

Let me start by saying that I am still quite unable to comprehend how anybody can think that what Fifa did in March 2020 is acceptable. Maybe it was desirable that those who elected us should be consulted. Frankly, however, it never occurred to us that anyone would view Fifa's decision to send in a normalisation committee after a mere four months of our tenure in any way different from the way we viewed it. In addition, the action directly affected the Executive and to some extent brought our names into disrepute.

We remain convinced that the right to make our case, to let our voices be heard, is a basic human right. It is a right which, in our view, Fifa denied us when they abrogated their responsibility at the Court of Arbitration. We are well aware of what that action led to.

We hasten to add that we recognise the authority of the Appeal Court to conclude that Madame Justice Carol Gobin erred.

We take this opportunity to salute all those TTFA members who did repose confidence in us in November and have not backed away from their initial position. We salute as well as those who did but later changed their minds. We do not begrudge them their right so to do.

We also thank all those ordinary citizens of our two-island republic who have no interest in football but have been able to see that the issue goes well beyond the field of play.

Over the last seven months since March, we were fortunate to be allowed rare candid views of the TTFA as it is really seen from several other vantage points, including the international and the regional and, latterly, the judicial and the political.

That combination of different points of view, especially the political, has made it clear to my vice-presidents, Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip, and me that our views and the views of some fraction of the membership remain at variance at this time. We are acutely aware that tomorrow is promised to no one of us and that it is the membership's right to decide on the tomorrow they desire for the TTFA.

We shall not stand in your way.

To this end, we have decided to absent ourselves from the EGM carded for November 25. In our view, the meeting was properly constituted and as per constitution, the delegates can elect a chairperson in the absence of the President.

Rayshawn Mars, Secretary and delegate of the North Zone has agreed to provide the technical support needed to conduct the meeting. We wish you a successful meeting

TTFA President
William Wallace
Title: Wallace and Co omit themselves from Sunday's EGM
Post by: Tallman on October 25, 2020, 09:34:08 AM
Wallace and Co omit themselves from Sunday's EGM
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (T&T Newsday)


T&T Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and vice-presidents Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip have omitted themselves from Sunday’s crucial extraordinary general meeting (EGM) of the fraternity’s 47-member delegation.

On the eve of the much anticipated EGM, which is being held to chart a way forward for T&T football, Wallace wrote to the TTFA’s membership explaining his absence while declaring Sunday’s meeting “properly constituted”.

“Over the last seven months since March, we were fortunate to be allowed rare candid views of the TTFA as it is really seen from several other vantage points—including the international and the regional and, latterly, the judicial and the political.

“That combination of different points of view, especially the political, has made it clear to my vice-presidents and me that our views and the views of some fraction of the membership remain at variance at this time.

He continued, “We are acutely aware that tomorrow is promised to no one of us and that it is the membership’s right to decide on the tomorrow they desire for the TTFA. We shall not stand in your way.

“To this end, we have decided to absent ourselves from the EGM. In our view, the meeting was properly constituted and as per constitution the delegates can elect a chairperson in the absence of the president.”

Wallace closed by saying Rayshawn Mars, secretary and delegate of the North Zone, agreed to provide the technical support needed to conduct the EGM. He then wished the member delegation a “successful meeting.”

Additionally, the embattled president remains convinced the previous court matter between the ousted executive and FIFA could have been heard in the local courts.

On Friday, however, Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice of Appeal Nolan Bereaux overturned two rulings delivered by Justice Carol Gobin of the TT High Court, delivered in August and October, on the local court’s jurisdiction to hear the TTFA’s complaint and its challenge of the imposition of the normalisation committee in March.

Both appellate court judges agreed the filing of proceedings in the local courts by TTFA’s president and his executive was a breach of the local football body’s constitution which provides that any dispute against a decision by FIFA must be heard by the CAS.

Wallace’s letter to the membership also said, “We remain convinced that the right to make our case, to let our voices be heard, is a basic human right. It is a right which, in our view, Fifa denied us when they abrogated their responsibility at the Court of Arbitration.

“We are well aware of what that action led to. We hasten to add that we recognise the authority of the appeal court to conclude that Madame Justice Carol Gobin erred.”

In response to Wallace,Taylor and Phillip pulling out of the EGM, TTFA board member Brent Sancho dubbed this move as anticlimactic. He even classed the executive’s “cowardly decision” as “the biggest farce in local football” and also deemed the meeting unconstitutional.

“The executive board never met. They sent out an email stating that they wanted to host a meeting. There’s nothing in the TTFA constitution which talks about round-robin a decision of such. The executive committee (13 members) can call an EGM but they have to meet to discuss the agenda and the actual meeting. There was none of that. No discussions were held,” he stated.

In this regard, Sancho believes the EGM was not properly constituted. He was also uncertain if he would take part in Sunday’s meeting but will address the Central FC board to decide what their next step is.

“This is part and parcel of the way they do things. The fact that he sent out this pathetic press release about not being in the meeting, I mean, how much more disrespectful can you get to the membership? They’re asking for a way forward and you’re not there. They are constantly dodging, diving, running from questions and refusing to face the music,” said the former sports minister.

Sancho continued, “How can you call a meeting, a non-constitutional one, then don’t show up as though you don’t want to hear the members and leave the entire thing in chaos? He’s a coward, he has absolutely no reason to be in any position of power.

“You can clearly see this has been one of the biggest farce in the history of football. He has taken the representation of this country and thrown it down a hole. I’m disgusted by his actions, the people around him and his advisors.”

Additionally, president of the East Zone Football Association (EFA) Kieron Edwards is unconcerned with Wallace, Taylor and Phillip’s decision to be absent. According to him, once enough TTFA members are in attendance, whatever decisions are agreed upon by the membership, these findings will determine the way forward for T&T football.

“It doesn’t concern me who attends the meeting, once we have a quorum. Any and every decision the membership makes must be abided by. With or without the president there, we will have the meeting and the members will have their say,” said Edwards.

Before Wallace and his team’s abrupt exit, the EFA president penned a detailed two-page document to the executive questioning how it plans to run the sport’s affairs if the nation remains indefinitely banned by FIFA.

“By them not showing up at the EGM, they gave an answer to me which indicates that they’re not answering anything. So whatever the decision the membership has to make at the EGM, they would be made. They were questions that were supposed to be answered. If he doesn’t want to, then that’s his choice,” he stated.

Meanwhile, chairman of the normalisation committee Robert Hadad remained tight-lipped on Friday’s ruling by the Court of Appeal, which quashed Wallace’s reinstatement back to the helm of the TTFA, making way for the possible reappointment of the FIFA-appointed committee.

He said, “We’re still working through exactly what the position is because TT is still suspended. Give me a couple days because we’re still discussing exactly where it is we’re going and we want to see what happens at the EGM.”
Title: TTFA v FIFA: What the Court of Appeal found
Post by: Tallman on October 26, 2020, 07:44:49 AM
TTFA v FIFA: What the Court of Appeal found
T&T Guardian


Delivering a judgement during a virtual hearing of Firday, Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Appellate Judge Nolan Bereaux ruled that the lawsuit, brought by embattled TTFA president William Wallace and his United TTFA executive team, contravened the TTFA's constitution.

The decision means that FIFA is now free to reintroduce the normalisation committee (NC) which replaced Wallace and his three vice presidents — Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillips, and Susan Joseph-Warrick (resigned) on March 17. The The eleced executives were contending that the NC installed on March 27 by FIFA “was unwarranted and indefensible” and also “made in bad faith and for an improper and illegal motive”.

DECISION

Chief justice Ivor Archie

1. I have had the benefit of reading the judgment of Bereaux, J.A. in this matter and I agree with his reasoning and conclusions. Accordingly, I too would allow the appeal and set aside the decisions and declarations of the learned judge at first instance. It would also follow that the TTFA must pay FIFA’s costs. However, this court – having rendered its decision – I wish to make some observations about the manner in which this case has been managed.

2. Service of originating documents, unless unequivocally waived, is a pre-requisite to the progression of proceedings. As any experienced practitioner will know, service of originating process is an arcane area of procedural law that is littered with pitfalls. Many a claim has floundered at the first hurdle. This is merely the latest example. Having come to the conclusion that the service was unlawful, quite apart from the other reasons set out in the judgment of my learned brother, we have no choice but to allow this appeal.

3. As Mendonca J.A. opined in Gomes v Nunez, (see para 33), the Civil Procedure Rules are a complete, self-contained scheme for the management of civil litigation. There is no inherent power in the Court to invent a process that is outside the contemplation of the Rules and then to direct a party to employ it. That is a recipe for chaos. Permitting it to stand would only further complicate an already difficult area of the law as there would be no guardrails for the purported exercise of any such discretion.

4. Owing to the particular primary challenge mounted by FIFA, it would have been wiser to let the challenge to service be determined, particularly in the context of a pending appeal. It was neither prudent case management nor an economical deployment of judicial time and resources to attempt to finally determine the substantive issues and to deliver a judgment less than a week before the scheduled hearing of the interlocutory appeal. The foreseeable result is that we must now set aside the declarations granted below.

5. While we are aware that the filing of an appeal against a final decision does not entitle the unsuccessful party to a stay, deeper consideration must be given in circumstances like this where, depending on the outcome of the appeal, the effort expended would have been in vain and the appellate court may be obliged to reverse any decision. Zeal is commendable but it must not obscure the need for caution. I trust that, in future, Courts at first instance will be guided accordingly.

Summary of decision

Nolan P.G Bereaux Justice of Appeal

The appeal is allowed for the reasons given at paragraphs i, iii and iv below:

i. The filing of these proceedings was a breach of Article 67 of TTFA’s Constitution by which the TTFA is bound. Section 67 is unambiguous. Any appeal against a final and binding decision passed by FIFA shall be heard by CAS. The filing of these proceedings was therefore ultra vires Article 67, null, void and of no effect and must be struck out.

ii. There is no evidence that William Wallace was not authorised by the Board to bring this action. That there cannot therefore be established.

iii. The judge was plainly wrong in refusing to stay these proceedings in favour of arbitration before the CAS. The Court of Appeal is entitled to look at the matter afresh. FIFA has met the threshold requirements which trigger the court’s discretion under section 7 of the Arbitration Act Chapter 5:01. I am satisfied that there was no reason why the matter should not have been referred to arbitration and that FIFA was ready, willing and able to conduct the arbitration.

iv. The purported service of proceedings by e-mail was a breach of the laws of Switzerland. Consequently, it was a breach of Part 7.8(2) of the Civil Proceedings Rules 1998 (CPR) which expressly provides that neither Part 7.8 nor any court order authorises any person to do anything in the country in which the court order is to be served, which is in breach of the law of that county. Because service of process by e- mail is illegal in Switzerland, any such service is void and therefore a nullity. It was also a breach of Part 7. 6(2)(b) of the CPR.

Analysis

Nolan P.G Bereaux Justice of Appeal

iv. On a proper review of the evidence, FIFA’s refusal to pay the advance costs of the arbitration did not amount to a lack of readiness or an unwillingness to properly conduct the appeal. As Mr. Palacios explained, it was FIFA’s practice, in conducting its arbitrations, not to pay advance costs because of the large numbers of arbitrations in which it is involved. Other than that, FIFA had proceeded to nominate one of the three arbitrators required for the conduct of the arbitration.

Issue ii – Did the President, William Wallace, have the authority to bring these proceedings?

31. Mr. Hamel-Smith submitted that he did not. He contended that under the TTFA’s Constitution, that authority resided in the board of directors as a whole and there was nothing in the evidence to suggest that such authority had been obtained. Certainly we would expect that any action taken by a corporate person will first have had the sanction of its board of directors. But there is nothing in the evidence to suggest that Mr. Wallace did not have the authority.

Issue iii – Should these proceedings have been stayed in favour of arbitration?

32. Had I come to another conclusion on the vires of the TTFA’s institution of these proceedings the appellant would have been entitled to a stay of these proceedings under section 7 of the Arbitration Act Chapter 5:01 or under the courts inherent jurisdiction. I shall address only the section 7 power in this appeal. Section 7 provides:

“If any party to an arbitration agreement, or any person claiming through or under him, commences any legal proceedings in the Court against any other party to the arbitration agreement, or any person claiming through or under him, in respect of any matter agreed to be referred, any party to such legal proceedings may, at any time after appearance and before delivering any pleadings or taking any other steps in the proceedings, apply to the Court to stay the proceedings, and the Court, if satisfied that there is no sufficient reason why the matter should not be referred in accordance with the arbitration agreement, and that the applicant was, at the time when the proceedings were commenced, and still remains, ready and willing to do all things necessary to the proper conduct of the arbitration, may make an order staying the proceedings.”

37. Dr. Crowne submitted that FIFA’s refusal to pay the advance costs of the arbitration rendered the costs of the arbitration prohibitive and the arbitration agreement inoperable. The evidence in this regard showed that by letter dated 30th April, 2020 CAS informed TTFA of FIFA’s policy of not paying advance costs and then called upon the respondent to pay the entire upfront fee. In the context of an already financially straitened organisation, such a request did seem to me to be highly unreasonable. My concern was heightened when I read Article 64(2) of the Statutes of the Bodies Working for the Settlement of Sports Related Disputes (which govern CAS arbitrations it appears) which was used by CAS to justify TTFA paying the entire amount of upfront costs. There was no basis under that provision for calling on the TTFA to pay the entire sum. Dr. Crowne submitted that calling upon the TTFA to pay that exorbitant sum was unconscionable and rendered the agreement unenforceable. He relied on the decision in Uber Technologies Inc v Heller 2020 SCC 16, in which a majority of the Canada Supreme Court held such a clause to be unconscionable and unenforceable in circumstances where the upfront costs to arbitrate a claim against Uber was equal to all or most of the gross annual income of the claimant working full time as an Uber driver. There is no question of unconscionability here. That case is distinguishable. The facts of this case are nowhere as extreme. FIFA in any event recanted its position and was prepared to pay its upfront costs.

Order

Nolan P.G Bereaux Justice of Appeal

50. I would therefore formally order as follows:

(i) The appeal is allowed. The decision of Gobin J dated 13th August, 2020 is set aside.

(ii) The decision of Gobin J dated 13th October, 2020 is set aside. The order granting declarations therein is quashed.

(iii) The costs of this appeal must follow the event. The TTFA therefore shall pay the appellant’s costs of the application in the High Court, certified fit for one senior and one junior attorney-at-law.

(iv) The TTFA shall also pay the appellant’s costs of this appeal which shall be two thirds of the costs assessed in the High Court.

Appearances:

C. Hamel-Smith SC, J. Walker instructed by C. Gopie, Attorneys-at-law, for the Appellant

Dr. E. Crowne, M. Gayle instructed by J. Jones and C. Paul, Attorneys-at-law, for the Respondent

Editor's Note:

The above represents selected portions taken from the 23-page judgment delivered on October 23, 2020 by the Court of Appeal.
Title: Lewis: Court ruling gives clarity
Post by: Tallman on October 26, 2020, 08:00:49 AM
Lewis: Court ruling gives clarity
T&T Express


Trinidad and Tobago Olympic Committee president Brian Lewis has said that the Court of Appeal ruling in the Trinidad and Tobago (TTFA) versus FIFA matter provided much needed clarity for sporting bodies to be guided by going forward.

“The decision of the Court of Appeal in the TTFA versus FIFA matter is very important in the context of sports jurisprudence in Trinidad and Tobago,” said Lewis.

“It would have provided important clarity by which sports organisations in Trinidad and Tobago can and must be guided by especially and including those incorporated under an act of Parliament such as the T&T Olympic Committee among others,” he added.

“The process and procedures (for conflict resolution) have been clearly laid out and it is an important decision in providing that needed clarity,” Lewis continued.

He also noted what the Appeal Court Justices said about FIFA’s initial requirement for the TTFA to pay the up-front costs to take the matter to the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS).

“What is also important was that in judgement, the actions of FIFA in initially requiring the TTFA to pay all the up-front cost was deemed highly unreasonable and that the action of CAS in supporting that request was deemed to have been reflective and without independent considerations,” Lewis said.

“Those are important conclusions as they in reality had, in my view, substance to the initial aggrievement of Mr William Wallace and his team in terms of the process they would have faced. What the Court of Appeal clarified was the issue of jurisdiction. The Court of Arbitration of Sport was the jurisdiction for that matter to be heard notwithstanding the sense of aggrievement would have been felt and that the views that the process wasn’t impartial,” he added.

“The Court of Appeal indicated that they were persuaded by Mr Hamel-Smith that the actions were those in the administrative division of CAS as opposed to the arbitrators themselves.

“The Court of Appeal did express in the judgment in paragraph 37 and 39 some concerns about the impartiality of CAS and what appears to be a cosy relationship with FIFA. There was no basis for calling on the TTFA to pay the entire up-front cost and FIFA was highly unreasonable,” Lewis concluded.
Title: New ‘Normal’: TTFA delegates continue to call for Wallace’s resignation
Post by: Tallman on October 26, 2020, 08:16:57 AM
New ‘Normal’: TTFA delegates continue to call for Wallace’s resignation
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express)


Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) representatives had their say when unanimously voting to have a FIFA-appointed normalisation committee take charge of running football in Trinidad and Tobago.

In the absence of outcast TTFA president William Wallace, his vice-presidents, and a United TTFA presence, Association delegates took charge of their destiny at yesterday’s Emergency General Meeting (EGM), at which members took decisive action they believed would clear the way for the lifting of FIFA’s international suspension of the TTFA.

“This motion that was passed basically agreed that the directorship of the TTFA will go to the normalisation committee,” stated Board member Brent Sancho, acting chairman of the T&T Pro League. “We essentially asked them to replace Wallace and company.”

FIFA suspended the TTFA on September 24 for breach of its statutes when, in defiance of the wishes of the TTFA majority, the former TTFA executive, led by Wallace, challenged their March 17 removal by FIFA—which imposed its own normalisation committee to run local football. Wallace was reinstated by Justice Carol Gobin’s October 13, judgment, declaring that FIFA’s imposition of a normalisation committee as null and void. But 10 days later, the Appeal Court, led by Chief Justice Ivor Archie and including Justice Nolan Bereaux, quashed Justice Gobin’s judgment and ruled in favour of FIFA.

