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1
Football / Re: Alvin Corneal Articles
« on: Yesterday at 12:03:02 PM »
Please save our football.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).

If the present ad­min­is­tra­tors are not ca­pa­ble of do­ing as stat­ed above, please give oth­ers an op­por­tu­ni­ty be­fore our foot­ball reach­es a state where it is un­re­pairable like has been the cas­es in Zim­bab­we and Egypt where they are now lit­er­al­ly beg­ging the FI­FA to in­ter­vene to solve prob­lems which will help their foot­ball change its course of di­rec­tion and im­prove their com­pe­ti­tion blue­print.

TT football is already at this stage. No professional football for 12 months, clubs ejected from continental competitions due to our glorious leader's inability to fill in bloody paper work, collapse of positive progress on the league, total disregard for the new constitution, fractures in the board that sees factionalism win over football, and they expected big attendances? I mean they're higher than the Pro League ever got, but there's precious little local attachment for a number of these clubs - why beg a community that you're not part of? We're rapidly reaching "scrap the whole bloody lot and rebuild" territory.

Would it interest you to know that ...?

Under the Glorious Leader's watch, the TTFA is ONE of only three FIFA member associations within CONCACAF NOT to have been responsive to requested submissions from FIFA regarding reporting on club licensing and related club data.

The TTFA holds that honour with Montserrat and SVG.

Would it interest you to know that ...?

This absence of diligence came significantly before the exclusion from the CONCACAF Champions League ... and was not directly related to that sanction ... HOWEVER, had the Glorious Leader been attentive to the appropriate conditions on the ground in the office, the TTFA would have recognized that omission (or commission, assuming that the non-compliance was not instructed) as a harbinger of things and might have avoided the embarrassment.

One has to applaud the imagination of the Glorious Leader though ... not facilitating reporting when licensing and reporting go hand in hand.

It's notable that ... (let me quote with specificity) ... "... a number of reminders were sent ..." in this regard.

Between 2017 and 2019 there was more than ample time for the Glorious Leader to put his house in order ... yet still the Letters to the Editor flow singing the Glorious Leader's praises. Building one Home, yet mashing up the one yuh live in must be a thing to be applauded.

Was Ms. Lynch scapegoated and dismissed merely because W Connection was one of the clubs that suffered DJW's self-inflicted wound? After all, other screw-ups have gone unpunished.

2
General Discussion / Re: Dr. Frederick (Howard University)
« on: Yesterday at 10:40:15 AM »
NBA superstar Stephen Curry gives Howard University the gift of golf
By Wesley Lesley and Candace Buckner, The Washington Post


Following a January screening of “Emanuel,” a documentary about the deadly 2015 shooting of nine black worshipers at a church in Charleston, S.C., a throng of Howard University students jockeyed for handshakes and selfies with the film’s executive producer, NBA star Stephen Curry.

Otis Ferguson, then a junior at Howard, hung back for a moment before catching the ear of the Golden State Warriors guard.

“Hey Steph!” Ferguson called out. “Let’s get in a round of golf before you leave.”

It was a well-calculated shot: In addition to being a three-time NBA champion, two-time MVP and perhaps the best shooter ever, Curry is a passionate golfer.

Ferguson didn’t hit the links with Curry, but they did engage in a brief conversation about their mutual love of the sport. In fact, Ferguson said, he had turned down an offer to play collegiately to attend Howard, which, like many historically black colleges and universities, doesn’t have a golf team.

That chat made such an impression on Curry that he returned to Washington on Monday to announce that he is sponsoring the creation of men’s and women’s golf teams at Howard — bringing competitive golf to the university for the first time in decades.

“To hear somebody as passionate about the game as I was, all the while still pursuing their education at Howard … impacted me,” Curry said in an interview Saturday.

At Monday’s announcement, he set expectations high.

“This is going to go way beyond the game of golf, way beyond Howard,” Curry said. “This is huge.”

The cost of a collegiate golf program, including both operating expenses and scholarships, can add up to hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. While declining to reveal the exact amount, Curry’s team said he will make a seven-figure donation paid out over the next six years, aimed at giving Howard time to raise an endowed fund that would make the program self-sustainable.

“We haven’t had people do that for athletics,” Howard President Wayne A.I. Frederick said at Monday’s news conference about Curry’s donation, which was described as one of the most generous in the historically black university’s 152-year history. “It’s significant. That’s the argument I’ve been trying to make since I assumed the presidency … this is one of America’s best investments. HBCUs, the return on the investment has been incredible for the country.

“[Curry] has celebrity but I hope that what people will get out of this story is his integrity, his purpose, his motivation behind doing these things.”

Curry himself championed the effects of sport.

“No matter where you come from or what socioeconomic background you had, we all were that kid once upon a time that was just excited about finding out who they were as a person through athletics,” said Curry, who is encouraging these players to make an impact, as well. The student-athletes who join Howard’s golf program also will agree to volunteer in Greater Washington with Eat. Learn. Play., a foundation run by Curry and his wife, Ayesha, that encourages healthy development in children.

For decades, Howard had a Division II team, which university officials believe was discontinued in the 1970s. The new program being financed by Curry is believed to be the first time Howard will have a Division I golf program in the university’s history.

Over the course of those six years, Frederick said the program will have time to grow and assess its competitiveness in Division I golf — the men will play in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference while the women must play independently since there are no women’s golf programs in the conference.

When the program launches for the 2020-21 season, it will have a coach and three scholarship athletes, two women and one man. The Bison teams will be outfitted by Under Armour, the shoe company that sponsors Curry, and play with equipment provided by Callaway Golf. University officials say it will also take about a year to figure out where the golf teams will practice and play. One option, they hope, will be Langston Golf Course, the District’s historic black golf course — named for John Mercer Langston, Howard Law School’s first dean and Virginia’s first black congressman. Curry’s announcement Monday was held at the course in Northeast Washington.

“It’s a big opportunity for us to expose students to a game that oftentimes is played as business deals are decided and a game that generations of families can play together,” Frederick said.

Curry’s announcement comes as the sport — more than 20 years after Tiger Woods became the first black golfer to win the Masters — continues to see deep diversity struggles: The PGA Tour is nearly as white today as it was in the 1980s, a number of historic black golf courses across the nation have shuttered, and golf programs at HBCUs are struggling to survive.

Observers and historians note that while there have always been black golfers and caddies, the sport requires too much money and space to be accessible to many black children.

“It’s not a sport that is cheap for people to play, you have to travel long distances to get to golf courses, and golfers don’t get all of the ballyhoo that basketball and football players get,” said Calvin Sinnette, author of “Forbidden Fairways: African Americans and the Game of Golf” and a retired professor at Howard’s medical school.

