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Sports => Football => Topic started by: lizzard1910 on November 28, 2005, 04:22:01 AM

Title: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: lizzard1910 on November 28, 2005, 04:22:01 AM
In German TV there was a report about de Soca Warrioirs. Also about there history. The showed a match between Haiti and TT. TT scored 4 goals all of them were denied. The only mentioned that the referee was banned for lifetime. Anybody knows more about it? Who payed for the referee ans stuff? ???
Title: Re: 1974
Post by: Rodney on November 28, 2005, 05:20:53 AM
In German TV there was a report about de Soca Warrioirs. Also about there history. The showed a match between Haiti and TT. TT scored 4 goals all of them were denied. The only mentioned that the referee was banned for lifetime. Anybody knows more about it? Who payed for the referee ans stuff? ???

This is mentioned quite a lot on this site...surprised you haven't heard about it before  ???

Anyway, the final qualifying group for Germany 74 was held in Haiti at the time the notorious 'Papa Doc' was in charge. It involved Haiti, T&T, Mexico, Honduras, Guatemala and another team I can't remember that came last and didn't win a game. T&T lost their first game to Honduras 2-1 and in their Second game played the Hosts and also lost 2-1, however they scored a additional 4 goals that were disallowed. This turned out to be the key result in the tournament as T&T then won all their other games while Haiti lost to Mexico. T&T had a far superior goal difference so would have qualified if they had drawn or won that game. What made the situation worse was the match was reviewed and the refereeing decisions were deemed so dubious that the referee was banned for life...yet in those days the oringinal decision was final and could not be overturned. There were rumours of bribery, blackmail and threats to officials but I have no idea if anyone ever admitted to anything. It is still a sore point for all T&T football supporters as that team in many people's opinion was T&T's best ever. They certainly would have given a better account of themselves in Germany than Haiti as from all reports they were the class team in the Concacaf at that time.
Title: Re: 1974
Post by: fishs on November 28, 2005, 05:30:38 AM
Ah know this is a loooong post , but the info was on a PDF file and I could not create a link. However it is good reading and important for people to understand the history.
Baby Doc Duvalier was the president for life in Haiti and it was widely speculated that the officials were faced with take the money or death.