The Appeal Court’s decision confirmed that both the TTFA constitution and FIFA Statutes gave FIFA the right to appoint a normalisation committee. Wallace had pledged that he would not appeal the decision.

Richard Ferguson, the Terminix La Horquetta Rangers managing director and former TTFA presidential candidate, chaired yesterday’s EGM at which delegates passed a resolution to reinstate FIFA’s normalisation committee and also to remove all matters against world football’s governing body from court.

Members also agreed to amend the TTFA statutes, structuring it more in line with the statutes of FIFA, and so fulfilling conditions the world body had set for the TTFA to be reinstated to the international football fold. Once the suspension is removed, T&T will be eligible to compete in qualifiers for the upcoming CONCACAF Gold Cup and 2022 FIFA World Cup.

“The message sent is that we have lost all confidence in Mr Wallace, and want the normalisation committee to take charge,” stated Eastern Football Association (EFA) president Kieron Edwards. “Correspondence will be sent to the normalisation committee chairman Mr (Robert) Hadad shortly... by Tuesday, and it is then up to FIFA to go forward and rectify the suspension and so on,” Edwards explained.

A majority 35 of 47 delegates actively took part in the one-hour virtual EGM, with just a couple having difficulty logging on due to technical issues, while a minority chose not to participate. Referees Association representative Osmond Downer raised a motion which was seconded by Morvant Caledonia United’s Jamaal Shabazz and voted upon by the 35 delegates on-line.

“Be it resolved that in view of the precarious position that the TTFA now finds itself that this extraordinary general meeting of the TTFA decides that the way forward for the TTFA is for the TTFA to fully comply with its obligations as a member of FIFA, recognising the legitimacy of the FIFA-appointed normalisation committee in bringing its own statutes in line with the FIFA statutes and to fully comply with the normalisation committee. Be it further resolved that all court matters existing between the TTFA and FIFA shall be immediately brought to a stop,” Downer’s motion stated.

“I think the members came in knowing that we had to do something to make sure that we got back into the FIFA fold,” Sancho added. Of those present virtually, only a Tobago representative and a FC Santa Rosa delegate abstained, while among those missing were representatives from the Veterans Football Organisation and the Pro League club, FC Port of Spain.

“Basically, it was a motion of no-confidence in William Wallace and his associates,” stated Edwards, adding, “The motion was passed with 33 members voting in favour, two abstaining, and none against.” The Express’ attempts to contact Wallace for a response to the EGM‘s outcome and to confirm whether he would resign—as he had indicated last week—proved futile, as Wallace could not be reached. However, TTFA board members are calling on him to step aside.

“Mister Wallace said that if members wanted to move on with normalisation, that he would resign. A clear 33 members out of 35 present voted that they do not have the confidence in him to lead the TTFA. He should do the honourable thing as he said he would resign,” Edwards noted.
Title: 33 delegates voted to reinstate Normalisation Committee
Post by: Tallman on October 26, 2020, 08:17:39 AM
33 delegates voted to reinstate Normalisation Committee
By Keith Clement (T&T Guardian)


In what was described as a very cordial and mature gathering of the membership of the T&T Football Association (TTFA), the meeting voted for the reinstatement of the FIFA appointed normalisation committee to resume its control and administration of the local sports during a virtual Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM) on Sunday.

The meeting was chaired by Richard Ferguson in the absence of embattled president William Wallace and his two vice presidents - Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip, who made good on their written promise not to attend.

However, in their absence, 38 of 47 delegates entitled to vote, appointed Ferguson, who contested the November 24 presidency of the TTFA and lost in the first round, to chair the meeting after he was nominated by Caledonia Morvant representative Jamal Shabazz and seconded by Howard Spencer of the Southern Football Association (SFA) to do so. He was unanimously given the nod.

Guardian Media Sports was informed that the meeting which got off to a late start but completed its single agenda item - Discussions re: The way forward - FIFA suspension, by noon following a motion which was moved by Osmond Downer, the T&T Football Referees (T&TFRA) representative which read: "Be it resolved that, in view of the precarious position that the TTFA now finds itself, this extraordinary general meeting of the TTFA decides that the way forward for the TTFA is for the TTFA to fully comply with its obligation as a member of FIFA, recognising the legitimacy of the FIFA appointed normalisation committee, and bringing its own statutes in line with the FIFA Statutes, and to fully cooperate with the normalisation committee in the fulfilment of its mandate as stated in FIFA's letter of March 17, 2020. Be it further resolved that all court matters existing between the TTFA and FIFA shall be immediately brought to a stop".

The motion was seconded by Keith Jefferys of Central FC with 33 delegates voting in favour of it, while three delegates, when called upon to vote, did not respond. The Tobago FA's Terry Jopseh and the Santa Rosa FC representative abstained.

Meanwhile, the letter sent to president Wallace on Thursday by Kieron Edwards, the president of the Eastern Football Association (EFA) requesting that he answers 19 questions which included how he intends to pay the salaries of coaches, office staff and other contracted officials like Peter Miller, the TTFA's marketing representative and how the TTFA debt $70 million will be cleared, but issue did not come up since Wallace was not present. Neither did the vote of no-confidence in the president and his vice two presidents.

According to Downer, "There was no need to move such a motion since the agenda did make provision for it and only the constitution can address it.

The meeting also directed Ferguson, a businessman and the owner of Terminix La Horquatta Rangers FC and Boni Bishop, the general secretary of T&TFRA to write Robert Hadad, the chairman of the normalisation committee informing his about the membership decision and that the letter must be delivered by 4 pm on Tuesday.

On Friday, the Court of Appeal judges, Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Appellate Judge Nolan Bereaux ruled in FIFA favour and overturned the ruling by High Court Judge Carol Gobin made on October 13, thereby throwing the future of United T&T Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and his vice presidents into limbo.

The lawsuit, brought by Wallace and his United TTFA team, which also included former football executives, T&T Super League president Keith Look Loy and Anthony Harford, the president of the Northern Football Association (NFA), contravened the TTFA's Constitution, which prescribes that all disputes between the TTFA and FIFA should be dealt with by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), the Appellate judges concluded.

The Appeal Court, the highest court in T&T, also ordered the cash-strapped TTFA to pay the legal cost of FIFA.

In fact, in his summary of the decision, Judge Bereaux stated that: "There is no evidence that William Wallace was not authorised by the Board to bring this action. That there cannot, therefore, be established." which means that the cost is the responsibility of the TTFA.

The meeting which also had 13 observers, also decided to address the Court of Appeal decision on Friday in which it ordered that the TTFA pays FIFA legal cost in the jurisdiction appeal matter which FIFA won, at another meeting.

On Saturday, TTFA board member and the T&T Pro League acting chairman Brent Sancho told Guardian Media Sports that: "Just like the financial burden that is coming out of the unilateral contracts signed by Wallace which is possibly costing the TTFA close to $14 million and of course the immense fall out the TTFA is experiencing because of him and his egotistical cronies charge towards the high courts of Trinidad and Tobago, all without board approval. This is yet again an example of a man that seems to believe he is a lord onto himself. There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that the membership will be actively looking at taking a legal course for breach of fiduciary duties. It is a must."

Another board member Richard Quan Chan of the Southern Football Association said: "The membership need to take legal action against the United TTFA team for the legal cost which the court ordered the TTFA to pay FIFA. The decision to take legal action against FIFA was a United TTFA decision and not a TTFA Board decision. The TTFA should not be saddled with that cost since it was never informed, gave approval or was involved in such a decision."

FIFA suspended the TTFA on September 24 (T&T Republic Day) from all football events and activities under FIFA and demanded that the TTFA Statutes comes in line with FIFA's own before the suspension is lifted.

In the event, that the suspension is not lifted by either FIFA or the CAS by 5 pm on December 18, T&T will be replaced by Antigua and Barbuda as the next highest-ranked team based on performances during the 2019 Concacaf Nations League.
Title: Statutory ambiguity
Post by: Tallman on October 27, 2020, 02:01:51 PM
Statutory ambiguity
By Dr. Terrence Farrell (T&T Express)


THE decision of the Court of Appeal has drawn a line under the litigation between the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) and FIFA, a conflict which recalls the Creole aphorism: “Tief from tief does make God laugh!” Justice Gobin took the parties and the country on an excursion which brought to mind former Chief Justice Michael de la Bastide’s query, posed in the context of another matter adjudicated by Gobin J, as to whether judicial review legislation had opened the door to “judicial adventurism’’.

Justice Gobin’s frolic did, however, surface a significant issue, the legal status of certain entities created by statute and the justiciability of their actions.

To be sure, the issue is not really new. Justice Judith Jones (as she then was) had to interpret the Integrity in Public Life Act of 2000 and the related amendments to the Constitution.

Those pieces of legislation widened the ambit of the Integrity Commission to include boards of “statutory bodies and state enterprises, including those bodies in which the State has a controlling interest”. But the legislation did not define either.

After interrogating the Interpretation Act and the Constitution itself, Jones J opined that: “In their natural and ordinary meaning the term [statutory bodies] must be taken to mean: ‘those bodies or organisations established by statute’... there is no other possible meaning that can be ascribed to these words.”

And there lay the problem. There are a host of organisations—sporting, charitable, religious—that are established by statute. Attorney Tyrone Marcus (Guardian October 18) gave a list of sporting organisations created by statute. The Catholic Religious Education Development Institute, of which I am a director, was set up by statute. Ricardo Williams (Sunday Express October 25) has given an excellent summary of how such organisations come into being and from where their powers arise, which is not from the statute incorporating them.

These organisations are incorporated by statute for reasons of prestige or some other arcane reason. But as Bereaux JA pointed out, that does not mean that they have any defined public purpose or respond to any public policy.

They do not report to Parliament or to any government minister. They do not fall within the principle established in Datafin because they discharge no public duty. And even if, as with the TTFA, there is some public interest in what they do, that is not sufficient to bring them within the ambit of judicial review.

Despite the Jones decision, which has not been appealed, the Integrity Commission has wisely ignored these particular “statutory bodies’’ and has not required their boards to be subjected to its onerous strictures.

Incorporation by statute wrong-footed Boodoosingh J (as he then was) in the Look Loy v Gabriel matter, on which Gobin J relied, and which Bereaux JA suggests was also wrongly decided on that point. Bereaux JA, clear-headed and careful, and the antithesis of judicial activism, did not seek to legislate when a body created by statute should be treated as a private body and hence not subject to judicial review. However, his dicta on that point leaves open the question whether a body established by statute could, outside of resort to arbitration, oust the jurisdiction of the local courts if its legislation explicitly so provided, and whether or not our courts would accept such ouster.

The difficulties of statutory incorporation do not end there. There remains considerable ambiguity about the governance of State-owned enterprises. Yes, they do fall within the purview of the Integrity Commission, and, in accordance with section 119(9) of the Constitution, they do “report’’ to Parliament, usually long after horses have bolted. But because State enterprises are incorporated under the Companies Act, the only legitimate nexus to governance by the State is through the Minister of Finance (Corporation Sole) Act, which is wholly inadequate for effecting good governance. This lacuna has allowed corporate travesties such as UDeCOTT, Education Facilities, Petrotrin’s GTL project, EMBD, LifeSport, and a host of others to occur.

The applicability of judicial review to State enterprises was discussed in NH International v UDeCOTT with instructive judgments by Kangaloo and Warner JJA, and a powerful and persuasive dissent by Sharma CJ.

It is why the 2016 State Enterprise Review Committee recommended that all State-owned enterprises be governed under a two-tiered legal system of incorporation of the Companies Act, together with a New Zealand-style State Enterprise act which clearly legislates the powers of both the “line minister’’ and the finance minister, and would leave directors of state enterprises, who are now very exposed, much less exposed.

The TTFA-FIFA imbroglio will unfold and one hopes that there will eventually be an outcome that is positive for the game in Trinidad and Tobago.

The question of the status of private bodies incorporated by statute which probably should not be, and State enterprises which are not, but should be, ought to garner the attention of a Law Reform Commission, if we still have one.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 27, 2020, 04:55:44 PM
‘A wasted trial’; how Gobin and Wallace were undone by court of appeal—as Fifa prevailed.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


The Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) versus the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (Fifa) was billed as the most important case in local sport history, at the opening whistle.

By the time the dust had cleared, though, Justice of Appeal Nolan Bereaux described the exercise as ‘a wasted trial’ and Madame Justice Carol Gobin’s seismic rulings in the Port of Spain high court were consigned to the bin, rather than the judicial history books.

The TTFA was represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Jason Jones and Crystal Paul, while Fifa was represented by Christopher Hamel-Smith SC, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie.

TTFA president William Wallace still, theoretically, has the option of a final appeal to the privy council. But, by Monday morning, it may no longer be his call to make, as the TTFA’s 47 member delegates await for what promises to be a feisty, extraordinary general meeting on Sunday.

Wallace cannot be removed on Sunday, as his fate is not on the agenda. But a strong show of disapproval for his actions can make his position untenable, still less than 12 months into his four-year term as president.

The besieged TTFA president said, earlier this week, that no matter what happened today or on Sunday, he would be buoyed by Gobin’s notable judgments in the high court. Today, he lost that as well, as Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Bereaux tore into Gobin’s decisions as well as the merits of the TTFA’s approach to the local high court.

It is worth noting that, after Wallace and vice-presidents Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick and Sam Phillip were removed by a Fifa-appointed normalisation committee on 13 March, the officials set off in search of an independent hearing. They still have not gotten that.

Today’s matter was about whether the Trinidad and Tobago courts was the right venue for the proceedings. And Archie and Bereaux said, emphatically, ‘no’.

Remarkably, the court of appeal ruled that the TTFA’s attorney had not served Fifa properly to begin the proceedings in the first place.

“As any experienced practitioner will know, service of originating process is an arcane area of procedural law that is littered with pitfalls,” said Archie. “Many a claim has floundered at the first hurdle. This is merely the latest example.

“Having come to the conclusion that the service was unlawful, quite apart from the other reasons set out in the judgment of my learned brother, we have no choice but to allow this appeal.”

Bereaux, for his part, said Gobin was ‘wrong to reject’ an affidavit from Fifa attorney Miguel Lietard Palacios that pointed to TTFA’s apparent failure to follow Swiss law in serving his employer by email.

Bereaux described the form of service as ‘illegal … void and a nullity’ and ‘another reason why the judge’s order must be set aside and the claim struck out on this basis’.

“Due regard and respect must be paid, as a matter comity, for the laws of other nations,” stated Bereaux. “A court is committed to uphold the rule of law and cannot give effect or be seen to give effect, to a form of service of process which is unlawful under the law of another country in which the proceedings have been served.

“If the proceedings are to have effect in Trinidad and Tobago, they must not be tainted by illegality—especially an illegality in the country of one of the parties to the dispute, who will be expected to observe any order which the Trinidad and Tobago court makes.”

Archie further chided Gobin.

“There is no inherent power in the court to invent a process that is outside the contemplation of the rules and then to direct a party to employ it,” said the chief justice. “That is a recipe for chaos.”

Gobin, in refusing Fifa’s request for the TTFA case to be stayed and/or directed to CAS, gave weight to the fact that the local football body is incorporated by an act of parliament. As such, she ruled that Wallace’s grievance ‘falls squarely within the jurisdiction of the high court of this country’.

Section 3 of the TTFA Act states: ‘The aims and objects of the Association are:-

1. to regulate and control the conduct of Football in Trinidad and Tobago (under the Federation Internationale de Football Association system) and to provide playing fields and conveniences in connection therewith;

2. to promote local, inter-territorial and International Football matches and to provide prizes or awards to participants thereof; and

3. to foster and promote the playing of Football under the said system and to become members of or affiliated to Associations having similar objects.”

Gobin suggested that section 3 was not ‘operative’ since ‘a reference to the Fifa system in any case is not the same as Fifa Statutes’.

“Had Parliament intended to enact Fifa Statutes so as to oust the jurisdiction of the courts and to effectively deprive the TTFA of access to the courts of this country,” said Gobin, “it would have had to do so expressly in clear and unambiguous terms. Because TTFA is a statutorily-created corporation, it cannot oust the jurisdiction of the courts by its rules.

“Further, the adoption of rules which seek to oust the jurisdiction of the courts breach a well-established policy of the law, which renders such rules void. Moreover, it is outwith the jurisdiction of an entity incorporated under our legislation to agree to submit to foreign law as Fifa Statutes prescribe.”

However, Bereaux said Gobin erred by effectively failing to grasp the reasoning behind the act of parliament in general and section 3 in particular.

“The TTFA Act was introduced into parliament as a private member’s bill,” said the justice of the appeal. “There was no debate on the floors of either the House or Senate. It, therefore, cannot be said that there was some public policy behind its incorporation.

“To the extent that there is any policy to be discerned, one must look to the provisions of the TTFA’s Act and those point to the TTFA working compatibly within the Fifa system. Further, there is no rule of law which prohibits a corporation incorporated by an act of parliament from submitting to a jurisdiction of a foreign tribunal.”

As for section 3, Bereaux said it is indeed operative and ‘deliberately drafted in wide terms to permit TTFA the latitude to flesh out its functions and modus operandi in the constitution itself, as its membership see fit, without the necessity of having to return to parliament to broaden its powers’.

“The term ‘Fifa system’ is vague, deliberately so,” said Bereaux. “This is because the term is intended to cover the entire system of football organised and controlled by Fifa.

“Such governance can only be effected by Fifa through laws, rules and regulations; that is to say, the Fifa statutes, as well as Fifa’s subordinate rules and regulations, decisions and directives.”

Having decided that the TTFA Act did not restrict the local football from abiding by Fifa’s regulations in any way, Bereaux did not accept Crowne’s argument that the stipulation which forced the local body to use CAS was an imposition.

Article 67 of the TTFA Constitution states:

‘In accordance with the relevant provisions of the Fifa Statutes, any appeal against a final and binding decision passed by Fifa, Concacaf or the leagues shall be heard by the CAS, unless another arbitration tribunal has jurisdiction in accordance with art 69.

‘[…] TTFA shall ensure its full compliance and that of all those subject to its jurisdiction with any final decision passed by a Fifa body, by a Concacaf body, by the arbitration tribunal recognised by TTFA or by the CAS.’

Bereaux said Fifa membership is voluntary and if the TTFA chose to join, then it is obliged to accept its rules.

