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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #690 on: June 09, 2016, 02:58:34 PM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/IWw4YqaexJ4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/IWw4YqaexJ4</a>

Part 1.


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/-IRFjndSGVk" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/-IRFjndSGVk</a>

Part 2.


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/X3kuBPwUIuA" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/X3kuBPwUIuA</a>

Part 3.


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/wPwh4B4f328" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/wPwh4B4f328</a>

Part 4.


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/Z-siCziB-sw" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/Z-siCziB-sw</a>

Stephen Keshi: brawler, talker and most successful black African coach of all time
By Jonathan Wilson, The Guardian.


The former Nigeria and Togo manager, who died on Tuesday evening aged just 54, was, at international level, the finest African coach of his generation

The first time I met Stephen Keshi was in 2002. He was lying on a sun-lounger by a pool in a hotel in Bamako and I was one of about a dozen journalists crouched at his feet, eager for the views of the great centre-back turned assistant coach. The next time I saw him, four years later, he was fighting Emmanuel Adebayor on a bus in Cairo.

The last time I spoke to him was from a car park outside a warehouse in Johannesburg that, it turned out, stocked poles for erotic dancing as I interrupted my journey to the airport to find out whether he had actually resigned or was engaged in an act of remarkable brinkmanship.

Keshi, who died on Tuesday evening aged just 54, was a brilliant coach. He was a talker, a brawler and a politician. He had the thickest hide and deepest laugh of anybody at any Africa Cup of Nations over the past two decades. His critics, of whom there were many, would point out that he liked money, and that he used football to acquire it, which is true, although he’s hardly unique in that. But he’s also the most successful black African coach of all time, one of two people to win the Cup of Nations as a player and manager, and the only black African to coach in the knockout phase of a World Cup.

Even from that first chat in Mali, it was obvious then that he had a bright future in management. He was intelligent and ebullient, forthright in his answers and, vitally for anybody working in Nigerian football, he visibly enjoyed the process of being questioned and of explaining himself.

Keshi had been a very fine central defender, winning titles in Nigeria and Ivory Coast before moving to Belgium with Anderlecht where he won two cups and a league title. In 1994, he was, in partnership with Augustine Eguavoen, the bedrock of the superb Nigeria side that won the Cup of Nations in Tunisia. He was 32 then and moved to the US, winding down his playing days while studying to be a coach. He maintained a house in California for the rest of his life.

His first steps in coaching came with Togo. In 2004 he took over a side that had only previously reached five Cups of Nations, never getting beyond the group stage, and led them to an improbable qualification for the 2006 World Cup. It was a miraculous achievement but, the following January, Adebayor was left out of the starting line up for Togo’s opening game at the Cup of Nations, a 2-0 defeat to DR Congo. There was unconvincing talk of an injury but as journalists waited in the car park for players after the game, we became aware of a ruckus on the Togo team bus. Looking up, we saw Keshi being restrained by Togo players, fist raised, trying to get to Adebayor.

Keshi, it subsequently emerged, felt he was owed some sort of bonus for the centre-forward’s move from Monaco to Arsenal.

Keshi involved himself in transfers, something that was true even in his playing days. When Nii Lamptey, after impressing at the Under-20 World Cup in 1989, fled the Ghanaian football federation to make for Europe he went via Keshi’s agent in Lagos.

He eventually left Nigeria for Belgium on a forged passport that claimed he was Keshi’s son.

Without Adebayor, Togo lost all three games at that Cup of Nations.

Inevitably, Keshi was sacked, replaced by the septuagenarian German Otto Pfister. Togo lost every game at the World Cup as well. But Keshi would have his World Cup. He had an unexceptional stint in charge of Mali, sandwiched between two other spells with Togo before getting the job for which he had always seemed destined.

Nigeria are the great underachievers of African football. Despite being the most populous nation on the continent and caring deeply for the sport, they had won only two Cups of Nations. They didn’t even qualify for the 2012 tournament. Keshi perhaps, had learned from the experience of his former defensive partner Eguavoen, a decent man overwhelmed by the job, battered by what is perhaps the world’s most demanding football media.

