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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #750 on: February 28, 2018, 07:55:13 AM »
Spanish soccer legend Quini dies aged 68
By Ladislao J. Moñino, El Pais.


Enrique Castro Quini died on Tuesday in Gijón from a heart attack. He was 68. Nicknamed “El Brujo,” or The Wizard, Quini was one of the most prolific goal scorers in the history of Spanish soccer. Few players have been as well admired as Quini, who was praised for both his skill on his field and his good sportsmanship. He made history with the team Sporting de Gijón, playing alongside his brother and goalkeeper Jesús Castro, and coming in second place in the 1979 championship. In 1980, he signed with FC Barcelona, joining other legendary players such as Diego Maradona and Javier Urruticoechea on a team that looked set to win the championship. Then, on March 1 1981, Quini was kidnapped at gunpoint by two individuals.*

The kidnapping shocked Spanish society. Quini was freed 25 days later, the same day that Spain won against England at Wembley (1-2). Just hours after he was let go, the magnanimous sportsman came out to publicly forgive his kidnappers. But FC Barcelona, which was then managed by Helenio Herrera, did not recover from the blow and ended up losing the title to Real Sociedad. In 1993, Quini was faced with another life-changing event: the death of his brother Castro, who died shortly after saving two English boys from drowning off Pechón beach in Cantabria.

Quini became one of Barcelona’s most valuable players, earning around 83 million pesetas (around €500,000 today). He played with Barcelona until the 1983-84 season and then returned to Sporting. Quini’s last match in the league was on June 14, 1978 – against his former team Barcelona. He ended his soccer career having played 448 games and scoring 219 goals.**

After retiring, Quini became a representative for Sporting and was the face of the club’s international relations. In Gijón, his son opened a restaurant named Dquini, which is decorated with images from his father’s spectacular career.

The death of Quini has been deeply mourned by the soccer community. Spanish player David Villa shared this touching message, “When I was making my first steps in in the profession I had the luck to receive advice from the best Spanish forward of all times. I would never have got where I am today without your help at the beginning of my career. I will be eternally grateful my friend.

Poster's Notes

* Quini was kidnapped to prevent him from playing against Atlético Madrid.

** Quini is the 8th highest scorer in La Liga history.



« Last Edit: February 28, 2018, 08:02:27 AM by asylumseeker »
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #751 on: March 04, 2018, 08:41:35 PM »
Death of Fiorentina's Davide Astori is a tragic reminder of life's fragility
By Gabriele Marcotti, ESPN.


January 7, 1987 - March 4, 2018

The light went out in Davide Astori's hotel room just after 11:30 p.m. on Saturday. To that point, it had been as ordinary and unremarkable an evening as any in the life of a professional footballer playing away from home.

Arrive at a generic business hotel on the outskirts of town. Unpack what little one brings for a single night on the road. Have some team meetings, a team dinner. Go back to the room -- as team captain and one of the older players, there's no roommate -- and set up the PlayStation. A teammate (goalkeeper Marco Sportiello) joins to play for an hour or so. Then he leaves, says goodnight, knowing he'll be keeping watch from the back the next day when Fiorentina team take on Udinese.

Settle into bed. Maybe, before sleep, there's a thought about the good fortunes of life; Astori made a family with Francesca and had been gifted a two-year old daughter, Vittoria, whom he'd have been hugging and kissing again less than 24 hours later upon returning home to Florence. How fortunate it is to be playing football for a living and not just playing it, but playing it really well, well enough to win 14 Italy caps and spend a decade in Serie A. Astori has said as much: "I really love my job. I love football. I love it more now and I enjoy it more than I did when I was 18."

But then, Astori didn't wake up. The team masseur was summoned to find him the following morning when he didn't show up for breakfast. It was unlike him; as captain, he was often the first one there.

