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Author Topic: The Jack Warner Thread.  (Read 347351 times)

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Offline King Deese

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2610 on: September 29, 2015, 08:06:18 PM »
"Ban me for life, even so without a hearing" - Jack Warner.

I dear you to travel to Switzerland for a hearing Jack. Come FIFA, please give Jack a fear hearing.
I am the punishment of God...If you had not comitted great sins, God would not have sent a punishment like me upon you.

Offline Peong

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2611 on: September 29, 2015, 11:06:25 PM »
"Ban me for life, even so without a hearing" - Jack Warner.

I dear you to travel to Switzerland for a hearing Jack. Come FIFA, please give Jack a fear hearing.

If they do that now he will say he will not dignify it by attending.

Offline Tallman

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2612 on: September 30, 2015, 05:06:22 AM »
Former General Secretary of the Caribbean Football Union Harold Taylor describes FIFA's lifetime ban on Jack Warner as a total joke.
http://www.cnc3.co.tt/sports/harold-taylor-fifa-ban
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline dreamer

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2613 on: September 30, 2015, 07:58:33 AM »
All de recipients of the largesse coming out of the woodworks in praise for their pimp.
Yuh have to be really hopelessly dependent and beholden to want to go down with Renraw.
I guess they will sing that tune of support until he boards that jet with US Marshalls.
Some may be thinking real longterm hoping that when he sings in testimony against Blatter,
that instead of never seeing T&T again, that he might get a reduced sentence to 15 yrs
and his friends will be earning a li'l change for nursing care help and emotional help on his return
Supportin' de Warriors right tru.

Offline palos

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2614 on: September 30, 2015, 01:13:28 PM »
"Ban me for life, even so without a hearing" - Jack Warner.

I dear you to travel to Switzerland for a hearing Jack. Come FIFA, please give Jack a fear hearing.

Have no fair....Jack will be their  ;)
« Last Edit: September 30, 2015, 01:16:01 PM by palos »
Carlos "The Rolls Royce" Edwards

Offline Sando prince

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2615 on: October 08, 2015, 04:36:16 PM »
JACK WARNER RELEASES SERIES OF EMAILS BETWEEN HIMSELF AND SKY SPORTS NEWS; SHOWS EMPATHY TOWARDS SEPP BLATTER

Below is an email chain involving Jack Warner and Sky Sports News:

https://www.facebook.com/CNC3Television/posts/10153686824277996:0

"Dear Roger,

I am sorry for having taken a seemingly inordinate length of time to respond to your last advice but several matters of a more pressing nature militated against an earlier reply.

Let me state at the outset that I take no pleasure in seeing the demise of colleagues in the FIFA with whom I once worked despite the shabby and unfair manner in which they treated me.

As far as I am concerned two wrongs would never make a right and I could never support this witch-hunt that is now taking place and which has been initiated by the USA for reasons obvious to even the blind.

Most of these guys in FIFA, if not all, at one time were my friends and together we worked hard to improve the standard of football globally.

That we have drifted apart is no reason to shred the memories that we shared, ignore the strides we have made or even plot against the freedom of each other.

Sky Sports News should have followed the Pontiff’s tour of the USA and understand his message of forgiveness, a message filled with compassion and love and maybe they would have been touched enough to understand that one cannot gloat on the pain of others.

For this reason I must decline your request.

My story is my story and I refuse to be a part of the multitude that wishes to bring pain and hurt upon people who I once called friends.

Thanks for your offer but I must refuse. I am copying this advice to you to my Media Officer in the hope that he can disseminate it as extensively as I know you would do from your end.

Regards
Jack Warner

In a message dated 10/8/2015 8:00:53 A.M. SA Western Standard Time, Roger.Clarke@sky.uk writes:
Dear Mr Warner,

As always I am extremely grateful for your prompt response to my previous email. While I appreciate your desire to offer no further comment on the subject, there remains an appetite here at Sky Sports News to hear more from you. It is clear from your email that you are aggrieved by your treatment by FIFA and we are now seeing those who you feel instigated your departure facing accusations of their own. We would once again like to offer the opportunity to speak to us on camera, to add detail to what you have alluded to. The whole Football world is watching and waiting to find out the truth about FIFA and we believe you can shed considerable light on the matter.

I understand that you will have had many requests for such interviews, and I appreciate the politeness and decency with which you have responded to our own numerous requests. I would like to think that we at Sky Sports News can offer you a platform where you can speak freely and be treated fairly and without prejudice. The offer remains open. We would be prepared to travel at any time you should decide you be happy to speak. In the meantime, would there perhaps be an opportunity to conduct an interview over the phone, if only to repeat what you have already said in your email?

Once again, I appreciate your continued correspondence regarding this matter and hold out the hope that at some stage we can meet for an interview.

Regards,

Roger Clarke

From: dsurvivor2011@aol.com [mailto:dsurvivor2011@aol.com]
Sent: 08 October 2015 12:25
To: Clarke, Roger (Sports News) <Roger.Clarke@sky.uk>
Subject: Re: Sky Sports News

Roger, I left FIFA more than 4 years ago and I have said repeatedly that though I have left FIFA it seems that the FIFA does not want to leave me. However I will continue to maintain my silence and say nothing about the FIFA and the problems it is experiencing today. Suffice it to say that Sepp Blatter and Jerome Valcke are the cause of their own demise; a demise which started on May 17, 2011 when they both wrongly hounded Bin Hammam and me out of office using the Blatter-invented and controlled FIFA Ethics Committee. Today the tables have turned, proving once again, that what goes around comes around.

And this is my final comment on this subject.

Regards

In a message dated 10/8/2015 6:47:12 A.M. SA Western Standard Time, Roger.Clarke@sky.uk writes:
Good Morning Mr Warner,

I hope you are well. You will be aware of the recent events at FIFA with the decision of the Ethics Committee to suspend Sepp Blatter for 90 days along with Michel Platini and Jerome Valcke. Do you have any comment to make on these latest developments? Would it be for the best for Sepp Blatter to accept the suspension and step down now rather than continue with his plan to stay on until February?

Regards,

Roger Clarke"

« Last Edit: October 09, 2015, 10:32:15 AM by Flex »

Offline Sando prince

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2616 on: October 09, 2015, 08:43:39 PM »

VIDEO Report; http://www.tv6tnt.com/sevenpm-news/-Warner-On-FIFA--7303-331845841.html

Quote

Warner On FIFA


President Sepp Blatter has appealed his 90 day suspension from the world football governing body. This coincides with FIFA's announcement that there will be an extraordinary meeting of its executive committee in Zurich on October 20. This morning Blatter got a ringing endorsement from one of his former allies Jack Warner, who also got into his own ban on football. Warner even had a little prediction as to T&T's World Cup ambitions. We caught up with the former Concacaf boss after he spoke at TTUTA's Teachers’ Convention in St Ann's.

Offline Sando prince

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2617 on: November 18, 2015, 06:02:49 AM »
Jack Warner gets MBA
Sunday, November 15 2015

INDEPENDENT Liberal Party (ILP) former leader, Jack Warner, 72, was awarded a Masters of Business Administration (MBA) degree issued by Anglia Ruskin University at the School of Accounting and Management (SAM) graduation ceremony at the Hilton Trinidad, Port-of-Spain on November 8.


Fascinatingly, he was among an unusually high number of fellow-graduates who were also present and/or former members of the former People’s Partnership government.