Keshi, right from the off, fought back. Nigeria press conferences usually involve a pack of journalists berating the poor man at the front in the tracksuit; the browbeating carried on, but under Keshi the roles were reversed. This was the Big Boss in action, smarter, tougher, funnier than anybody else in the room. But he was not without humour and his barbs never felt like bullying. He appreciated a joke.

This was the Big Boss in action, smarter, tougher, funnier than anybody else in the room
For a couple of years the Second Captains podcast has used a hilarious sample of a charged exchange between Keshi and the BBC journalist Oluwashina Okeleji as one of its stings.

At the press conference in Rustenburg after Nigeria had beaten Ivory Coast in the quarter-finals of the 2013 Cup of Nations, the microphone was handed to the legendary South African journalist Mark Gleeson.

“Where have you been, big man?” Keshi asked (Gleeson is 6ft 10in). “I haven’t seen you in ages.”

“I’ve been covering the big boys,” came Gleeson’s reply.

For a fraction of a second, Keshi tried to look annoyed, but then his head rocked back in a familiar rumble of laughter.

Keshi had shown himself to be admirably independent. He’d infuriated many by calling up four players from the domestic league, and he had shown before the tournament that he was prepared to drop anybody he considered insufficiently committed. The old days of stars pulling out of friendlies and qualifiers at the last minute were ended. Nigeria went on to win the tournament, their first since 1994, and it was discernibly Keshi’s triumph.

Yet even in the hours after the final, the impossibility of the job was revealed as Nigerian Football Federation (NFF) officials approached the Zambia coach Herve Renard with a view to installing him in Keshi’s place. Keshi resigned, prompting my panicked call on the way to the airport, and the NFF was forced to back down. He led Nigeria to qualify for Brazil 2014, and there took them to the last 16 where they were a little unfortunate to lose to France.

His wrangles with the NFF went on and he finally left the job last year, having resigned on at least half a dozen occasions. His wife of 33 years, Kate, died last December and he has understandably had a lower public profile of late but there was still a sense that he had a lot more to give.

He could be awkward and obstreperous, and some of his involvement in transfer dealings was murky, but Keshi was, at international level, the finest African coach of his generation and he was fun to be around. Without his booming laugh, Cups of Nations won’t be the same.


R.I.P. Stephen Keshi.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2016, 04:06:16 PM by asylumseeker »

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #691 on: July 07, 2016, 10:27:02 AM »
Ohio State soccer player Fikayo Idowu drowns while swimming
By Bill Bush, The Columbus Dispatch.


1997-2016

Danny Jensen was hanging out with Fikayo Idowu on Thursday night and heard about a plan to go swimming on Friday.

“I knew a few people had been invited,” Jensen, an Ohio State University soccer player, said Saturday. “I just figured I’d stay home. I had to lift, I had to practice.”

While picking up a friend at Idowu’s house on Saturday, Jensen got the call: Idowu, his teammate, was dead, having drowned Friday in a lake about 40 miles northeast of Columbus.

“We kind of hung up the phone, and we kind of just looked at each other wondering if it was real,” Jensen said.

More than 100 people gathered to remember Idowu at the university’s Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium on Saturday evening. They used lighted candles to form his jersey number, 14, and released balloons into twilight sky.

“I didn’t believe it at first,” said Tyler Kidwell, 21, another teammate. “He was one of my best friends on the team.”

“It’s just an incredible turn of events,” Jensen said.

The drowning happened at Apple Valley Lake about 5 miles east of Mount Vernon in Knox County. Idowu, 19, was with teammates, soccer coach John Bluem said.

Idowu was a defender on the Buckeyes team who had played since 2014. He was a junior enrolled in a premed program. Friends said he wanted to be a surgeon.

"He was a very quiet kid," Bluem said. "Very intelligent, marvelous athlete, really, really hard worker. And again — one thing about him — there was always a smile, and always a pleasant person to be around."

The Knox County sheriff's office wasn't releasing details about the incident Saturday night.

"As I understand it, they just went up for the end of the day after classes,” Bluem said of the players. “They just went up to go for a swim."

Idowu's family is originally from Nigeria; they were traveling to Columbus on Saturday, Bluem said.

While living in Mississippi, Idowu reached out to OSU's coaches, Bluem said. "Here comes this 16-year-old. This 6-foot-3, 190 pounds, a chiseled athlete."