The sudden death of Astori, Fiorentina captain, at 31 years of age shocked European football on Sunday morning. The remaining Serie A fixtures to be played later that day were postponed. The initial medical report spoke of "cardiocirculatory arrest," and an autopsy may or may not reveal more. Either way, he joins the list of professional footballers suddenly taken from us in the midst of their playing careers, a list that includes Espanyol's Dani Jarque, Perugia's Piermario Morosini, Sevilla's Antonio Puerta, Cameroon's Marc-Vivien Foe, Motherwell's Phil O'Donnell and others.

It's an uncomfortable list because these are professional athletes who make a living with their bodies, receive the highest possible medical care and are regularly subject to the most meticulous screenings.

And yet, they die. Suddenly and sometimes seemingly without explanation, beyond the mere cruel fact that life is a gift that can be revoked at any moment. For all our scientific advances, knowledge packed behind white coats and medical analysis, and even the awe we bestow on technology and medicine to keep us alive, we haven't mastered death.

It can come at any moment. It's a thought that ought to humble us.

Death is difficult to accept, and truth be told, we can be humbled without accepting it. We owe it to ourselves as humans to strive on, do everything within our power to understand what happened and do our utmost to ensure it doesn't happen again. We need to rage against this dying of the light even as we know we may not be able to find answers, let alone win in the end.

In this instance, we're left with the tragedy of a young woman robbed of her soulmate and who has to raise a two-year-old child who will never see her father ever again. There are countless friends and family left to grieve for a man who was universally admired, in the words of his Italy teammate Gigi Buffon, as an example of "selflessness, elegance, manners and respect towards others."

The example Astori set on the pitch and in his daily life as a son, father, friend and teammate will live on, at least for those who knew him. For those who didn't, maybe there's some inspiration to be found in that quote, which bears repeating: "I really love my job. I really love football. I love it more now and I enjoy it more now than I did when I was 18."

The light doesn't need to go out on that thought, the simple joy of a man who loved what he did and loved it and appreciated it more as he got older.

Rest in peace, Davide Astori.

Leader Davide Astori is fondly remembered as Serie A falls quiet
By Paolo Bandini, The Guardian.


Serie A stopped for Davide Astori on Sunday. This was supposed to be the biggest weekend of the season, the biggest for many seasons, perhaps, all of the top eight sides pairing off against one another with everything from the Scudetto to Champions League places and Milan derby bragging rights up for grabs. Then a young man died and none of it really seemed to matter.

Astori was not a household name outside Italy. He played most of his career away from the very biggest clubs. Although he graduated from the Milan academy, the first six of his 10 seasons in Serie A were spent with Cagliari. The last three were with Fiorentina. He had only one season of Champions League football, at Roma, in 2014-15, and played in only two games.

For a sense of his impact on people within the sport, though, one need only have listened to a sampling of the tributes that came flooding in on Sunday from figures as diverse as Antonio Conte, Sergio Ramos and David Beckham. Gigi Buffon called Astori “the greatest expression of an old world, one in which masters were made of values like altruism, elegance, education and respect”.

Others remembered him for his optimism – that wide grin as fixed on his face as the bushy moustache right above it. “How many times did we laugh together,” wrote Leonardo Bonucci. “How many conversations did we have sitting beside one another at [the Italian national team’s training base in] Coverciano, or out on the pitch … You with that smile that never ended and which let us know how much good you had inside you.”

Former colleagues spoke of his leadership and his willingness to give up his time to help others. Astori had been named as Fiorentina captain at the start of this year and in perhaps his last major interview – published by Gazzetta dello Sport last month – he had scolded journalists for putting too much pressure on a young talent like Federico Chiesa.

His own footballing qualities deserve to be recognised. Things might not have worked out for him at Roma – where injuries played a part – yet this is someone who played 14 times for Italy, despite reaching his peak in an era when the BBC of Bonucci, Andrea Barzagli and Giorgio Chiellini held a near monopoly on the starting roles.

It is worth noting, furthermore, that his international caps were spread across seven years and three managers. From Cesare Prandelli through Conte and Giampiero Ventura, Italy’s managers invariably wanted him present in their squads even when there was no room in the starting XI. Few doubted that he would have earned more under the next manager, whoever that may be.