“The TTFA has made that choice—a choice which preceded its incorporation in 1982,” said Bereaux. “It has been a member of Fifa since 1964. It chose to join Fifa and to abide by its statutes, rules and regulations.

“[…] To the extent that Article 67 ousts the court’s jurisdiction, it was the choice made by the TTFA within the wide ambit permitted it by sections 3 and 4 of the TTFA Act. Having made its choice and having bound itself by its own constitution to comply, it cannot now act outside of its provisions.”

Still, the court of appeal was unimpressed with CAS’ behaviour in this matter and its relationship with Fifa.

Wallace opted to move to the high court, on the guidance of his attorneys, after what they felt to be signs of inherent bias at CAS. And Bereaux found they had good reason to be uneasy, as he noted Fifa’s refusal—even when asked—to abide by CAS’ rules to pay arbitration fees upfront.

Inexplicably, CAS demanded that the cash-strapped TTFA pay Fifa’s share for them too, at a total cost of 40,000 Swiss francs (TT$300,000).

“In the context of an already financially straitened organisation, such a request did seem to me to be highly unreasonable,” said Bereaux. “My concern was heightened when I read Article 64(2) of the Statutes of the Bodies Working for the Settlement of Sports Related Disputes (which govern CAS arbitrations it appears), which was used by CAS to justify TTFA paying the entire amount of upfront costs. There was no basis under that provision for calling on the TTFA to pay the entire sum.

“[…] In this regard, I had entertained some concern about the impartiality of the CAS and what appeared to be a cosy relationship with Fifa.”

Yet, Bereaux found that Crowne went too far in declaring Fifa’s breach to be ‘unconscionable’.

“Dr Crowne submitted that calling upon the TTFA to pay that exorbitant sum was unconscionable and rendered the agreement unenforceable,” said the justice of the appeal. “He relied on the decision in Uber Technologies Inc v Heller 2020 SCC 16, in which a majority of the Canada Supreme Court held such a clause to be unconscionable and unenforceable in circumstances where the upfront costs to arbitrate a claim against Uber was equal to all or most of the gross annual income of the claimant working full time as an Uber driver.

“There is no question of unconscionability here. That case is distinguishable. The facts of this case are nowhere as extreme. Fifa, in any event, recanted its position and was prepared to pay its upfront costs.”

Further, he said the breach was insufficient grounds for Gobin to rule out arbitration altogether, while he noted Hamel-Smith’s argument that the fees were demanded by CAS’ administrators rather than the arbiters.

“CAS’ reaction to Fifa’s request to forego its share of upfront costs appeared to be reflexive with no apparent independent consideration being given to it,” said Bereaux. “I am however persuaded by Mr Hamel-Smith that the actions were those in the administrative division of the CAS, as opposed to the arbitrators themselves who would have decided the matter.

“In any event, as Mr Hamel-Smith rightly submitted that the Swiss Courts would be the proper forum to hear any complaints about the CAS’ impartiality. In conclusion, on this point, therefore [Fifa] was entitled to have had these proceedings stayed in favour of the arbitration proceedings before the CAS.

“[…] On a proper review of the evidence, Fifa’s refusal to pay the advance costs of the arbitration did not amount to a lack of readiness or an unwillingness to properly conduct the appeal.”

It is not that Wallace and his vice-presidents did not have a case against their removal by Fifa and the behaviour of CAS, according to the court of appeal, it is that they took their grievance to the wrong forum.

The court of appeal took Gobin to task for accommodating them.

“We are concerned here with the exercise of a judicial discretion,” said Bereaux. “Gobin J must be shown to have been plainly wrong in exercising her discretion to refuse the stay in order for this court to interfere with her decision.

“[…] In my judgment she was plainly wrong in her reasoning.”

The chief justice further denounced Gobin for her refusal to allow the court of appeal hearing to happen before she ruled on the substantial matter.

The high court judge blamed Hamel-Smith for not requesting an expedited trial from the appeal court. However, Archie accused Gobin—who he has crossed swords with publicly on other matters over the past year—of wasting the court’s time.

“Owing to the particular primary challenge mounted by Fifa, it would have been wiser to let the challenge to service be determined—particularly in the context of a pending appeal,” said Archie. “It was neither prudent case management nor an economical deployment of judicial time and resources to attempt to finally determine the substantive issues and to deliver a judgment less than a week before the scheduled hearing of the interlocutory appeal. The foreseeable result is that we must now set aside the declarations granted below.

“While we are aware that the filing of an appeal against a final decision does not entitle the unsuccessful party to a stay, deeper consideration must be given in circumstances like this where, depending on the outcome of the appeal, the effort expended would have been in vain and the appellate court may be obliged to reverse any decision.

“Zeal is commendable but it must not obscure the need for caution. I trust that, in future, courts at first instance will be guided accordingly.”

Ultimately, Wallace and/or the TTFA will pay for Gobin’s perceived error.

“[The] TTFA by proceeding with the trial while this appeal was pending must bear the costs of what is now a wasted trial,” stated Bereaux. “[…] The TTFA therefore shall pay the appellant’s costs of the application in the high court, certified fit for one senior and one junior attorney-at-law.

“The TTFA shall also pay the appellant’s costs of this appeal which shall be two-thirds of the costs assessed in the high court.”

Crowne submitted that ‘pursuit of this appeal is not only academic but also moot because Trinidad and Tobago’s membership in Fifa has now been suspended and TTFA cannot now exercise any rights under the Fifa Statutes’.

Not so, according to the court of appeal.

“While it is not in evidence before us, the reason for the suspension is the fact that the TTFA is in breach of Articles 11 and 14 of the Fifa Statutes by its filing of these proceedings,” said Bereaux. “But in any event, Fifa has challenged the validity of these proceedings in the high court and in this appeal. It is entitled to pursue its appeal.

“Further, as Mr Walker submitted, there are declarations made by Gobin J in the substantive claim which, in so far as they have been made by a high court judge of Trinidad and Tobago, are binding on Fifa (at least locally) and remain binding so long as the decision subsists.”

And so, the court of appeal proceeded to strip the TTFA of its wins in the lower court.

“The appeal is allowed; the decision of Gobin J dated 13th August 2020 is set aside,” stated Bereaux. “The decision of Gobin J dated 13th October 2020 is set aside. The order granting declarations therein is quashed.”

Yanked by Fifa, Wallace has now been spanked by his own courts.

Elected TTFA president on 24 November 2019, the former Carapichaima East Secondary vice-principal’s short stint in charge looks set to be remembered for all the wrong reasons.

Fifa struck first and early in the affair. Wallace and the TTFA thought they had played their way back into the match.

But, in the end, a late show by Fifa’s attorneys ensured a rout.

RELATED NEWS

Fifa triumphs! Court of appeal orders TTFA to pay legal costs as Gobin’s rulings set aside.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


In roughly four minutes, Chief Justice Ivor Archie brought Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace’s legal jaunt to a crashing halt, as the court of appeal ruled in favour of Fifa today, and set aside high court Judge Carol Gobin’s verdicts on 13 August and 13 October.

The TTFA was also ordered to pay legal costs for the high court and court of appeal to the tune of one senior counsel and one junior. Archie noted that he and fellow Justice of Appeal Nolan Bereaux concurred with the final ruling in every respect.

The TTFA was represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Jason Jones and Crystal Paul, while Fifa was represented by Christopher Hamel-Smith SC, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie.

Wallace and his vice-presidents, Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick and Sam Phillip, were removed, according to Fifa, on 13 March 2020, when the Bureau of the Fifa Council—headed by president Gianni Infantino—ordered that the local body would henceforth be run by a Fifa-appointed normalisation committee, due to its parlous financial state.

Wallace initially turned to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) for adjudication; but, after complaining of bias by the Swiss-based body, changed course and filed at the Port of Spain high court instead in May. Gobin subsequently declared that Wallace was entitled to justice from the local courts due to the behaviour of CAS and Fifa and because the TTFA is formed by an act of parliament.

Archie and Bereaux took a decidedly different view today.

“The filing of these proceedings was a breach of article 67 of the TTFA’s Constitution of which the TTFA is bound,” stated the chief justice. “We are of the view that section 67 is unambiguous … The filings of these proceedings were, therefore, ultra vires, null and void and of no effect and will be struck out.”

Article 67, which deals with the Court of Arbitration for Sport, states:

‘In accordance with the relevant provisions of the FIFA Statutes, any appeal against a final and binding decision passed by Fifa, Concacaf or the leagues shall be heard by the CAS, unless another arbitration tribunal has jurisdiction in accordance with art 69.

‘[…] TTFA shall ensure its full compliance and that of all those subject to its jurisdiction with any final decision passed by a Fifa body, by a Concacaf body, by the arbitration tribunal recognised by TTFA or by the CAS.’

Archie declared that Gobin was ‘plainly wrong in refusing to stay these proceedings’. The court of appeal also found the TTFA’s attorneys to be in breach of the laws of Switzerland and the local Civil Proceedings Rules (CPR) by serving Fifa via email.

“There was no reason why the matter should not have been referred to arbitration,” said Archie. “Fifa was ready, willing and able to conduct the arbitration … The decisions of Madame Justice Gobin, dated 13 August 2020 and 13 October 2020, are set aside; and the order granting the declarations dated 13 October 2020 is squashed.”

Wallace revealed earlier that the New City Chambers attorneys were working pro bono, with the TTFA only asked to pay for the necessary filings. The legal costs so far were all borne by the elected officials and their supporters.

However, as a parting gift, Archie and Bereaux made a substantial addition to their tab.

“TTFA will therefore pay Fifa costs for the application in high court as well as this appeal,” said the chief justice, “with the cost of this appeal to be two-thirds of the costs assessed below. In both instances, costs are certified fit for one senior [attorney] and one junior.”

The court of appeal did not accept Fifa’s argument that Wallace and his vice-presidents were not authorised to launch the legal proceedings against Fifa in the first place.

“There is no evidence before us to indicate it was not filed in accordance with the constitution of the TTFA,” said Archie.

As a result, the legal bill incurred by today’s crushing defeat could theoretically be passed on the TTFA. Whether it is Wallace and his United TTFA slate or the local football body, the bill would be daunting for either party.

Wallace, Taylor and Phillip are due to meet with the TTFA’s member delegates on Sunday in an extraordinary general meeting to decide the way forward for the local body, which is on a provisional suspension from Fifa at present.

Wallace, in an interview with the Trinidad Newsday yesterday, did not rule out a trip to the privy council if they lost at the court of appeal—although that is likely to be something that TTFA member delegates will have some say on this weekend.

‘We shall not stand in your way’ Wallace and VPs skip TTFA EGM—but have not resigned.
Wired868.com.


“[…] We remain convinced that the right to make our case, to let our voices be heard, is a basic human right.

“[…] We are acutely aware that tomorrow is promised to no one of us and that it is the membership’s right to decide on the tomorrow they desire for the TTFA. We shall not stand in your way…”

In the following press statement, Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace confirms that he and vice-presidents Clynt Taylor and Sam Phillip will not attend tomorrow’s EGM, which they called—in the wake of yesterday’s legal defeat at the court of appeal:

Dear Members,

Let me start by saying that I am still quite unable to comprehend how anybody can think that what Fifa did in March 2020 is acceptable. Maybe it was desirable that those who elected us should be consulted.

Frankly, however, it never occurred to us that anyone would view Fifa’s decision to send in a normalisation committee after a mere four months of our tenure in any way different from the way we viewed it. In addition, the action directly affected the executive and to some extent brought our names into disrepute.

We remain convinced that the right to make our case, to let our voices be heard, is a basic human right. It is a right which, in our view, Fifa denied us when they abrogated their responsibility at the Court of Arbitration. We are well aware of what that action led to.

We hasten to add that we recognise the authority of the appeal court to conclude that Madame Justice Carol Gobin erred.

We take this opportunity to salute all those TTFA members who did repose confidence in us in November and have not backed away from their initial position. We salute as well as those who did but later changed their minds. We do not begrudge them their right so to do.

We also thank all those ordinary citizens of our two-island republic who have no interest in football but have been able to see that the issue goes well beyond the field of play.

Over the last seven months since March, we were fortunate to be allowed rare candid views of the TTFA as it is really seen from several other vantage points—including the international and the regional and, latterly, the judicial and the political.

That combination of different points of view, especially the political, has made it clear to my vice-presidents, Clynt Taylor and Joseph Sam Phillip, and me that our views and the views of some fraction of the membership remain at variance at this time. We are acutely aware that tomorrow is promised to no one of us and that it is the membership’s right to decide on the tomorrow they desire for the TTFA.

We shall not stand in your way.

o this end, we have decided to absent ourselves from the EGM carded for 25 October. In our view, the meeting was properly constituted and as per constitution the delegates can elect a chairperson in the absence of the president.

Rayshawn Mars, secretary and delegate of the North Zone, has agreed to provide the technical support needed to conduct the meeting. We wish you a successful meeting.

Editor’s Note: TTFA president William Wallace confirmed that the release above was not meant to be a resignation letter, as initially interpreted by Wired868. Instead, Wallace is awaiting clarity from Fifa with regards to its normalisation committee. If the normalisation committee is in place, the president was allegedly advised by attorneys that ‘the issue of resignation does not arise’.

At present, the TTFA believes that although the operations of the normalisation committee are suspended, its chairman Robert Hadad remains in place.

Title: Harris happy T&T abiding by FIFA rules
Post by: Tallman on October 28, 2020, 06:17:04 AM
Harris happy T&T abiding by FIFA rules
By Morissa Lindsay (T&T Express)


President of the Caribbean Football Union Randy Harris said he is elated with the recent decision made by the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) to accept the normalisation committee put in place by FIFA.

Harris said it would have been a waste and a loss to have Trinidad and Tobago suspended by FIFA bearing in mind how legendary they are as one of only two English-speaking Caribbean countries who made it to the World Cup.

This past weekend it was announced that the united TTFA voted in favour to drop the court matter against FIFA and to adhere to the normalisation committee put in place by the world governing body.

“Let me say that I am very elated that Trinidad has now made a decision that would bring them back into the Caribbean fold. I am very elated about that because I was very concerned since Trinidad is one of our gems in terms of football in the Caribbean.

“I was always worried because I knew from the beginning that we as members of FIFA agreed to stand by certain statute and regulations in the interest of the sport. One of the things you know is that we should not take matters to ordinary court and that was done and I knew that would have been a problem,” he said.

Harris added: “All of us knew from the beginning that FIFA was not saying they are higher than the law courts, in the sovereign countries. What they are saying is that if we want football to be managed by people and operating in a smooth manner, that we have to deal with our issues ourselves. I am happy that it has ended this way. I think it is a learning experience not only for the united TTFA team but for all of us as administrators.”

According to Harris, what transpired with the TTFA should not be a reflection of the entire Caribbean. He said, “One country or person in the Caribbean does not make the Caribbean. The point is that people in the Caribbean like people in Europe, North America and all over the world sometimes make decisions that they believe in and sometimes those decisions are wrong. That is not a way to judge the Caribbean.”
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: vb on October 28, 2020, 07:39:11 AM
Corruption wins

https://www.hail-caribbean-sport.com/
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 28, 2020, 08:58:25 AM
Corruption wins

https://www.hail-caribbean-sport.com/
:beermug:
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 28, 2020, 02:30:40 PM
TTFA withdraws appeal before Court of Arbitration for Sport
By Jada Loutoo (Newsday).


THE TT Football Association (TTFA) executive has withdrawn its appeal of FIFA’s suspension of T&T from international football before the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland.

On Wednesday, deputy president of the CAS appeals arbitration division Dr Elisabeth Steiner ruled that the appeal between the TTFA and FIFA was terminated and removed from the court’s roll.

Wednesday’s order was given without costs, except for the court office fee already paid by the TTFA.

On Monday, the TTFA withdrew its appeal, which was filed on September 25.

This withdrawal follows Sunday’s extraordinary general meeting, at which the majority of the TTFA membership voted to accept the normalisation committee appointed by FIFA in March.

Since then, TTFA’s president William Wallace and his executive have been in a battle against FIFA, first over the appointment of the committee and then the world governing body’s suspension of T&T from international football.

On Friday, the Court of Appeal overturned Justice Carol Gobin’s decision that FIFA acted illegally in removing Wallace’s executive.

Wallace also confirmed his battle against FIFA has ended, and that he will not be taking the matter to the Privy Council as speculated. He denied allegations he was considering appealing the Appeal Court’s decision.

Wallace confirmed to the Sunday Express that his fight is over and that he will take no further action in either local or international courts or at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

“Definitely not. The Privy Council is out of the question,” Wallace confirmed. “I am not taking any more action. This is the end, as far as I am concerned.”

RELATED NEWS

Wallace pulls final matter out of Swiss court.
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express).


CAS(E) ENDS

WILLIAM WALLACE followed up on his promise, officially withdrawing from court yesterday the final matter in the seven-month battle between his ousted Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) executive and FIFA, the governing body for world football.

Yesterday, Dr Elisabeth Steiner, deputy-president of the Switzerland-based Court of Arbitration for Sport’s (CAS) appeals arbitration division confirmed via an e-mailed letter that the TTFA’s matter before CAS had been terminated.

Wallace’s second appeal to CAS for 2020 began on September 25, when his attorneys filed an urgent application for a stay of the decision rendered by the Bureau of the FIFA Council, which a day earlier suspended the TTFA, for breach of its statutes regarding domestic court litigation. The Trinidad and Tobago Football Association, were represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Crystal Paul and Jason Jones, while Dr Emilio Garcia and Miguel Lietard represented the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA).

In terminating Wallace’s action, CAS said: ‘The Deputy President of the Appeals Arbitration Division of the Court of Arbitration for Sport, ruling in camera, pronounces: The procedure CAS 2020/A/7411 Trinidad & Tobago Football Association v. FIFA is terminated and removed from the CAS roll. The present Order is rendered without costs, except for the Comi Office fee of CHF 1,000 (Swiss francs) which was paid by Trinidad & Tobago Football Association and which is retained by the Court of Arbitration for Sport.’