Bluem said that coaches thought upon meeting him: "'Oh, I think we're going to be excited about seeing this one play.'"

According to the Ohio State athletics website, Idowu was from Madison, Mississippi, and was majoring in health and rehabilitation sciences while planning to attend medical school. He was an Ohio State Prominence Scholar and a two-time OSU Scholar-Athlete.

Note: Prior to Ohio State, Fikayo participated in the Chicago Fire Academy program. He is thought to have been an Arsenal fan.

Offline ribbit

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Re: FIFA News Thread.
« Reply #692 on: August 19, 2016, 01:12:27 PM »
just saw havelange died on this week at the age of 100 (wow!).

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #693 on: August 19, 2016, 07:02:56 PM »
Former FIFA President Joao Havelange dies aged 100
FIFA


The President of FIFA from 1974 to 1998, Joao Havelange died in Samaritano Hospital, Rio de Janeiro. He was 100.

FIFA President Gianni Infantino expressed his sympathies: "During his 24 years as FIFA President football became truly global, reaching new territories and bringing the game to all corners of the world. Something the whole football community should be grateful for. I extend my condolences to his family."

Born in Rio de Janeiro on 8 May 1916 to Belgian immigrants, Jean-Marie Faustin Godefroid de Havelange proved himself to be an exceptional swimmer and represented Brazil at two Olympic Games, competing in the 400m and 1500m freestyle events at Berlin 1936 and forming part of the country’s water polo team at Helsinki 1952.

Though he trained as a lawyer, Havelange continued to pursue a career in the world of sport, becoming the head of the Brazilian delegation at the Melbourne Olympics in 1956 and the honorary president of Fluminense Football Club. In 1958, at the age of 42, he was appointed chairman of the Brazilian Sports Association (CBD), which later became the Brazilian Football Association (CBF).

Voted on to the International Olympic Committee in 1963, Havelange was elected President of FIFA on 11 June 1974. During his six terms in office a total of 50 new associations joined the governing body of world football. It was also during his presidency that FIFA organised the inaugural Women’s World Cup in 1991 and the first Futsal, Men’s U-20 and Men’s U-17 World Cups, in 1989, 1977 and 1985 respectively.

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #694 on: September 08, 2016, 08:57:44 PM »
When the world fell in love with Leonidas
FIFA.com


September 6, 1963  --- January 24, 2004

While much about the FIFA World Cup™ has changed and developed over the decades, its capacity to produce stars has been evident and unchanged from the word go.

By its third edition, the tournament had already helped make household names of players such as Luis Monti, Giuseppe Meazza and Matthias Sindelar - and a first Brazilian icon was on the way.

Leonidas da Silva was to become the top scorer and leading light of France 1938. By the time this photograph was taken, as he chatted to fans ahead of Brazil’s third-place win over Sweden, the entire football world – in addition, it seems, to a few of the local women – had become besotted with the player known as the ‘Rubber Man’ and the ‘Black Diamond’.

The tone was set in Brazil’s opening match – an incredibly dramatic 6-5 win over Poland – when he scored a brilliant hat-trick. Leonidas’ decisive third goal was the most memorable of all, with the Brazilian losing one of his boots in the thick Strasbourg mud before struggling on without it to fire home. This was a player who took particular pride in such spirit, once saying: “Even if I didn’t always play well, I never settled for a defeat.”

But will to win was just one of the ingredients that went towards making Leonidas the 1938 World Cup’s most exciting talent. "He was as fast as a greyhound, as agile as a cat, and seemed not to be made of flesh and bones at all, but entirely of rubber,” wrote Jerry Wienstein, one of his many admirers. “He was tireless in pursuit of the ball, fearless, and constantly on the move. He never conceded defeat. He shot from any angle and any position, and compensated for his small height with exceptionally supple, unbelievable contortions, and impossible acrobatics."

Those acrobatics were on show in the quarter-finals, when Leonidas scored again and stunned Czechoslovakia and the French fans with a new and spectacular trick: the bicycle kick. “Whether he’s on the ground or in the air, that rubber man has a diabolical gift for bringing the ball under control and unleashing thunderous shots when least expected,” wrote Raymond Thourmagem in Paris Match. “When Leonidas scores a goal, it all feels like a dream.”