Having gained Independence eleven years earlier on August 31, 1962, Trinidad and Tobago had
every reason to prove to the rest of the world that it was ready to stand on its own when it began its
bid in 1973.
Several of the players had been exposed to professional and semi-professional football.
Among them were New York based Warren Archibald, Selris Figaro, Selwyn Murren, Everald
‘Gally’ Cummings and semi-professional Anthony Douglas who was based in Canada.
The Football Association had also hired an International coach in Englishman Kevin Verity who
was assisted by locals Edgar Vidale (assistant coach), Ken Henry (trainer) and Polly Regis
(physiotherapist).
Ivan Carter was chef de mission and Oliver Camps, manager.
The full team team was: Gerald Figeroux, Kelvin Barclay, Devenish Paul (goalkeepers), Russell
Tesheira, Raymond Moraldo, Selwyn Murren (captain), Selris Figaro, Winston Phillips (defenders),
Cummings, Dennis Morgan, Sydney Augustine, Leon Carpette, Anthony Douglas, Peter Mitchell
(midfielders), Steve Khan, Wilfred Cave, Ray Roberts, Leo Brewster, Steve David and Warren
Archibald (forwards).
Earlier the team had bulldozed its way through the first round where it headed group six with 11-1
and 2-1 victories over Antigua and a 1-all home result and 2-1 away win against Suriname.
All that remained between them and Germany was Haiti, Mexico, Guatemala, Netherland Antilles
and Honduras.
Trinidad lost its first game 0-1 to Honduras and knew that it was vital to collect two points in the
second game against the host.
They put up one of their best performances from a local team in major football competitions,
scoring five goals but at the end of the game, the score read Haiti 2 Trinidad and Tobago 1.
The game will forever remained etched in the minds of the local fans as one in which their team
was robbed and denied of an opportunity to play in the World Cup.
It was marred by some of the worst officiating in a match of such magnitude and later, the referee
Jose Enrique of El Salvador and Canadian linesman James Higuet were both banned for life by the
FIFA.
A report of the match in the Trinidad Guardian of December 6, 1973, written by Keith Sheppard
who covered the tournament tells the story:Sheppard wrote:
“If I had not seen it with my own eyes, I would not believe it. Trinidad and Tobago scored five
times and should have gotten a penalty in each session but lost 1-2 to Haiti in a very one-sided
match at the Sylvia Cator Stadium here last night. They say goals win matches. This is one time
they didn’t.
I know it will be hard for the pessimistic fans home to believe. But our boys played over through
and around the home team from start to finish so much so that Philippe Vorbe, voted Player of the
tournament in Trinidad two years ago, looked like an ordinary schoolboy and even the Haitian
people hardly noticed that he voluntarily left the field eight minutes before time.
Perhaps it was voodoo working against us but for those who do not care for the supernatural, I can
blame it on the very strange decisions of referee Jose Enrique (El Salvador) and James Higuet
(Canada).
They virtually nailed us to the cross. Because of last night, the team which played like champs are
now likely to return home as chumps.
Henrique who does not understand a word of English, decided it was a goal in the 12th minute
when a long throw from Winston Phillips landed in the net after brushing off a Haiti defender. It
looked legal to me and to the referee on the spot. But with the ball ready to be kicked off, Haitians
in the crowd drew the players attention to the fact that the linesman Higuet’s flag was up. I do not
know what Higuet could have said but his action, signifying that the goalie had been jostled were
strange since Rudy Roberts was the only player close enough to worry the goalie and did nothing of
the sort suddenly found favour with the referee whom I repeat had been on the spot and had said
goal.
This was just the first of many strange decisions which caused players and officials to be in tears
when the final whistle came and many Haitians to line the streets and cheer us on the way back to
the hotel.
At the time of the first disallowed goal, TT was trailing 0-1 on a ninth minute goal from Emmanuel
Sanon - his third of the series. He was on spot to tap home a low cross from right winger Claude
Bartholomew which had eluded the TT defenders.
Two minutes after this setback, however, Steve David notched the second goal of the series to win
a case of beer bet with one of TT’s leading pessimists ‘Short Mikey’ from Belmont. Archibald
went up the left flank and sent over a low pass for David to do the rest.
That was the signal for an all out onslaught on the Haiti goal. In the 30th minute, another Phillips
throw tweaked goalie Henri Francillon fingers and landed in the net. No goal, of course.
Seconds later, a Cummings crack had Francillon diving to hold and the same player shot off a
bullet from about 20 yards which was back in play off the upright before Francillion could move.
It was really vintage soccer and Archibald made the unofficial half time score 4-1 by heading in the
ball after Cummings had taken it to the line before squaring it back. Why was it disallowed? Ask
linesman Higuet. He ruled offside.
The second half was a carbon copy of the first. The midfield trio of Douglas, Moraldo and
Cummings so dominated play that Haiti had only two cracks from well outside the box before
getting the winner during a scrimmage in the 87th minute from left winger Roger St Vin.
In the 61st minute a Roberts’ flick bounced off Francillon’s shoulder and fell on an obliging Steve
David head. Again the decision went against us. It was ruled a foul on the goalie.
After the match everyone was sympathetic towards us. But who cared. We were robbed for sure.
No hand shake will change that.
“I will never forget this night as long as I live,” said English professional coach Kevin Verity.
Ron Newman, coach of the US pro soccer team Dallas Tornado also had a comment. “You can
quote me on this. You were robbed. I have never seen anything like this in my life.”
Needless to say our boys are disgruntled. Some are saying they are not feeling to play any more. I
can understand that feeling. It was real tough luck...”
With much to prove, the local team went back into action and won their next three games,
including a 4-0 whipping over tournament favourites, Mexico.
Cummings scored in a 1-0 win against Guatemala and he added two more against Mexico while
David and Archibald also got on the score sheet.
David, however, stole the show against the Netherlands, getting a beaver-trick.
He eventually won the prize for the most goals. Cummings was voted ‘Player of the tournament.’
and Kelvin Barclay was the best goalkeeper .
Trinidad and Tobago also collected $47,000 for placing second in the tournament while each player
was presented with a gold wrist watch by ‘Baby Doc’ Duvalier, president of Haiti.
But these were no consolation as Haiti had ended the series with eight points, including the dubious
two from their victory against Trinidad and Tobago who fiished second with six points.
Manager Oliver Camps later described the Haiti game as one of the most difficult in his life. “Big
men were crying like babies. Some lost the urge to get off the ground and return to the dressing
room. I don’t know which match the referee and linesman were seeing but it certainly wasn’t the
one between Haiti and Trinidad and Tobago.”
Trinidad and Tobago eventually filed a protest and although all the officials were banned, the
results stood.
Title: Re: 1974
Post by: lizzard1910 on November 28, 2005, 05:42:07 AM
[
Quote