Those also receiving MBAs including United National Congress (UNC) acting chairman, Khadijah Ameen; former tourism minister, Chandresh Sharma; former Congress of the People councillor, Kevan Gibbs; and former Strategic Services Agency head, Reshmi Ramnarine



Offline Trevor

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2618 on: November 18, 2015, 02:51:44 PM »
Were they giving away MBA degrees?

Offline maxg

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2619 on: November 18, 2015, 04:24:07 PM »
Were they giving away MBA degrees?
anybody who could wuk Fifa and a country for so many years deserve a Prize..not Nobel nor Noble..but at least a Chifu something

Offline Flex

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2620 on: November 29, 2015, 05:57:40 AM »
Jack: I'll go broke.
By Jada Loutoo (Newsday).


FORMER FIFA vice-president Jack Warner was once considered “football’s darling”. He held one of the highest positions in the international football body, was close to the sport’s boss, suspended FIFA president Sepp Blatter, and was said to be worth millions.

Now Warner, who no longer walks through football’s corridors of power, is now concerned about being left in a “parlous financial state” during his last years.

The 72-year-old former politician, now newspaper publisher and corruption accused, in his affidavit to support his application to have the entire process adopted so far by the government to have him extradited to the United States (US) nullified, says he is concerned over what the bill for his defence would do to him.

“I am concerned that the amount of money it will take to defend myself in relation to these charges will drain all of my resources and leave me in a parlous financial state during my last years when I am found not guilty,” he said.

Holding fast to his promise, the former Fifa vice-president last Friday approached the High Court seeking to have deemed illegal the go-ahead given by Attorney General (AG) Faris Al-Rawi to proceed with extraditing the former government minister to the United States (US).

He is also challenging the Extradition Order issued by the US, saying it goes against local extradition laws.

Warner’s lawyers filed the voluminous application and are awaiting a date for the leave hearing.

The former FIFA vice-president is represented by Senior Counsel Fyard Hosein, Rishi Dass, Nyree Alfonso, Sasha Bridgemohansingh and Anil Maraj. According to documents supporting his application for leave, Warner said since the beginning of the process to have him face criminal prosecution in the US, he has had significant and persistent anxiety over the extradition process.

He said he has also read in various American and international publications that the bond arrangements for other persons accused of corruption related charges are extremely high.

Warner quoted reports from the Cayman Islands that Jeff Webb, a former Concacaf president and FIFA vice president like himself and his successor at FIFA before also being named in the US indictment, was going “broke” in meeting his US$10 million bond and complying with his house arrest arrangements in New York, which are conditionalities for his bail.

Webb has also been indicted on alleged racketeering, conspiracy and corruption.

Warner also said he has read of the guilty plea of a former senior FIFA official in November, 2013, who was also released on a US$10 million bond, and the extradition of Alejandro Burzaco, the second accused person to be extradited to the US arising out of the FIFA debacle, who was placed on US$20 million bail.

Warner, who held positions as a minister in the last People’s Partnership government; chairman of the United National Congress; and political leader and chairman of the fledging Independent Liberal Party, withdrew from FIFA related activities in 2011.

There have been several allegations against him relating to the decades he spent in football, from black market ticket sales to requests for personal payments, and pocketing football’s money.

In 2013, Concacaf ’s Integrity Committee, headed by David Simmons, former Chief Justice of Barbados, issued a report accusing Warner and his former cohort Chuck Blazer of mismanagement and massive fraud.

Warner is alleged to have concealed his ownership of the land on which Concacaf ’s $25 million Joao Havalange Centre of Excellence was built, which made him the effective owner of the building.

Warner’s initial public reaction was defiant: “As far as I am aware it is baseless and malicious.

“I left Concacaf and turned my back on football two years ago.

Since then I have had no interest in any football-related matter.” Two years later he was indicted for wire fraud, racketeering and money laundering by the US Department of Justice and was banned from FIFA for life.

In his affidavit, Warner says since relinquishing his role as leader of the ILP, he moved back to the realm of business. Among the entities in whose management he is involved, are: Jamad Maintenance Services Limited, Multi Stores Limited; Joe Public Limited; Renraw Investments Limited; East Bend Management Limited; CCAM and Company Limited; Kantac Limited; and Sunshine Publishing Company Limited.

He says he also hold shareholdings in other companies.

Much of his affidavit surrounds the circumstances for his legal headaches, giving a time line of the extradition process thus far.

He returns to court on Wednesday, but this matter will be stayed pending the outcome of the determination of the judicial review application, which could take years if the case goes to Privy Council.

He also speaks of the exchanges between his attorneys and former AG Garvin Nicholas as well as the current AG Faris Al-Rawi, whom he accused of attempting to barter with his right to make representation against the continued ability of the AG to infringe his liberty with an arbitrary deadline of a few days prior to him signing the authority to proceed (ATP), which gave the go-ahead to the chief magistrate to commence extradition proceedings.

“My attorneys also emphasised the failure to provide disclosure requested and a fair hearing were the result of the position taken by the Attorney General.

“In fact, having delayed the extradition matter to the eve of the deadline imposed by the court, the Attorney General required my agreement to a further infringement of my rights that was contrary to the scheme of the Extradition Act,” he said.

According to the judicial review claim, there is no common law right of extradition and the mere existence of a treaty between TT and a foreign sovereign state is of itself of no domestic effect until and unless that treaty is incorporated into domestic law The application notes that the power to domestically incorporate an extradition treaty is given to the AG, by Order, under Section 4 of the Extradition (Commonwealth and Foreign Territories) Act, and remains an executive action, subject to the ordinary judicial review jurisdiction of the High Court.

Accordingly, the US request for extradition (US Order) purportedly made under Section 4 of the Act, remains delegated legislation, subject to being quashed as being ultra vires its empowering statute.

The lawsuit notes that the US Order, failed to comply with the strictures contained in the local Extradition Act; was not in conformity of the Act, and specifically offended against the restrictions contained in the Act against the return of persons to a requesting state.

The application says it was unlawful for a person to be tried and punished in the requesting state for extra- territorial offences where such offences, had they occurred outside of TT in similar circumstances, would not have constituted an offence in this country.

The lawsuit also went on to note that the US Order offended against the principle of minimum gravity by allowing a person to be detained, tried and punished for offences for which a magistrate has not ordered committal.

More fundamentally, the lawsuit said, the US request signals that this country will have no objection to a wanted person being detained, punished and tried for any number of offences for which they have not been sought and represented a “dilution” of the protection afforded by local extradition laws.

Warner’s lawyers have also cited breaches of natural justice in the issuance of the authority to proceed, the failure to provide Warner with a fair hearing, as well as the issue of bias as the AG was advised by lawyers representing the interests of the US in the proceedings in the courts.

The former Member of Parliament is also asking for declarations that the extradition request of the US be deemed unlawful as well as the authority to proceed signed by the AG, and orders that the request and the ATP be quashed.

Warner also wants that section 4(3) of the Extradition Act, which allows for the recitation of the treaty held with a foreign country in any extradition order made and prevents the legality of the order from being questioned in any legal proceedings, be declared unconstitutional and it be struck down.

Warner, who surrendered himself to Fraud Squad officers on May 27, after learning of the provisional warrant is currently on $2.5 million bail.

On September 21, days after the deadline for him to sign expired, Al-Rawi issued the authority to proceed.