Wallace’s latest step follows Friday’s T&T Appeal Court decision in which Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice Nolan Bereaux, ruled in favour of FIFA. The Court overturned an October 13 decision of lower court Justice Carol Gobin, which had briefly re-instated Wallace as TTFA president and deemed FIFA’s decision to appoint a normalisation committee as null and void. The Appeal Court’s decision confirmed that both the TTFA constitution and FIFA statutes gave FIFA the right to appoint a normalisation committee.

Wallace has been further stripped of all power by TTFA delegates, who on Sunday voted unanimously to accept FIFA’s normalisation committee, as replacement for Wallace’s executive. Wallace had promised to resign following the T&T Appeals Court verdict. His last position was that his resignation was “moot’, now that he is no longer TTFA president and FIFA’s normalisation committee is in charge.

Trinidad and Tobago remain under international suspension by FIFA due to Wallace’s decision to pursue local High Court action against the world governing body (FIFA), when challenging FIFA’s March 17 decision to replace his four-month-old executive with its own normalisation committee.

The CAS appeal began on September 25, when the CAS court office initiated an appeals arbitration procedure under the reference CAS at Wallace’s request. On October 5 FIFA responded to the appellant’s (TTFA) application for a stay if FIFA suspension and on October 15 the TTFA followed up when filing a statement of appeal with respect to the decision rendered by the Bureau of the FIFA Council to suspend the TTFA. In its final action, Wallace withdrew the matter from CAS on October 26 and confirmation was received from Steiner two days later on October 28.

The Swiss court further said it is able to render a termination order due to the case not having commenced. An appeal brief had not yet been filed by the appellant (TTFA) and no panel of judges had been constituted by CAS. Therefore, the matter cost the TTFA nothing, except the 1,000 swiss franc filing fee, which has been retained by the Court of Arbitration.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on October 28, 2020, 02:39:45 PM
Corruption wins

https://www.hail-caribbean-sport.com/
yes it did, but wallace gave it a huge helping hand over the finish line by taking the worst advice imaginable. william wallace should have shut his pie-hole and go to the government for help to pay his way to CAS especially when he got the attention of the prime minister who asked him to do the right thing.

believe me VB that man is a fool. he went to the high court when FIFA would never adhere to any judgment handed down, not only that, even when he won in the high court they would still be suspended , something the high court cannot over turn.

so he wasn't reinstated, he lost in the end, he has a huge legal bill to pay for fifa and final conclusion is that he's lost the very people that elected him, so even if he wanted to run again for president he will most likely find the membership hostile towards him, so what was all that fighting for?

IMO he was supposed to take the case to CAS and took his chances, in the end he could have asked the court to have FIFA pay his legal fees, because i believe he would have beaten fifa in the court of abitration since he had a very strong case for victimization. the man took stupid rubbish advice from gale and crown. those two lawyers are clueless. 
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: vb on October 28, 2020, 03:14:50 PM
Corruption wins

https://www.hail-caribbean-sport.com/
yes it did, but wallace gave it a huge helping hand over the finish line by taking the worst advice imaginable. william wallace should have shut his pie-hole and go to the government for help to pay his way to CAS especially when he got the attention of the prime minister who asked him to do the right thing.

believe me VB that man is a fool. he went to the high court when FIFA would never adhere to any judgment handed down, not only that, even when he won in the high court they would still be suspended , something the high court cannot over turn.

so he wasn't reinstated, he lost in the end, he has a huge legal bill to pay for fifa and final conclusion is that he's lost the very people that elected him, so even if he wanted to run again for president he will most likely find the membership hostile towards him, so what was all that fighting for?

IMO he was supposed to take the case to CAS and took his chances, in the end he could have asked the court to have FIFA pay his legal fees, because i believe he would have beaten fifa in the court of abitration since he had a very strong case for victimization. the man took stupid rubbish advice from gale and crown. those two lawyers are clueless. 

I assume you mean pay his costs after he had won the case which would mean he still would have had to come up with the money in any case. Yes he could have approached the TT Govt. but they knew of the situation and could have approached him.

VB
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on October 28, 2020, 07:40:37 PM
The point is verseen it was all for nought. the endless jabber, the standing in the way of the normalization committee with the inaccessibility of the bank accounts where coaches and staff could not be paid, the firm stand on principle, the holding your ground, all that giant better have all just to resign and walk away accomplishing absolutely nothing of substance, and just to say we stood up against fifa?

It’s like a skinny mild mannered man fighting a big strong bully for a seat on the bus and wound up losing his front grill in the process, when he could have been smart enough to walk away and let him have the seat and call the police to deal with him and keep your teeth in the long run.

don’t get me wrong I full supported wallace, but the flip flopping was too much for me to bare, the man was going to CAS today and the high court tomorrow and negotiating the day after and meeting with the membership the day after the day after, William Wallace IMO was clueless, when a man decides to take on a giant he better have all his bases covered and his business in order. that man wanked off and gift fifa with the ability to further victimize him by playing right into their hands.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on October 28, 2020, 08:29:40 PM
Statutory ambiguity
By Dr. Terrence Farrell (T&T Express)


THE decision of the Court of Appeal has drawn a line under the litigation between the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) and FIFA, a conflict which recalls the Creole aphorism: “Tief from tief does make God laugh!” Justice Gobin took the parties and the country on an excursion which brought to mind former Chief Justice Michael de la Bastide’s query, posed in the context of another matter adjudicated by Gobin J, as to whether judicial review legislation had opened the door to “judicial adventurism’’.

Justice Gobin’s frolic did, however, surface a significant issue, the legal status of certain entities created by statute and the justiciability of their actions.

To be sure, the issue is not really new. Justice Judith Jones (as she then was) had to interpret the Integrity in Public Life Act of 2000 and the related amendments to the Constitution.

Those pieces of legislation widened the ambit of the Integrity Commission to include boards of “statutory bodies and state enterprises, including those bodies in which the State has a controlling interest”. But the legislation did not define either.

After interrogating the Interpretation Act and the Constitution itself, Jones J opined that: “In their natural and ordinary meaning the term [statutory bodies] must be taken to mean: ‘those bodies or organisations established by statute’... there is no other possible meaning that can be ascribed to these words.”

And there lay the problem. There are a host of organisations—sporting, charitable, religious—that are established by statute. Attorney Tyrone Marcus (Guardian October 18) gave a list of sporting organisations created by statute. The Catholic Religious Education Development Institute, of which I am a director, was set up by statute. Ricardo Williams (Sunday Express October 25) has given an excellent summary of how such organisations come into being and from where their powers arise, which is not from the statute incorporating them.

These organisations are incorporated by statute for reasons of prestige or some other arcane reason. But as Bereaux JA pointed out, that does not mean that they have any defined public purpose or respond to any public policy.

They do not report to Parliament or to any government minister. They do not fall within the principle established in Datafin because they discharge no public duty. And even if, as with the TTFA, there is some public interest in what they do, that is not sufficient to bring them within the ambit of judicial review.

Despite the Jones decision, which has not been appealed, the Integrity Commission has wisely ignored these particular “statutory bodies’’ and has not required their boards to be subjected to its onerous strictures.

Incorporation by statute wrong-footed Boodoosingh J (as he then was) in the Look Loy v Gabriel matter, on which Gobin J relied, and which Bereaux JA suggests was also wrongly decided on that point. Bereaux JA, clear-headed and careful, and the antithesis of judicial activism, did not seek to legislate when a body created by statute should be treated as a private body and hence not subject to judicial review. However, his dicta on that point leaves open the question whether a body established by statute could, outside of resort to arbitration, oust the jurisdiction of the local courts if its legislation explicitly so provided, and whether or not our courts would accept such ouster.

The difficulties of statutory incorporation do not end there. There remains considerable ambiguity about the governance of State-owned enterprises. Yes, they do fall within the purview of the Integrity Commission, and, in accordance with section 119(9) of the Constitution, they do “report’’ to Parliament, usually long after horses have bolted. But because State enterprises are incorporated under the Companies Act, the only legitimate nexus to governance by the State is through the Minister of Finance (Corporation Sole) Act, which is wholly inadequate for effecting good governance. This lacuna has allowed corporate travesties such as UDeCOTT, Education Facilities, Petrotrin’s GTL project, EMBD, LifeSport, and a host of others to occur.

The applicability of judicial review to State enterprises was discussed in NH International v UDeCOTT with instructive judgments by Kangaloo and Warner JJA, and a powerful and persuasive dissent by Sharma CJ.

It is why the 2016 State Enterprise Review Committee recommended that all State-owned enterprises be governed under a two-tiered legal system of incorporation of the Companies Act, together with a New Zealand-style State Enterprise act which clearly legislates the powers of both the “line minister’’ and the finance minister, and would leave directors of state enterprises, who are now very exposed, much less exposed.

The TTFA-FIFA imbroglio will unfold and one hopes that there will eventually be an outcome that is positive for the game in Trinidad and Tobago.

The question of the status of private bodies incorporated by statute which probably should not be, and State enterprises which are not, but should be, ought to garner the attention of a Law Reform Commission, if we still have one.

Boss content.

That aside, somewhere between  the decision to seat solely two Justices to include the CJ, and the PM's untimely amplified barking (it was more sentiently audible than a mere dog whistle), I am less than impressed with the CoA's pronouncement on this matter despite the compelling support that is represented to undergird its authority.

There was an opportunity here to dress the hearing of this matter  in different attire and the absence of a third Justice - accompanied by multiple perceptions of fealty, if not indebtedness to the PM - nimbly assisted in the avoidance of a complete cloak of transparency and independence.

That harm indicated, what would have been the harm in taking the alternative approach in terms of number or recusal (even if tenuous)?

As Farrell above suggested elsewhere (Express, February 25) on the matter of constitutional reform in the context of Section 137(3):

It is wrong to suggest that the issues raised by the Law Association reflect some partisan, politically-inspired agenda to remove the Chief Justice, though doubtless, there are individual lawyers who do embrace such an agenda. The Law Association’s committee on Judicial Appointments ... made comprehensive recommendations for the reform of the JLSC. The Law Association long ago also made comprehensive and sensible recommendations for the reform of the award of silk. Both reports have been studiously ignored by our politicians who seem to ‘like it so’!

One could be forgiven for concluding that this matter neatly has collapsed into the favoured column of 'like it so' convenience.
Title: As expected, FIFA has its way
Post by: Tallman on October 29, 2020, 07:01:08 AM
As expected, FIFA has its way
By Colin Murray (T&T Guardian)


After a painstaking seven months of battling FIFA, the United T&T Football Association's (TTFA) wheels have finally fallen off.

Indeed, it seemed much longer than that as the saga just went on and on like those soap operas where you just felt you knew the outcome, yet still kept on watching with the faint hope there was a twist in the tail and the show would end up with the good guys eventually coming out on top. Unfortunately, in this soap opera, the good guys did not emerge as victors.

One by one, they started to retreat. First, it was the president of Women's League Football (WOLF) Susan Joseph-Warrick who threw in the towel last month. But when the mighty “pitbull” Keith Look Loy retreated into the stands, you knew the fight was over. If you know Look Loy, he does not back down from a good fight so when he quits on your team, your defence is left open and vulnerable.

At that point, two were down with four to go, and somewhere in between, Tony Harford decided he was not going to run for Northern Football Association (NFA) president and Joseph Sam Phillip was quiet as a mouse who seemed quite content hoping someone would leave some cheese exposed.

On the other hand, Clynt Taylor started to be more proactive in the last couple of months but all-in-all, the barrage of criticism was firmly aimed at the TTFA's president - William Wallace - who stood up manfully for what he believed in.

But let us try to understand exactly how we have found ourselves here by going down memory lane to the period of say 2017-2019 when members of T&T's football-loving fraternity decided enough was enough with the maladministration of our football. The debt was completely out of control with no firm plan to alleviate this financial burden; our men and women national teams were being withdrawn from international competitions due to no funding from the body responsible for their welfare; results on the field were an embarrassment; staff were not being paid for months; vociferous demands were made without success for accountability and transparency within the TTFA especially for multi-million dollar projects like the 'Home of Football' (Couva) which is now shrouded in deep controversy.

It also appeared that coaches and technical directors were being fired for non-football reasons and sponsors started to turn their backs on football. Perhaps the deepest of them all - spectators began to stay away from games as the TTFA, during that period, held its worst image in the court of public opinion. All -in-all, it appeared that a category five hurricane, which you my readers can give a name to it, had crippled our football.

So up strode the United TTFA led byWallace, the then president of the Secondary Schools Football League, who, I must admit had a good track record as he was a past president of the Secondary Schools Cricket League and was an executive member of the T&T Cricket Board during the most successful period in local cricket history from 2006 to 2009.

Wallace campaigned well and had a powerful team behind him in Taylor of the Central Football Association, Joseph-Warric,, president of WOLF, Phillip yformer chairman of the Pro League, Harford president of the NFA and Look Loy, president of the T&T Super League. The football fraternity in large numbers except for those who were blinded by the former regime for one reason or another felt this was the opportunity to finally get our administration right and elevate people with honesty, integrity, character, morality, decency, probity, and much more.

It was felt that gone were the days when someone can buy an election with promises of funding for clubs, leagues and associations; promises of senior and high-paying positions; promises of trips and managerial appointments which we have witnessed over several years in our major sports.

On November 24, 2019, when the former administration was told thank you and goodbye by a 26-20 vote, it seemed a new chapter was on the horizon for the TTFA. People were just praying for good governance with no promises of anything other than a refined and transparent approach to our football. The United TTFA was democratically trusted with the responsibility to lead our football over the next four years.

But little did they realise then that they were not the preferred one by FIFA in the race. If you're not in FIFA's good books, as they say, “crapaud smoke your pipe”. A well-placed source in the football fraternity revealed to me last week that FIFA was trying to install a normalisation committee since December 2019 mere days after the United TTFA came into office. This is indeed startling if true but totally unsurprising.

Eventually, FIFA made their move in March 2020 by appointing its committee, and then the fight began. Wallace and his United TTFA fought for justice for football in our country and although deep down he must have felt he was always battling against the odds, he manfully never gave up until the end. So the dye is cast; we don't want to get suspended from international football and we have gone on bent knees to FIFA to say we are back.

All obstacles have been removed and all court matters existing between the TTFA and FIFA shall be immediately brought to a halt. Every single Trinbagonian knew that FIFA would come out on top. Let's face it, they have all the trumps and poor Wallace only had one high card to win a lift.

However, I absolutely detest when I hear people suggest that this fight had to do with emotions, aggression, arrogance, etc. is that for real? This fight, once again, had to do with respect for our democratic process and if we honestly put ourselves in Wallace's shoes and objectively consider the situation, we may have done the same. The man may have lost the war, but he deserves far more respect than he is getting from T&T.

Now, it's back to the normalisation committee. I'm not quite certain just how much football they know but I suppose we have no choice but to give them a chance. I just hope and pray they will do the right thing but only time will tell.
Title: TTFA v FIFA: The end of the saga
Post by: Tallman on October 29, 2020, 07:02:24 AM
TTFA v FIFA: The end of the saga
By Carissa Rodulfo (T&T Guardian)


Erin Hunter once said, “Power is neither good nor evil, but its user makes it so.”

One can say that much about the T&T Football Association (TTFA) versus FIFA debacle echoed this very notion of power – which organisation had the power to govern the football affairs of T&T, which legal institution had jurisdiction over the matter, whether FIFA was exercising its global prominence, whether the new TTFA executive board was simply too eager for power, etc.

With the decision the Court of Appeal rendered on Friday, in favour of FIFA and invalidating the jurisdiction of the domestic court, as well as the apparent concession of ousted TTFA president, William Wallace, it seems that closure of the wounds of this battle is imminent.

A battle of David and Goliath

Who’s the boss? That was the real question.

Several rumours have swirled pertaining to the legitimacy of FIFA’s normalisation committee which was meant to replace the newly elected TTFA executive board. Some say that it was preordained and contingent on the election results. Others say it was a means by which FIFA sought to cover up TTFA’s financial improprieties and discrepancies of which FIFA had been aware for years. Having felt like his executive was given the short end of the stick, Wallace decided to contest FIFA’s action.

It is general rule of international sports law, that the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) is widely accepted as the requisite body for settlement of sporting disputes. This is also recognised in FIFA’s regulations.

In the application stages at CAS, there was clear bias towards the global powerhouse of FIFA. The organisation maintained that it would not be paying its share of fees as respondent in the matter—a norm usually acquiesced to by the institution and against the Court’s procedure. Additionally, FIFA applied to CAS to have the matter heard by three arbitration instead of one, thereby tripling the cost of proceedings. The degree to which this was a calculated, exploitative attempt by FIFA to constrain TTFA was evident. Having assessed TTFA and possessing the knowledge of their financial struggles for years, FIFA was unequivocally aware that these fees would have been too burdensome for TTFA to bear.

Home turf advantage

Between financial constraints and the alleged bias of CAS, the cards were stacked against TTFA. Therefore, it filed an application for the matter to be heard in the T&T High Court. Upon preliminary inquiry, Madame Justice Carol Gobin ruled that the matter could be tried in the local jurisdiction. From a legal standpoint, however, some of the merits of such a decision were questionable.

On the point of judicial review, it seemed that her principal occupation was the fact that the body had been incorporated by an Act of Parliament. While this may be somewhat conclusive, other factors relevant to the assessment of whether TTFA was a public body were not entirely examined. For example, the contractual relationship with FIFA and its members, the TTFA constitution which arguably is the source of power, and the nature of some of the constitution’s clauses e.g. arbitration clause, which suggest that the body was a private body. The ultimate question ought to have been: if TTFA didn’t exist, and was not performing the roles that it did, would the government have intervened in the area of the management of football? The answer is likely ‘no’.

Regarding the TTFA as a public body enhances the potential of political influence than if it were regarded as a private entity. This may even result in the government being able to disregard for its constitution if there is presumably a countervailing consideration e.g. dissatisfaction with who is appointed into certain positions. This is worrisome, as political interference can threaten the neutrality of sport, and may result in TTFA being indefinitely suspended by FIFA.

However, on the arbitration point, it seems like the denial of the request for a stay of proceedings was justified; by virtue of its unwillingness to pay the advance costs to CAS, it seems like FIFA has stalled the arbitration process. Additionally, the fact that the ratification of the decision by FIFA’s Council came quite late, and therefore FIFA cannot invoke the dispute resolution process which excludes the court, was well-back reasoning.