Czechoslovakia took the quarter-final to a replay, but another goal from Brazil’s first World Cup superstar proved to be their undoing in that return meeting. Leonidas did, however, pick up a slight muscle strain in the victory and was rested for the semi-final against Italy, which the South Americans - weakened by the absence of his unique talents - lost 2-1. Yet as this photo shows, he was back in the team and, after some light flirting, back among the goals in the Match for Third Place, scoring two and setting up another as Sweden were seen off 4-2.

Having hit the net seven times in just four appearances, Leonidas returned home to a well-earned hero’s welcome, his place in World Cup folklore well and truly assured.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2016, 09:00:07 PM by asylumseeker »

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #695 on: October 25, 2016, 11:17:04 AM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/M5HbmeNKino" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/M5HbmeNKino</a>

Carlos Alberto, Brazil World Cup-winning captain, dies aged 72
The Guardian


July 17, 1944 –-- October 25, 2016

The World Cup-winning Brazil captain Carlos Alberto has died aged 72, his former club Santos have announced.

The full-back made 53 appearances for Brazil and scored what is considered one of the greatest goals in World Cup history, a fierce low strike to cap off a wonderful move in the 4-1 victory over Italy in the 1970 final.

Carlos Alberto died after suffering a heart attack in Rio de Janeiro, according to local TV.

He played for Fluminense, Santos, Flamengo and the New York Cosmos in a career stretching from 1962 to 1982 before going into management.

A Santos statement read: “He played 445 matches and scored 40 goals from 1965-1975, and is considered the best right-back in the history of Praiano Alvinegro.” The club also announced a mourning period of three days.

The Cosmos tweeted: “We’re deeply saddened by the loss of Carlos Alberto, a legendary player and wonderful person. He’ll always remain part of the Cosmos family.”

Peter Siemsen, the Fluminense president, said: “Very sad about the loss of our great captain Carlos Alberto Torres – one of the best in the history of world football. Formed in the Fluminense youth teams, the captain had tricolor blood. He took part in one of the great moments in the history of the club.”

Flamengo said in a statement: “Flamengo deeply regrets this irreparable loss and want the deepest feelings to fans, friends and family.”

Santos added: “Thanks for everything.”


Carlos Alberto, Brazil's World Cup-winning captain, has died aged 72
The Telegraph


Carlos Alberto, the captain of Brazil's 1970 World Cup-winning side, has died aged 72, his former club Santos have announced.

The defender scored one of the most memorable goals in the history of the World Cup sealing the 4-1 win over Italy in the 1970 final in Mexico City, when he completed a brilliant team move with a powerful angled drive from the right side of the penalty area.

A statement on the official Santos website read: "Santos FC regrets the death of the idol Carlos Alberto Torres, who was 72 years old.

"He played 445 matches and scored 40 goals in the 1965 period to 1975, and is considered the best right-back in the history of Praiano Alvinegro. The club had decreed official mourning three days."

Full-back Alberto won a total of 53 caps for Brazil and also helped both Santos and Fluminense secure domestic titles as well as enjoying a spell with New York Cosmos in the North American Soccer League later in his career alongside Pele.

The cause of Alberto's death could not immediately be confirmed.

Alberto could not take part in the 1974 World Cup because of a knee injury, although he did lead Brazil again in the qualifying campaign for 1978 before he retired from international football when he headed to the United States.

The Brazilian moved into management at his former club Flamengo, as well as spells in charge at Corinthians and Fluminense.

Alberto also held coaching roles with Nigeria and Oman before being appointed to take over as national boss of Azerbaijan in 2004. His time there included a 2-0 defeat against Sven-Goran Eriksson's England at St James' Park in March 2005.

Reports in the Brazilian media suggested Alberto, who recently worked as a commentator for broadcaster SporTV, had died of a heart attack.


The moment the news broke in Brazil.

:salute:


In eulogizing Carlos Alberto, Ronaldinho Gaucho refers to him as "an example of leadership on and off the field and a great friend who always treated him with affection". Ronaldinho also referred to him as "eternal captain" ... captain forever.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2016, 11:20:02 AM by asylumseeker »

Offline palos

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #696 on: October 25, 2016, 06:01:19 PM »
Sad news!  RIP
Carlos "The Rolls Royce" Edwards

Offline Deeks

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #697 on: October 25, 2016, 07:29:36 PM »
He led one of the greatest football team. What an iconic ending to that game. RIP, Carlos.