“As a result,” he added, “the game doesn’t attract many young black people.”

Most often, it’s a sport passed down from parents to their children, which was the case for Ferguson, who spent his boyhood in Bloomfield Hills, Mich., swinging a set of plastic golf clubs, eager to join his father on the green.

He was playing competitively by middle school and made the varsity team his freshman year of high school.

That same year he took a trip to Howard, where his father and uncle had gone, as well as all three of his older sisters and several cousins. Captivated by Howard’s homecoming, Ferguson decided at 14 he would someday enroll, too.

But attending Howard would mean giving up competitive golf.

Few HBCUs prioritize golf programs, instead focusing the bulk of their resources and scholarships on sports more likely to generate revenue, such as football and basketball. Out of more than 100 HBCUs in the country, about 30 have golf programs — and none have their own golf courses on campus, Sinnette said.

“I think black collegiate golf is going to die unless we come up with another Tiger Woods,” said Eddie Payton, who coached Jackson State University’s golf program, among the best in the nation, for 30 years. In 2017, just one year after Payton retired, the university announced it would disband the golf program.

“It broke my heart,” Payton said. “It’s a damn shame that our university leaders don’t see the value.”

During the spring of his sophomore year at Howard, Ferguson posted fliers suggesting the formation of a campus golf group. He was unsure of what to expect, but nearly 40 people showed up. It took until the following fall for Ferguson to work out the logistics, and by the time Curry arrived in January, the club had begun figuring out where it would practice.

Curry was now squatted in front of him, offering to help in any way he could and providing his email address.

They touched base once, then Curry suddenly stopped responding. It was basketball season, of course. Ferguson decided to keep sending updates.

He emailed Curry to say he had found sponsors for the golf club and to cover the cost of tee times. He sent additional messages as the club competed in each of its first two tournaments. He emailed again to relay that he had had a short conversation with the university president, who seemed receptive to the idea of expanding the golf club into an official team.

Still having not heard back, Ferguson sent a fifth and final email to Curry in May, to congratulate him on the Warriors winning the Western Conference finals. Still nothing.

But Curry had been reading the emails and was determined to figure out how he could bankroll a golf program at Howard.

Like Ferguson, Curry picked up golf from his father, former NBA player Dell Curry, first joining him on the course when he was about 10, then spending three years on his high school golf team.

“I was blessed at a young age that we could afford to play,” said Curry, who launched a mini-golf reality show on ABC this summer and is a frequent golf partner of former president Barack Obama. “I just think about how many kids, especially from underserved communities, have the talent to play but just don’t have the funds or the resources.”

Once the NBA season had wrapped, Curry’s team reached out to officials at Howard to ask what it would take to restart the program.

“It was sort of a jolt for us,” said Kery Davis, Howard’s athletic director, adding that university leaders had in the past discussed the idea of reviving the golf program.

“Golf has always been a game of privilege,” Davis said. “An association with the sport can break down barriers.”

University administrators began working with Curry’s representatives to figure out what it would take to sponsor a team and whether it was possible to get things in place before the coming fall semester. Amid the flurry of calls to work out details, they realized that in the scramble, no one had told Ferguson.

He finally found out from a message on Instagram sent by Jeron Smith, a former Howard basketball player who now runs Curry’s media business.

“I don’t know what you said,” Smith wrote to Ferguson, “but you inspired Stephen.”

The next day, the long-awaited phone call finally happened.

“I don’t know how to describe how I felt when I realized the power of that moment,” Ferguson recalled. “I was pretty much speechless.”

On Monday, he finally got in that round with Curry. As temperatures surged past 90, Curry readied to play with Frederick, Ferguson and others.

“There’s no secret how much golf is a passion of mine and again, how much I learned about the game,” Curry said. “I hope [this donation] encourages people in terms of just being authentic about what they want to do and how they can create opportunities to give back.”


5
Football / Re: David John Williams Thread.
« on: August 22, 2019, 03:41:43 PM »
I thought it was going to be satire when I start to read

Yuh didn't make out DJW starring as George Orwell's Napoleon? 

Yuh know how it goes, all losses are recast as victories and all screw-ups are buried as bumps in the road. Clearly this is the best football administration in history.

6
Football / Re: David John Williams Thread.
« on: August 22, 2019, 06:31:49 AM »
In defence of TTFA president Williams
T&T Newsday


THE EDITOR: Many uncomplimentary things have been said of the TTFA and articles written by the same journalists in different newspapers. I sometimes wonder if we live in the same country.

Reference here is strictly to David John Williams (DJW), esteemed president of the vitriolic TTFA. All DJW has done in his four years as head is to provide the leadership so absent in our country by delivering – and not old talk and lacouray.

After inheriting an asset of $147,000 and millions of dollars in debt and unpaid bills after 100 years of the TTFA, he now has delivered assets to the TTFA of close to $120 million.

He has in the Couva Sports City brought on stream the only revenue-generating sports facility in the country. Go see the sports and entertainment centre, the hotel, the TTFA Home of Football.

In 100 years of football we never had a home. We were kicked out of premises a couple years ago with not even an orphanage to go to.

Due to his unrelenting voluntary efforts which entailed many sleepless nights and an abundance of abuse from certain individuals, he was finally able to get a financial audit done for FIFA, which previous administrations failed to produce for reasons best known to them.

Out of this piece of work came the resurrection of the good name of the T&T Football Association, which had been dragged through the mud in previous international scandals.

This audit cleared the way for FIFA to trust DJW with the flagship project of FIFA of designing and building the Home of Football. This project did not go to Jamaica or Mexico or the Bahamas.

When one considers that the Chinese did not do this but locals and in one year, we have to wonder why the verbal venom is directed towards DJW just for doing such a great job. This project is a dream come true for local football, for the future of this country.

One has to wonder if the petty North vs South nonsense is at play here as the journalists who persist in their pious design in the persecution campaign which they wage against him all come from the North and, as I understand, are friends of some of the previous administrators who once again seek to put the TTFA back in a dark hole. DJW is from Santa Flora and went to Naps.

We are all too happy to sing the praises of outsiders yet when people we know, we have taught, we meet in church, we play mas and party with, visit at Christmas and Divali and Eid etc, our own family, we go out of our way to destroy their work and trivialise their achievements. We insult them and get their friends in the media to wage a campaign against them.

DJW has done it. Whatever his methods, he has delivered a world class facility within budget and on time – and despite court injunctions and orchestrated frustrations and innuendoes about irregularities, all of which have been proven to be lies.

So the next time you see a negative article about David John Williams, think and ask your self why.