Besides, not every player gets to start 289 Serie A games. And you had better believe Astori, who is survived by his partner, Francesca Fioretti, and a two-year-old daughter, was counting. He was a man with a head for numbers. If you asked him about a given season in his career, the chances were that he would be able to tell you not only how many games he had played but precisely how they were divided across different competitions.

“Statistics are my passion,” he told an interviewer from the newspaper La Nazione last year. “I’m a conservative sort.” Italian football can be a conservative culture, at times, one where big decisions often get bogged down in debate and polemic dispute. No voices were raised in protest when the decision was made to cancel every Serie A game on Sunday. But plenty of tears were shed.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2018, 08:56:48 PM by asylumseeker »
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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #752 on: March 05, 2018, 10:51:49 PM »
^^^ Real sad and shocking story. He was supposed to meet with management today to negotiate his contract extension too.

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #753 on: March 15, 2018, 08:03:37 AM »
'Our captain forever': Fiorentina says goodbye to Davide Astori
By Wright Thompson, ESPN.


Thousands of mourners tied their purple Fiorentina scarves tight against the chill and crowded together in the piazza outside the Basilica of Santa Croce. Workers started building the church in 1294, and for more than 700 years now, this is where Florence says farewell to someone who has earned a place in the city's parochial heart. Santa Croce is where secular saints are canonized. The funerals of Michelangelo, Galileo and Machiavelli were held here, and at 10 a.m. on Thursday, a white Maserati hearse carrying the body of the Fiorentina football captain Davide Astori stopped at the foot of its marble stairs.

Fans and citizens pressed against the police barricades. They removed their scarves and raised them high above their heads. People on the front row wiped tears from their eyes. They remained silent except for polite, restrained applause -- a show of appreciation -- for famous footballers who arrived to pay their respects. A towering statue of Dante stood watch on the crowd, and huge funeral flower arrangements surrounded the base, many from other Serie A clubs. Even Fiorentina's most hated rival, Juventus, sent a tasteful spray of white roses and white lilies. Mourners leaned out of the open windows towering on all sides of the piazza, hanging banners in memory of capitano.

It was quiet in the crowded square when a group of men emerged from a street that runs between the Arno River and the piazza. Everyone recognized them.

The Juventus football team had come to Florence.

They played in London the previous night in the Champions League, but a surprising number walked into the square together, headed up the steps into the sanctuary. As the mourners realized what the enemy players had done and how far and fast they'd traveled to do it, the applause started. Quickly it spread. The clapping grew louder and louder until even the priests inside Santa Croce could hear it.

Gigi Buffon, the Juventus goalie, looked out and saluted the crowd.



The Italian football world stopped on Thursday to bury Davide Astori, who died of natural causes in his sleep. He left behind a family with Francesca and a toddler daughter Vittoria. Only 31 years old, his sudden death shocked fans and his fellow players, who were forced to consider the chaos that might overtake them at any moment.

Astori was so young and the city he called home is so old -- with traditions and rituals stretching back 800 years -- that these colliding truths gave birth to the scene in the piazza. It was a state funeral. Men and women in traditional local uniforms with feathers and vibrant colors carried drums and banners. His family arrived and mingled near the hearse. His mother kept stealing glances at the coffin a few feet away.

The civic grief in Florence didn't make a lot of sense from the outside; he was a good but not great player who had only been with the team for about three years. But in Florence, where citizens care much more about their city than their country, he approached his captainship with a responsibility that resonated. He made himself visible and touchable and knowable. He didn't grandstand or talk a lot. "A few words but direct," says Paolo Caselli, a local journalist. "No blah, blah, blah."

Sometimes Florentines can feel like strangers in their own town. This is where the world climbed out of the Middle Ages and those relics of history, from museums like the Uffizi to churches like Santa Croce, have brought so many generations of tourists and students to the city that it can feel overrun by outsiders. Ancient but lingering class divides split the city even more, so that the only thing everyone agrees on is Fiorentina. Centuries ago Florence was a city-state and it remains inward looking. As Alessio Francesco cut meat on Thursday at his butcher's stall in the Sant'Ambrogio Market, he quoted a popular saying: "Florence is my capital and Fiorentina is my national team."