Offline Tallman

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RIP Larry Loobie
« Reply #698 on: November 07, 2016, 07:26:27 AM »
Former Trinidad and Tobago youth goalkeeper Larry Loobie passed away yesterday (November 6th) at the age of 41. He also played for El Dorado in the Colleges League.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline palos

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Re: RIP Larry Loobie
« Reply #699 on: November 07, 2016, 08:26:55 AM »
Condolences to family and friends
Carlos "The Rolls Royce" Edwards

Offline Tallman

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Former T&T Youth Goalkeeper Larry Loobie dies
« Reply #700 on: November 08, 2016, 09:58:24 AM »
Former T&T Youth Goalkeeper Larry Loobie dies
By Walter Alibey (T&T Guardian)


The football fraternity was plunged into mourning on the weekend following the death of former national goalkeeper Larry Loobie on Sunday morning. He was 41.

Loobie who produced a safe pair of hands in helping the country’s Under-15 football team to the Caribbean Football Union (CFU) title in Martinique in 1990, passed away from hypertension due to complications after gastic bypass surgery that was expected to assist him with weight loss and live a healthier life style.

His death comes less than a year after his father’s passing from the same condition on December 19.

Loobie represented El Dorado West, formerly El Dorado Junior Secondary with honours before being the obvious first choice with neighbouring El Dorado Comprehensive Secondary. He was the preferred choice to the outstanding Kelvin Jack and Kevin Leacock by coach Jean Lilywhite ahead of the CFU tournament, which they won playing unbeaten, courtesy an all round display that was marshalled from the defence by Loobie.

Loobie later joined the T&T Fire Service where he was again the coach’s choice in T&T’s top flight Semi Professional Football League. He also represented House of Dread and Penta Pacemakers in the Eddie Hart Football League.

Yesterday his sister Gillian, though saddened by his death, said she just cannot afford to weep at this time as she had to make funeral arrangements. She is expecting family members from the United States to arrive. The funeral is tentatively set for Friday at the St Mary’s Anglican Church in Tacarigua and then to the Tunapuna Cemetery.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Deeks

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Re: RIP Larry Loobie
« Reply #701 on: November 08, 2016, 10:07:35 AM »
Condolences to the Loobie family. I have heard a lot of this guy, but have never seen him play. RIP, FOOTBALL WARRIOR.

Offline fari

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Re: RIP Larry Loobie
« Reply #702 on: November 08, 2016, 02:44:28 PM »
Grew up hearing the name. Wow...41...young. Condolences to the family.

Offline Deeks

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Kieth Bronco Aqui
« Reply #703 on: November 11, 2016, 03:31:20 PM »
Forumites, I don't like to be the bearer of sad news. Just got a text that Bronco
died of heart attack. Will update with more details.

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Re: Kieth Bronco Aqui
« Reply #704 on: November 14, 2016, 12:31:22 PM »

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Re: Kieth Bronco Aqui
« Reply #705 on: November 14, 2016, 03:30:03 PM »
Sad indeed. RIP Keith
Carlos "The Rolls Royce" Edwards

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Re: Kieth Bronco Aqui
« Reply #706 on: November 14, 2016, 06:27:54 PM »
May he RIP.

Just curious, what part of TT was he from?
What Secondary school did he play for?

VB
VITAMIN V...KEEPS THE LADIES HEALTHY...:-)

Offline Tallman

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Re: Kieth Bronco Aqui
« Reply #707 on: November 14, 2016, 07:04:08 PM »
May he RIP.

Just curious, what part of TT was he from?
What Secondary school did he play for?

VB

He was from Tacarigua and played for St. George's College.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Kieth Bronco Aqui
« Reply #708 on: November 14, 2016, 07:45:38 PM »
There was a trio from Tacarigua, starting with Eddie Hart,
Buggy Haynes and Keith. They all went and played with Malvern.

Offline Tallman

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Loobie hailed as a man of many talents
« Reply #709 on: November 16, 2016, 12:42:16 PM »
Loobie hailed as a man of many talents
By Walter Alibey (T&T Guardian)


A man of many talents was how ex national goalkeeper Larry Loobie was described at his funeral service at the St Mary’s Anglican Church in Tacarigua, before he was laid to rest at the Tunapuna Cemetery last Friday.