VAL RAMSINGH via e-mail

I guess each week from now until November we are going to be treated to submissions of this kind. They all have the same characteristic pattern and tone and curiously echo the TTFA president's cadence in interviews and conversations.

Whatever his methods, huh?

Incidentally, Homes of Football were not invented by David John-Williams. They exist all across the world in various forms. I've had the fortune of having been to several and all have had their share of detracting voices, politicization and financial transparency concerns. We are not on novel ground.

Ideally, FIFA wants each member association to have its own home and field of dreams. There isn't a bidding war among federations to secure one. ("This project did not go to Jamaica or Mexico or the Bahamas.) And Mexico, for one, is not lacking in this area. It has an impressive facility in Toluca tucked away from public view. The writer is disingenuously attempting to give the impression that T&T received some special bounty. We did not. We are late in the dance because we forfeited the excellent centre we had.

Here's a question an inquiring mind should ask: how state of the art is the Home of Football?

If DJW knew that the responsibility of being TTFA president was beyond his competence perhaps he should have petitioned to focus on contributing to infrastructural projects. In some ways he would have been a better general-secretary than he has been president.

Speaking of irregularities, here's another question for an inquiring mind: when DJW conducts TTFA business via his personal email account how indicative of accountability and best practice is that? How would anyone else in the organization obtain an appreciation of those aspects of official business? How is a successor to treat with those gaps in information?

And on the North vs South divide, have you missed the stones DJW threw into this arena? Surely you jest.

7
Football / Re: 2019 T&T Pro League Thread
« on: August 21, 2019, 06:00:18 PM »
This is laughable stuff, particularly the second paragraph:

Quote
Were the Pro League teams ever serious about supporting the T-League? One club owner, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said he was always hesitant about throwing his lot in with the TTSL; and he thinks he was not alone.

“What do Super League clubs know about raising money and running professional football?” he asked. “We have been doing this for years but they don’t really believe in professional football. They want to drag us down to their level …”

https://wired868.com/2019/08/21/pro-league-and-ttsl-go-separate-ways-as-t-league-hopes-fade-guardian-3-million-claim-refuted/

8
Football / Re: 2019 T&T Pro League Thread
« on: August 21, 2019, 04:20:52 PM »
I think he is saying not to grant the subvention under the condition that the PRO League takes the US$500 and separate themselves from the T-League.

Ok! Is this nightmare happening for truth?

Hence the foreshadowing of this comment:

"The T&T Pro League brass are said to be seeking to identify ways in which to honor Richard Fakoory. Agreeing with him or not, one less than elaborate way to do so would be to honor Richard by recalling his voice in future discussions and by injecting his perspective into issues mooted for discussion. Richard Fakoory’s legacy merits at least that."

9
Football / Re: 2019 T&T Pro League Thread
« on: August 21, 2019, 09:35:58 AM »
Pro League gets $3M sponsor, T-League in trouble.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


A US$500,000 spon­sor­ship is set to put a new­ly-re­brand­ed T&T Pro League on track soon, a source close to the League has re­vealed on Tues­day.

Guardian Me­dia Sports was re­li­ably in­formed that the new­found spon­sor­ship, from a lo­cal or­ga­ni­za­tion, could lead to the aban­don­ment of the UE­FA/FI­FA-pro­posed T-League which has strug­gled to get the fund­ing from the Min­istry of Sports and Youth Af­fairs and the FI­FA For­ward Project.

It is un­cer­tain why monies from the Min­istry of Sports have not been forth­com­ing af­ter min­is­ter Sham­fa Cud­joe made it clear ap­proval has al­ready been giv­en for its re­lease to clubs.

Ac­cord­ing to the source, a meet­ing of the pro league clubs will be held to­day at 10 am at the of­fice of the Home of Foot­ball in Bal­main Cou­va, to de­cide if the pro league will pro­ceed on its own with some of the ini­tia­tives of the UE­FA and FI­FA.

The meet­ing will al­so seek to de­cide on the prize struc­ture for the pro league, a new name for the league, the for­mat and a start­ing date.

If the Pro League gets go­ing, then a call will be made by pro league clubs for the aban­don­ment of the foot­ball com­mis­sion, which was cre­at­ed to steer T&T foot­ball in­to the new era of the T-League.

Ac­cord­ing to the source, the ma­jor­i­ty of the clubs are in favour of the Pro League go­ing it alone. They al­so be­lieve the time has come for the pro league to have its own sec­ond di­vi­sion tour­na­ment, which could fit in­to the as­pi­ra­tions of the UE­FA and FI­FA rec­om­men­da­tions high­light­ed in the T-League.

Last week this news­pa­pers re­port­ed re­cent­ly that the T&T Su­per League clubs were lob­by­ing the or­gan­is­ers of the As­cen­sion In­vi­ta­tion­al Foot­ball League to play a sec­ond round of com­pe­ti­tion, as stat­ed by the spon­sors of the League at its launch two months ago.

How­ev­er, the source ex­plained that clubs are against this re­quest, as they be­lieve it was be­ing done by a group with an agen­da to desta­bi­lize the sport be­cause of its de­sire to seek gov­er­nance of the sport lat­er on this year.

"There is a heavy dis­trust for su­per league clubs and its chair­man Kei­th Look Loy be­cause of a per­ceived agen­da ahead of the T&T Foot­ball As­so­ci­a­tion Elec­tions in No­vem­ber. If this group gets its way, then its mem­bers will make TTFA pres­i­dent David John-Williams and na­tion­al coach Den­nis Lawrence look bad, for them to look like sav­iours of lo­cal foot­ball," the source said.

The source la­belled the As­cen­sion league as a glo­ri­fied Mi­nor League, de­signed for Ter­minix La Hor­quet­ta Rangers to win, say­ing the La Hor­quet­ta based club which took over the fran­chise of St Ann's Rangers just over a year ago, is the on­ly club that will play all its match­es at home.

From the 10 pro league clubs, Guardian Me­dia Sports un­der­stand that on­ly one team- Club San­do, has come out in sup­port of an ex­tend­ed round to the As­cen­sion League. How­ev­er, pro league clubs have al­ready dis­cussed among them­selves, that su­per league con­tenders Cunu­pia FC will be an ad­e­quate re­place­ment for Club San­do in the Pro League.



The quality of the Ascension league is an entirely separate issue from whether it should enter a second round of play. The Ascension league is neither a panacea nor a threat. Try not to pretend that its influence extends beyond its restricted appeal.

None of the ingredients needed to save local football are to be found anywhere in this article.

A cult of personality won't save local football. Fearmongering won't save local football. Propaganda won't save local football. Protecting turf won't save local football. Casting good advice aside won't save local football. Nor will constructing buildings nor $500,000 US. Nor the government subvention.