This is mentioned quite a lot on this site...surprised you haven't heard about it before  ???

Quote

I guess because I only have time to read some oft the topics  ::)
Anyway, thanks to both of you.
Title: Re: 1974
Post by: vb on November 28, 2005, 05:46:30 AM
I saved this story years ago for my files...and every time I see it...I get sad...I can only IMAGINE how the playes must feel when they remember this tragedy.

Peace,
VB
Title: Re: 1974
Post by: Rodney on November 28, 2005, 05:49:00 AM
Just Some comment on Fish's post on the Haiti game. I always remember T&T losing 2-1 to Honduras with Steve David scoring for T&T in the second half. Checked on the RSSSF site and they agree with me. Also they say David ONLY  :angel: scored a Hattrick against the N.Antillies. Still that is insignificant to the robbery that occured.

Here is the Link to the qualifier stats from RSSSF:

http://www.rsssf.com/tables/74qual.html

scroll down to the Concacaf qualifiers.
Title: Re: 1974
Post by: fishs on November 28, 2005, 05:55:42 AM
Cheers Rodney, ah jus downgrade mih history report to ah B-  ;D ;D ;D
By the way I got this from the story of football in Trinidad and Tobago 1893-2004,
No author.
Title: Re: 1974
Post by: Rodney on November 28, 2005, 06:10:57 AM
Cheers Rodney, ah jus downgrade mih history report to ah B-  ;D ;D ;D
By the way I got this from the story of football in Trinidad and Tobago 1893-2004,
No author.

No problem....according to the TTFF website that was done by Valentino Singh. I have it too, infact, I think most of the old school on this site have that on dey harddrives. Very Informative! 
Title: Re: 1974
Post by: trinibug on November 28, 2005, 07:35:46 AM
At least Short Mikey get a case of beers.
I wonder if we ever beat Mexico 4-0 again after that?
Can you imagine a Mexico squad getting that result today - coach will havt to pack his bags following the final whistle.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: Peong on November 28, 2005, 11:54:59 AM
lizzard by chance do you have access to a digital copy of the report?
Title: Re: 1974
Post by: Pointman on November 28, 2005, 01:06:41 PM
That is why I say that the People of Trinidad and Tobago should include the 1974 team in the Celebrations for our getting to 2006. If any player from 1974 is no longer around, invite a family member to be there.
LET US DO IT TNT it is the least we can do
in fact I was so mad with FIFA then that I now believe that FIFA should pay to include those players in these lead up celebrations now!
I sure if Jack Warner is a REAL boss man he will include them in the celebrations for 2006!!!!