Word spread through the city about the ovation Juventus received. For some local citizens, it felt like a little bit of hopeful breeze. The nation just went through a brutal election that saw the same rising populism that's been sweeping so many other countries. "It's a miracle," Caselli said. "In Florence, applause for Juventus? Never, never, never. Today is a miracle."

For a few hours, the Florentines took back the piazza from the usual camera-toting tourists. They plugged into old rituals. The first people to arrive in the piazza found vendors setting up stands to sell Astori jerseys. The fans ran the merchants away, telling them not to make business of today's tragedy.

The service began. Speakers around the church broadcast the service to the crowd.

A cardinal addressed the mourners. He invoked the famous Florentines buried in this basilica where they'd gathered and said that Davide Astori now belonged in that number.

Astori's brother, Marco, tried to give a eulogy.

His breathing turned ragged and he struggled to get the words to come out. He thanked all the players for coming and then thanked the people out on the piazza. They responded with a loud applause that everyone inside Santa Croce heard. The second and final eulogist was a teammate, midfielder Milan Badelj, who finished his tribute with a story. Astori, he said, always got to the training facility first and took responsibility for turning on the lights in the weight room.

"For me," Badelj said, "you are the light."

The priest bid the mourners farewell.

He looked at the coffin at the front of the church.

"Davide," he said, "go in peace."



The ultras carrying long flag poles began moving as they recognized the mass coming to an end, taking up position in a line across the center of the piazza. The speakers broadcast a soprano singing a mournful, soaring funeral aria, her voice carrying off the mustard colored buildings fronting the piazza. The mourners took their scarves off once more and held them above their heads. Bells rang. The ultras started waving the flags and a fan set off a purple flare, the smoke billowing up in the center of the crowd. Even hardened reporters in the press bullpen on the church steps cried.

A fan in the middle held up a homemade sign that said, "Our captain forever."

This is the scene that greeted the family of Davide Astori as they exited the church. The pallbearers shouldered his wood coffin through the towering front doors of Santa Croce. That's when the crowd, basically silent through the entire service, began to sing the Fiorentina anthem. Some call it a hymn.

"The hymn is like a prayer," Caselli said.

The ultras waved the big flags and now purple, pink and white flares popped off all over the crowd until the entire piazza was hidden in acrid smelling smoke. The pallbearers stopped and held the coffin in place, waiting for the song to finish. Only then did they make the slow walk to the hearse.

The mourners chanted, "Capitano! Capitano! Capitano!"

They threw bouquets of flowers at the hearse.

They took off their scarves and threw them, too.

A funeral director scooped everything up and piled it on top of the casket.

His mother blew a kiss to the crowd.

As the hearse began to pull away, the fans chanted, "Stay with us! Stay with us!"

Then one final chant rose up from the crowd, the greatest compliment a Florentine can pay someone from the outside, the rarest of bestowed civic honors.

"Davide Astori ... One of us! Davide Astori ... One of us!"

Thirty minutes later, the piazza was empty again, except for the tourists and the pigeons. It's like it never happened, except the people outside the church won't ever forget it. They'd performed their civic responsibility, as their fathers and mothers taught them to do. The city asked citizens and business owners to shut down for one minute at 1 p.m. -- 13:00 in military time, which was Astori's number -- and that's what happened. A minute or two before, Alessio the butcher was standing in the Sant'Ambrogio Market beneath his Fiorentina banners and posters.

"For me," he said, "a football player is like Dante."

Then the clock hit 1 p.m. He turned away from the counter and switched off the lights in his shop. All around the market, everyone else did the same. A minute later, the market returned to life. At the Trattoria da Rocco, a table of locals who'd been in the piazza poured glasses of wine from a straw-wrapped bottle and sang the Fiorentina hymn.
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #754 on: March 16, 2018, 08:19:06 PM »
Spanish soccer legend Quini dies aged 68
By Ladislao J. Moñino, El Pais.