What's more important dear Pro League? A Reserve League or a second division competition? Feeding a starving infant bread or water?

Destabilize the sport?  :rotfl: Is anyone paying attention? Dahis already a fait accompli. We are there!

10
Football / Re: 2019 T&T Pro League Thread
« on: August 21, 2019, 01:13:04 AM »
Shamfa, your obligation as Minister is to insist on the consolidation of the T-league or to withhold the subvention.

Proper public policy and the public interest supersede short-term self-interested determinations that do not mesh with the medium to longer-term viability of first-class and professional football in Trinidad and Tobago.

If the Pro League "brain trust" are willing to sacrifice vision, and confound common sense, informed by clutching at $500,000 US, view this as a first step in weaning them off the public teat.

And, by the way, it is not the role of the Pro League to act as a proxy for the perceived political preservation of a TTFA president or to act as a buffer to protect the job security and image of the national team coach.

If indeed it is, the operational architecture of football is both poorly designed for success and sustainability and artificially girded with protections against conflicts of interest.

That being the case, we should, all declare 'lost ball' and go home, or, end the small goal football that is "charading" as as a big objective project.

Grant the subvention under these circumstances if your Government is willing to have a legacy of coronating the TTFA president and endorsing ill-informed decisional destinations.

11
Football / Re: Home of Football Thread
« on: August 20, 2019, 08:19:59 PM »
Aye, Babsy ...

12
Football / Re: Thread in Honour of Retiring Players
« on: August 20, 2019, 10:22:10 AM »
Fernando Torres to pay homage to Atletico Madrid in final game of his career
Arturo J. Caballero, Marca


Fernando Torres will hang up his boots on August 23 during a match against Vissel Kobe, who have his friends Andres Iniesta and David Villa in their ranks, and the striker has played a role in deciding which shirt the Sagan Tosu players will wear.

The strip, which emulates Atletico Madrid's Puma kit from the 1990s, will mean that Torres will be able to pay homage to the team of his heart, despite being halfway across the world.It remains to be seen if Torres will return to Atleti after retiring in a non-playing capacity.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/iVUaIWzEtBM" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/iVUaIWzEtBM</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/CvXhnozCVfU" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/CvXhnozCVfU</a>


Speaking with Javier Matallanas of as.com about the most important goal he scored:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/qRLbzpy1y8Y" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/qRLbzpy1y8Y</a>

"It’s the goal that changed my career. What’s more, it was after my best footballing year which was at Liverpool. That group of players, we changed the history of Spanish football and it fell to me to have the luck of scoring the goal in the final. At the time you don’t realise you’ve scored the most important goal you’re going to score in your career. With time, you do realise. It didn’t just change my life, it changed the dynamic of the Spanish team, it takes you to another level as a player, they value you differently. It’s a key moment, a before and after moment."

[What other goals would you pick from your career?]

The one in Vienna, of course. My first goal when I came back to Atleti for my second spell, because of the opponents, to score again wearing that shirt, what it meant at the time. I always talk about the goal in the other final of the European Championships in 2012, which seems like it never happened. The goal in Vienna is so important that it seems like in the final in 2012 I never scored, both that goal and the pass to Juan Mata, they are moments I value in my career. And of course the final goal in an Atleti shirt, because there’ll never be any more.



13
Football / Re: Women's Football Discussion Thread
« on: August 20, 2019, 09:24:52 AM »
After concussions ended her soccer career, a former star is helping girls avoid a similar fate
By Roman Stubbs, The Washington Post


It was a short drive she had made countless times, from her home in Maryland’s Frederick County to a secluded soccer field 30 minutes away, yet Brittni Souder still needed a GPS to guide her black Honda Pilot there early one morning in July. A 15-year-old female soccer player met her there, eager for another private lesson from the 27-year-old Souder in a sport that had already taken so much from both of them.

Souder grabbed a bag of soccer balls and adjusted her prescription sunglasses, the ones she rarely takes off even indoors, because after the six diagnosed concussions she suffered as a high school and college player, simple vision was a daily problem. Everything now seemed like a daily problem, including this 90-degree sun, which just a few years ago might have shut her body down completely.

But memory loss was the worst part of her life after playing, so she whipped out a white card and read aloud directions to her pupil on this July morning. The 15-year-old was working her way back from a concussion of her own, joining the girls’ soccer players across the country who are suffering from traumatic brain injuries at an alarming rate, nearly as rapidly as high school football players.

Souder herself suffered a traumatic brain injury while playing soccer — part of a growing and perplexing challenge that some of the sport’s leaders and medical officials view as a crisis — and had designed custom drills as part of her pupil’s rehabilitation. For nearly an hour their injuries had not come up, not until the end of the workout, after they practiced kicking the ball into the upper corners of the net. The girl asked Souder whether she could head the ball in.

“Why head it?” Souder replied. “What’s the point?”

Girls who play soccer really need to be aware
About two weeks earlier, Souder sat in a sports bar near her home, watching the U.S. women’s national team’s World Cup title-game victory over the Netherlands. She had once dreamed of playing on such a stage, but she remembered this game for the worst reasons.

She watched as U.S. player Becky Sauerbrunn went up for an aerial challenge and came down with blood dripping down her face. Souder excused herself from the table because she had grown nauseous. She needed to leave.

It wasn’t so unlike the jarring hits she had taken as a rising star at Walkersville High and later a starting center-back at Division III Hood College, where by 2015 her career had ended with six concussions, two neck surgeries and a life spinning out of control. She was among the approximately 300,000 adolescents who suffer concussions while participating in organized sports every year. In matched sports, girls are 12.1 percent more likely to suffer a concussion than boys, a 2017 study by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons found.

It also concluded that female soccer players are more likely to suffer a concussion than male football players — and are three times more likely to suffer a traumatic brain injury than male soccer players.
“What was very surprising was that girls’ soccer was just as impactful as boys’ football. We did not expect to see that,” said Wellington Hsu, an orthopedic surgeon at Northwestern who led the study. “Girls who play soccer really need to be aware of these issues. These symptoms and having a second concussion is sequentially worse from the first one.”

Concussions make up nearly 27 percent of injuries in girls’ soccer, according to Hsu’s study, yet there is no conclusive answer as to why. Some in the medical field have pointed to the fact that girls’ neck muscles are not as developed as those of boys, leading to the susceptibility of more head injuries. Other have blamed heading the ball — and collisions resulting from players attempting headers — as a culprit. In 2015, U.S. Soccer, which governs the sport across the country, introduced new guidelines for headers and banned the practice for youth participants 10 years old and younger.