Supporters and well wishers including former national striker Stern John and ex Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the T&T Cricket Board Forbes Persaud, packed the church mere hours before T&T was scheduled to face Costa Rica in a World Cup Qualifier at the Hasely Crawford Stadium in Mucurapo—a match that Loobie would have been quizzed on for his expert advice.

Instead his sister Kheisha Nicholls, in eulogising his life, said he was a well-respected individual with talents in tennis, football and music which quickly made him his mother’s starboy. “He was the apple of mammie’s eye. He was the spoil one. Anything Larry asked for he got. I would swell up and complain as mummy gave her last dollar to ensure Larry always had the equipment and gear he needed for football.”

Before his untimely passing on November 6th from hyper tension resulting from complications due to gastic bypass surgery, Loobie, 41, began his sporting career in table tennis from the age of nine and was quickly spotted by coaches when he also decided to try his hand at football soon after.

This talent led him to many achievements as he became the first choice custodian for minor league teams Tunapuna Spain, Penta Pace Makers and House of Dread and could not be denied when Persaud and Trevor Spicer got their eyes on him at both El Dorado West and East Secondary Schools respectively.

Loobie later helped in guiding the T&T Under-15 football team to the Caribbean Football Union (CFU) title in Martinique in 1990 and continued his acrobatics in the goal up until the U-21 level and for his employers- the T&T Fire Service.

After his football days Loobie decided to act on his love for music by playing for Tropical Angel Harp for many years during Panorama. And when he was not playing pan, he was producing tracks which later propelled him to start his own mixology company known as Trakslasha Productions.

For all his sporting and musical achievements, however, Loobie’s true pride and joy came from the birth of his niece Rianne, whom he loved dearly and often filled the role of the father she always dreamt of.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Deeks

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Re: The In Memory of Thread (Red, White, & Black)
« Reply #710 on: November 16, 2016, 04:19:46 PM »
Keith Bronco Acqui funeral service will be held this Friday at 10 am at the
Howard University Law School chapel. This is the Van Ness campus on Connecticut ave
in northwest DC.

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Keith Aqui reminds us of a ‘truer and livelier’ sport
« Reply #711 on: November 16, 2016, 07:25:34 PM »
Former Howard University soccer star, Keith Aqui, reminds us of a ‘truer and livelier’ sport
By Paul Gardner (theundefeated.com)


There comes a reminder — a sad reminder, alas — from the 1970s. The death of Keith Aqui brings memories flooding back of college soccer and the exploits of Howard University.

Aqui, who died far too young at 71, was on the Howard team that in 1971 won the NCAA Division I title. A tremendous upset, it may have been the first time an all-black college ever won a Division I NCAA title.

Upset indeed — obviously there were people within college soccer who were greatly upset, who didn’t like what had happened. The NCAA was “notified” that Howard was allegedly using ineligible players. An official NCAA inquiry followed, and Howard was found guilty and stripped of the title.

Aqui was a prime target of the investigators. He was 25, suspiciously old, of course, and the NCAA nailed him and four other players. So Aqui played his last meaningful game for Howard: the bittersweet win-it-lose-it final of 1971.

I was at that final — at the Orange Bowl, on what then-Howard coach Lincoln Phillips called “sandpaper” AstroTurf. I remember Aqui quite well. I never spoke to him, but he spoke to me. He and the whole Howard team spoke to me with their vibrant soccer.

That experience rekindled my interest in the college game, which had been fading rapidly. I had seen far too many games that featured nothing but athleticism. The word I got sick of hearing was “hustle” — that, it seemed, was the be-all and end-all of college soccer back then.

Suddenly here was Howard, sparkling with a different type of soccer, one that seemed to me to be a much truer and livelier version, one that allowed the sport itself to star. I loved it.

Howard had athleticism, of course — you cannot play this sport without plenty of that. But it was athleticism at the service of soccer. It did not dominate the proceedings. The skill of the Howard players did that.