In spite of the decision’s inadequacies, the matter proceeded to the substantive claim relating to the legality of FIFA instituting the normalisation committee where Madame Justice Gobin declared that the removal of the duly elected executive was illegal null and void and of no effect.

FIFA had made no submissions as it maintained the preliminary point that the domestic court did not have jurisdiction to hear the matter.

Outrage and overturned

Prior to the case’s preliminary inquiry ruling, FIFA issued a warning to TTFA that if it did not withdraw the claim from the Court, TTFA would be suspended. Having failed to meet these demands, FIFA followed through with this threat and suspended FIFA indefinitely due to “grave violations of the FIFA Statues”. This meant that T&T would not able to participate in international competitions and would not receive any resources from FIFA as it relates to training and other aids.

Notably, it would seem that much of the criticism was directed towards TTFA’s actions which can be taken to correlate to the Court’s decisions. While the Minister of Sports, Shamfa Cudjoe, spoke out against TTFA before any judicial rulings were made, this was not the case for the Prime Minister, Dr Keith Rowley. There must be credence given to the rule of law which allows for the separation of powers, especially in active judicial cases. In light of the fact that the Court had yet to hear the appeal, the statements of the Prime Minister had the potential to compromise the sanctity of the Court’s proceedings.

Nevertheless, on Friday, the Court of Appeal decided in favour of FIFA and invalidated the jurisdiction of the domestic court. The Court agreed with FIFA that any appeal against a final and binding decision passed by FIFA shall be heard by CAS.

The decision of Justice Gobin is now merely academic.

Could there have been alternative action?

Was TTFA standing up against FIFA as a small organisation in a small island developing State or was TTFA being selfish in not accepting the action of its overarching superseding body?

In light of CAS’ alleged improprieties, TTFA’s main contention was that there was no other means of reasonable recourse beyond the domestic courts. However, this may not be entirely true. CAS is a Swiss institution governed by the Swiss Private International Law Act (PILA), subject to the more general framework of international arbitration. However, as Despina Mavromati writes, arbitral awards are final upon their notification and can only be challenged before the Swiss Federal Tribunal (SFT) on very few grounds as prescribed by article 190(2) of the PILA. In fact, the SFT has set aside several CAS awards in multiple rulings. It plays a significant role in controlling the both the legality of CAS as an arbitral institution and the legality of CAS awards. Additionally, the SFT may confirm, reject or more generally interpret some of the procedural provisions of the CAS Rules and the law applicable to the merits.

Taking this into consideration, it may have been very possible for TTFA to appeal to the SFT in order to compel FIFA to pay its share of the CAS fees. Proceeding in such a manner, one that would have been compliant with FIFA’s procedures, would have given FIFA no credible justification to suspend TTFA. Further pursuant to this, even if the underlying alleged bias of CAS prevailed in the proceedings of the matter, TTFA would still have been afforded a substantive appeal to the SFT.

So, what now?

The invalidation of jurisdiction reverts us now to the original position. Its consequence would indicate the normalisation committee could now possibly be instituted once accepted by TTFA. However, it may be that FIFA’s position is that TTFA’s suspension means that there is no longer a normalisation committee to be operationalised, leaving the direction of local football at a standstill. On Sunday, TTFA held an Extraordinary General Meeting of TTFA which saw the notable absence of Wallace. The decisions which came from said meeting were that TTFA would not pursue a further appeal to the Privy Council by a vote of 33-2. Additionally, TTFA will fully comply with its obligations as a member of FIFA, recognise the legitimacy of the FIFA-appointed normalisation committee and bring its own statutes in line with the FIFA statutes. It remains to be decided how the payment of FIFA’s legal fees as ordered by the Court of Appeal will be addressed.

Until then, time ticks away to the CONCACAF Gold Cup Tournament which has been delayed until August 1, 2021 with many persons wondering whether the suspension would be lifted to facilitate our participation. If not, this may greatly impact on T&T’s chances at qualification for World Cup 2022 in Qatar. Already experiencing disdain from COVID-19 restrictions, local footballers are left in the wind and search for a new purpose since international competitive aspirations have been stifled. Notwithstanding this, the sour taste left in FIFA’s mouth for TTFA may leave their relationship in a position beyond complete repair.

How permanent are the scars of TTFA v FIFA? Only time will tell.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: LKMaryTrini on October 29, 2020, 05:26:41 PM
The majority of the questions that will posed to WW has one commonality\, funding.  FIFA already says it's going to withhold funding so where is the money going to come from to address all these concerns?  Who will sponsor a football team that has been ostracized by the governing board of football?  I applaud anybody who stands for principle, but when the outcome is detrimental to the current and future of our football, it is time to rethink, and live to fight another day.  2006 feels like a lifetime ago, sadly.
The majority of the questions that will posed to WW has one commonality\, funding.  FIFA already says it's going to withhold funding so where is the money going to come from to address all these concerns?  Who will sponsor a football team that has been ostracized by the governing board of football?  I applaud anybody who stands for principle, but when the outcome is detrimental to the current and future of our football, it is time to rethink, and live to fight another day.  2006 feels like a lifetime ago, sadly.
What funding ? And for what ? Certainly not for players, they weren't paid, not for coaches or tech directors, whose contracts were not honoured, not for staff who regular work months with payment. Not For international competitions, presently suspended. So how much funding the administrators require for their personal projects to still end up in debt ? Anyway, back to to the Circle of ever Dependence that we may drink from the fountain of stagnation and regression as those around us forge ahead. It's what we have grown used to. I guess there is some measure of comfort in the devils that we know.
What funding? FIFA FUNDING, which allows TTFA administrative staff and national coaches to be paid.  Isn't that the crux of the issue?  The mismanagement of money for football operations.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 30, 2020, 09:36:45 AM
What funding? FIFA FUNDING, which allows TTFA administrative staff and national coaches to be paid.  Isn't that the crux of the issue?  The mismanagement of money for football operations.
What is the purpose of TTFA ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trinidad_and_Tobago_Football_Association

So since from way back, with FIFA funding, players, coaches and admin staff were not regularly paid, to this day, where many judgements against that body and ours, whereby our organization is presently over 50 M $ in debt, the FIFA funding has not managed to in any way change or benefit our stations, in either results, development nor organization of any of the staff - players, coaches or staff. We are in more disarray than ever before, we have less players in top leagues than ever before, our on field record is abysmal.
 In addition, we are at present suspended from FIFA organized (competitive international tournaments). An elected body which ran and won the elections based on transparency and proper business practices won the elections and was removed by FIFA. The reason given, poor financial and organizational practices, even doh, the debt was built before them and in the few months in office they exposed and brought to the forefront the state of the Organization. Fine.  Finally in an attempt to right that wrong, they decided to fight that case, which they won, to which FIFA appealed and they lost, due to FIFA rules have to be absolutely followed as a staturory member.
   FIFA didn't suspend UNITED TTFA and it's members, no, they suspend the TTFA. Reason being United TTFA took them to court. (makes me wonder how Sanch and company went to court and didn't get suspended). What if socawarriors fans, take them to court, they would suspend TTFA ? I digress.
So my issue is all the funding we have had and here we are. Staff , Players, coaches, administrators not paid), Thus Funding is NOT the only answer. Then maybe then it's admin, however, when an attempt was made to change the admin, reason being and given as to be better and more transparent administrators, that was obviously rejected by FIFA due to their support of the older, preferred regime. So FIFA prefer to have kept things how they were. TTFA in obvious debt- multiple reasons, teams in obvious disarray and unsuccessful, no development - players not attaining highest international leagues. 
Yet, ppl still saying we have to stick with FIFA at present, so we can get Funding for football. So we can pay National players and coaches and staff. To do what ? Make more debt ? Why repeat the same operation, when over and over it has proven to cause us to wither.  They already have us by our balls, must we dig our graves too.

 I believe we have to at present, re-organize ourselves, and actually work for whatever we want to achieve, before we get back to FIFA.
Not because someone likes football, watches, studies, eats , sleep and plays football everyday, mean he's going to be a professional. One has to put in the work and balance it with real life, assisted by guardians(could be the state)/parents, teacher, coaches, community and environment, all volunteer, and even then very few can attain those ranks. We want to go World cup, because we could put some uniforms on the field ? It has never happened like that. As a ex-Jnr National athlete, I didn't know sporting bodies were so beholden to us.  What if you try putting in the work, have all the support, and encouragement, but certain individuals say nah you not good enough, we have better, look some money to start,by a ticket, come sit in the stands and watch our boys, then when yuh get another work, yuh could buy yuh own ticket and maybe a kit and support us... is that who you will hang with, or you would continue working, training and stick with your supporters and encouragers. If I must stop, I would find someone in my own community to support and contribute too.
 We need a temporary break from FIFA, we need to work, organize ourselves. This suspension could be the best thing that happen to us. We don't at present need highly paid TTFA staff, coaches nor players. We need volunteers, we need Government program. We need to work, support each other and promote the best of us. All our young footballers won't make it, but we need to encourage and assist those than are capable, without bias, without envy.
We need coaches who have a regular job and is willing to develop players out of love for country. There are quite a few that always did and there are ssome even now. They not in the papers, looking for funding or fame, they in it to make woung men and women, who will contribute to the society, yet they are to few, these are the guys and gals that need help and some measure of funding, they don't need a salary, they have been operating without most of their lives. Usually the ones who make the most noise are the ones who made a little change and have grown used to that.

We need the ppl who is elected to take charge and lead the ppl of TT to actually lead, develop and prepare, and when they think we are ready for the world, then introduce the world to us. We once was ready for the world, we have to relearn and adopt the mentality that got us there. We need time and space.

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Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on October 30, 2020, 11:45:01 AM
Sancho optimistic FIFA will lift ban.
By Jada Loutoo & Jonathan Ramnanansingh (T&T Newsday).


THE TT Football Association (TTFA) executive has withdrawn its appeal of FIFA’s suspension of T&T from international football before the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland.

On Wednesday, deputy president of the CAS appeals arbitration division Dr Elisabeth Steiner ruled that the appeal between the TTFA and FIFA was terminated and removed from the court’s roll.

Wednesday’s order was given without costs, except for the court office fee already paid by the TTFA. On Monday, the TTFA withdrew its appeal, which was filed on September 25. This withdrawal follows Sunday’s extraordinary general meeting, at which the majority of the TTFA membership voted to accept the normalisation committee appointed by FIFA in March.

Since then, TTFA’s president William Wallace and his executive have been in a battle against FIFA, first over the appointment of the committee and then the world governing body’s suspension of T&T from international football. On Friday, the Court of Appeal overturned Justice Carol Gobin’s decision that FIFA acted illegally in removing Wallace’s executive.

In response to TTFA’s withdrawal, TTFA board member Brent Sancho believes this may be a positive step in the right direction towards having T&T’s suspension lifted before December 18.

On September 25 – one day after T&T was indefinitely banned by the sport’s global governing body – the Concacaf council met and decided that if TT can meet the criteria laid down by FIFA, and if FIFA does in fact life the ban by December 18, the Soca Warriors will be permitted to compete at the 2021 Gold Cup.

Sancho, however, knocked Wallace and his United TTFA slate for sinking T&T football to its lowest point. Although still suspended, the former 2006 World Cup defender remains quietly optimistic.

“They were heading down this path from since March and they’ve taken everyone and everything with them. Thankfully, all the documents have been sent off to the relevant correspondents. I suspect FIFA would have their say which may probably indicate a lift in suspension.

“The work really begins now to try and put things in place to move T&T football forward. The past eight months was a complete waste of time. From the get go, it was just men trying to feed their egos. I think the dead end that was always there, they’ve finally arrived at it. It was inevitable,” he said. All attempts to contact normalization committee chairman Robert Hadad for a response on TTFA’s CAS withdrawal proved futile.

Title: Justice Gobin slams 'gratuitous observations' in FIFA appeal ruling
Post by: Tallman on October 30, 2020, 12:14:02 PM
Justice Gobin slams 'gratuitous observations' in FIFA appeal ruling
By Jada Loutoo (T&T Newsday)


OUTSPOKEN judge Carol Gobin has defended her rulings in the T&T Football Association’s legal challenge to Chief Justice Ivor Archie, writing to him expressing her concern over “gratuitous observations” he and another Appeal Court judge made in their ruling on the FIFA appeal.

On Wednesday, Gobin reminded Archie of what he said of her in the decision delivered on Friday. In it, Archie and Justice of Appeal Nolan Bereaux quashed two of her previous decisions, which had given victory to the T&T Football Association.

The judges gave a unified decision, but each had something to say. Archie dedicated one and a half pages to Gobin's managing of the case, and in the remaining 20 pages, Bereaux focused on arguments advanced in FIFA's appeal.

In her letter, Gobin addressed some of the comments. “I believe it was Justice Linda Dobbs who said that ‘fairness is in the DNA of judges,’ and I am sure that we would all like to think so.

“You would therefore understand, Chief Justice, why I must raise my concerns about the ‘observations’ and guidance you gave in the very short judgment you delivered.” Archie had criticised Gobin’s “less than prudent case management and uneconomical deployment of judicial time and resources.”

By doing so, Gobin said, the CJ formulated “new guidance” and that “zeal is to be commended but it should not obscure the need for caution. “The import of the statement was not lost. In ordering TTFA to pay the costs of it, Bereaux JA, described it as 'a wasted trial,'” Gobin pointed out.

She said the "gratuitous observations" raised by the CJ and Justice Bereaux were not ever raised by the parties involved during the appeal.

“FIFA filed no application for a stay of my default trial directions, and TTFA had agreed that the trial should proceed. I believe that these unwarranted statements (by the CJ) reflect negatively on my competence as a judge, though I am sure that was not what you intended,” Gobin told Archie.

She also noted that “quite remarkably,” the comments were made without reference to her reasons for proceeding with the case in the way she did.

“The Court of Appeal, on the basis only of the calendar it would seem, concluded that it would have been wiser to have waited for just a few days for the outcome of FIFA’s appeal, to save precious judicial time. This is against the background of FIFA’s declaration to the world, that the appeal was filed ‘as a formal step’ and that even then it did not recognise the jurisdiction of our local courts,” she pointed out.

Gobin told Archie she did not need to remind him there was more to the management of cases than fixing timetables.

“First instance judges often have to remind litigants and lawyers of the significance of what we do. A judge who refuses to defer to a defendant whose conduct is unlawful, intimidatory, deliberately contemptuous, is not being overzealous.

“Such a judge is only doing what the oath of office requires .The authority of our courts is the foundation of our justice system. How we respond in the face of a patent attempt to undermine and deride it, ultimately defines our judiciary,” she said.

She noted it was clear that “for some reason and somewhere along the line,” after the trial, FIFA changed its position on recognising the jurisdiction of the local courts.

“Because of that, your judicial time was well deployed but no one could reasonably suggest that I should have allowed a possibility of FIFA’s vacillation to dictate the pace at which I discharged my duty in the High Court,” she said.

On the criticisms by the appellate court about the “waste of time on the trial,” Gobin said she did not consider her judicial time wasted on an undefended trial for default judgment on affidavits.

"There is nothing unusual about default trials where declaratory relief is sought. In the end the TTFA had the hearing it was entitled to for all of an hour and a half. FIFA chose not to participate. My docket remained well under control. No other matter suffered for want of my attention.

“The outcome of the appeal has caused me no regret.

"I respect the ruling of the Court of Appeal,” she added, as she urged Archie to look back at a 2012 JEI distinguished lecture by Justice Adrian Saunders, now president of the Caribbean Court of Justice, and his advice "as to the need to reverse respectfully for the maintenance of public confidence in the system.

“I end by seeking clarification on the guidance that first instance judges are now mandated to follow, because quite frankly I do not see myself doing anything differently if this were to arise at any time in the future,” she said adamantly.

Her three-page letter was also sent by e-mail to Bereaux and other judges.

In the days following the Appeal Court ruling, TTFA president William Wallace withdrew its appeal of FIFA’s suspension of T&T from international football before the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland.

The withdrawal followed Sunday’s extraordinary general meeting, at which the majority of the TTFA membership voted to accept the normalisation committee appointed by FIFA in March because of “massive debt” and financial woes plaguing the local football body. It also gave the TTFA an ultimatum in September: comply with its obligations as a FIFA member, by recognising the legitimacy of the committee.

FIFA has been informed of TTFA’s recognition of the committee. TT’s suspension must be lifted by December 18, for T&T to compete in upcoming international competitions.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 30, 2020, 01:26:03 PM
 :applause: :applause: :applause:

MiLady is tenacious with her integrity - besides having balls - , more than what I could see from the CJ.
The ruling was based on an unfair procedure, not if FIFA have the right to do it or not.
Once upon a time the slave trade was legal, that don't mean it was ok for the enslaved.
If i sign a contract to work with a company, as long as they pay me, they can do with me as they will without any recourse on my part if there is unfair treatment, discriminations or disagreements, without any mutual discussions or warnings ?  We supposed to go to a bargaining table (CAS), we have to meet a mutual obligation (Sharing of Cost), but the company say nah, I must pay for everything, we ain't paying none. And the arbitrator say ok. No sah, that is moving the goalpost, I know I lost my case already, if them dictating to the arbitrator their own new set of rules. So where do I go. Look meh hand, shackle meh and do with meh as you wish ? I rather jump overboard even if I can't swim, but best to jump before we leave dock and go any further, I might make it back to shore, or die trying. Many brave souls stayed and made it, and to this day, still fighting to be free and many equally brave souls didn't.  JMO.


“Such a judge is only doing what the oath of office requires .The authority of our courts is the foundation of our justice system. How we respond in the face of a patent attempt to undermine and deride it, ultimately defines our judiciary,” she said.

She noted it was clear that “for some reason and somewhere along the line,” after the trial, FIFA changed its position on recognising the jurisdiction of the local courts.

“Because of that, your judicial time was well deployed but no one could reasonably suggest that I should have allowed a possibility of FIFA’s vacillation to dictate the pace at which I discharged my duty in the High Court,” she said.

On the criticisms by the appellate court about the “waste of time on the trial,” Gobin said she did not consider her judicial time wasted on an undefended trial for default judgment on affidavits.