Enrique Castro Quini died on Tuesday in Gijón from a heart attack. He was 68. Nicknamed “El Brujo,” or The Wizard, Quini was one of the most prolific goal scorers in the history of Spanish soccer. Few players have been as well admired as Quini, who was praised for both his skill on his field and his good sportsmanship. He made history with the team Sporting de Gijón, playing alongside his brother and goalkeeper Jesús Castro, and coming in second place in the 1979 championship. In 1980, he signed with FC Barcelona, joining other legendary players such as Diego Maradona and Javier Urruticoechea on a team that looked set to win the championship. Then, on March 1 1981, Quini was kidnapped at gunpoint by two individuals.*

The kidnapping shocked Spanish society. Quini was freed 25 days later, the same day that Spain won against England at Wembley (1-2). Just hours after he was let go, the magnanimous sportsman came out to publicly forgive his kidnappers.
Poster's Notes

* Quini was kidnapped to prevent him from playing against Atlético Madrid.

** Quini is the 8th highest scorer in La Liga history.
So they kidnapped this man for 25 games just so he won't play against Atletico Madrid wow.

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #755 on: March 23, 2018, 12:37:55 PM »




Argentine soccer great Rene Houseman dies
Al Día


Rene "el Loco" Houseman, a member of the Argentina squad that won the 1978 World Cup, died Thursday in Buenos Aires of tongue cancer. He was 64.

Domestically, Houseman led Huracan for most of the 1970s, scoring 108 goals in 266 matches for the Buenos Aires club.

Born in the northern province of Santiago del Estero, he grew up supporting Club Atletico Excursionistas, based in the Buenos Aires neighborhood of Belgrano, and played in the Excursionistas youth divisions before turning pro with Defensores de Belgrano.

His 1973-1980 tenure with Huracan was followed by stints with River Plate, Chile's Colo Colo and Independiente.

Houseman retired while playing for his beloved Excursionistas.

"It is with great sadness that we report the death of Rene Orlando Houseman," Excursionistas said on its Twitter account. "Words fall short. We join family and friends in this sorrowful time."

Independiente, on its Twitter account, said: "We profoundly regret the death of Rene Houseman, a member of our championship team in the 1984 Libertadores Cup, and a legend of Argentine sports. Soccer will miss you, Loco. Forever."

The Argentine Soccer Association (AFA) said last October that Houseman, who had been diagnosed with tongue cancer, was "going through bad times," and that the institution would ensure he had "all the necessary means to receive treatment."

Houseman was capped 55 times for the national team and scored 13 goals.

Argentina World Cup winner Houseman dies
Business Standard


Rene Houseman, a member of Argentina's 1978 World Cup-winning team, has died at the age of 64, the Argentine Football Association said.

The former Huracan, River Plate and Colo-Colo player was diagnosed with tongue cancer last year, reports Xinhua news agency.

Known as El Loco, Spanish for 'The Madman', Houseman was revered for his dribbling ability, speed and extroverted personality.

"With a lot of pain, we say goodbye to the champion Rene Houseman," Huracan said on Twitter on Thursday.

"Thank you, Loco, for so much joy. We will miss you."

Houseman's former national teammate Osvaldo Ardiles, also paid tribute to his friend on the social media platform.

"Extraordinary player," Ardiles said.

"Unique. All the skill in the world. Brave. Fast. Off and on the field. Humble. Privilege to have played so many games alongside him."

Houseman was capped 55 times for Argentina and was a part of their 1974 and 1978 World Cup squads.

       
Quote
Footballers playing under the influence
The Guardian


An excerpt extracted from an article originally published on August 25, 2010.