And the player who eventually caught my eye was Aqui, Howard’s goal-scoring forward. He started that 1971 final on the bench with a fever. The fever miraculously vanished when their opponent, Saint Louis University, went up, 2-1. Enter Aqui, who led Howard with 25 goals that season, and enter an ominous threat for Saint Louis. He did not score. But two of his teammates, fellow Trinidadian Alvin Henderson and Mori Diane, did.

Aqui had a special soccer quality that all good forwards need. Difficult to define. I recall a comment from arguably soccer’s greatest player, Diego Maradona, before a game against Germany. “Ganaremos nosotros,” he confidently asserted, “Tenemos mas picardia.” We’ll win, we have more . . . well, more what? More picardia.

And I still can’t quite get the right meaning for picardia. Trickiness? Cheekiness? Sneakiness? Probably craftiness comes closest. Whatever, it’s a knack that Aqui had. The feints, the quick movement, the subtle timing of the moves, the ability to suddenly not be there when the defender moves in, but to be very much there when the ball arrives. A menace, a player who unsettles defenders, who makes them nervous.

There’s a lot to picardia and much of it has a distinct personal quality. No doubt that makes it so difficult to define. I don’t think it can be coached. It wasn’t seen too often in college soccer. It is part of the artistry that soccer needs, but which is too often suppressed in the interests of hustle.

Aqui, whose nickname was “Bronco,” had that artistry. Later I decided that “artful” was the right word for him. His movement could be dangerously direct, or stealthily subtle, whichever he sensed was needed. But it always had the balance and the rhythm of the born soccer player.

These were true soccer values. When they were absent, which they generally were in college soccer, the sport was diminished. Coach Phillips knew their value, and he let Aqui use them. When, so effortlessly, Aqui brought them into action, soccer began to look like “The Beautiful Game.”

That was all I saw of Aqui, in the huge and echoingly empty Orange Bowl. He played in the 1-0 semifinal win over Harvard University, then his substitute role in the final. I would have loved to see more.

A tight-knit bunch, many of his former teammates — many of whom hail from across the African diaspora and the Caribbean — will come together Friday to bid him farewell, at Howard.

Aqui, a senior attorney for the U.S. Department of Treasury who had been “thinking about retirement,” his son Jason said, is survived by his wife Antoinette and three children: Nicole, Ryan, and Jason; and four grandchildren: Tyree, Sydney, Jackson and Caleb.

His college days ended with that 1971 final, but his career is remembered. In 1996, he was elected to Howard’s Hall of Fame.

Howard’s 1971 title was cruelly snatched away from them, but they had their day, as Phillips had his, in 1974 when they again won the NCAA Division I trophy, this time for keeps. The thrills and emotions of that memorable triumph are depicted in the ESPN Films Spike Lee Lil Joint documentary, Redemption Song. And surely Aqui played a big part in the events leading to that belated celebration.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #712 on: November 21, 2016, 04:48:10 PM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/AvGkBt7Un48" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/AvGkBt7Un48</a>


Former Costa Rica defender Gabriel Badilla dies aged 32
By Peter Gilbert, SkySports.


1984 - 2016

Former Costa Rica international Gabriel Badilla has died at the age of 32 after collapsing during a 10km run, according to reports in his native country.

Badilla collapsed near the finish of the race in Santa Ana and died from a suspected heart attack at the scene despite attempts by paramedics to revive him.

The former New England Revolution and Saprissa defender won 25 caps for Costa Rica and played in two CONCACAF Gold Cups and the 2006 World Cup.

Badilla underwent heart surgery in 2013 and retired from football in June.

Revolution president Brian Bilello paid respect to their former player in a statement released by the MLS side.

"The New England Revolution family is deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Gabriel Badilla on Sunday morning.

"During his time with the Revolution, he made a lasting impact on all those who were fortunate enough to know him, and we consider ourselves lucky to be among them.

"We remember Gabriel as a great man, team-mate, and player, and our thoughts and prayers go out to his family at this difficult time."

« Last Edit: November 21, 2016, 04:49:41 PM by asylumseeker »

Offline Deeks

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #713 on: November 21, 2016, 06:31:21 PM »
Condolences to the family. So young! RIP. GodBless.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #714 on: November 21, 2016, 07:51:13 PM »
Condolences to the family. So young! RIP. GodBless.