"There is nothing unusual about default trials where declaratory relief is sought. In the end the TTFA had the hearing it was entitled to for all of an hour and a half. FIFA chose not to participate. My docket remained well under control. No other matter suffered for want of my attention.

“The outcome of the appeal has caused me no regret.

"I respect the ruling of the Court of Appeal,” she added, as she urged Archie to look back at a 2012 JEI distinguished lecture by Justice Adrian Saunders, now president of the Caribbean Court of Justice, and his advice "as to the need to reverse respectfully for the maintenance of public confidence in the system.

“I end by seeking clarification on the guidance that first instance judges are now mandated to follow, because quite frankly I do not see myself doing anything differently if this were to arise at any time in the future,” she said adamantly.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on October 30, 2020, 02:43:18 PM
Based on previous jurisprudence, the CJ arguably had reason to know what Bereaux's inclination would be. Seat Bereaux and the CJ and talk done.
Title: Lesson learnt
Post by: Tallman on October 31, 2020, 08:20:52 AM
Lesson learnt
By Morissa Lindsay (Barbados Today)


The recent impasse between FIFA and the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) which has predictably ended in favour of the world governing body for football, is a lesson for other regional associations. And now says Barbados senior sports administrator Adrian Donovan, the fate of the TTFA president William Wallace is in the hands of FIFA.

After seven months of back and forth between the embattled TTFA president Wallace and his group, a few days ago the membership of TTFA unanimously agreed that all court matters involving FIFA be stopped.

According to Donovan who has been following the impasse closely, it has taken a long time for the membership to realise that they had the power in their hands. In fact, in a previous interview, Donovan stated upfront that this was the way for the TTFA to go by telling Wallace to throw in the towel.

Donovan explained that it was expected that FIFA would  lift the suspension on the TTFA and allow all football to resume as normal. However, he insisted that an issue might arise depending on the state of mind of the FIFA hierarchy whereby Wallace could find himself facing disciplinary action.

“It is a known fact and well documented that member clubs, associations or individuals are not allowed to take FIFA to court. It is not expected that FIFA will impose any action on the TTFA as the normalisation committee is now back in power and any expense imposed will have to be paid by FIFA which makes no sense.

“The outstanding matter is what will they do with William Wallace. Will they let him walk away free or will he be made an example? William Wallace has not only brought the Trinidad football fraternity to disgrace but the nation of Trinidad and Tobago on a whole was subjected to the international embarrassment of the highest order. And the question will be asked, will he be able to get away scot-free,” Donovan said.

He added: “History would tell us several regional football administrators have been either suspended or banned entirely from all football activities. So, Mr Wallace would just join a long list. The decision by the membership is a very mature one in that they saw that the situation that presented itself only meant more trouble for football in Trinidad and Tobago.”

The former Barbados Football Association general secretary also referenced Wallace’s lieutenant Keith Look Loy who saw what was coming at the end of the tunnel and jumped ship early. Loy resigned a few days before the special general meeting was called.

Although Wallace will go down in history as successfully gaining a verdict against FIFA in Court, Donovan has suggested that Wallace do the honourable thing like Look Loy who has resigned from all football.

Also, the veteran advised Wallace to take guidance from the membership, as in their letter to FIFA, they humbly expressed an apology for causing shame on the governing body of football.

“Look Loy has resigned from all football and has said he has run his course. It is sad, very sad when a group of people have combined their effort to fight a cause and when they see things are not turning in their favour they abandon the ship one by one. This is exactly what has happened with William Wallace. He was the only man left on a burning deck.

“Up to press time Mr Wallace has not officially resigned and although he said that his resignation will come after the special general meeting, one wonders what could be the hold-up. With all legal matters having been terminated, several other important issues will now have to be settled. But of course the payment of the staff and the alleged contracts that were not seen or approved by the TTFA executive committee [are still to be dealt with].

“Mr. Wallace may be facing some sleepless nights not knowing what FIFA‘s next move is. For sure it is expected that the world’s governing body will go after anyone who has allegedly misspent or misappropriated their funds. It will be advisable for the deposed former leader to cooperate with the impending investigations and avoid being brought to his knees,” Donovan explained.
Title: Re: Lesson learnt
Post by: asylumseeker on October 31, 2020, 09:05:09 AM
Lesson learnt
By Morissa Lindsay (Barbados Today)


The recent impasse between FIFA and the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) which has predictably ended in favour of the world governing body for football, is a lesson for other regional associations. And now says Barbados senior sports administrator Adrian Donovan, the fate of the TTFA president William Wallace is in the hands of FIFA.

After seven months of back and forth between the embattled TTFA president Wallace and his group, a few days ago the membership of TTFA unanimously agreed that all court matters involving FIFA be stopped.

According to Donovan who has been following the impasse closely, it has taken a long time for the membership to realise that they had the power in their hands. In fact, in a previous interview, Donovan stated upfront that this was the way for the TTFA to go by telling Wallace to throw in the towel.

Donovan explained that it was expected that FIFA would  lift the suspension on the TTFA and allow all football to resume as normal. However, he insisted that an issue might arise depending on the state of mind of the FIFA hierarchy whereby Wallace could find himself facing disciplinary action.

“It is a known fact and well documented that member clubs, associations or individuals are not allowed to take FIFA to court. It is not expected that FIFA will impose any action on the TTFA as the normalisation committee is now back in power and any expense imposed will have to be paid by FIFA which makes no sense.

“The outstanding matter is what will they do with William Wallace. Will they let him walk away free or will he be made an example? William Wallace has not only brought the Trinidad football fraternity to disgrace but the nation of Trinidad and Tobago on a whole was subjected to the international embarrassment of the highest order. And the question will be asked, will he be able to get away scot-free,” Donovan said.

He added: “History would tell us several regional football administrators have been either suspended or banned entirely from all football activities. So, Mr Wallace would just join a long list. The decision by the membership is a very mature one in that they saw that the situation that presented itself only meant more trouble for football in Trinidad and Tobago.”

The former Barbados Football Association general secretary also referenced Wallace’s lieutenant Keith Look Loy who saw what was coming at the end of the tunnel and jumped ship early. Loy resigned a few days before the special general meeting was called.

Although Wallace will go down in history as successfully gaining a verdict against FIFA in Court, Donovan has suggested that Wallace do the honourable thing like Look Loy who has resigned from all football.

Also, the veteran advised Wallace to take guidance from the membership, as in their letter to FIFA, they humbly expressed an apology for causing shame on the governing body of football.

“Look Loy has resigned from all football and has said he has run his course. It is sad, very sad when a group of people have combined their effort to fight a cause and when they see things are not turning in their favour they abandon the ship one by one. This is exactly what has happened with William Wallace. He was the only man left on a burning deck.

“Up to press time Mr Wallace has not officially resigned and although he said that his resignation will come after the special general meeting, one wonders what could be the hold-up. With all legal matters having been terminated, several other important issues will now have to be settled. But of course the payment of the staff and the alleged contracts that were not seen or approved by the TTFA executive committee [are still to be dealt with].

“Mr. Wallace may be facing some sleepless nights not knowing what FIFA‘s next move is. For sure it is expected that the world’s governing body will go after anyone who has allegedly misspent or misappropriated their funds. It will be advisable for the deposed former leader to cooperate with the impending investigations and avoid being brought to his knees,” Donovan explained.

On the first comment in bold: One could disagree with United TTFA, but to characterise the choices of action as disgraceful and embarrassing is a considerable stretch.

Donovan's comments could be construed as bordering on being mischievous and meddlesome but for the mitigation that they are responsive to Barbadian media.

Regarding the second comment in bold: Sleepless nights being experienced by Wallace? Clearly not. Coach, that should have been the easiest assessment to determine correctly, but you have not categorised it correctly.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on October 31, 2020, 09:21:16 AM
Sancho optimistic FIFA will lift ban.
By Jada Loutoo & Jonathan Ramnanansingh (T&T Newsday).


THE TT Football Association (TTFA) executive has withdrawn its appeal of FIFA’s suspension of T&T from international football before the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland.

On Wednesday, deputy president of the CAS appeals arbitration division Dr Elisabeth Steiner ruled that the appeal between the TTFA and FIFA was terminated and removed from the court’s roll.

Wednesday’s order was given without costs, except for the court office fee already paid by the TTFA. On Monday, the TTFA withdrew its appeal, which was filed on September 25. This withdrawal follows Sunday’s extraordinary general meeting, at which the majority of the TTFA membership voted to accept the normalisation committee appointed by FIFA in March.

Since then, TTFA’s president William Wallace and his executive have been in a battle against FIFA, first over the appointment of the committee and then the world governing body’s suspension of T&T from international football. On Friday, the Court of Appeal overturned Justice Carol Gobin’s decision that FIFA acted illegally in removing Wallace’s executive.

In response to TTFA’s withdrawal, TTFA board member Brent Sancho believes this may be a positive step in the right direction towards having T&T’s suspension lifted before December 18.

On September 25 – one day after T&T was indefinitely banned by the sport’s global governing body – the Concacaf council met and decided that if TT can meet the criteria laid down by FIFA, and if FIFA does in fact life the ban by December 18, the Soca Warriors will be permitted to compete at the 2021 Gold Cup.

Sancho, however, knocked Wallace and his United TTFA slate for sinking T&T football to its lowest point. Although still suspended, the former 2006 World Cup defender remains quietly optimistic.

“They were heading down this path from since March and they’ve taken everyone and everything with them. Thankfully, all the documents have been sent off to the relevant correspondents. I suspect FIFA would have their say which may probably indicate a lift in suspension.

“The work really begins now to try and put things in place to move T&T football forward. The past eight months was a complete waste of time. From the get go, it was just men trying to feed their egos. I think the dead end that was always there, they’ve finally arrived at it. It was inevitable,” he said. All attempts to contact normalization committee chairman Robert Hadad for a response on TTFA’s CAS withdrawal proved futile.

Really? By your assessment, egocentric conduct commenced in March? Let's be serious.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on October 31, 2020, 10:48:15 AM
On the first comment in bold: One could disagree with United TTFA, but to characterise the choices of action as disgraceful and embarrassing is a considerable stretch.

Donovan's comments could be construed as bordering on being mischievous and meddlesome but for the mitigation that they are responsive to Barbadian media.

Regarding the second comment in bold: Sleepless nights being experienced by Wallace? Clearly not. Coach, that should have been the easiest assessment to determine correctly, but you have not categorised it correctly.

The embarrassing things have been the comments from Randy Harris and Adrian Donovan throughout this saga.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: maxg on October 31, 2020, 08:17:54 PM
Dr Gloudon: TTFA-Fifa: an inconvenient truth that won’t be deciphered with one-dimensional thinking.
Wired868.com.


“[…] The TTFA has undoubtedly been in a mess for a long time; and so has Fifa. Indeed, we may have learned how to be corrupt in football from Fifa. No one in a local or regional body can carry on sustained defrauding of Fifa without the assistance of someone inside of Fifa.

“[…] Nevertheless, in the case of Fifa, they are the international umbrella for the sport and do have a right, as given to them by their membership, to execute according to their rules and regulations. The point, however, is that this should be done equitably…”

The following Letter to the Editor on the legal battle between Fifa and the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) was submitted to Wired868 by Reverend Dr Iva Gloudon—a former Trinidad and Tobago international athlete, sport administrator, university director of sport and former ambassador to Jamaica:

It is my opinion that the matter of the TTFA-Fifa controversy has been mostly dissected through the lens of one-dimensional thinking, which has seen this important instance in the terms of a single linear factor and scale. It seems that most are of the opinion that we cannot walk and chew gum at the same time.

As far as I am concerned, this is not merely an issue of right and wrong. The TTFA, like most other sporting organisations in the world who want to participate in the ‘big leagues’, often sign on the bottom line without the full knowledge of the significance of the terms, or in the belief that the clauses which produce a niggling feeling in their stomachs will never happen to them.

And before you even think that this only happens with sportsmen and sportswomen who are really not too smart; let me remind you of the insurance policy that you signed when you were 21 years old, only to find that, when you turned 60, the outcome was a far cry from what you expected. Or the numerous applications that you downloaded on your smart phone, without knowing the serious consequences of doing so.

The TTFA has undoubtedly been in a mess for a long time; and so has Fifa. Indeed, we may have learned how to be corrupt in football from Fifa. No one in a local or regional body can carry on sustained defrauding of Fifa, without the assistance of someone inside of Fifa.'

Just as no one can defraud our Ministry of Sport without someone on the inside knowing or not executing their oversight. Nevertheless, in the case of Fifa, they are the international umbrella body for the sport and do have a right, as given to them by their membership, to execute according to their rules and regulations.

The point, however, is that this should be done equitably. No one can convince me that Fifa would have moved on any one of the first world countries in Europe or North America—who, by the way, have also had their challenges with corruption—in the same manner that they did with Trinidad and Tobago.

There are so many other respectful ways in which this could have been executed.

What has been fascinating and unprecedented is the manner in which we as a country have capitulated to them. From the highest level, during the ongoing court matter, the president of the TTFA was publicly ridiculed after he won the first case.

The person with responsibility for our Ministry of Sport found it prudent to shout across the land and all the way to Zürich that the TTFA President had won the battle, but lost the war. The head of the Sport Company of Trinidad and Tobago, which is responsible for funding sport, made it openly clear that there would be a sharp reduction in funding to the TTFA if the association got suspended.

Most of the TTFA membership unceremoniously tossed out their president and then moved, cap and apology in hand with almost complete acquiescence, to implore Fifa and the normalising committee to return with no strings attached; completely defeated.

It is understandable why the membership of the TTFA would have done what they did. Sporting organisations have been at the mercy of all of our governments and mostly riddled with incompetent leadership.

There are many coaches and other technical persons who have worked assiduously and have not received their remuneration for months and, in some cases, for years.

But in the face of it all, why did they not have any demand for respect from Fifa or some input in the process? They just simply opened the door to our sovereign space.

It all speaks to the way that we have been indoctrinated for generations. Our court of appeal looked at the Fifa regulations and decided that we were a legitimate party to it, and therefore we now have to play by the rules.  Nowhere did the court of appeal say that Madame Justice Carol Gobin’s statements on the case were untrue. And that is because she singlehandedly got to the heart of the matter.

The court of appeal, however, ruled that in law, Justice Gobin did not have jurisdiction over the case. I do not agree with this linear thinking, but then I know my limitations, as I am no lawyer.

Nelson Mandela spent twenty-seven (27) years in prison because the apartheid laws were legitimately on the South African books. Those in charge make the laws to suit themselves and those disadvantaged by the laws often have an uphill battle for justice.

Slavery for hundreds of years was legitimately on the law books. We black people were once considered mere chattel; but downtrodden men and women with the help of powerful allies fought for it to be taken off the law books.

The Windrush Exposé, a 2018 British political scandal which included Caribbean people of colour who were wrongly detained, denied legal rights, threatened with deportation and in many cases illegally deported by the British Home Office, is a recent example.

These included the first group of Caribbean persons who went to the UK in 1948 on the invitation of the British government, who needed their services at that time. Now, after all of these years, the British government wants to deport them.

These are all such devastating and overwhelming instances that today our minds are still mired by slavery, colonialism and elitism. We have not, in the words of Robert Nesta Marley, been able to emancipate ourselves from mental slavery.

It is time for us to be liberated. It is time for us to pivot. It is time for our successive governments to stop merely using sport as political patronage. It is time for us to not only assess where we are with the administration of sport, but to also delve into how it is executed and what it takes for us to improve on what we are doing.

It is time for our corporate community to come on board with sport—not just at the back end but at the front end. It is time that our universities educate persons who can administrate sport, coach sport, and research sport, and not merely produce persons who are certified in sport.

It is also time that persons in sport, at every level, take hold of their skill and their craft with the determination to shape it into what it ought to be.

To the former TTFA president, Mr Wallace, I say that not many understand or can withstand that integrity comes before creature comforts, but you obviously do. That politicians are not always those who stand on principle, but you do. That the judiciary works under the constraints of the narrow law, but you do not, as you also understand the inconvenient truth.

You too, like all of us, have made mistakes, but I support you in what you were trying to achieve and thank you for your 30 years of service to sport.

Some of us know that sport is everything, as it teaches everything. It may yet be the way out of our national quagmire in determining who we really are as a people and as a nation.

RELATED NEWS

Dear editor: There was nothing ‘pyrrhic’ about Wallace and the UTTFA’s fight, history will smile on them.
Wired868.com


“[…] The UTTFA and supporters of its stand against the mighty Fifa might also be encouraged by the words of a martyr for the cause of Poland’s Solidarity Workers in the 1980s.

“Before he was brutally murdered on 19 October 1984, Father ‘Pop’ (Jerzy Popiełuszko) reportedly urged embattled workers with words that still ring true today:

“Truth never changes. It cannot be destroyed by decisions or legal acts. Telling the truth with courage is a way leading directly to freedom. A man who tells the truth is a free man despite external slavery, imprisonment or custody…”

The following Letter to the Editor on the stance of former Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and the United TTFA slate against their removal by Fifa, was submitted to Wired868 by Anthony Rock of the St Joseph Training Club:

I read and re-read Wired868’s reporting on last Monday’s appeal court proceedings that preceded the judgement released on Friday 23 October 2020.

Although I was disappointed in the appeal court’s determinations on Friday 23 October, I was not completely surprised—having noted the line of the CJ’s probings and the questions and responses traded between attorneys representing the respective adversarial parties.

So yes, I got a very uneasy feeling before release of the court of appeal judgement that things may not turn out well this time for the party I champion in this still unfolding impasse.

But really those who would resist injustice, even at great sacrifice, should continue to take courage from Madame Justice Carol Gobin’s judgements on 13 August and, particularly, on 13 October. To my mind, she properly dealt with the United TTFA’s concerns of injustice, regarding who committed the wrongs and who was the victim.

The remit of the appeal court was only about whether the matters should have been adjudicated within the jurisdiction of the Trinidad and Tobago courts or somewhere else. Therefore the appeal court hearing was not about declaring on who was right and who was wrong in the substantial matters.

That was the business of the trial judge, Madame Justice Gobin; and she did attend to that business—except of course, as we now learn, her 13 October determinations are no longer of any legal avail, since the appeal court found (regardless of the merits of that high court judgement) that the matters should not have been heard here in the first case.