I couldn't agree more. This is a very sore topic for me as I was witness to that '73 game, although I was just a small boy of 10. I remembered actually seeing big men I knew from my neighbourhood, who we all respected, in TEARS and everybody in a really depressed state. People who didn't even follow football that much(ie my aunt) were talking about that incident. Those '73 fellas were fantastic ballmen...I have Haitian friends who to this day remember how Warren Archibald was terrorizing the wing. If we don't do anything for these fellas it would be shameful.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: Trini on November 28, 2005, 01:23:56 PM
So who u propose pay the $30,000 by 20 ($600,000TT) to send up the 1974 team to Germany just for nostalgia's sake?
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: Pointman on November 28, 2005, 01:34:20 PM
So who u propose pay the $30,000 by 20 ($600,000TT) to send up the 1974 team to Germany just for nostalgia's sake?

It could be any kind of formal, public acknowledgement not necessarily kick out that kind of money for them. Who said anything about sending them to Germany?
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: morvant on November 28, 2005, 01:41:49 PM
it is true that to know where youre going you have to know your history

but let 73,89 just be a reminder and leave it at that

lewwe stop dwelling in de past nah man

please doh cuss meh i young and stupid ;D
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: Pointman on November 28, 2005, 02:08:37 PM
it is true that to know where youre going you have to know your history

but let 73,89 just be a reminder and leave it at that

lewwe stop dwelling in de past nah man

please doh cuss meh i young and stupid ;D

ah doh think de issue is "dweeling" as it is "acknowledging" in a public setting. As you said we have to know our history. A lot of youthmen in Trini doh know these '73 players and for the one who know the '73 story they can put faces to names. Then we would finally be able to put '73 to rest.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: morvant on November 28, 2005, 02:10:34 PM
well i say we do somthing right b4 de first practice match on de field and honary dem fellers and them
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: Pointman on November 28, 2005, 02:27:34 PM
well i say we do somthing right b4 de first practice match on de field and honary dem fellers and them

dat would be ah good time. especially if dey playing a big team like Brazil or Argentine(FBD)*, or England.






*Fire Bun Dem
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: Socapro on November 28, 2005, 04:33:02 PM
well i say we do somthing right b4 de first practice match on de field and honary dem fellers and them

Great idea Morvant, I hope we do that for the BIG warmer game in T&T, the world will be watching so what better time to remind them that we deserved to reach World Cup since 1974 but got cheated!

Someone with some sway please pass this suggestion onto the TTFF!! They NEED to do this to show that we still remember and appreciate our football pioneers!
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: morvant on November 28, 2005, 04:33:46 PM
let we kill dem with email starting now ;D
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: Pointman on November 28, 2005, 05:46:28 PM
let we kill dem with email starting now ;D

post dey email address...ah go start dem.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: Disgruntled_Trini on November 28, 2005, 09:54:56 PM
FIFA should ah give we ah bly in 78 jes for that.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: pioneertrini on November 28, 2005, 10:08:33 PM
yeh all the players should be taken to germany and given 1st class hotel best seats vip treatment for all Trinidads matches. as a gesture by fifa of a bad decision by them if u wanna call it that from the past. i tink that would be a big story too, a team that qualified 32 years ago finally get to germany. its descusting that could ever happen and its a real pitty we still see it today. the one place were money and politics should have no say. is now the place that they dominate. boi they does fix presidential elections, world cup finals (brazil v France 98)  ;D nuttin safe again.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: BigToe on November 28, 2005, 10:10:23 PM
I knew that four goals were called back and the referees were banned for life. But, I never actually read or heard the details. What f**kery! FIFA should have intervened.

I was able to see Steve David play in the NASL, and, although, older was still a boss baller.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: lizzard1910 on November 29, 2005, 04:29:47 AM
lizzard by chance do you have access to a digital copy of the report?

right now: no  :(
but i'll contact the tv station and will check out if there's a chance to get it.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: lizzard1910 on November 29, 2005, 05:56:15 AM
lizzard by chance do you have access to a digital copy of the report?

right now: no  :(
but i'll contact the tv station and will check out if there's a chance to get it.