“I’m not sure that’s solving anything, because I think once you get to the age of 12 … you could easily hurt yourself heading the ball at a high speed if you don’t know what the proper technique is,” Hsu said.

This issue was back in the spotlight during the World Cup after former U.S. national team members Brandi Chastain and Michelle Akers announced they would participate in a Boston University study of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which is most often associated with football players who have taken constant blows to the head. No female athlete has been diagnosed with CTE, which can only be confirmed through autopsy. Akers and Chastain have publicly expressed concern about memory loss in the years since they retired from soccer.

Hsu said the number of concussions in women’s soccer continues to rise each year, part of which is a result of growing awareness.

“We have not seen a plateau,” he said. “We have not seen anything tail off as far as incidents with this problem.”

She was in denial about how bad it really was
It’s difficult for Souder to pinpoint what caused so much damage to her brain. Beginning at age 8, she begged her mother to spend hours in the backyard throwing the ball in the air so she could redirect it with her head. She suffered one diagnosed concussion in high school but suspected three others because of collisions. During the first three months of her junior season in college, she suffered three diagnosed concussions, each from a different kind of violent play. She was cleared medically after each, but each precipitated the next.

“I honestly had not grasped the seriousness of concussions up until that point,” she said.

By the next season, after her first game back, Souder was in the emergency room and placed on a beta blocker to manage her heart rate, which was in the 30s. A couple of days later, at a concert with her family, she crumpled to the ground with migraines, clutching her head with both hands. She was carried out of the venue by her stepfather and cousin.

She didn’t know what was happening. She began to have an electrical, burning sensation in her jaw and temple. The right side of her face went numb. By that October, doctors diagnosed her with trigeminal neuralgia, which is also known as “suicide disease” because of the number of patients who took their own lives as a result of the pain.

Yet what might have made Souder the saddest was being away from the game she loved, and she met each suggestion to slow down or give up the sport with fierce stubbornness. Her mother knew Souder was paying her own way through college and felt she couldn’t tell her daughter what to do. Team doctors had cautioned her and helped her find neurologists and concussion specialists to work with, but Souder’s relentless desire to play always won out.

It was very difficult for us to really just educate her on the dangers behind it and kind of have her sit down and really understand what she was putting her body through,” said Laura Richards, a former athletic trainer at Hood. “She did not want to give up the love of the game.”

“She was in denial about how bad it really was,” said Souder’s mother, Stacy Johnston. “She hid them really well.”

By the time she was a graduate senior, she had endured two surgeries on her occipital nerves — doctors believed a neck issue was causing Souder’s unbearable pain — and countless hospital visits, but she was still heading the ball, justifying her decision by only doing it in games.

On her team’s senior day, she was battling in a double-overtime thriller when in the final seconds her world went dark. Video would later show a defender being pushed into Souder, who fell back and hit her head on the turf. It was the last time she played soccer.

“I knew my life would never be the same,” she said.
 
Britni is our hero
There were many times in the six months after she graduated that Souder thought about ending it all. Soccer was gone, but the toll the concussions had taken remained. Souder had trauma-induced anorexia and had to force-feed herself, because she couldn’t hold an appetite. She started sleeping all day, leaving the same TV shows on loop because she couldn’t look at the screen. She eventually quit her job at a golf course; the heat was shutting her body down and making her sick.

But workers at that golf course also helped Souder raise $16,000 to see a brain specialist in Georgia in 2016, followed by another visit the next year. She got a dog to help with her emotional needs and moved in with her parents, who joined in spreading awareness to other families of the concussion risks facing girls’ soccer players.

Most players would be bitter about the sport that has created so much pain, but after college, Souder began chasing a coaching career.

“Sometimes I am conflicted,” she said. “But I absolutely love the game, and I want to use what happened to me to help as much as I can.”

The game, Souder said, has saved her in the years since. She has made it her mission to share her story with as many players as possible, and her first conversation with each player is always about head safety. She sees herself in each of them and wonders whether she can relay to them what is at stake.

She started to talk to me about how she … wanted good to come out of it,” said Alexis Andrukat-Price, a former college teammate. “To see her try and take this thing that would have made a lot of people quit … and literally craft her life’s work out of it is remarkable.”

Jennifer Grunwald, the mother of Allyssa Grunwald, the 15-year-old girl Souder tutored that July morning, said her trust in Souder made her comfortable with allowing her daughter back on the field. Allyssa, who suffered a concussion while on a roller coaster three years ago and aggravated it at soccer practice soon after, has dreams of earning a college soccer scholarship. She is Souder’s most delicate student, and a chance to put to the test everything Souder learned through her own struggle.

“Brittni is our hero,” Jennifer said.

Most of Souder’s students don’t know what their teacher goes through on a daily basis. She often jokes with her fiance that he is about to marry an 80-year-old woman, because she forgets almost everything, including directions around her own neighborhood. Her life must be scripted on her iPhone calendar. Her Apple Watch reminds her to eat. The migraines still pop up frequently.

Souder and her mother rarely talk about the possibility of her having CTE, but both think about it often.

“It’s at the forefront of all of our minds, hers included, just because we see the signs,” Johnston said. “She doesn’t let it consume her life, even though I know we all have that fear.”


14
Football / Re: Thread in Honour of Retiring Players
« on: August 19, 2019, 11:15:03 AM »
Juan Silveira dos Santos ("Juan")

Not a player about whom there is extensive documentation in the media, particularly in English language publications, but his contributions at both ends of the football field made a statement.

This goal against Uruguay, under Tabarez one of the most defensively applied teams in the world, speaks for itself.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/N1cmMnEzQOY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/N1cmMnEzQOY</a>


15
Football / Re: Thread in Honour of Retiring Players
« on: August 19, 2019, 09:13:38 AM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/MHO0JEbtlZM" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/MHO0JEbtlZM</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/cD07S2K4Pu4" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/cD07S2K4Pu4</a>

Wesley Sneijder hangs up his boots after a glittering 17-year career
DutchNews.nl


Former Dutch international Wesley Sneijder has announced his retirement from professional football after a 17-year career filled with trophies. Sneijder, 35, said in Utrecht on Monday evening he had decided to call it quits. He made the announcement on the FC Utrecht tv channel when talking about his decision to rent a skybox at the Galgenwaard stadium. ‘I have a major attachment to the city,’ he said. ‘Now I have stopped playing, I want to have a good place to share my memories.’ Sneijder, who comes from Utrecht, has been without a club since the summer and stood down as an international in September 2018 after a record-breaking 134 caps for Oranje.

He is the third of the Dutch greats after Robin van Persie and Arjen Robben to announce his retirement from the game this year.