Thus the appeal court’s ruling of Friday 23rd October 2020 will abide henceforth (unless a privy council ruling later overturns its findings).

But for me, I remain on course with Justice Gobin’s findings. The lady judge confirmed my own layman’s findings prior that Fifa acted improperly, unfairly and in a high-handed manner with one of its vulnerable members. Fifa also behaved less than respectfully towards T&T’s sovereignty.

I think it is important for neutrals—indeed all—to revisit the 13 October 2020 judgement of Madame Justice Carol Gobin (both the determinations and its justifications) as well as the comments of UTTFA’s Wallace, published before the appeal court determinations were released.

No doubt battle-worn, Mr Wallace might take comfort that there are still a few persons, like-minded as himself, who in empathy shared his team’s efforts in boldly standing up for principle against the odds—in the face of impending deprivation and castigation.

The UTTFA and supporters of its stand against the mighty Fifa might also be encouraged by the words of a martyr for the cause of Poland’s Solidarity Workers in the 1980s. Before he was brutally murdered on 19 October 1984, ‘Father Pop’ (Jerzy Popiełuszko) reportedly urged embattled workers with words that still ring true today:

“Truth never changes. It cannot be destroyed by decisions or legal acts. Telling the truth with courage is a way leading directly to freedom. A man who tells the truth is a free man despite external slavery, imprisonment or custody…”

I thought that in Justice Gobin’s court, much of the truth in this unwholesome Fifa drama came out.

Incidentally, Trinidad and Tobago’s appeal court met to hear the matter between the TTFA and Fifa on the anniversary of Father Pop’s death on 19 October.

I regretfully note that, from the loud voices in opposition to the UTTFA’s stand, it seems in Trinidad and Tobago that admirable civic virtues such as: conviction in cause, faithfulness to statutory duty, patriotism, willingness to make sacrifice for a greater good, testicular fortitude, etc, are no longer relevant.

These are the virtues demonstrated in the actions of Messrs Wallace, Clynt Taylor, Sam Phillip, Keith Look Loy and the rest of the UTTFA team—and perhaps were never even countenanced by those who balk at the prospect of a Fifa ban.

But if our citizenry were imbued with the aforementioned civic qualities, particularly our leaders, we would throw off the shackles of self-contempt (picked up again by Bajan Prime Minister Mia Motley in her ‘Time to Pivot’) and defend the state from its enemies: internal and external.

Whatever losses are sustained to preserve the honour and dignity of our people can be regarded as ‘acceptable losses’. And therefore any victory—be it moral or temporarily legal—in pursuit of those priorities, cannot be ‘pyrrhic’ at all.

But as they say, it is what it is. And that continued in today’s TTFA EGM. So accordingly Mr Wallace, as you have seemed to have hinted this last week, take a bow and ride out, erect and tall. Whoa!

Perhaps eons later after reflecting, some whom you fought for—and maybe some who opposed you—might endorse the following inscription on your epitaph:

“True, true, true… The odds were against you; your own people too. Yes, eventually pummelled. Yet posterity TnT is grateful. You bravely reminded Fifa: ‘Football? Yes, but not at all costs’. It is important to stand up to a bully, get in a few well directed blows and expose him for what he is.”

So look out Fifa; and others peeking in. If iz heat yuh feeling, know iz Fire coming in!

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: soccerman on October 31, 2020, 09:46:28 PM
https://wired868.com/2020/10/26/dr-gloudon-ttfa-fifa-an-inconvenient-truth-that-wont-be-deciphered-with-one-dimensional-thinking/
:beermug:
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Deeks on October 31, 2020, 10:47:53 PM
William Wallace has not only brought the Trinidad football fraternity to disgrace but the nation of Trinidad and Tobago on a whole was subjected to the international embarrassment of the highest order. And the question will be asked, will he be able to get away scot-free,” Donovan said.

You, Donovan, is an f---king embarrassment.
Title: Happy grovelling
Post by: Tallman on November 01, 2020, 07:56:21 PM
Happy grovelling
By Fazeer Mohammed (T&T Express)


Tony Greig is the man who first made me aware of what the word “grovel” meant.

Of course it is now the stuff of cricketing lore that the comment by the England captain ahead of the 1976 home campaign against the West Indies so fired up the Caribbean team, especially the fast bowlers, that they made it their business to go after him with additional venom whenever he came to the crease during that five-match rubber in which Clive Lloyd’s team prevailed by a 3-0 margin.

“People are building these West Indians up. I’m not really quite sure that they are as good as everyone thinks they are. If they are down, they grovel, and I intend, with the help of Closey (Brian Close, recalled for the series at the age of 45) and a few others to make them grovel.”

For a white South African, at a time of heightened awareness of the dehumanising treatment of the majority black population under white minority apartheid rule in that country, to insinuate that a team comprised predominantly of the descendants of African slaves would be crawling on their hands and knees at his feet was not only outrageous, but revealed the absence of any real empathy – notwithstanding the efforts of anti-apartheid campaigners – in the United Kingdom and the rest of Europe for the injustices in a part of the world where they were happy to visit and continue to do business.

All of that immediately came to mind last week when a letter was sent, presumably representing the majority who prevailed at last weekend’s emergency meeting of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association, to Robert Hadad, chairman of FIFA’s normalisation committee, which included a humble apology to the almighty gods of the game in Zurich.

Not surprisingly, there has been an attempt to backpedal from that grovelling reference. Yet even if the actual phrase was not approved by the membership and inserted by the writer of the letter, it doesn’t change the fact that this was precisely the perspective perpetuated by those stridently opposed to the legal action initiated by William Wallace and the other members of his deposed TTFA executive. To put it simply, they were prepared to do whatever needed to be done to get back in the good books of HRH Gianni Infantino.

Let me just re-state for the record that I was in support of the legal challenge by the group known as “United TTFA” to their surreptitious removal by the game’s global governors. That FIFA’s rules permit this type of unjust intervention doesn’t validate the injustice. It merely reinforces that so very often the gap between what is lawful and what is just is dispiritingly wide.

For most of the rest of this column I will defer to Brian Lewis because the president of the Trinidad and Tobago Olympic Committee said it much better than I can in an interview on Lasana Liburd’s “Wired868.com” website as far as putting this entire disgraceful episode into context.

Here’s what he had to say in response to the widely-held view that Wallace and his colleagues were selfish, irresponsible and reckless in initiating this action which has resulted in the TTFA being suspended by FIFA:

“I don’t think there is anyone within any organisation who had been democratically elected, and then four months later was removed; I can’t see anyone honestly and legitimately not having empathy for Mr Wallace…They would have wanted for themselves exactly what he was asking for. But there are people whose only priority seems to be to participate in the FIFA system.”

And now for a perspective on the administration of football post-normalisation committee:

“Whenever the next election falls, I think it will be important that we not see the same faces circulating – many of whom are part of the problem. There is a thinking that the people who create a problem are not the people to solve them. I believe that people who have the best interest and the genuine interest of football should step up; otherwise the people with ulterior motives who want to control football for the wrong reasons will take charge – and then the problems will continue.”

And finally, here’s Lewis’ opinion on the behaviour of FIFA and other world bodies:

“These global sport organisations, particularly the ones based in Europe, are very difficult to hold to account. They operate under this veneer of autonomy and authority, which they use to push back against efforts to hold them accountable...Nobody is going to (resist), especially if you are economically vulnerable...That is why organisations like FIFA move in a particular way in places like Africa, Asia and the Caribbean but they do not treat the bigger countries in the same way.”

Well said Brian. In case you don’t know though: we like it so.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: asylumseeker on November 02, 2020, 09:42:24 AM
Statutory ambiguity
By Dr. Terrence Farrell (T&T Express)


THE decision of the Court of Appeal has drawn a line under the litigation between the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) and FIFA, a conflict which recalls the Creole aphorism: “Tief from tief does make God laugh!” Justice Gobin took the parties and the country on an excursion which brought to mind former Chief Justice Michael de la Bastide’s query, posed in the context of another matter adjudicated by Gobin J, as to whether judicial review legislation had opened the door to “judicial adventurism’’.

Justice Gobin’s frolic did, however, surface a significant issue, the legal status of certain entities created by statute and the justiciability of their actions.

To be sure, the issue is not really new. Justice Judith Jones (as she then was) had to interpret the Integrity in Public Life Act of 2000 and the related amendments to the Constitution.

Those pieces of legislation widened the ambit of the Integrity Commission to include boards of “statutory bodies and state enterprises, including those bodies in which the State has a controlling interest”. But the legislation did not define either.

After interrogating the Interpretation Act and the Constitution itself, Jones J opined that: “In their natural and ordinary meaning the term [statutory bodies] must be taken to mean: ‘those bodies or organisations established by statute’... there is no other possible meaning that can be ascribed to these words.”

And there lay the problem. There are a host of organisations—sporting, charitable, religious—that are established by statute. Attorney Tyrone Marcus (Guardian October 18) gave a list of sporting organisations created by statute. The Catholic Religious Education Development Institute, of which I am a director, was set up by statute. Ricardo Williams (Sunday Express October 25) has given an excellent summary of how such organisations come into being and from where their powers arise, which is not from the statute incorporating them.

These organisations are incorporated by statute for reasons of prestige or some other arcane reason. But as Bereaux JA pointed out, that does not mean that they have any defined public purpose or respond to any public policy.

They do not report to Parliament or to any government minister. They do not fall within the principle established in Datafin because they discharge no public duty. And even if, as with the TTFA, there is some public interest in what they do, that is not sufficient to bring them within the ambit of judicial review.

Despite the Jones decision, which has not been appealed, the Integrity Commission has wisely ignored these particular “statutory bodies’’ and has not required their boards to be subjected to its onerous strictures.

Incorporation by statute wrong-footed Boodoosingh J (as he then was) in the Look Loy v Gabriel matter, on which Gobin J relied, and which Bereaux JA suggests was also wrongly decided on that point. Bereaux JA, clear-headed and careful, and the antithesis of judicial activism, did not seek to legislate when a body created by statute should be treated as a private body and hence not subject to judicial review. However, his dicta on that point leaves open the question whether a body established by statute could, outside of resort to arbitration, oust the jurisdiction of the local courts if its legislation explicitly so provided, and whether or not our courts would accept such ouster.

The difficulties of statutory incorporation do not end there. There remains considerable ambiguity about the governance of State-owned enterprises. Yes, they do fall within the purview of the Integrity Commission, and, in accordance with section 119(9) of the Constitution, they do “report’’ to Parliament, usually long after horses have bolted. But because State enterprises are incorporated under the Companies Act, the only legitimate nexus to governance by the State is through the Minister of Finance (Corporation Sole) Act, which is wholly inadequate for effecting good governance. This lacuna has allowed corporate travesties such as UDeCOTT, Education Facilities, Petrotrin’s GTL project, EMBD, LifeSport, and a host of others to occur.

The applicability of judicial review to State enterprises was discussed in NH International v UDeCOTT with instructive judgments by Kangaloo and Warner JJA, and a powerful and persuasive dissent by Sharma CJ.

It is why the 2016 State Enterprise Review Committee recommended that all State-owned enterprises be governed under a two-tiered legal system of incorporation of the Companies Act, together with a New Zealand-style State Enterprise act which clearly legislates the powers of both the “line minister’’ and the finance minister, and would leave directors of state enterprises, who are now very exposed, much less exposed.

The TTFA-FIFA imbroglio will unfold and one hopes that there will eventually be an outcome that is positive for the game in Trinidad and Tobago.

The question of the status of private bodies incorporated by statute which probably should not be, and State enterprises which are not, but should be, ought to garner the attention of a Law Reform Commission, if we still have one.

Boss content.

That aside, somewhere between  the decision to seat solely two Justices to include the CJ, and the PM's untimely amplified barking (it was more sentiently audible than a mere dog whistle), I am less than impressed with the CoA's pronouncement on this matter despite the compelling support that is represented to undergird its authority.

There was an opportunity here to dress the hearing of this matter  in different attire and the absence of a third Justice - accompanied by multiple perceptions of fealty, if not indebtedness to the PM - nimbly assisted in the avoidance of a complete cloak of transparency and independence.

That harm indicated, what would have been the harm in taking the alternative approach in terms of number or recusal (even if tenuous)?

As Farrell above suggested elsewhere (Express, February 25) on the matter of constitutional reform in the context of Section 137(3):

It is wrong to suggest that the issues raised by the Law Association reflect some partisan, politically-inspired agenda to remove the Chief Justice, though doubtless, there are individual lawyers who do embrace such an agenda. The Law Association’s committee on Judicial Appointments ... made comprehensive recommendations for the reform of the JLSC. The Law Association long ago also made comprehensive and sensible recommendations for the reform of the award of silk. Both reports have been studiously ignored by our politicians who seem to ‘like it so’!

One could be forgiven for concluding that this matter neatly has collapsed into the favoured column of 'like it so' convenience.

I was of the view that I had exhausted comment on this thought and related thoughts, but, I have not.

On the path of looking for something else, I revisited an article I read in early August during the peak of fertility of the dispute between the U/TTFA and FIFA. That article, written by Dr. Emir Crowne attracted my attention as to the wisdom of its insertion into the public discourse at that time. Despite its eminent lucidity, it struck me as potentially provocative in the context of prickly egos and what could happen next.

Excerpt of relevant comments.
Quote
... In recent days we have also seen the publicising of internal emails between Justice Gobin and the Chief Justice. The emails set out Justice Gobin’s disagreement with her assignment to the Family Court in Tobago and the Chief Justice’s response to same.

With the greatest of respect, the very public airing of these matters cannot strengthen the public’s confidence in the administration of justice. The judiciary must distance itself from the familiar bacchanal that we simultaneously love and detest in this country.

In fact, the integrity of the judiciary must be protected at all costs. Not merely from agenda-laden attacks and personal animus, but on principle. It is on this basis that I believe the Honourable Chief Justice should resign.

In my view, the merits of the allegations against the Chief Justice are irrelevant. Nor should my suggestion that he resign be taken as my personal belief in any of those allegations. His resignation should come as a matter of principle. Akin to a judge who recuses themselves from hearing a matter due to the mere perception of bias (as opposed to any actual bias per se); so too the Chief Justice might consider voluntarily resigning to protect the integrity of the Office of the Chief Justice, and judiciary as a whole, despite any wrongdoing.

...

https://wired868.com/2019/08/02/crowne-archies-kobayashi-maru-why-chief-justice-should-resign/

Perspective is a weighty beast.
Title: FIFA conducts TTFA status assessment after EGM letter
Post by: Tallman on November 04, 2020, 06:36:08 PM
FIFA conducts TTFA status assessment after EGM letter
By Walter Alibey (T&T Guardian)


Football's world governing body — FIFA is currently assessing the actions of the T&T Football Association (TTFA) general membership, as well as the ruling by the Court of Appeal of T&T, with a possible intent to remove the suspension handed down on September 24 and accept the TTFA back into the fold of the FIFA family.

FIFA general secretary Fatma Samoura delivered this information in a letter on Wednesday, pointed out that on October 23, the Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Appellate Judge Nolan Bereaux overturned a ruling by High Court Judge Carol Gobin made on October 13 to recognise the United T&TFA's team of William Wallace (president) and vice presidents Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillip and Susan Joseph-Warrick, as the legitimate managers of football in T&T.

The TTFA had challenged a decision by the FIFA in March to appoint a Normalisation Committee to replace the Wallace-led T&TFA for putting the country's football on the brink of insolvency. The T&TFA first went to the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) in Switzerland, before deciding to challenge the matter in the local High Court, which was a violation of the FIFA Statutes, citing constitutional bias at the CAS.

However, Justice Bereaux concluded that the TTFA constitution prescribes that all disputes between itself and FIFA should be dealt with by CAS.

He said: “The fact that such a provision is enshrined in the TTFA’s constitution means that the TTFA and its executive are bound to comply. The result is that the filing of these proceedings was a breach of the TTFA’s constitution.”

Archie, on the other hand, said “It was neither prudent case management nor an economical deployment of judicial time and resources to attempt to finally determine the substantive issues and to deliver a judgement less than a week before the scheduled hearing of the interlocutory appeal...Zeal is commendable but it must not obscure the need for caution,” Archie said.

In the judgement, it was determined that the litigation contravened the Judiciary’s Civil Proceedings Rules, as it was served on FIFA via email when Swiss law does not permit such a method for service of a lawsuit.

The ruling was followed by an Extraordinary General Meeting on October 25, at which the TTFA members agreed to drop all the court matters with the FIFA if the TTFA were to be accepted as a member again, and thereby be allowed to play in all FIFA-sanctioned events.

The TTFA was also required to accept the normalisation committee as the organisation to run the affairs of the sport in T&T, as well as bring its statutes in line with that of the FIFA.

Samoura in a letter to Robert Hadad, chairman of the normalisation committee dated November 4, acknowledged the attempts made the sport's membership and the court of appeal, saying: " FIFA acknowledged receipt of the decision of the T&T Court of Appeal in the case to which FIFA was a respondent party. In this context, the decision of the Court of Appeal ruled that the former leadership of the TTFA had acted unlawfully by appealing to a local court to contest the appointment by FIFA of the Normalisation Committee for the TTFA."

She added: "In addition, the Court of Appeal stressed that in accordance with art. 57 par. 1 of the FIFA Statutes and art. 67 of the TTFA statutes, the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) is the only recognised path to resolve such dispute. Furthermore, the FIFA administration acknowledges the receipt of written proof that on 25 October 2020 a meeting was held among the TTFA members. In this context, we duly take note that the members of the TTFA expressed themselves and decided that “(…) the way forward for the TTFA is: for the TTFA to fully comply with its obligations as a member of FIFA, recognising the legitimacy of the FIFA-appointed Normalisation Committee, and; bringing its own statutes in line with the FIFA Statutes, and; to fully cooperate with the Normalisation Committee in the fulfilment of its mandate as stated in FIFA´s letter of March 17th, 2020; be it further resolved that all court matters existing between the TTFA and FIFA shall be immediately brought to a stop”.

According to Samoura, FIFA welcomes both decisions and is assessing the matter internally, promising that an update will be provided in due course.

The Confederation of North, Central America and the Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF) which made it known it wanted T&T in its main draw for the CONCACAF Gold Cup on September 28, later gave the T&TFA until December 18 to sort out its matters with the FIFA or miss the tournament in 2021.