One week later, an application by Warner’s lawyers to have the provisional warrant quashed, was denied by the deputy chief magistrate. Under the ATP, Warner is charged with 29 counts of several statutory offences, including money laundering under the Proceeds of Crime Act; corruption under the Prevention of Corruption Act and receiving under the Larceny Act.

There are also several common law offences including conspiracy to accept corrupt payments; conspiracy to launder money and conspiracy to defraud.

Warner was indicted in May by a US grand jury on 12 charges of wire fraud, racketeering and money laundering over an escalating scandal at FIFA, football`s world governing body.

US authorities have charged 14 FIFA officials and sports marketing executives of soliciting and receiving more than $150 million in bribes and kickbacks over two decades.

On July 23, US authorities asked for Warner, a former head of football`s governing body in North America, Central America and the Caribbean (Concacaf) to be extradited to face the charges.

So far only three of those charged are in the jurisdiction of New York.

Warner and nine other defendants are still fighting extradition to the US —six from Switzerland, where they were arrested in a May swoop on a Zurich hotel — two from Argentina and one from Uruguay.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline coache

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2621 on: November 29, 2015, 08:29:50 PM »
John Williams would make Jack Warner look like a saint....why?..Jack taketh and Jack giveth...

John Williams will pillage and racket will run amok...the national football will starve while John Williams and WConnection will be in high society....mark my words....today is the darkest day for National teams...

Hart will get the axe....let's hope his good results continue.

Offline King Deese

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2622 on: November 30, 2015, 08:30:08 AM »
Jack: I'll go broke.
:rotfl: :violin: :violin: :violin: :violin: :violin:
A fool and his money will later part.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2015, 11:38:41 AM by Tallman »
I am the punishment of God...If you had not comitted great sins, God would not have sent a punishment like me upon you.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2623 on: December 06, 2015, 05:00:49 AM »
Jack Warner says US winning battle to take over FIFA
Jamaica Observer


 PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad and Tobago (AFP) – Fallen Trinidad and Tobago football honcho Jack Warner said Friday the latest fallout from the corruption scandal gripping world football showed the United States was winning its battle to "take over FIFA."

Speaking outside a court hearing where he is seeking to stave off his extradition to the United States, Warner said there were ulterior motives for the US indictments charging him and a host of other top football officials and marketing executives with corruption.

He said that one official snared Thursday in latest anti-graft sting, Honduran national Alfredo Hawit, would be replaced as president of the North American, Central American and Caribbean football confederation (CONCACAF) by the head of the US Soccer Federation, Sunil Gulati.

Although CONCACAF has not named a replacement for Hawit, Warner warned of a nefarious American plot.

"Since the US is the football police of the world they're happy the acting president of CONCACAF is the US president of football, so I guess they have won the first stage for now," he said.

"So let them take over FIFA and let them remove the World Cups from Qatar and Russia, that is all right," he said sarcastically.

Warner, 72, was among the initial group of 14 people indicted last May on racketeering, bribery and money laundering charges by the US Attorney General for their alleged involvement in corrupt practices at world football's governing body, including massive bribes for the awarding of marketing rights to tournaments.

Warner's lawyers are challenging the legality of an extradition treaty between Trinidad and Tobago and the United States.

Justice James Aboud adjourned the case to December 17 and said he hoped to deliver a decision by early February.

Warner's lawyers have already indicated they are prepared to appeal all the way to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in Britain, the final court of appeal for this Commonwealth country.

Warner's defense chief, Fyard Hosein, said the day's proceedings were "the start of a long, drawn-out legal battle" that would take several years.
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline asylumseeker

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Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline Flex

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2625 on: January 23, 2016, 05:24:10 AM »
Warner extradition proceedings stayed
By JADA LOUTOO (Newsday)


A HIGH Court judge has stayed extradition proceedings against former FIFA vice president Jack Warner, but the former minister’s attorneys say they will not be rushed as they seek to challenge the legality of the Extradition (Commonwealth and Foreign Territories) Act, and the Treaty signed between this country and the United States.

Warner is wanted in the US to answer eight counts of racketeering and fraud as they relate to his tenure while at the helm of the world’s football governing body.

At a sitting in the Hall of Justice, Port-of-Spain yesterday, Justice James Aboud gave Warner permission to challenge the authority to proceed signed last September by Attorney General Faris Al-Rawi, which gave the Chief Magistrate the go ahead to begin committal proceedings.

Aboud noted while the leave stage was not a full scale dress rehearsal of the claim, the bar must not be raised too high.

He granted Warner permission to challenge the legality of the authority to proceed, as well as, what he referred to as the “sincerity” of the offer by AG Al-Rawi to the former FIFA vice president and the response of the former minister.

The judge said while the first ground of complaint was arguable with a realistic prospect of success, the latter barely crossed the bar.

He however said the complaint of apparent bias by the AG as he allegedly received advice from attorneys representing the requesting state (United States) failed to get off the ground as he found no evidence to impugn the impartiality of Al-Rawi.

Warner is to file his lawsuit by February 5 and the matter has been adjourned to February 26, when dates will be set for a hearing of the substantial case.

It was after the judge advised that he intended to run on a tight schedule and will be prioritising the extradition hearing as any delay will only serve to retard the momentum of the case, that temperatures began to rise in the courtroom.

Warner’s lead counsel Fyard Hosein SC, warned against rushing the case to pander to the United States.

He also took issue with comments by lead counsel for the State, Douglas Mendes SC, that there were other persons being extradited around the world in connection with the FIFA investigations in the US, and “we won’t want to find ourselves in a position where we are lagging behind.” Hosein said, “I don’t see why this case is being treated as a priority because some foreign government they have an issue with a citizen of this country.” But Mendes made it clear the State was not seeking to compromise the rights of claimants, but he noted the case was an academic one and reminded that extraditions involved an agreement between states and persons should be mindful to continue the comity between states even as the process is being challenged.

Following the exchange between both lead counsel, Aboud made it clear that he treated with all extradition hearings with expediency.

“I believe it is in the interests of the police whose return is being required,” he assured. Aboud said a person who did not want his extradition case to proceed expediently must have a good reason for not wanting his case to be treated in this way.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Sando prince

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2626 on: January 26, 2016, 11:59:44 AM »

https://www.facebook.com/tntthrowbacks/photos/a.1495363504057007.1073741829.1494304490829575/1684548161805206/?type=3&theater

Quote
Please join us in wishing Happy Birthday to former FIFA Vice President, CONCACAF President and T&T Cabinet Minister AUSTIN 'JACK' WARNER as he celebrates 73 years of life on earth today 🇹🇹

Offline E-man

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2627 on: February 24, 2016, 02:31:36 PM »
First time I read this in detail

94: Howdy! How remortgaging a house saved the World Cup
Read more at http://www.fourfourtwo.com/features/94-howdy-how-remortgaging-house-saved-world-cup#CIejFgEDB2A3dt56.99

Is this where JW got his idea/story about saving T&T football?

Offline Flex

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2628 on: February 28, 2016, 06:37:31 AM »
Warner judicial review lawsuit takes new twist.
By Derek Achong (Guardian).


US applies to be made interested party

Former government minister Jack Warner’s extradition proceedings took another turn yesterday when the United States government attempted to intervene in his judicial review lawsuit challenging Attorney General Faris Al-Rawi’s decision to sign off on its request to have him extradited to face charges in the ongoing Fifa bribery scandal.

During a status hearing in the Port-of-Spain High Court yesterday morning, attorney Vanessa Gopaul, who is representing the US, appeared in court and indicated her client intended to apply to be joined as an interested party.