There's a video section on their website, but the report is not in it. I asked them to include it...Let's wait and see.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: dombasil on November 29, 2005, 05:58:18 AM
This is a little off de point but do any of you remember dr'Little Mikey' Sheppy was talking about. Dat man was used to come to every game in de savannah and give men real talk. Players used to fraid Mikey mouth.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: lizzard1910 on November 30, 2005, 09:44:59 AM
lizzard by chance do you have access to a digital copy of the report?

I got an answer from the TV sation: They say they cant put it on the website ??? >:( it's possible to buy a tape or a dvd of the whole show for € 40,- :cursing:
If I find the time, I'll put a translation of the written story they've published in the forum...
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: rastafari on November 30, 2005, 10:24:56 AM
This is a little off de point but do any of you remember dr'Little Mikey' Sheppy was talking about. Dat man was used to come to every game in de savannah and give men real talk. Players used to fraid Mikey mouth.

Yeah I remember him when i use to play football for burrokeets youth team and de sunday league team. Ah use to cuss him nuff times when i was indisciplined  but one thing though, he was the biggest critic and the biggest fan of all time in T&T football for me.
I is ah belmont man so i know all dem, sheppy included.

R.I.P SHORT MIKEY
We finally make it he go be  supporting we still that's for sure.

JAH BLESS RASTAFARI
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: Behbehman on November 30, 2005, 03:38:14 PM
In German TV there was a report about de Soca Warrioirs. Also about there history. The showed a match between Haiti and TT. TT scored 4 goals all of them were denied. The only mentioned that the referee was banned for lifetime. Anybody knows more about it? Who payed for the referee ans stuff? ???

If yuh doh know...buh it look like Haiti geh cuss from heaven because dey interfere with Jah people...Haiti is still the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere....God eh sleeping breds.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: Peong on November 30, 2005, 05:31:49 PM
lizzard by chance do you have access to a digital copy of the report?

I got an answer from the TV sation: They say they cant put it on the website ??? >:( it's possible to buy a tape or a dvd of the whole show for € 40,- :cursing:
If I find the time, I'll put a translation of the written story they've published in the forum...

Thanks for the effort lizzard, but don't bother to spend your money.
Title: Warner, Witchcraft and the 1974 World Cup Whipping Boys
Post by: Tallman on March 28, 2018, 09:17:59 PM
Warner, Witchcraft and the 1974 World Cup Whipping Boys
footballpink.net


Its one of those moments that you remember; well, I do anyway. Not quite a where were you when JFK sort of thing, and certainly much less of an event on the world stage, but something that stuck in my mind. Its a memory of a Haitian official, perhaps a trainer, a coach or similar; he may even have been a substitute I suppose. Im not sure of his precise role and it matters little, but he had a bright red Haitian tracksuit on. And there he was staring into the camera in Wild-eyed disbelief, doing what I can only describe as overexcited star jumps, surrounded by similarly attired celebrating colleagues, with a look of joy that his face simply seemed incapable of containing.

It was 15th June 1974 and the World Cup was being played out in West Germany. The game was at the Olympic Stadium in Munich and Italy, who had sauntered through their qualification group with sublime ease, were taking on the minnows of Haiti. The Caribbean countrys qualification had been a little more interesting than that of the Azzurri but much more of that later. So, what was the event that caused such euphoric celebrations on the touchline on that Munich evening?

It was the opening fixture of Group 4 of the tournament, and a game that Italy were overwhelmingly fancied to win comfortably. Not only had they come through the qualifying tournament unbeaten, not only were they one of the favourites to win the tournament, but their defence, complete with the legendary Dino Zoff in goal, had not conceded a goal since September 1972, comprising a total of ten games. Plus, when playing for Juventus, Zoff had kept the Old Lady of Turins sheets clean for over 900 minutes. Haiti were considered the most unlikely of candidates to sully that proud record. But, you know how it goes; this is football. Before we consider the events of the match however, lets wind back a little along the twisted tale of how Haiti came to be in Germany in the first place.