Sneijder made his debut for the Dutch national team in a friendly match against Portugal in April 2003, less than two months after breaking into Ajax’s first team as an 18-year-old.

He is the third of the Dutch greats after Robin van Persie and Arjen Robben to announce his retirement from the game this year. Sneijder made his debut for the Dutch national team in a friendly match against Portugal in April 2003, less than two months after breaking into Ajax’s first team as an 18-year-old.

His real breakthrough came in November that year when he masterminded a 6-0 win against Scotland in the second leg of the play-offs for Euro 2004, after the Netherlands had lost the first leg 1-0.

Sneijder was the linchpin of the team that reached the 2010 World Cup final, scoring five goals from midfield to become the tournament’s joint top scorer. Four years later he won his 100th international cap as the Dutch shocked world champions Spain in their opening World Cup match, winning 5-1 on their way to the semi-finals.

As an Ajax player Sneijder won the league title in his debut season and the KNVB Cup twice before being sold for €27 million to Real Madrid in 2007. Two years later he joined Inter Milan, where he was instrumental in winning the treble of league, cup and Champions League in the 2009-10 season.

He later spent five years at Turkish club Galatasaray before buying himself out of his contract in July last year and moving to Qatar.

16
Football / Re: Thread in Honour of Retiring Players
« on: August 19, 2019, 08:42:13 AM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/GQzjbYifuBc" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/GQzjbYifuBc</a>

Ashley Cole retires from playing and plans move into coaching
Press Association


Ashley Cole has said he is planning a move into coaching after calling time on his illustrious playing career.

The former England defender won 13 major titles during his 20-year career, including the 2012 Champions League with Chelsea, three Premier League titles and seven FA Cup triumphs.

38-year-old Cole, who won 107 caps for England, announced his retirement on Sky Sports, where he was appearing as a pundit for Sunday afternoon’s Premier League games.

“After hard thinking and consideration, it was obviously time to hang my boots up and look towards my next chapter, which will hopefully be coaching. I’m doing a course at the moment,” Cole said. “Now I want to be great at being a coach.”

Cole made more than 500 club appearances in a career that took in Arsenal, Crystal Palace (on loan), Chelsea, Roma, LA Galaxy and Derby County.

“As a young kid I never expected to be a professional, so looking back now, to be able to say I played in World Cups, Champions League finals ... being lucky enough to lift Premier League titles is a young kid’s dream, so I’ve fulfilled my dream. [It’s been] incredible, to be honest.”

Despite his impressive haul of domestic trophies, Cole said he was proudest of his England caps. Only Peter Shilton, Wayne Rooney, David Beckham, Steven Gerrard and Bobby Moore have made more England appearances.

“I probably didn’t grasp it as much as I should,” Cole added. “I look back now and I’ve played for my country, not just once but I’ve managed to play over 100 times. I’m proud of that and it’s just a little bit disappointing I didn’t get to a final or even a semi-final with England.”

Cole began his career with Arsenal and, after a brief loan spell at Palace, went on to make more than 200 appearances for the North London side, lifting the FA Cup three times and winning the Premier League twice.

He was a member of the “Invincibles” team who went through the 2003-04 Premier League season unbeaten, but left the club in acrimonious circumstances two years later. His move to Chelsea angered Arsenal fans, who dubbed him “Cashley”. In his autobiography, Cole said he had “nearly swerved off the road” after being told by his agent that Arsenal were offering him £55,000 per week, compared to £90,000 from Chelsea.

Cole was fined £100,000 – later reduced to £75,000 on appeal – for his part in an illegal approach from Chelsea in 2005. A year later, Cole joined Chelsea for £5m, with William Gallas moving the other way.

The left-back won the FA Cup in his first season at Chelsea, and four times in total while at Stamford Bridge. Cole also won the Premier League in 2010 and the Champions League in 2012, scoring in the penalty shootout as Chelsea beat Bayern Munich in the final.

After leaving Chelsea in 2014, Cole enjoyed spells with Roma and LA Galaxy before ending his playing career under former Chelsea team-mate Frank Lampard at Derby. Cole joined in January and helped Lampard’s side reach the Championship play-off final, where they lost to Aston Villa.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/zUHvPgJgop8" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/zUHvPgJgop8</a>

If there were a hall of fame for left-backs, Cole would be an instant inductee. The Englishman possesses 107 caps, three Premier League winner’s medals – won with two different clubs – seven of the same from the FA Cup and one League Cup. Cole won the Champions League and Europa League, too, during a terrific spell at Chelsea. Earlier, Cole was part of Arsenal’s revered Invincibles side. All this after being brought up by a single mother in the East End of London.

--- Ewan Murray writing in the The Guardian, September 24, 2017.

17
Football / Re: Fire David John Williams Thread
« on: August 19, 2019, 08:15:25 AM »
Here's a working definition of success under DJW: not being fired.

18
Football / Re: Marcus Joseph Thread
« on: August 19, 2019, 08:00:38 AM »
Just goes to show that organization and money are not guarantors of quality on the field.

19
Football / Re: Kevin Molino Thread.
« on: August 18, 2019, 06:15:53 PM »
I've watched a couple Minn games on ESPN since Molino's return and in each game there was a moment or two where Molino will play an pinpoint one-touch forward pass splitting the defense for a teammate on run onto. He's been doing it consistently.Even Taylor Twellman applauded the accuracy and timing on his passes during the commentary.

Yet ...

(Why yuh think that's happening?)
Why is it happening?


There are several ways to respond to this. Since some have already been touched on, I will go this route:

In organized football, play either develops (1) with intentionality (2) organically/instinctively or (3) opportunistically. The identity of a team is discerned from intentional play. The team's quality is assessed (in part) on the organic elements.

While intentional play and its opposite (haphazard play) can both produce opportunistic moments, the haphazard approach can't achieve the level of cohesion (organic, instinctive) that comes from intentional play and intentional preparation.

A team (or subset of players) consistently doing something (passing patterns, movements off the ball etc) or not consistently doing something (say, eliminating the midfield through use of the long ball) are hallmarks and components of an identity and intentionality.

Even if a team has placed greater intentional emphasis on defending, the supreme moment of intention on a field is a direct attempt to score a goal. It is the sum of all other intentions. It is the sum of intentional play.

A one-touch vertical pass intended to break lines and nullify numerical disadvantage is a high order example of intentional play. Where players have exploiting attributes of that nature, it is the coach's job to maximize those exploiting attributes and even if he doesn't have the benefit of rehearsing such activity with the same frequency as one would have in a club environment, one has the responsibility of setting the conditions/stage for players with those attributes to impose themselves in those game situations (cue Pulisic for the US). You only get intentional play from intentional expectations.