... Meanwhile Martin Laplace writes in from Argentina, with a tale of how a pre-match drinking session can actually be performance-enhancing. "There's a really famous story about René Houseman, 1978 World Cup champion and Huracán player, nicknamed El Loco," he writes, adding yet another South American footballer nicknamed El Loco to the Knowledge's vast collection. "He was a huge drunkard and himself tells the tale (apologies, my translation ain't perfect): 'In 1974 I turned up once completely drunk to play Huracán v River Plate. The night before I had a birthday. My team-mates gave me like 20 showers and a lot of coffee, but it was of no use. I couldn't start the game and went in during the second half with the game tied 0-0. I got the ball, dribbled past three defenders, the goalkeeper and kicked the ball in. My team-mates tell me that I fell on the floor and started laughing. I then proceeded to fake an injury, got subbed and went home to sleep. I don't remember nothing of that.'"

Not to worry, René. Luckily somebody was on hand to record the goal for you to admire when you came round. If the man was that good drunk as a monkey, what must he have been like sober?


Muere René Houseman, campeón mundial con Argentina
fifa.com


El puesto de ‘wing’ está de luto luego de conocerse este martes 22 de marzo el fallecimiento de René Orlando Houseman, una de las figuras de la selección argentina que ganó la Copa Mundial de la FIFA 1978. Tenía 64 años.

Apodado Loco por su carácter extrovertido, sobresalió gracias a su velocidad y sus gambetas desfachatadas sobre la banda derecha, a punto tal de ser considerado uno de los mejores en su puesto . Para muchos, fue el último wing genuino del fútbol argentino.

Nacido en Santiago del Estero, Houseman se desarrolló en clubes del ascenso de Buenos Aries, aunque saltó a la fama como integrante de aquel gran equipo del Club Atlético Huracán que ganó el Campeonato Metropolitano de 1973.

También jugó en Independiente, River Plate y Colo Colo de Chile. Hasta hace pocos días se lo podía ver todavía yendo al estadio de Huracán o el de su otro gran amor, Excursionistas -hoy en la cuarta categoría del fútbol argentino-.

En aquel 1973 llegó a la selección argentina, con la que primero disputó el Mundial de Alemania 1974. Allí participó en los seis partidos de su equipo y marcó tres goles.

Cuatro años más tarde, fue una de las piezas importantes de la Argentina de César Luis Menotti que ganó el Mundial en su país: el Loco jugó en seis de los siete encuentros de la Albiceleste, tres de ellos como titular, y aportó un tanto.

En total, vistió la camiseta de su país 55 veces y marcó 13 dianas.

Houseman gambeteó casi todo lo que el destino le puso enfrente -incluyendo un problema con el alcohol-, menos el cáncer de lengua que le quitó la vida. Su recuerdo, sin embargo, permanecerá por siempre en las canchas argentinas.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/AbFiUSpAAuY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/AbFiUSpAAuY</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/Qt1dvnWiKbQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/Qt1dvnWiKbQ</a>
« Last Edit: March 23, 2018, 12:42:52 PM by asylumseeker »
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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #756 on: March 23, 2018, 12:48:22 PM »
Quote
Para muchos, fue el último wing genuino del fútbol argentino.
Considered by many the last true winger produced by Argentina.


There's also another article worth reading. The quote from that article that resonates is:
Quote
Flaquito, pequeño y melenudo, pocos podían imaginar que ese tipo con pintas de rey de la bohemia podría transformarse en un genio sobre la cancha. Era un extremo astuto, habilidoso, imprevisible. El heredero natural de Corbattta, Garrincha y Best. Es curioso que a todos ellos se les haya denominado locos.
... The natural heir of Corbatta, Garrincha and Best. It's curious that all of them have been called crazy.

See here.



« Last Edit: March 23, 2018, 01:16:28 PM by asylumseeker »
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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #757 on: March 23, 2018, 01:06:41 PM »


Rubén Galván, a teammate of Houseman's on the 1978 WC squad, died last week.

Galván and Houseman were two of 43 Argentine national players who hold WC winning medals.

Although Galván retired at the age of 27, he won four Copa Libertadores titles with Club Atlético Independiente (plus two domestic league titles in addition to the 1978 World Cup title).
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #758 on: March 30, 2018, 10:38:50 AM »
Missed this one ...