Her statement was immediately opposed by Warner’s lawyer Fyard Hosein, SC, who questioned the reason for the country’s attempt to enter the case.

“It (the US) is partisan in its approach. They want to get Warner there in the shortest possible time,” Hosein said.

Stating that Hosein will be able to make extensive submissions on the issue at a later date, Justice James Aboud then instructed Gopaul to file her client’s application by March 18. Hosein also has until that date to file an application to adduce expert testimony in the case.

Warner, in his claim, is questioning the procedure adopted by the Office of the Attorney General in signing off on the US’s request for his extradition made in May, last year, at the end of the US Department of Justice’s investigation into Fifa. He is facing fraud and money-laundering charges related to his two decades as a vice-president of world football’s governing body.

Earlier this year, Aboud granted Warner a stay of his ongoing extradition proceedings currently before Chief Magistrate Marcia Ayers-Caesar, which will expire after Aboud decides on the legality and constitutionality of his extradition.

Warner’s attorneys are alleging that this country’s extradition treaty with the US contradicts the Extradition (Commonwealth and Foreign Territories) Act. They are claiming that, in passing the act, Parliament afforded citizens certain protections which are ignored by the international treaty.

He is also complaining that Attorney General Faris Al-Rawi failed to give his attorneys a fair opportunity to make representations to him before he signed off on the Authority to Proceed, which was required to kick off the proceedings before Ayers-Caesar.

Shortly after taking over the case from his predecessor Garvin Nicholas in September, last year, Al-Rawi extended the option to Warner. However, his attorneys allegedly refused as they said it was made a day before Al-Rawi was required to approve the extradition.

Warner is also being represented by Nyree Alfonso, Rishi Dass and Anil Maraj, while the State is being represented by Douglas Mendes, SC, and Michael Quamina.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2629 on: March 14, 2016, 04:28:45 PM »
From today's Frankfurter Allgemeine:

http://m.faz.net/aktuell/sport/fussball/wm-2006-skandal-ok-zahlte-auf-dubioses-jack-warner-konto-14124202.html

German federation said to have deposited €56,469 euros to an account not affiliated to the then TTFF.

E-man?
« Last Edit: March 14, 2016, 04:30:59 PM by asylumseeker »
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline Flex

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2630 on: March 16, 2016, 02:16:10 PM »
FIFA admits to World Cup hosting bribes, asks U.S. for return of money.
USA Today


GENEVA (AP) — FIFA acknowledged Wednesday that past World Cups were awarded based on bribes, and the organization wants U.S. prosecutors to give it "tens of millions of dollars" seized from the former FIFA officials who took the cash.

FIFA submitted a 22-page claim to the U.S. Attorney's Office in New York on Tuesday that seeks a big share in restitution from more than $190 million already forfeited by soccer and marketing officials who pleaded guilty in the sprawling corruption case.

Tens of millions of dollars more is likely to be collected by U.S. authorities when sentences are handed down, and from dozens of officials currently indicted but who have denied bribery charges or are fighting extradition.

FIFA claims it is the victim of corrupt individuals, despite widespread criticism that bribe-taking was embedded in its culture in the presidencies of Joao Havelange and Sepp Blatter, who was forced from office after 17 years by the current scandal.

"The convicted defendants abused the positions of trust they held at FIFA and other international football organizations and caused serious and lasting damage to FIFA," FIFA President Gianni Infantino said Wednesday in a statement. "The monies they pocketed belonged to global football and were meant for the development and promotion of the game. FIFA as the world governing body of football wants that money back and we are determined to get it no matter how long it takes."

In documents seen by The Associated Press, FIFA asks for:

— $28.2 million for years of payments, including bonuses, flights and daily expenses, to officials it now says are corrupt

— $10 million for the "theft" of money that FIFA officials transferred as bribes to then-executive committee members to vote for South Africa as 2010 World Cup host

— "substantial" cost of legal bills since separate U.S. and Swiss federal probes of corruption in international soccer were revealed last May

— damages for harm to its reputation, plus other bribes and kickbacks for media rights to non-FIFA competitions but "which were made possible because of the value of the FIFA brand"

"FIFA has become notable for the defendants' bribery and corruption, not its many good works," lawyers for soccer's world body state in the claim. "FIFA is entitled to restitution for this harm to its business relationships, reputation and intangible property."

FIFA's grab for a share of the money sets up a battle with two of its regional confederations — CONMEBOL, the South American confederation, and CONCACAF, the body running soccer in North America. It was officials and competitions from those regions that were most involved in the corruption crisis.

It also signals a change in strategy for FIFA, after months of senior officials distancing Zurich from the scandal, instead blaming confederations which are beyond its control.

Most of the already seized money — $151.7 million — will come from Brazilian marketing executive Jose Hawilla, whose group of agencies were heavily involved with matches CONCACAF and CONMEBOL controlled but not FIFA directly.

In an initial claim for $28.2 million, FIFA specifies an amount for each of 20 men from the Americas over many years that it says it should be repaid from money held by U.S. authorities.

FIFA wants more than $5.3 million it spent on Chuck Blazer, the disgraced American official who has pleaded guilty, allocates $4.4 million of its claim for former FIFA vice president Jack Warner, and $3.5 million for Ricardo Teixeira, Havelange's former son-in-law form Brazil.

Warner, a long-time powerbroker from Trinidad and Tobago until resigning in a 2011 election bribery scandal, is identified by FIFA in its 22-page claim for receiving a $1 million bribe from 1998 World Cup bid candidate Morocco, and ensuring the $10 million bribe from South Africa was paid via a FIFA account in 2008.

FIFA claims a further $2 million for payments to Jeffrey Webb, the Cayman Islands banker who was arrested at a luxury Zurich hotel last May, and now lives at his home near Atlanta, Georgia, awaiting sentence in June.

"These dollars were meant to build football fields, not mansions and pools; to buy football kits, not jewelry and cars; and to fund youth player and coach development, not to underwrite lavish lifestyles for football and sports marketing executives," Infantino said.

It is unclear how much influence Infantino, a former lawyer, had had in the restitution claim since he was elected only three weeks ago, with strong support from voters in the Americas.

Infantino's signature pitch to voters on election day was about finances, saying bluntly "It's your money." That resonated with members of CONMEBOL and CONCACAF, who have had a combined $20 million central funding frozen by FIFA.

CONCACAF, based in Miami, has had its past three presidents implicated in the U.S. case. But it has passed wide-ranging reforms to clean up its operations, and has targeted restitution money to rebuild.

"CONCACAF views itself as a victim of a number of the offenses described in the indictments and intends to seek restitution at the appropriate time," the regional body said in a statement.


Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

RELATED NEWS

Fifa to sue Jack Warner, Chuck Blazer and Jeffrey Webb in attempt to reclaim pocketed millions
By Phil Blanche (Independent).


The governing body has submitted documents to the US authorities in an effort to reclaim tens of millions of dollars

Fifa plans to reclaim millions of dollars pocketed illegally by corrupt Fifa members and other football officials.

A US investigation exposed widespread corruption at the top of world football and Fifa estimates that at a minimum tens of millions of dollars were diverted from the sport illegally through bribery, kickbacks and corrupt schemes carried out by the defendants.

Fifa submitted documents on Wednesday to the US authorities in an effort to reclaim tens of millions of dollars taken illegally by corrupt Fifa members and other football officials

Newly-elected Fifa president Gianni Infantino said in a statement: "The defendants diverted this money not just from Fifa but from players, coaches and fans worldwide who benefit from the programmes that Fifa runs to develop and promote football."