The NT has shown what is emphasized as intentional in its play and verticality with the ball and positioning have not been notable highlights.

Did not have to wait long for an example to pop up. Here's a rundown on Real Madrid's match versus Celta Vigo, played yesterday. In the game Modric was sent off. Zidane doesn't train for 10 v 11 situations, unlike Mourinho and Benítez during their RM tenures.

"El Real Madrid, que no entrena situaciones de 10 contra 11, reaccionó de manera instintiva a la roja a Modric y revivió en su victoria en Vigo el aroma de fútbol coral de la época dorada de Zidane."

"A diferencia de Mourinho y Benítez, Zidane no entrena situaciones en las que su equipo se queda con diez frente a once. Pero, a partir de la roja, y ante lo que calcularon que podía ser un “golpe mayúsculo”, el fútbol del Madrid fluyó de manera natural hasta desembocar en un gran tercer gol."

https://elpais.com/deportes/2019/08/18/actualidad/1566139306_518590.html

Real Madrid 3 Celta Vigo 1

20
Football / Re: Daneil Cyrus Thread.
« on: August 17, 2019, 01:43:55 PM »
Some ppl keep being mystified by Cyrus and his selection, but if you see the player there ought to be no mystery about him being selected to the NT.

I am one of those people, so please demystify his continued selection.

In terms of his past continued selection, the things I suspect that may have recommended Cyrus taking the field are his experience, his confidence (leadership to a degree), his adaptability and his ambition to advance the ball rather than just to deny chances.

Considering  the future, his continued selection is a function of position by position competition, versatility in alternatives and whether there is mounted trust in less experienced players (in the role of CB) rather than in Cyrus per se making an overarching compelling case for selection.

Certainly, as has David Luiz, he's been at the center of some unfortunate muck-ups on the field, but on a comprehensive level there's little denying that he merited NT selection relative to his peers. And apparently that's  been the case for some time. Gilbert Bateau told me at a young age Cyrus was already demonstrating his versatility and could play anywhere on the field.

Once he's kept finding a decent club abroad, it's been hard to ignore him. If he gets stuck in T&T that might be a different outcome. At club level, I think of him as a player who tries to fit in where he can get in and keep it moving, but still I would have thought that he would have looked to consolidate his career in Saudi Arabia.

The issues that have influenced perception of Cyrus are notable errors (awareness and decision-making) and positioning. His reaction time/speed may be on the verge of being a liability. Other than that, he puts in a reasonably good but not remarkable shift.

Although it is left to be seen whether he can convince other coaches that he adds value in another playing position, that could be possible for a coach coming to TT from outside but unlikely to be the route taken by a coach inside the country where Cyrus playing at CB would be the preference of many and is viewed as settled. His passing isn't elaborate but he has moments of accuracy over long range.

An authoritative source describes him as "active in defensive actions, takes a lot of challenges and makes [them] with high effectiveness." Same source: "doesn't make a lot of passes per game".

That source also says ... "reads the game well" ... I don't doubt that ... but reacting to the reading?

Subjectively, I think we should have been getting more out of his headers on both ends of the park (say if you compare him to Yohance who heads the ball true).

Mixed bag.

A mixed bag has been good enough to do it.



21
Football / Re: Kevin Molino Thread.
« on: August 17, 2019, 04:25:31 AM »
It's not clear to me who that comment is about. Up to lefty to name who he has in mind, but as a general comment it raises the eyebrows as phrased. Comfortable on the ball has technical and psychological elements.

Triston Hodge, for example, is a defender that could NEVER fall into the category of not being comfortable on/with the ball. Some players may be susceptible to the charge of being too comfortable with the ball, but on the NT in matches there haven't been glaringly frequent examples of players (as far as I recall as I write) being dispossessed of the ball because their playing speed and mental speed don't coincide in that sense. Many of our defensive blunders either involve recovering late, incorrectly assessing threats in the development of play, a lack of communication and coordination, goalkeeping errors etc.

Granted, not all our defensive players are especially technical but its possible to have good technique yet be not a particularly technical player.

To refer to a player ppl like to see light it up: Caesar. He is comfortable on the ball but not especially technical in a classic sense. Cato, also comfortable on the ball and more technical, although not the complete article.

Some ppl keep being mystified by Cyrus and his selection, but if you see the player there ought to be no mystery about him being selected to the NT.

As far as goalkeepers, it should be common knowledge who lacks tools with the ball at their feet. There can be no argument that this aspect of developing young keepers needs to be emphasized more.

Cruyff said: ""Choose the best player for every position, and you’ll end up not with a strong XI, but with 11 strong 1’s."

Think about it.

Every coach is faced with finding/striking a selection balance between what he wants done and the player's gifts and ability to execute the plan (intentionality again).

Is there room to boost our technical play in the context of a tactical reorientation of how we play? Yes. This is tied to my  previous post. However, three players on the field not being comfortable on the ball would be a starter in killing any coach's plan. I don't think that's the primary issue. There is generally consensus on our NT call-ups from the domestic game.




22
Football / Re: Kevin Molino Thread.
« on: August 16, 2019, 01:12:10 PM »
There's a quote I will add to this discussion. I stumbled across it in someone's Twitter feed about two weeks ago, but can't recall precisely whose (it was a retweet on the main feed I was reviewing). I remember it as being a quote attributed to Marcelo Bielsa.

It is appropriate to this thread.

When I read it, I thought it vindicated my views. I certainly think its relevant to how our U-13 and U15 representatives have approached football and I think there has to be a [cultural] sea-change in how our players are taught the game, on the evidence of these showings. They need more than one [traditional] solution to resolving how the ball moves from their half into the opposing half.

23
Football / Re: Kevin Molino Thread.
« on: August 16, 2019, 12:56:48 PM »
I've watched a couple Minn games on ESPN since Molino's return and in each game there was a moment or two where Molino will play an pinpoint one-touch forward pass splitting the defense for a teammate on run onto. He's been doing it consistently.Even Taylor Twellman applauded the accuracy and timing on his passes during the commentary.

Yet ...

(Why yuh think that's happening?)
Why is it happening?


There are several ways to respond to this. Since some have already been touched on, I will go this route:

In organized football, play either develops (1) with intentionality (2) organically/instinctively or (3) opportunistically. The identity of a team is discerned from intentional play. The team's quality is assessed (in part) on the organic elements.

While intentional play and its opposite (haphazard play) can both produce opportunistic moments, the haphazard approach can't achieve the level of cohesion (organic, instinctive) that comes from intentional play and intentional preparation.