César Demóstenes Maturana García
March 13, 1957 - February 26, 2018

Former national team assistant coach of Trinidad & Tobago (2008-2009), Panama and Ecuador, and manager of Panama.

« Last Edit: March 30, 2018, 12:55:49 PM by Tallman »
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #759 on: March 30, 2018, 11:58:05 AM »
WOW!! RIP Brother! You are one of the few South American Brothers who succeeded in guided a national to WC. Much respects. Vaya Con Dios, Senior Pacho.

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #760 on: March 30, 2018, 12:12:03 PM »
WOW!! RIP Brother! You are one of the few South American Brothers who succeeded in guided a national to WC. Much respects. Vaya Con Dios, Senior Pacho.

It's not Pacho who passed. César is his brother. Pacho is Francisco Maturana.
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #761 on: March 30, 2018, 02:12:37 PM »
WOW!! RIP Brother! You are one of the few South American Brothers who succeeded in guided a national to WC. Much respects. Vaya Con Dios, Senior Pacho.

It's not Pacho who passed. César is his brother. Pacho is Francisco Maturana.

Oh!!!,My biggest BAADD! But RIP. I did not know about his brother.

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #762 on: April 08, 2018, 03:40:48 PM »
Ray 'Butch' Wilkins, footballer – obituary
Telegraph Obituaries


September 14,1956 - April 4, 2018

Ray 'Butch' Wilkins, who has died aged 61, was in the 1970s and 1980s a highly accomplished midfielder for England and a host of leading clubs including Chelsea, Manchester United and AC Milan.

Arguably, Wilkins was – to coin a phrase – an Italian player with the character of an English one. Blessed with tactical intelligence and an assurance unusual in British footballers, and making a virtue of retaining possession, he was sometimes under-appreciated by those on the terraces, though never by team-mates.

His habit of playing the ball square, often the safe option, led him to be mocked as “the Crab” at Old Trafford, where he played from 1979 until 1984. Yet there he was conforming to his role of anchoring the side, and earlier in his career he had shown that he could be a visionary passer of the ball, if not a ball-winner nor prolific goalscorer.

Wilkins had come to prominence in 1975 when, aged 18, he had been made captain of a Chelsea side newly relegated from Division One. Although conspicuously bald by his mid-thirties, he was then regarded as something of a dreamboat, albeit one who stood only 5 ft 8 in; other players called him “Butch”, in part on account of his liking for flamboyant clothes.

Yet he had the grit to drive the team to promotion in 1977, though they went back down again in 1979, at which point he was sold to United. There, under Dave Sexton, he stood out in a dour side and helped it to finish second in 1980. Playing for Sexton’s replacement Ron Atkinson, he demonstrated his ability in the 1983 FA Cup Final when curling in a memorable shot from outside the box against Brighton. (Brighton were eventually beaten in a replay.) The year after, the side reached the semi-final of the Cup Winners Cup, before Wilkins departed to Milan for £1.5 million.

He won 84 caps for England over a decade that saw a sluggish renaissance of the national fortunes. Making his debut against Italy in 1976 under Don Revie, he became an automatic choice under Ron Greenwood. At the 1980 European Championships, Wilkins showed both high skill and awareness when scoring against Belgium after lobbing the ball to himself over the onrushing defence.

He played in the 1982 World Cup and began to deputise as captain for Bryan Robson. Four years later in Mexico, he took the armband when Robson dislocated his shoulder against Morocco, only to be sent off for losing his temper and throwing the ball towards the referee. Wilkins accordingly missed the “hand of God” quarter-final against Argentina.

His self-consciously measured tones – used to good effect in the “Orange Man” Tango advertisements of the 1990s – appeared to mirror his interior calm. So, it came as a surprise when Wilkins revealed in 2016 that the price of his career, especially in recent decades as a coach, had been grave physical and mental illness. He revealed that he had struggled with depression three times in his life, the first occasion being when under pressure as a young captain of Chelsea, resorting to Valium.