To be fair all things being equal, Haiti should really have taken their bow at footballs big party four years earlier. In the play-off for the last Concacaf qualifying spot at the 1970 World Cup Finals in Mexico, they had been pitted against El Salvador. In the previous round, the Central American country had fought a war against neighbouring Honduras whilst also engaging with them on the football pitch. The clash with Haiti was less dramatic at least in terms of armed conflict although there was a somewhat unusual outcome. Whilst the Salvadorians won 1-2 in Port au Prince, Haiti then travelled to the Central American mainland and secured a 0-3 victory. Unfortunately, no-one had thought to flag up that the tie should be decided on aggregate if each team won a game. Haiti were therefore denied the qualification that modern-day natural justice suggests should have been theirs. A third match to decide the final qualification was played out on neutral territory and El Salvador prevailed. The country from the western half of the island of old Hispaniola would have to put their ambitions on hold for at least another four years.

By the time the next qualification tournament rolled around, there had been a drastic overhaul of the process. Instead of a long drawn out affair, qualification was to be decided over a three-week period, with all aspirants competing in a single group, in one location, with Haiti selected as the venue for all games. Theres a labyrinthine tale about how the location was selected, but two facts are indisputable. Firstly, Haiti was then run by the despotic and corrupt regime of Baby Doc Duvalier, who had inherited the family business from his father Papa Doc. Duvalier junior had resolved that this time his countrys team would not be left with noses pressed against the window whilst others went to the big party. He would do what was necessary to get his country to the World Cup Finals. With the qualification being played out within his own private fiefdom, and the widely feared Tonton Macoutes secret police to do his bidding, he was set to achieve his aims, but also had more than a little largesse to spread around if it would lubricate things.

The second fact is that the Trinidad & Tobago FA was headed up by the hugely influential and, some might say equally despotic and corrupt, general secretary, Jack Warner. This time of course was some forty-odd years before the torrential outpouring of FIFA misdemeanours, so many a misdeed was hidden and would stay that way. It would of course be wrong to insinuate that the aspirations of Baby Doc, or the actions of Warner had any unsavoury influence on who qualified from Concacaf, but in the light of the selection for where the games where to be played, and the  events that followed, I guess its for each of us to draw our own conclusions.

Baby Doc apparently decided that throwing a chunk of his ill-gotten financial gains at his aspirations would be a good way to smooth the path to success. Joe Namphy, who headed the Haitian Football Federation at the time, explained that a special bank account was set up for the federation He financed the whole show, including the national Sylvio Cator Stadium, which was totally refurbished for the 1973 Concacaf at the cost of a million dollars. He also built the Olympic Track and Centre Sportif de Carrefour, and the Gymnasium Vincent for basketball. He was almost like Berlusconi at AC Milan. He was in complete control of things. Player, Manno Sannon whose exploits were later to create excited emotions in Germany adds that He made it clear that it was his team, and his money which got us to where we were. He was much more accessible than his father, and hed show up to training, and regularly phoned me and several of the other players to check that we were OK. Some of the guys felt it was dangerous to have Jean Claude (Duvalier) too close to the team. Although he was young, he was still like an old fashioned father, who gave us life, but could also punish us if he wished. Theres more than a hint of perceived threat in Sannons words. Baby Docs carrot was dangling from the end of a very big stick, and he had the Tonton Macoute to wield it on his whim.

All of the qualifying tournaments games were played at the Sylvio Cator stadium in Port au Prince; a cauldron filled to boiling point by 30,000 people when the home nation played. Sannon related how the atmosphere helped the Haitian squad along. The crowd made a huge noise, and intimidated the opposition. Games in Central America and the Caribbean can always be vocal, but this got fairly toxic at times, with objects thrown onto the pitch and at rival players, and there were stories of opposition players getting hassled in car parks. It wasnt something any of us would condone, but it happened, and I cant deny that it helped us. The last sentence is indicative of the fact perhaps Duvalier was less than prepared to let fate take its natural course in the games.