Former executives Jack Warner, a former Fifa vice-president, Chuck Blazer and Jeffrey Webb are among the defendants Fifa has said it will sue.

Fifa says it is a "victimised institution" and has submitted a request for restitution to the US attorney's office and the US probation office for the Eastern District of New York.

It is claiming damages from 41 former Fifa officials from other football organisations indicted in the ongoing investigation by the US Department of Justice.

Fifa accepts the millions of dollars lost during the corruption scandal is likely to increase as the investigation continues.

The US government has already announced forfeiture amounts that should cover Fifa's claims for damages.

"The convicted defendants abused the positions of trust they held at Fifa and other international football organisations and caused serious and lasting damage to Fifa, its member associations and the football community," Infantino said.

"The monies they pocketed belonged to global football and were meant for the development and promotion of the game.

"Fifa as the world governing body of football wants that money back and we are determined to get it no matter how long it takes.

"These dollars were meant to build football fields, not mansions and pools; to buy football kits, not jewellery and cars; and to fund youth player and coach development, not to underwrite lavish lifestyles for football and sports marketing executives.

"When Fifa recovers this money, it will be directed back to its original purpose: for the benefit and development of international football."

« Last Edit: March 16, 2016, 02:25:46 PM by Flex »
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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2631 on: March 16, 2016, 03:27:45 PM »

Offline Flex

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2632 on: March 19, 2016, 04:49:57 AM »
Warner says FIFA owes him money.
AFP News


PORT OF SPAIN (AFP) - Disgraced former FIFA vice-president Jack Warner scoffed Friday at reports that the new leaders of the global football governing body are seeking to sue him, insisting FIFA owes him money.

"I don't owe FIFA one nickel and I know that FIFA owes me, but we will deal with that in the fullness of time," Warner said, addressing reporters on the steps of the Hall of Justice in Port-of-Spain.

Warner said that since his resignation in 2011, he has not been paid a pension of US $100,000 a year.

"I don't even think the FIFA you're talking about is the FIFA I know," Warner said when asked for his reaction to the suit.

On Wednesday FIFA filed requests for restitution with US authorities to reclaim an estimated $190 million which 39 former FIFA executive members, regional football officials, sports marketing moguls and two companies indicted in the United States are accused of embezzling over decades.

Newly elected FIFA president Gianni Infantino said in a statement: "The defendants diverted this money not just from FIFA but from players, coaches and fans worldwide who benefit from the programmes that FIFA runs to develop and promote football."

The new FIFA executive says a $10 million payment from South Africa to CONCACAF -- football's governing body for North and Central America and the Caribbean which was led by Warner at the time -- was a bribe in exchange for votes in the 2010 World Cup bid process.

Warner was in court on Friday for a hearing in his legal challenge to extradition proceedings filed against him by the United States.

He is challenging the legality of the extradition treaty that exists between the United States and Trinidad and Tobago.

Several procedural matters remain to be dealt with. Another hearing was set for June 3.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

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The depths of Jack Warner's greed: Excerpt from American Huckster
« Reply #2633 on: April 20, 2016, 07:10:42 AM »
The depths of Jack Warner's greed: Excerpt from American Huckster
By Mary Papenfuss and Teri Thompson


This article is excerpted from American Huckster: How Chuck Blazer Got Rich From—and Sold Out—the Most Powerful Cabal in World Sports by Mary Papenfuss & Teri Thompson, available April 26 from HarperCollins. It can be pre-ordered here.

A jumble of bleached concrete structures rises in the sticky heat across from farm fields in the tiny Trinidadian township of Macoya. CONCACAF, the acronym of the soccer federation representing the Caribbean and Central and North America, is spelled in large blue letters on a water tower. The complex includes a bathhouse, an outdoor swimming pool, the small Marvin Lee Stadium and soccer field, a hangar-sized meeting and banquet building, a health club and an inn. The buildings are so out of place in this tropical landscape 11 miles east of Port of Spain that they could have been dropped there by aliens. But they’re hardly futuristic or even state of the art. The electricity sometimes flickers out at the inn, or the hot water trickles to nothing.

This is CONCACAF’s $26 million Centre of Excellence.

It was meant to help promote the beautiful game and develop playing and coaching skills. Instead, it’s the mother of sports boondoggles, built by the man branded by one U.S. law enforcement investigator as FIFA’s crook of crooks: former CONCACAF president Jack Warner.

Warner’s greed was deeper than the Caribbean, and it would drown both him and his longtime American partner in crime, CONCACAF secretary general Chuck Blazer.

Blazer had backed Warner to become the association’s president in 1990, an initially lucrative miscalculation that, a decade and a half later, would trigger Blazer’s ignominious downfall—and FIFA’s. Over the years Warner’s scams became ever more brazen and his invective ever more outlandish until they exposed the FIFA executive committee’s dirty business, which had been cloaked for decades behind impeccable manners and carefully coded conversations at elegant dinners.

The Centre of Excellence was Warner’s brainchild, paid for by FIFA and CONCACAF. But the CONCACAF board didn’t discover until 2012 (17 years after the center was approved) that the complex had been built on land owned by Warner. He used soccer association funds to buy the real estate and controlled all construction and operating funds. As of late 2015, four years after his removal from both CONCACAF and the FIFA executive committee (Ex-Co), Warner still owned the center and collected income from it.

The complex is tucked away at the extreme southeastern edge of the vast CONCACAF territory, which extends from the Caribbean to northern Canada. “It’s as if we located it in some backwater town in Alaska,” noted Clive Toye, the former general manager of the defunct New York Cosmos, who worked for a time for CONCACAF. “There was a soccer pitch, but not a very good one, and I never saw a single person playing a game or practicing.”

There seemed to be everything else, though. The Centre of Excellence has hosted the Trini Ink Tattoo Convention, the Caribbean Nail and Beauty Trade Show and a Barely Legal Pimp My Ride car show. Weddings are its major moneymakers. As for soccer-related activities, very occasional coaching clinics are conducted by the Joe Public Football Club, one of Warner’s many family companies. (It also owns the FC Santa Rosa team, which plays the odd game at the stadium.) The Warner family travel agency, Simpaul, arranges all transportation to the site.

In 1996 João Havelange, who was then FIFA’s president thanks in part to the votes of Caribbean nations that Warner delivered, praised Warner for his “vision” in creating the center. By then two Warner family companies, CCAM and Company Ltd. and Renraw Investments Ltd., had purchased the three plots of land for the center for a total of $1.7 million. The first purchase in Renraw’s name was tracked directly to FIFA funds; records on the purchase details for the other parcels are missing, but CCAM and Renraw bought the land shortly after FIFA funds were deposited in—and vanished from—CONCACAF accounts.

CONCACAF spent at least $26 million on the construction and development of the Centre of Excellence from ’96 to 2006. Warner also leveraged the property as collateral to obtain personal loans, according to a subsequent investigative report by CONCACAF’s integrity committee. The committee was unable to determine how any of the millions spent on the center were used, because all records (if any existed) were kept by Warner, who refused to turn them over.

The boldness of the scam worried Blazer. The two men had colluded to collect bribe money in CONCACAF tournaments such as the Gold Cup, Blazer would later confess in U.S. court, and they had covered for each other on individual moneymaking schemes. But the Centre of Excellence was a monster con that devoured funds needed to run the association and its legitimate activities. “There are so many things that could have been done with the tens of millions of dollars wasted there,” Blazer is quoted as saying in the integrity committee report.