FIFA later also gave the FIFA T&TFA the same deadline to drop all the court matters against it and bring its constitution in line with FIFA's, if T&T was to have a chance to contest the 2022 World Cup in Qatar.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Rastaman on November 05, 2020, 07:52:25 AM
To all the fools who thought FIFA would just welcome us back with open arms.....see what's happening. They will draw this out as long as they feel.....this had nothing to do with football in the first place. It was all about controlling the "minnows"

Somebody send that message to Sancho
Title: FIFA lifts suspension of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Tallman on November 19, 2020, 01:40:02 PM
FIFA lifts suspension of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
FIFA.com


After taking note of the recent decision of the Trinidad and Tobago Court of Appeal and the express wish of the members of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) for all associated legal claims brought by parties purporting to act in the name of the organisation to be terminated, the Bureau of the FIFA Council has decided to lift the suspension of the TTFA with immediate effect.

This means that all of the TTFA membership rights have been reinstated and TTFA representative and club teams are again entitled to take part in international competitions. The TTFA may also benefit from development programmes, courses and training provided by FIFA and/or Concacaf. Moreover, FIFA member associations may again enter into sporting contact with the TTFA and/or its teams.

The members of the TTFA normalisation committee, which was installed by decision of the Bureau of the FIFA Council on 17 March 2020, will proceed with their duties. FIFA regrets the stances and actions taken by the members of the removed Executive Committee, which negatively impacted all aspects of Trinidad and Tobago Football. Such actions greatly misdirected the attention of the normalization committee and hindered its work and execution of its mandate. FIFA is, however, confident that the normalisation committee will now be able to focus on the execution of its assigned tasks.

RELATED NEWS

FIFA lifts TTFA suspension.
By Gyasi Merrique (T&T Guardian).


Following what has been described at a "fruitful discussion" between FIFA and the Normalisation Committee representing the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association, FIFA has agreed to lift the TTFA's international suspension.

A statement by FIFA explained its decision:

"After taking note of the recent decision of the Trinidad and Tobago Court of Appeal and the express wish of the members of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) for all associated legal claims brought by parties purporting to act in the name of the organisation to be terminated, the Bureau of the FIFA Council has decided to lift the suspension of the TTFA with immediate effect.

This means that all of the TTFA membership rights have been reinstated and TTFA representative and club teams are again entitled to take part in international competitions. The TTFA may also benefit from development programmes, courses and training provided by FIFA and/or Concacaf. Moreover, FIFA member associations may again enter into sporting contact with the TTFA and/or its teams.

The members of the TTFA normalisation committee, which was installed by decision of the Bureau of the FIFA Council on 17 March 2020, will proceed with their duties. FIFA regrets the stances and actions taken by the members of the removed Executive Committee, which negatively impacted all aspects of Trinidad and Tobago Football. Such actions greatly misdirected the attention of the normalization committee and hindered its work and execution of its mandate. FIFA is, however, confident that the normalisation committee will now be able to focus on the execution of its assigned tasks."

Meanwhile, press release put out by the Normalisation Committee this afternoon noted that the TTFA's "membership rights in FIFA will be reinstated in time for Trinidad and Tobago to compete in the 2021 (CONCACAF) Gold Cup and the 2022 FIFA World Cup Qualifiers."

The Bureau of the FIFA Council took the decision to suspend the TTFA on September 24 after the previous administration of the TTFA, led by former president William Wallace persisted with legal action in T&T's high Court challenging FIFA's appointment of a normalisation committee in March of this year. Such action was contrary to and a breach of article 59 of the FIFA Statutes.

The TTFA was granted victory in the matter on October 13 by Judge Carol Gobin, who deemed that FIFA's decision to activate the normalisation was improper and made in bad faith.

However, 11 days later Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice Nolan Bereaux overturned Gobin's ruling when they determined that the lawsuit brought by Wallace and his United TTFA team had contravened the TTFA’s constitution.

Facing a TTFA Extraordinary General Meeting to decide whether the TTFA should recognise FIFA's normalisation committee, Wallace stepped down as TTFA president, clearing the way for the committee chairman businessman Robert Hadad to initiate discussions with FIFA.

Below is the Normalisation Committee's statement in full:

The Normalization Committee recently held fruitful discussions with FIFA and we are pleased to deliver the good news that the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association's suspension will be lifted and its membership rights in FIFA will be reinstated in time for Trinidad and Tobago to compete in the 2021 Gold Cup and the 2022 FIFA World Cup Qualifiers. This could not happen without the decisive contributions by numerous T&T stakeholders in signaling their desire for a new chapter for football in our country. However we have a long way to go and there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that this return to competitive action, in all age categories, is sustainable. The Normalization Committee is committed to that undertaking.

The Committee was appointed to:

• run the TTFA’s daily affairs;

• establish a debt repayment plan that is implementable by the TTFA administration;

• review and amend the TTFA Statutes (and other regulations where necessary) and ensure their compliance with the FIFA Statutes and requirements before duly submitting them for approval to the TTFA Congress; and

• organize and conduct elections of a new TTFA Executive Committee for a four-year mandate.

We have already made some positive headway over the last few months through dialogue with the players and coaches and are committed to strengthening these relationships. This is one of our first priorities. The financial and governance issues of the TTFA are looming large, but we believe that together, we can put Trinidad and Tobago football where it needs to be on and off the field. We look forward to meeting with the various constituencies to work towards a structure that ensures that we begin winning again. It is even more imperative now that we work together. Football is a family, a community. We must heal together. Trinidad and Tobago football needs the help of all of its stakeholders working together shoulder to shoulder - the players, coaches, administrators, corporate supporters and our loyal fans. We look forward to your continuous support in exchange for our commitment to deliver growth and success in Trinbago football.

Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on November 19, 2020, 02:55:59 PM
The going rate for normalisation committee members appears to be US$6,500 (TT$44,000) per month for the chairman and US$4,000 (TT$27,000) for other members. Neither Fifa nor the normalisation committee confirmed the figures paid to the Trinidad and Tobago-based officials.
Title: Re: FIFA lifts suspension of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: ABTrini on November 19, 2020, 07:01:08 PM
FIFA lifts suspension of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
FIFA.com


After taking note of the recent decision of the Trinidad and Tobago Court of Appeal and the express wish of the members of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) for all associated legal claims brought by parties purporting to act in the name of the organisation to be terminated, the Bureau of the FIFA Council has decided to lift the suspension of the TTFA with immediate effect.

This means that all of the TTFA membership rights have been reinstated and TTFA representative and club teams are again entitled to take part in international competitions. The TTFA may also benefit from development programmes, courses and training provided by FIFA and/or Concacaf. Moreover, FIFA member associations may again enter into sporting contact with the TTFA and/or its teams.

The members of the TTFA normalisation committee, which was installed by decision of the Bureau of the FIFA Council on 17 March 2020, will proceed with their duties. FIFA regrets the stances and actions taken by the members of the removed Executive Committee, which negatively impacted all aspects of Trinidad and Tobago Football. Such actions greatly misdirected the attention of the normalization committee and hindered its work and execution of its mandate. FIFA is, however, confident that the normalisation committee will now be able to focus on the execution of its assigned tasks.

RELATED NEWS

FIFA lifts TTFA suspension.
By Gyasi Merrique (T&T Guardian).


Following what has been described at a "fruitful discussion" between FIFA and the Normalisation Committee representing the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association, FIFA has agreed to lift the TTFA's international suspension.

A statement by FIFA explained its decision:

"After taking note of the recent decision of the Trinidad and Tobago Court of Appeal and the express wish of the members of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) for all associated legal claims brought by parties purporting to act in the name of the organisation to be terminated, the Bureau of the FIFA Council has decided to lift the suspension of the TTFA with immediate effect.

This means that all of the TTFA membership rights have been reinstated and TTFA representative and club teams are again entitled to take part in international competitions. The TTFA may also benefit from development programmes, courses and training provided by FIFA and/or Concacaf. Moreover, FIFA member associations may again enter into sporting contact with the TTFA and/or its teams.

The members of the TTFA normalisation committee, which was installed by decision of the Bureau of the FIFA Council on 17 March 2020, will proceed with their duties. FIFA regrets the stances and actions taken by the members of the removed Executive Committee, which negatively impacted all aspects of Trinidad and Tobago Football. Such actions greatly misdirected the attention of the normalization committee and hindered its work and execution of its mandate. FIFA is, however, confident that the normalisation committee will now be able to focus on the execution of its assigned tasks."

Meanwhile, press release put out by the Normalisation Committee this afternoon noted that the TTFA's "membership rights in FIFA will be reinstated in time for Trinidad and Tobago to compete in the 2021 (CONCACAF) Gold Cup and the 2022 FIFA World Cup Qualifiers."

The Bureau of the FIFA Council took the decision to suspend the TTFA on September 24 after the previous administration of the TTFA, led by former president William Wallace persisted with legal action in T&T's high Court challenging FIFA's appointment of a normalisation committee in March of this year. Such action was contrary to and a breach of article 59 of the FIFA Statutes.

The TTFA was granted victory in the matter on October 13 by Judge Carol Gobin, who deemed that FIFA's decision to activate the normalisation was improper and made in bad faith.

However, 11 days later Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice Nolan Bereaux overturned Gobin's ruling when they determined that the lawsuit brought by Wallace and his United TTFA team had contravened the TTFA’s constitution.

Facing a TTFA Extraordinary General Meeting to decide whether the TTFA should recognise FIFA's normalisation committee, Wallace stepped down as TTFA president, clearing the way for the committee chairman businessman Robert Hadad to initiate discussions with FIFA.

Below is the Normalisation Committee's statement in full:

The Normalization Committee recently held fruitful discussions with FIFA and we are pleased to deliver the good news that the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association's suspension will be lifted and its membership rights in FIFA will be reinstated in time for Trinidad and Tobago to compete in the 2021 Gold Cup and the 2022 FIFA World Cup Qualifiers. This could not happen without the decisive contributions by numerous T&T stakeholders in signaling their desire for a new chapter for football in our country. However we have a long way to go and there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that this return to competitive action, in all age categories, is sustainable. The Normalization Committee is committed to that undertaking.

The Committee was appointed to:

• run the TTFA’s daily affairs;

• establish a debt repayment plan that is implementable by the TTFA administration;

• review and amend the TTFA Statutes (and other regulations where necessary) and ensure their compliance with the FIFA Statutes and requirements before duly submitting them for approval to the TTFA Congress; and

• organize and conduct elections of a new TTFA Executive Committee for a four-year mandate.

We have already made some positive headway over the last few months through dialogue with the players and coaches and are committed to strengthening these relationships. This is one of our first priorities. The financial and governance issues of the TTFA are looming large, but we believe that together, we can put Trinidad and Tobago football where it needs to be on and off the field. We look forward to meeting with the various constituencies to work towards a structure that ensures that we begin winning again. It is even more imperative now that we work together. Football is a family, a community. We must heal together. Trinidad and Tobago football needs the help of all of its stakeholders working together shoulder to shoulder - the players, coaches, administrators, corporate supporters and our loyal fans. We look forward to your continuous support in exchange for our commitment to deliver growth and success in Trinbago football.


Hold on hold on before we begin yuh celebrate pound chest and start the parade, could some  we get a statement from FIFA as to what was the justifiable cause for them to appoint a normalization committee in the first place?  What could have been so drastic in the  four months of the new administration to warrant FIFA' Draconian measures? Consider all the misadventures and mis guided decisions  by the previous administration?
And in FIFA' statement " regretfully........blah blah". Laying blame on the TTFA administration. Does anyone hold FIFA accountable  for their actions? What becomes of alleged deals around the HOF?
So their is a collective sigh of relief- ban lifted  we get  to participate and our brethens in the Caribbean can now talk to us wow!!!!
Lessons to be learnt - don't Fck with those in power especially if you are a minnow - moral of this whole stinking saga. So while some may be jumping with glee consider the ultimate price we are subjected too- pawns on display for FIFA to display - explicit tyranny and  autocratic rule  by any means necessary -
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Rastaman on November 20, 2020, 06:53:29 AM
To all the fools who thought FIFA would just welcome us back with open arms.....see what's happening. They will draw this out as long as they feel.....this had nothing to do with football in the first place. It was all about controlling the "minnows"

Somebody send that message to Sancho
Well Well....they only took 3 weeks. I guess I was wrong......good luck going forward guys.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: soccerman on November 20, 2020, 12:56:01 PM
Hold on hold on before we begin yuh celebrate pound chest and start the parade, could some  we get a statement from FIFA as to what was the justifiable cause for them to appoint a normalization committee in the first place?  What could have been so drastic in the  four months of the new administration to warrant FIFA' Draconian measures? Consider all the misadventures and mis guided decisions  by the previous administration?
And in FIFA' statement " regretfully........blah blah". Laying blame on the TTFA administration. Does anyone hold FIFA accountable  for their actions? What becomes of alleged deals around the HOF?
So their is a collective sigh of relief- ban lifted  we get  to participate and our brethens in the Caribbean can now talk to us wow!!!!
Lessons to be learnt - don't Fck with those in power especially if you are a minnow - moral of this whole stinking saga. So while some may be jumping with glee consider the ultimate price we are subjected too- pawns on display for FIFA to display - explicit tyranny and  autocratic rule  by any means necessary -
Summed it up nicely.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: pull stones on November 20, 2020, 01:21:24 PM
Anyone has terry fenwick email address? I need to contact him.
Title: Re: FIFA suspends the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Post by: Flex on November 22, 2020, 07:49:46 AM
Eve welcomes FIFA lifting of suspension.
By Nigel Simon (Guardian).


Former T&T senior men's team captain and current national youth team coach Angus Eve has welcomed the decision by FIFA to remove the ban on T&T football.

On Thursday, FIFA lifted the T&T Football Association's (TTFA) international suspension with immediate effect after what it described as "fruitful discussion" between FIFA and the Normalisation Committee representing the TTFA.

In their release, FIFA said it had taken note of a recent decision by the of the T&T Court of Appeal and the express wish of the members of the local Football Association (TTFA) for all associated legal claims brought by parties purporting to act in the name of the organisation to be terminated, and after deliberating its Bureau of the FIFA Council had decided to lift the suspension.

By lifting the suspension, all of the TTFA membership rights have been reinstated and TTFA representative and club teams are again entitled to take part in international competitions.

The TTFA may also benefit from development programmes, courses and training provided by FIFA and/or Concacaf. Moreover, FIFA member associations may again enter into sporting contact with the TTFA and/or its teams.

In addition, the members of the TTFA normalisation committee, which was installed by a decision of the Bureau of the FIFA Council on March 17, has also been granted permission to resume with their duties.

In an immediate response to Thursday’s reinstatement by FIFA, the Normalisation Committee via a press release said it noted that the TTFA's "membership rights in FIFA will be reinstated in time for T&T to compete in the 2021 (CONCACAF) Gold Cup and the 2022 FIFA World Cup Qualifiers.

This after the Bureau of the FIFA Council took the decision to suspend the TTFA on September 24 after the previous administration of the TTFA, led by former president William Wallace persisted with legal action in T&T's high Court challenging FIFA's appointment of a normalisation committee in March of this year.

According to the Normalisation Committee, such action was contrary to and a breach of article 59 of the FIFA Statutes.

The TTFA was granted victory in the matter on October 13 by Judge Carol Gobin, who deemed that FIFA's decision to activate the normalisation was improper and made in bad faith.

However, 11 days later Chief Justice Ivor Archie and Justice Nolan Bereaux overturned Gobin's ruling when they determined that the lawsuit brought by Wallace and his United TTFA team had contravened the TTFA’s constitution.

Facing a TTFA Extraordinary General Meeting to decide whether the TTFA should recognise FIFA's normalisation committee, Wallace stepped down as TTFA president, clearing the way for the normalisation committee chairman, businessman Robert Hadad, to initiate discussions with FIFA.

Eve, T&T’s most capped player with 117 appearances, on Friday said it was a really great day for T&T football.

“It’s really good to see that FIFA has risen the ban on our football, said an upbeat Eve, a member of the recently formed National Coaches Association.

“This is positive news in that it now allows for players to get back involve in some form of training locally with the aim of helping their respective national teams qualify for international tournaments, for officials to be appointed to competitions on an international scale as well as coaches to get back out there and help develop the nation’s youths.”

Reflecting on the day that FIFA opted to re-instate the TTFA, 48-year-old Eve said, “Ironically, we celebrated November 19 (Thursday) in remembrance of the “Strike Squad” not just only coming so close to qualifying for the Italy 1990 World Cup, but as a day that brought the country together in the most positive way through sports.

“And in a sense with us now being re-instated on November 19 it feels like we have been liberated again because sports and in particular football has a way of making such a positive impact on our society as it has shown in the past."

With regards to all the issues surrounding the payment of coaches which were put on hold when the normalisation committee ceased operations, Eve, the current national Under-17 coach said that they will be ready and willing for any positive discussions when the opportunity is presented to them.

Already national senior men's coach Terry Fenwick has resumed training with a mostly locally-based group of players.

On Friday morning ahead of the start of the national team's practice session, Hadad paid them a visit, addressing the members of staff and players.

"It was a great boost for everyone this morning to have the normalisation committee chairman Robert Hadad at our training session the very next morning after the ban was lifted and normalisation committee reinstated to run the affairs of the FA.

"He addressed us and while we are fully aware that there is much work to be done as we look ahead to a hectic 2021, I think his presence was well received and we are all anticipating more positive developments for our football in the months ahead," Fenwick said.

However, with no FIFA international match window available until next March, Fenwick will be hoping to navigate his way around organising some international friendlies with neighbouring countries with the aim of getting his players up to the required fitness levels needed for international competition.

When the Concacaf World Cup qualifiers for Qatar 2022 kicks off in March, T&T will compete in Group F with Puerto Rico, Guyana, St Kitts/Nevis and Bahamas from which only the winners will advance to face the table-toppers from Group A, which comprises US Virgin Islands, El Salvador, Grenada, Antigua & Barbuda and Montserrat.

Fenwick's men will also face minnows Montserrat in their first-round playoff for the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup with the winners to face the victor between French Guiana and Cuba for a spot at the Gold Cup in a tough Pool A than consists of Curacao, Mexico and El Salvador.