Did such antics prevail? Its difficult to discern the effects, but the players were certainly influenced. Jean Austin, a midfielder in the team related that, Those three weeks were the most incredible I can remember in Port Au Prince. After every victory in the tournament, there were carnivals in the streets, and the whole place came to a virtual standstill.

The tournaments pivotal match-up was between the hosts and the highly-fancied Trinidad and Tobago, played on 4th December. Trinidadian striker, and the the tournaments leading scorer, Steve David, charged that the dictator had enlisted malevolent forces to his aid, Dark arts enabled Haiti to get through that. You cant tell me that that game was fair and above board. Its unclear just how far these arts influenced events, but theres little dispute that government-sponsored cheerleaders were employed to whip support for the team into a frenzy with drums and megaphones beating out the need for victory. Witchdoctors were also placed amongst the fans to conjure up evil spirits and incantations. Such things may sound a little bizarre, but Haiti was the home of voodoo, and perception trumps reality every time.

The game finished with a 2-1 victory for the hosts, but only after four seemingly legitimate goals for the Trinidadians had been strangely disallowed for nefarious reasons, and two clear penalty claims were rejected. These things happen of course, and its possible that Haiti were just the recipients of good fortune. Their opponents however were, by common consent, the best team in the tournament and to say the result was unexpected probably does it scant justice. Most of the Trinidadians were clearly less than happy.

Steve David, later said, It was as though we were in a trance. We felt we could score at will so we didnt argue, we just continued playing every time they disallowed one of our goals. We were so sure that we could not lose. It was a feeling echoed by Oliver Camps, a Trinidadian official, who described how big men were crying like babies (after the game). I dont know which match the referee and linesman were seeing but it certainly wasnt the one between Haiti and Trinidad and Tobago.

In such circumstances one would surely expect some kind of protest from the top brass of the Trinidadian FA. There was however one member of the entourage who kept his thoughts very much to himself. Mr Jack Warner, General Secretary of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association, the man charged with looking after the welfare and interests of his team chose to remain silent. Some reports suggest that such a non-response was the result of a purchased silence. Unsurprisingly perhaps, no real evidence of any collusion came to light. Recent revelations of disloyal payments amongst footballs hierarchy however, may offer support to such views. Then, to compound the issue, the referee and both linesmen were banned from officiating in games for life. Mr Warner still however chose to sit his ample girth on his hands and say nothing to support his teams feelings of resentment. Who knows why? Some think they do. Only Mexico chose to officially complain about the game, perhaps prescient about the way things would pan out. The result could well have cost them qualification. It was an action doomed to failure, but the gesture speaks loudly of what they, and others, believed had happened.

On the 13th December, Haiti played a key game against Guatemala. After defeating Trinidad and Tobago, a win would put them in a strong position. The crunch game was against Guatemala Austin recalled. Before the game Duvalier was in the dressing room urging us to Win, win, win for Haiti. And we did just that. Sannon spoke of how he sank to my knees and thanked God. He mentions nothing of any thanks due to Baby Doc Duvalier.

The following day, the Trinidad and Tobago players apparently took their frustration out against hapless Mexico, defeating them 4-0. The result meant that Haiti where in the comfortable position of being able to lose their last game against the Mexicans, still win the tournament and qualify, with the Trinidadians in second place. Whatever shenanigans had or had not taken place, the Haitians were on their way to Germany to compete in footballs global extravaganza. Trinidad and Tobago left Port au Prince feeling bewildered. Mexico left feeling cheated. Jack Warner left quietly. Baby Doc Duvalier was left feeling vindicated.

Some months later, the Haiti squad flew out to Germany to take their place amongst the worlds elite footballing countries. If they left the Caribbean with any optimism however, it was unmatched by many pundits. For example, having observed the squad in training, Hugh McIlvanney of The Observer suggested that, despite having a six month period given over to preparation for the tournament, The marking by defenders is so haphazard as to suggest a fundamental weakness. It is easy to imagine hefty scores being piled up against them in the World Cup.