Warner controlled at least four accounts with slight variations in name, a shell game to cache diverted funds, investigators for the integrity committee discovered. When Blazer asked Australian bid committee chairman Frank Lowy about the promised money, the men realized it had been hijacked into one of Warner’s accounts.
(Lowy later denied the money was intended as a bribe.)

Another contribution, cited in the U.S. indictments of multiple FIFA officials in May 2015, was South Africa’s bombshell $10 million donation to the center. U.S. officials called it a bribe. Blazer “understood the offer to be in exchange” for his and Warner’s FIFA Ex-Co votes backing South Africa’s bid to host the 2010 Cup, according to the federal indictments.

When CONCACAF investigators finally discovered in 2012 that Warner was the legal owner of the Centre of Excellence, he insisted the facility had been intended all along as a “gift for the Caribbean and Jack Warner” by his mentor, Havelange. “There is no ambiguity,” Warner announced. He claimed he had been given an initial $6 million grant for the center in exchange for a promise to Havelange that he would deliver CONCACAF votes to Havelange’s chosen successor as FIFA president, Sepp Blatter. With CONCACAF’s votes, Blatter did indeed win, 111 to 80.

It was this kind of breathtaking flimflam that helped turn an impoverished Trinidadian boy into a multimillionaire. Warner was one of six siblings raised largely by his mom, Stella, in the village of Rio Claro in southern Trinidad. Stella did cleaning and took in laundry for the parents of a number of Jack’s classmates. His peers sometimes used this to embarrass him, a teacher recounted in Warner’s biography From Zero to Hero, which he co-wrote with journalist Valentino Singh.

Later, when the Warner children lived with an aunt in another community, they faced a different form of discrimination: racism. Rio Claro was “dominated by Afro-Trinidadians,” the biography states; “now [Jack] found himself surrounded by Indo-Trinidadians” in a community where people’s “complexion often dictated how they were treated.” Even his aunt, whose children had lighter skin, treated her nieces and nephews differently. In his biography Warner compared his experience to Cinderella’s: “We were treated like outcasts and it was almost as if we were brought there to look after my aunt’s children.”

Warner was a bright, industrious student whose good grades earned him scholarships to some of Trinidad’s most rigorous schools. He attended the College of St. Philip and St. James and later earned a degree in international relations from the University of the West Indies. Eventually he became a history teacher at the island’s prestigious Polytechnic Institute.

Warner played soccer, but not very well. He loved the game, though, and was drawn to participate in its life in any way he could. He began by serving as general secretary of the Central Football Association and the Central St. George Football Association and rose to become secretary and head of the TTFF and eventually head of the Caribbean Football Union (CFU).

Warner’s cunning and his hardscrabble background served him well amid the varied demographics of Trinidad and Tobago’s soccer associations—and, later, in island politics. But few members of FIFA’s Ex-Co, to which Warner was elevated in 1983, had a soccer history as controversial as his. Printing and selling fake tickets and failing to pay players at the 1989 World Cup playoff was just the beginning.

In 2002 Simpaul Travel, the Warner family company, sold hundreds of black-market World Cup tickets packaged in expensive trips at a $350,000 profit, FIFA investigators discovered. For the ’06 Cup in Germany, Simpaul made at least a $1.7 million profit by selling $30,000 ticket-and-trip packages, which was by then against the rules—and the law, according to the 2015 U.S. charges filed against Jack’s son Daryan Warner. As a penalty FIFA ordered the Warner family to make a $1 million donation to a charity, but only $250,000 was paid. Jack Warner also agreed to sever all family ties to Simpaul—but Daryan remained a director.

Media rights giveaways to Warner from FIFA presidents in exchange for his crucial support also made him a fortune. Havelange “sold” Caribbean broadcast rights to the ’90 and ’94 World Cups to Warner for $1 each so he could resell them for millions. The profits were supposed to be spent developing soccer in the region, but Warner was free to use the proceeds as he saw fit. By Warner’s admission, Havelange and Blatter arranged the same deal for the ’98 rights, to reward Warner for helping to get Blatter elected FIFA president.

Blatter sold Warner Caribbean broadcast rights for the ’10 and ’14 World Cups for a total of $600,000, according to a contract uncovered by Swiss television station SRF. Warner sublicensed the rights to his private company J&D International (JDI), registered in the Caymans Islands, which in turn sold them to Jamaica SportsMax TV for as much as $20 million. Warner claimed that Blatter also gave him steep discounts on rights for the ’02 and ’06 Cups. JDI resold the ’06 World Cup rights for $4.25 million. No one but Warner knows where the money ended up.

Ticket and media deals were augmented by bribes and outright theft, according to U.S. law enforcement authorities and some soccer leaders. Lord David Triesman, the former chairman of the English Football Association and head of England’s bid for the ’18 World Cup, accused Warner in ’11 of soliciting almost $4 million in return for votes. Funds were supposed to be filtered—again—through the Centre of Excellence. Warner called the allegations a “piece of nonsense.” Blatter vowed to look into the accusations but said he couldn’t be responsible for the activities of all the Ex-Co members, who “might be angels or they could be devils.”

Some $750,000 paid to the TTFF by FIFA and the South Korean Football Federation intended for victims of the catastrophic earthquake that struck Haiti in 2010 vanished while Warner was special adviser to the Caribbean association. TTFF officials said the money landed in an account controlled by Warner.

Warner thought nothing of pressing targets for money loudly and pointedly—in front of witnesses. He even badgered the Queen of England while having tea with her at Buckingham Palace as part of her nation’s bid to host the World Cup. Warner berated Her Majesty for not spending money to cultivate soccer in Trinidad and Tobago. When representatives of Russia gathered at CONCACAF offices in Trump Tower for an early meeting concerning their 2018 World Cup bid, Warner blurted out at the end of their presentation: “What’s in it for me?”

Warner felt even more invincible as his increasing popularity in Trinidad thrust him into the political arena and he was appointed the country’s minister of security. In 2007 Warner was elected co-chairman of the opposition party, the United National Congress-Alliance. He became a member of Parliament when the party grabbed 15 of 41 seats in the election that year. He won again in 2010 and vowed to enforce capital punishment by hanging to crack down on crime and corruption. (There hasn’t been a hanging in Trinidad and Tobago since 1999.)

Warner allied himself with people and countries he considered to have been rebuffed by the old, white, Western world of FIFA power brokers. He repeatedly emphasized his nation’s part in the African diaspora. He felt that the Caribbean had been disrespected by FIFA, and he portrayed his indictment in 2015 as persecution by the spoiled Americans, who were miffed because they had missed out on hosting the 2018 World Cup. “America believes that it has some divine right to get the World Cup,” he said in a videotaped news conference, “and they don’t believe that a country like Qatar, a small country—a Muslim country—has a right to a World Cup.”

In the midst of this Warner mistook an article in the satirical newspaper The Onion as legitimate journalism. The piece was headlined “FIFA Frantically Announces 2015 Summer World Cup in United States.” The article, with a Zurich dateline, reported that matches were “set to kick off today . . . in Los Angeles.” A smiling Sepp Blatter unveiled the tournament’s official logo, a hand-drawn stick figure kicking a soccer ball with “USA 2015!” scribbled above its head in black marker. Warner posted a video to his Facebook page in which he held up the Onion article and asked incredulously, “If FIFA is so bad, why is it that the USA wants to keep the FIFA World Cup?”