Crazy scene. His wife (albeit estranged) is a journalist based in Germany. She had problems getting back to CRC because her plane experienced mechanical problems and the passengers had to be accommodated in a hotel. She was distraught at potentially missing the funeral and took to social media to plead with the authorities/family to make something happen. They had two daughters and well, yuh done know: she needed closure especially given how this went down (there is video of him in distress at the race). I believe (unconfirmed) it worked out so she could be present. Otherwise, that would be/have been a cruel outcome for a lifetime.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2016, 04:05:02 AM by asylumseeker »

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #715 on: November 29, 2016, 05:14:12 AM »
Our thoughts and condolences go out to the people of Chapeco and fans of the club Chapecoense. 

An aircraft on which the team travelled, en route to its first leg match versus Atlético Nacional in the Copa Sudamericana final, crashed within proximity of its destination.

Also aboard the aircraft was a contingent of media personnel and a delegation of officials.

Spare a thought in particular for the players not selected to travel and the players reported to have survived.

Chapecoense's playing ranks include former Atlético Madrid baller, Cleber Santana and Hoffenheim's Matheus Biteco (Brazil U-20) who arrived on loan this past summer.

At this time, we also remember other teams that have suffered losses through aviation failures.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2016, 05:22:50 AM by asylumseeker »

Offline Deeks

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #716 on: November 29, 2016, 09:45:34 AM »
Sad. RIP. WHEN THE BIG MAN CALL YOUR NUMBER .... that is it.  God Bless!

Offline soccerman

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #717 on: November 29, 2016, 07:12:23 PM »
One of the last pictures taken.

Offline weary1969

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #718 on: November 30, 2016, 10:15:32 PM »
The Zambian National Team this brings back memories.
Today you're the dog, tomorrow you're the hydrant - so be good to others - it comes back!"

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread (Foreign)
« Reply #719 on: December 18, 2016, 05:33:01 PM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/CDdpChTCdGs" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/CDdpChTCdGs</a>

Romanian defender Daniel Prodan mourned
UEFA


March 23, 1972 - November 16, 2016.

Romanian football is reeling following the death of former national-team central defender Daniel Prodan, who could not be resuscitated after suffering a heart attack on Wednesday night at the age of 44

His former team-mates are struggling to deal with the news, goalkeeper Florin Prunea saying: "We were colleagues in the national team and we shared the same office at the FA. He never had health problems, we played football together for pleasure – I really can not understand what has happened and why." Gheorghe Hagi added: "I am in shock. Rest in peace and farewell, Didi Prodan."

His former coach at Steaua, Mihai Stoichiţă, said: "He was such an optimistic person, always motivating everybody around him. He had this ability to take the tension out of any situation within the team. Life is so unfair."

Born in Satu Mare, he started his career at the local club Olimpia but was transfered to Steaua Bucureşti, where he played for three years until he moved on to Atlético Madrid in Spain in 1997. Prodan then joined Rangers in 1998 but was unable to make a single first-team appearance in Scotland due to a serious knee injury. He returned to Romania for spells with Steaua and fellow capital sides Rocar Bucureşti and National Bucureşti, and also spent a brief spell in Italy with Messina.

More notably, he was capped 54 times for Romania from 1993-2001 and was one of the stars of the team that made it to the quarter-finals of the 1994 FIFA World Cup (eliminating Argentina, but losing on penalties to Sweden), and then qualified for EURO '96.

After hanging up his boots in 2003, Prodan worked as sporting director of the Romanian Football Federation (FRF) and the senior national team until 2011, and fulfilled a similar role with the Under-21s from 2011-14. He also served on the UEFA Youth and Amateur Football Committee (2006-09), the UEFA Development and Technical Assistance Committee (2009-11) and the UEFA HatTrick Committee (2011-15).

NOTE (by poster).

Prodan was at the center of the penalty award that brought Argentina level (1-1) when he was ruled to have fouled Batistuta in the 1994 WC encounter. Cue that from ~ 4:46.

You can also see him, his shirt and name at 10:24 when he dominates the cameraman's frame as he joins his teammates to celebrate one of Romanian football's greatest moments.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/99n3XG1kB-E" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/99n3XG1kB-E</a>


« Last Edit: December 18, 2016, 05:36:58 PM by asylumseeker »