A team (or subset of players) consistently doing something (passing patterns, movements off the ball etc) or not consistently doing something (say, eliminating the midfield through use of the long ball) are hallmarks and components of an identity and intentionality.

Even if a team has placed greater intentional emphasis on defending, the supreme moment of intention on a field is a direct attempt to score a goal. It is the sum of all other intentions. It is the sum of intentional play.

A one-touch vertical pass intended to break lines and nullify numerical disadvantage is a high order example of intentional play. Where players have exploiting attributes of that nature, it is the coach's job to maximize those exploiting attributes and even if he doesn't have the benefit of rehearsing such activity with the same frequency as one would have in a club environment, one has the responsibility of setting the conditions/stage for players with those attributes to impose themselves in those game situations (cue Pulisic for the US). You only get intentional play from intentional expectations.

The NT has shown what is emphasized as intentional in its play and verticality with the ball and positioning have not been notable highlights.

24
Football / Re: Fire Dennis Lawrence Thread.
« on: August 15, 2019, 05:03:23 PM »
Sol is available. ;D

@lefty, watch the movement of Quintero off that Molino pass ... not just exquisitely timed, but refined movement. Yuh favourite player would have gone galloping on a straight line. 

25
Football / Re: Kevin Molino Thread.
« on: August 15, 2019, 10:08:42 AM »
I've watched a couple Minn games on ESPN since Molino's return and in each game there was a moment or two where Molino will play an pinpoint one-touch forward pass splitting the defense for a teammate on run onto. He's been doing it consistently.Even Taylor Twellman applauded the accuracy and timing on his passes during the commentary.

Yet ...

(Why yuh think that's happening?)

26
Football / Re: CONCACAF Under-13 Champions League Thread.
« on: August 15, 2019, 07:17:07 AM »
Jabloteh U-13s suffers fourth straight loss
By Nigel Simon (T&T Guardian)


T&T’s San Juan Jabloteh end­ed their cam­paign at this year’s Sco­tia­bank Con­ca­caf Un­der-13 Cham­pi­ons League with a fourth straight loss from as many match­es, 0-2 against Cha­pu­lineros de Oax­a­ca of Mex­i­co in the losers quar­ter­fi­nals at the Cos­ta Ri­can Foot­ball Fed­er­a­tion Sports Com­plex, in San Jose, Cos­ta Ri­ca on Wednes­day.

Com­ment­ing on the dis­play of his team, Jabloteh Tech­ni­cal Di­rec­tor, Kei­th Jef­freys said his team had on­ly it­self to blame for the loss af­ter miss­ing five one-one-one chances as well as an open goal with no goal­keep­er in­sight.

Jabloteh, mak­ing their fourth straight ap­pear­ance in the com­pe­ti­tion was forced to con­test the losers plate quar­ter­fi­nals af­ter end­ing bot­tom of their four-team Pool A round-robin se­ries with three de­feats.

On Sat­ur­day last, Guer­reros de Coahuila of Mex­i­co de­feat­ed Jabloteh 3-1 with goals from Car­los De La Cruz (28th), Emil­iano Cam­pos (30th) and Gio­van­ni Ale­mon (44th) af­ter the T&T club led through a sec­ond-minute strike from Ra­heem Mo­han.

A day lat­er Jabloteh went un­der to Cana­da’s Mon­tre­al Im­pact 4-1 with Sorin Ziane hav­ing a brace (1’, 30+2’), while Et­tiene Godin (40th) and An­toine N’Di­aye (53rd) added one each. Mo­han again tal­lied Jabloteh's lone item in the 23rd.

And on Mon­day in their fi­nal Pool A round-robin match, Jabloteh fell by a sim­i­lar 4-1 mar­gin to pool win­ners, San­ta Ana of El Sal­vador.

Both Ger­ar­do Con­tr­eras (18th & 20th) and Ri­car­do Vil­la­toro (30th & 39th) bagged braces for San­ta Ana af­ter Lin­dell Sween had giv­en Jabloteh, a sev­enth-minute ad­van­tage.

Last year, Jabloteh was oust­ed in the main draw quar­ter­fi­nals by Pana­ma’s Cl Plaza Ama­da af­ter a 5-0 loss.

Nigel Simon, thanks for bringing this age group into focus. Just a correction doh: It's not Jab's 4th straight appearance. Jabloteh's run was broken by Police in 2017.

By the way, the Panamanian club is CD Plaza Amador - a club has been making notable inroads in its junior age groups and like Jabloteh have multiple appearances at this tournament.

27
Even St Vincent winin on we now. Another richly deserved low, and the bottom still nowhere in sight.

Let dem wine. Thing is ... as a preparatory exercise the friendly was of more direct value to SVG than to TTO. SVG has fewer foreign-based players. Ultimately, when we compare what their squad versus Nicaragua looks like versus ours against Martinique, we'll see that our squad is the one with the marked difference. The friendly served differing ends for both nations.

28
In this context, the national team coach of another nation has no business poking his opinion (informed or not), about the affairs and governance of another MA, into the public domain.

I know all of us are pissed off. But I really do not see what is the big deal about his opinion. His opinion will not determine the outcome of the Admin. changes or coaching changes.

"The following Letter to the Editor by St Vincent and the Grenadines coach Dale Mercury was posted on the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association’s Facebook page."

It's not clear to me how his comment on Facebook transformed into a Letter to the Editor, but they somehow piqued the interest of Wired 868 and then were branded as such. (Maybe the relevant poster from W/868 will weigh in for clarity.)

This guy (in his capacity as NT coach) went to the TTFA FB page to insinuate an opinion about a federation that is not his own ... on that federation's website! Dat ain't right.

Despite my concurrence with some of his content (I disagree with absolving our NT coach of responsibility), it must be stated that Mercury inappropriately touched the thermometer. It is not his place to be a barometer of this subject matter in this manner.

Who knows? Maybe his boss also thinks DJW is a horrible administrator. If so, I await the SVGFF's president's post to that effect on the TTFA's Facebook page! Maybe that will drive home my point.

Whether the coach's opinion has an impact or not is not relevant. Even if one agrees with the content, the form is out the window ... although, if we read between the lines, most certainly not out of the blue.

29
In this context, the national team coach of another nation has no business poking his opinion (informed or not), about the affairs and governance of another MA, into the public domain.

30
Football / Re: Daneil Cyrus Thread
« on: August 14, 2019, 08:35:39 PM »
Daneil Cyrus signs with Indian I-League club, Mohun Bagan.

no wonder our national team struggling look at the the teams these guys are playing for

one can only work for a company when an offer is made.  :beermug:

At this moment, the I- league is better than the Ascension league.

:rotfl:






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