Even more entertaining was Warner’s dustup with British comedian John Oliver on Oliver’s HBO show Last Week Tonight. Warner had denounced his indictment in a paid political ad on Trinidad TV. He vowed to provide evidence linking FIFA officials and the 2010 Trinidad presidential election. “Not even death will stop the avalanche that is coming,” he said.

Oliver, all faux outrage and concern, paid for a spot on the same Trinidad station to run a portion of his comedy monologue answering Warner. He urged the Trinidadian to abide by his promise to lay bare FIFA’s disgusting secrets. Warner’s response again was clueless. He gravely attacked Oliver for “embarrassing” the citizens of Trinidad and Tobago. He called the British comedian an “American foreigner” and grumbled, “I don’t need any advice from any comedian fool.” That made Oliver giddy. He crowed on his program that he was adding “comedian fool” to his business card.

The $10 million bribe that Blazer and Warner extracted from South Africa in 2004 for the right to host the 2010 World Cup was criminal, but their cruel exploitation of 85-year-old former South African president Nelson Mandela was near tragic.

South Africa had lost the ’06 Cup to Germany, and the overwhelming sentiment within soccer was that Mandela and Africa deserved the next Cup. But Warner, then Trinidad’s security minister and a member of Parliament, was in need of political capital. Ten million or not, “Jack bluntly told us that if we wanted his vote, we must bring Mandela to the Caribbean,” Irvin Khoza, the chairman of South Africa’s organizing committee, said in 2009.

Mandela’s doctors advised against the long flight over the belly of the earth, but South African bid and government officials persuaded the tired and frail Madiba, as Mandela was known, to travel to Trinidad. On April 28, 2004, he boarded a Gulfstream V for the 22-hour flight to Port of Spain. When the G5 touched down at Piarco International Airport and Mandela stepped out, an honor guard stood on the tarmac and an eager crowd of politicians and civilians greeted him with shouts of “Madiba! Madiba!” Mandela hadn’t wanted the fanfare and was too weak to climb the steps of a podium where he was to address the adoring throng. Instead he smiled and told them simply that he had come “for two reasons: because I love you very much and because it is not easy to love an old man. So I urge you to love South Africa and this old man.”

Mandela had barely slept on the flight. His personal assistant, Zelda La Grange, later wrote in her book Good Morning, Mr. Mandela: A Memoir that she had tried to minimize Mandela’s appearances in Trinidad, to little avail: “The entire visit was a battle.”

Mandela’s stay in Trinidad was blessedly brief. He was called home less than two days later for the funeral of his first wife, Evelyn Mase, but not before attending a $1,000-a-plate dinner at the Centre of Excellence in its hard-to-reach dusty wasteland. On the evening of April 29 the center hosted a gala honoring Mandela, with the cracks in the walls covered by screens and curtains. Warner had wrung political gain from a sickly icon under the guise of bringing the CONCACAF vote to South Africa.

To the outside world, Mandela’s courage, charisma and place in history were the reasons for South Africa’s 14-to-10 winning vote over Morocco and Egypt, announced two weeks later in Zurich. Eleven years later, U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch would make it clear that the three tainted votes Warner had delivered were the real difference. As the South African newspaper Daily Maverick’s columnist Stephen Grootes wrote after the indictments: “We didn’t know then the cost. And particularly the cost to Nelson Mandela, shipping around the world to satisfy the craving of some two-bit crook.”

That was perhaps a little unfair to Warner, who was much more than a “two-bit” crook. After all, he’d already stolen more than $25 million from FIFA and CONCACAF.

Months after FIFA’s Ex-Co chose Qatar as the site of the 2022 World Cup—a selection that stunned soccer fans and players around the world—Mohamed bin Hammam, president of the Qatar Football Association and of the Asian Football Confederation, acted to capitalize on his nation’s new soccer clout. He announced in March 2011 that he was running to unseat Blatter as FIFA president.

Bin Hammam vowed to battle corruption and increase FIFA’s financial transparency—while at the same time he arranged to offer cash to voters in the Caribbean with Jack Warner’s help. The Qatari billionaire aimed to pay a total of $1 million to leaders of the various CFU member associations in Trinidad, investigators would later find. Presidents of the local federations and their general secretaries received an e-mailed invitation from Warner to an all-expenses-paid meeting at the Hyatt Regency in Port of Spain on Tuesday, May 10.

Bin Hammam and his nine-member delegation arrived in Trinidad on the eve of the meeting. The following day the CFU’s general secretary, Angenie Kanhai, retrieved a suitcase packed with envelopes of cash from Warner’s office, she would testify. CFU representatives gathered at the Hyatt on Tuesday morning and ate breakfast in a conference room where bin Hammam made a 45-minute speech explaining why he would make an excellent FIFA president.

He promised that, if elected, he would give the associations “more say, more support and more pay.”

At a luncheon later Warner instructed everyone to go to one of the hotel conference rooms and collect their “gift,” as Fred Lunn, vice president of the Bahamas Football Association, would explain in an affidavit. When Lunn was ushered into the room, CFU administrator Debbie Minguell asked him to sign a registration form. Lunn added in his affidavit:

She then handed me a manila envelope with “Bahamas” written on it. I opened the envelope . . . and stacks of hundred-dollar bills fell out . . . . I asked them what it was, and they told me that it was $40,000. They said it was a “gift” from the CFU. . . . I told them that I had not been authorized to accept such a gift. . . . Debbie reiterated that it was just a gift, and I should accept it. She also told me not to tell anyone about the money.

Lunn contacted his association president, Anton Sealey, who told him to immediately return the money. Sealey then called Chuck Blazer. Blazer “indicated that he was not aware of any payments and that he had not authorized any CONCACAF funds to be distributed as cash gifts,” Sealey recalled in his own affidavit. (Several other CFU officials also refused the money.) Blazer sent Warner an e-mail warning him, in code, that “MBH’s ATMs”—Mohamed bin Hammam’s payoffs—“were doing some damage, and we need to talk.”

The day after Sealey called Blazer, an angry Warner summoned CFU members to a hotel conference room. Warner expressed his extreme disappointment that word of the “gifts” had leaked. He insisted that both CONCACAF and FIFA knew about the payments and that “any country that doesn’t want the gift has the right” to return it to bin Hammam. “What I am telling you, even Mr. Blatter is aware of, no secret,” Warner said. “I told Blatter also what he gets as well.” He explained that cash was simply the most convenient gift available: “It was given to you because [bin Hammam] could not bring . . . some silver trinkets and so on, and something with Qatari sand.” Warner dismissed any moralizing: “If you are pious, go to a church, friends.”

Later that day Warner called Blazer to reassure him that he had informed Blatter about the money and that Blatter had no qualms about the payments. Three days after Sealey called him, Blazer contacted FIFA’s general secretary to advise him of an apparent violation of the organization’s code of ethics. Blazer couldn’t see any way to avoid making the call. Too many people knew about the payments, and one of them had come to him directly with a complaint.

Warner was floored that his friend reported him to Zurich, and he vowed revenge. He promised to expose Blazer and unleash a “tsunami” of information that would hit FIFA in the “fullness of time.” Warner ripped Blazer’s “ingratitude” as “worse than witchcraft” and blamed a “Zionist plot” against himself and bin Hammam, a clear attack on CONCACAF’s Jewish general secretary.