It was not an assessment disputed by one particular unnamed player who, whilst happy to discuss his teams prospects in the tournament, was more sanguine about revealing his identity. The reputation of the Tonton Macoutes, probably explains the recalcitrance. Admitting that his team had no chance, he went on to comment that, For us to take on the countries we are facing is like Haiti declaring war on the US. We have 11 good players. Poland, Italy and Argentina have maybe 4,000. It is all very well to say the game is played with 11 players but no one is fooled by such thoughts. So there it was Haiti took the pitch against Italy in their opening group game, and so back to a certain excitable Haitian.

Despite fairly consistent Italian pressure, a combination of luck determination and an outstanding display by the athletic and acrobatic Haitian goalkeeper Henry Fancillon, the score at the break was still goalless. Then, one minute after the restart, and 1,143 after last conceding a goal, Manno Sannon took the curtain call for his fifteen minutes of fame. Receiving a pass from Phillipe Vorbe, he shook off the attentions of Spinosi, drew Zoff, slipped by him and coolly slotted the ball home. Haiti 1 Italy 0. Cue celebrations on the touchline in Munich with red tracksuited Haitians jumping with joy, and the guy I remember looking wildly into the camera with a face about to explode with joy.

Sannons fame probably lasted a lot less than fifteen minutes in reality. Just half a dozen minutes later, Rivera netted the equaliser, before goals by Benetti and Anastasi brought a semblance of reality to the result. In the other group games Haiti lost 7-0 to Poland and 4-1 to Argentina, with Sannon again scoring. They finished rock bottom of the group table with zero points having scored twice and shipped 14.

When the squad returned to the Caribbean, its safe to say that there were no wild celebrations and some reports even hint at Baby Doc prescribing treatment of his own to those he felt let down the country, and more particularly him. Manno Sannon went to America, playing in Miami and San Diego. Duvalier was eventually overthrown in 1985, and briefly fled to exile in France before returning to the island and promptly being arrested five years ago. He died after a heart attack in October 2014. Jack Warner of course had a Teflon coating around his reputation until recent events ripped open the door of serial misdeeds. Whether a light will ever be shone on the seemingly perverse events that took Haiti to the 1970 World Cup Finals however is a different question.
Title: Re: T&T vs Haiti 1974
Post by: royal on April 01, 2018, 07:01:49 PM
Interesting article. Yes, I was there at that game in the stadium and did see that game in 1973. Thinking back at it today, I probably would have given T&T 2 of those 4 goals that were disallowed but not all 4. 2 out of them that I remembered until today the reason they were disallowed. During a corner kick,  T&T to have score on a header  and the referee disallowed it but after the the game,  Haitian goaly claim that a T&T player held him from both sides of his short and wouldn't allowed him to jump to go after the ball and the referee did notice it. Goal was disallowed.  The second one,  the ball went out of play / bounce in favor of T&T, during a free hand throw , a T&T player with a powerful hand throw and got the ball pass the Haitian defense and into the empty net. T&T players claim that the ball had touched 2 Haitian defenders / players leg or jersey before crossing the goal line but referee  and line-men thought otherwise. To conclude, yes , I would of given 2 out of the 4 goals for a 3-2 win against Haiti. But then again, by the time Haiti played  last game against Mexico and lost 1-0, they had already qualified for the world cup and played their bench players that day. Had T&T  won against Haiti, Haiti would have played their full team against Mexico in the last game and could also have won against Mexico and still made it to the world cup. So even with a win against Haiti, Mexico still had to beat Haiti for T&T to get in..

I saw the game and no one can convince me that baby doc didn't have a hand.I agree not all the goals were goals but many pundits only found that one of the goals was off side.There were concerns in Concacaf before the tournament about his involvement. This is why Mexico protested the game,there fears came through .Why were the referees ban for life ?