In a lightning-fast response that was unusual for FIFA—and that ensured another term for Blatter in the June 1 presidential election—the organization suspended both Warner and bin Hammam from all soccer administration activities on May 29, and bin Hammam bowed out of the race for president. By June 11 FIFA had announced that Warner was resigning from all international football organizations, and it barred bin Hammam for life from soccer activities.

Besides Warner, the long list of people charged by the U.S. in the FIFA scandal included his sons Darryl and Daryan, who copped to counts including wire fraud and money laundering. Daryan paid a $1.1 million fine and agreed to pay more at sentencing.

Meanwhile, in Port of Spain, Jack Warner appeared before a crowd in a run-down neighborhood and compared himself to an Ebola victim as he proclaimed his innocence and touted his candidacy for reelection to Parliament. He surely figured a seat in Parliament couldn’t hurt his fight to avoid extradition to the U.S. Warner denied publicly that he would ever cooperate with U.S. law enforcement, saying he had not been afforded due process.

On Sept. 21 Warner was in a Port of Spain courtroom awaiting a ruling on extradition from Trinidad attorney general Faris Al-Rawi. He had lost his election for Parliament and at least some of his political clout, but rumors circulated that he had cut a deal with the new prime minister, Keith Rowley, that saved him from the clutches of the U.S. Justice Department. Flanked by reporters and television cameras, Warner emerged from the courtroom with a delay in hand. His lawyers would eventually secure a judicial review of the extradition process itself, putting off their client’s next court appearance until Feb. 19, 2016.

The U.S. indictment describes Warner as a man engaged in racketeering, bribery, wire fraud and money laundering. One person close to the investigations would say, “The worst person I came across in football was Jack Warner.”
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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2634 on: April 20, 2016, 10:23:07 AM »
Jack is such a good villain. 10/10

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2635 on: April 20, 2016, 05:31:50 PM »
I wish to state for the record that FC Santa Rosa has never been owned by any member of the Warner family, or any company belonging to the Warner Group.

FC Santa Rosa is the property of Keith Look Loy, the founder and sole proprietor of the club since 19 September 1992. In the twenty-four years since its inception, the owner, staff, members and supporters of FC Santa Rosa have worked tirelessly to transform the reality of our Rosa Nation, the thousands of young people we have touched, and the community of Arima, to which we belong. We have transformed what was a youth club into one of the best football clubs in the country.

The statement regarding our club in this book excerpt is false and FC Santa Rosa's lawyers are addressing this matter. In that regard, the authors of the book from which the SI article is excerpted have contacted me this afternoon via telephone to apologize for the incorrect statement regarding FC Santa Rosa's ownership, and have promised a retraction and explanation in Sports Illustrated. I await this. We have also called on the authors to excise the statement from the book. We wait on that. Meantime, we reserve all options. - Keith Look Loy

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Deeks

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2636 on: May 02, 2016, 10:11:33 PM »
FCB moves on Jack to recover $1.2m
By Derek Achong (T&T Guardian)


Former government minister Jack Warner may potentially lose the Centre of Excellence, Macoya, as First Citizens Bank (FCB) seeks to recover $1.2 million in unpaid overdraft fees from him.

Through a lawsuit filed in March, First Citizens is seeking repayment of the outstanding funds as well as possession of the 26-acre complex in Macoya and a property in Crown Point, Tobago, which were both mortgaged by Warner as security for the overdraft facility.

The lawsuit came up for hearing before High Court judge Frank Seepersad in the Port-of-Spain High Court for the first time yesterday. Seepersad gave both parties deadlines for filing evidence in the case and adjourned it to June 6.

In her witness statement in the case the bank’s senior manager for private sector, corporate and investment, Maria Mike, said Warner set up the overdraft facility in 2010.

At the time of Warner’s last payment to the bank in November 2012, the outstanding balance on the overdraft was almost $860,000. The compensation being claimed by the bank includes interest on the balance stipulated by the bank in its agreement with Warner.

Since resigning as a government minister in 2013 following corruption allegations during his two-decade tenure as vice-president of world football’s governing body FIFA, Warner has been repeatedly hit with legal woes.

In 2014, he was ordered to pay $275,000 in compensation to Faaiq Mohammed, one of his Independent Liberal Party (ILP) local government councillors, who he accused of taking a bribe.

Last year, Justice Robin Mohammed ordered Warner to pay former attorney general Anand Ramlogan almost $900,000 in damages for defamation. Last month, Warner settled a defamation lawsuit brought by former food production minister Devant Maharaj against his weekly Sunshine newspaper.

Besides his legal woes for libel, Warner is challenging his extradition to the United States where he faces fraud and money laundering charges arising out of a US Department of Justice investigation into FIFA officials.

Warner was represented by Keith Scotland and Asha Watkins-Montserin, while Stephen Singh and Shalini Campbell appeared for FCB
« Last Edit: May 03, 2016, 03:00:49 PM by Tallman »

Offline Tallman

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Jack Warner counter sues FCB
« Reply #2637 on: May 03, 2016, 03:01:51 PM »
Jack Warner counter sues FCB
looptt.com


Jack Warner is countersuing First Citizens Bank (FCB) to recover money which he said was wrongfully taken out of his account.

In a statement responding to reports that FCB has filed a claim against him and three companies for the recovery of $1,256,026.90 which includes interest on an overdraft account in his name, Warner said the  loss falls on the bank.

"It was in 2013 Mr Warner brought to the attention of FCB Limited the fact that 36 cheques drawn on his account amounting to the total sum of $1,940,385.00 were honoured by the bank. On all of these cheques, the signature of Mr Warner was forged by one of his employees. FCB failed to detect these forgeries and honoured all of these cheques contrary to the obligations imposed on FCB by the law as well as good banking practice,” he said in a statement.

 Noting that the forgeries are the subject of criminal proceedings, Warner said representatives of FCB met with him on several occasions on that matter.

“They have however failed to deal satisfactorily with his complaints including the fact that they should not have honoured these invalid forged cheques. In fact, the bank’s expert selected only 12 of the 36 cheques which are in the possession of the Fraud Squad for examination and concluded that they were forged. Furthermore, the bank’s expert issued a report stating that the signatures on those cheques he examined were forgeries,” he said,

The statement said that the person(s) who perpetrated this fraud have been arrested and charged by the police.

“A bank has no authority to pay a forged cheque or debit it to a customer's account and, if it does so, any loss falls on the bank. In these circumstances, the amounts claimed by FCB includes amounts that were wrongfully taken out of Mr Warner’s account without authority.

“In fact, the amount owing to Mr Warner amounts to the sum of $1,940,385.00 plus interest which, calculated at the rate of 9 percent will be well in excess of the amount claimed by FCB. In these circumstances Mr Warner has given instructions to his attorneys to countersue the bank for damages in respect of those cheques,” the statement said.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Jumbie

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2638 on: May 03, 2016, 04:09:39 PM »
 :rotfl:  :rotfl: the irony

Offline Deeks

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Re: The Jack Warner Thread.
« Reply #2639 on: May 03, 2016, 04:09:44 PM »
"It was in 2013 Mr Warner brought to the attention of FCB Limited the fact that 36 cheques drawn on his account amounting to the total sum of $1,940,385.00 were honoured by the bank. On all of these cheques, the signature of Mr Warner was forged by one of his employees.

Jack, you take we for an arse or what ? Who is that employee? You is the man who knew everyone's business. Ah wonder if camps has anything to do with that?