For the last 30 years, he had also suffered from debilitating ulcerative colitis, for which he had been admitted to hospital and prescribed steroids that bloated his face.

It had also necessitated embarrassing rushes for the lavatory, piling more stress on him, until eventually he became an alcoholic. “I don’t think it’s uncommon that men struggle with these problems,” he acknowledged. “We’re just not very good at admitting it.”

One of six children, Raymond Colin Wilkins was born in Hillingdon, then in Middlesex, on September 14 1956. His father George had played professional football, mainly for Brentford, and all three of Ray’s brothers would make careers in the game.

He grew up in Hayes and at 10 began to train with Chelsea. On Saturday nights, he would trek across London to play the next morning on Wanstead Flats for Senrab, the noted Sunday League side, which he credited with honing his technique.

Wilkins moved to Milan at the same time as his England team-mate Mark Hateley, but the club was not then the dominant force it would become. In 1985, Milan reached the final of the Coppa Italia, but lost to Sampdoria.

Wilkins went next to Paris Saint-Germain, in 1987, but left after a dozen games together with manager Gérard Houllier. He joined Glasgow Rangers, endearing himself to the spectators by scoring with a piledriver in the Old Firm match. The club would win the league and the Scottish cup in 1989. Wilkins shed tears at the end of his last appearance for them.

Although already in his mid-thirties, he then spent five years with QPR. Recently appointed MBE, in 1994 he agreed to start in management as player-coach of Crystal Palace, but broke his foot in the only game he played for them. He subsequently returned to Loftus Road in the same capacity, replacing Gerry Francis.

The team finished in eighth place in the Premier League in his first season in charge, but the striker Les Ferdinand was then sold; the club was relegated the following season and after being sacked Wilkins attempted to return to playing at the age of 40.

He had short stints with a series of clubs, including Hibernian, before hanging up his boots in 1997 while at Leyton Orient, having played more than 900 matches as a professional.

He next became manager of Fulham, then in the second flight, whom he steered to the play-off finals in 1998. Much to his anger, he was sacked by the owner Mohamed Fayed and replaced for the play-offs by Kevin Keegan, the club’s chief operating officer.

A return to Stamford Bridge beckoned, and he was appointed assistant manager to Gianluca Vialli, whom he accompanied to Watford in 2000, although both ventures ended in dismissal for the pair. After a stint with Dennis Wise at Milwall, he became Peter Taylor’s coach to the England Under-21s in 2004.

He was not retained when Stuart Pearce took over and went back to Chelsea in 2008 as assistant to Phil Scolari. He was briefly caretaker when the Brazilian departed.

Wilkins’s knowledge of Italian and of the club’s traditions proved of much help to the new manager Carlo Ancelotti, and Chelsea went on to win the first Double in their history in 2010. Ancelotti wrote that without Wilkins they “would have won nothing” that season, which made his leaving at the end of it unexpected.

The cause, never explained, may have been a frank exchange of views with Roman Abramovich following the club’s exit from Europe at the hands of Inter Milan – managed by José Mourinho. Wilkins struggled to deal with the absence of football in his life and was convicted of drink-driving in 2012.

The following year he found a berth at Fulham, as assistant to René Meulensteen. Yet a touchline confrontation with Brendan Rogers raised doubts about his state of mind and he left after a month when Meulensteen did. He then had short spells as manager of Jordan and at Aston Villa in 2015, working thereafter as a pundit for Sky Sports.

Wilkins was convicted of drink-driving again in 2016 and given a four-year ban. He then began to seek help and to speak more openly about his problems.

He had a bypass operation last year but suffered a heart attack on March 30 and was subsequently placed in an induced coma.

Ray Wilkins is survived by his wife Jackie and by their children Ross and Jade.

<a href="https://youtube.com/v/bb6kTF2GLqs" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://youtube.com/v/bb6kTF2GLqs</a>
Wilkins goal vs. Belgium, 1980 European Championship.

Ray Wilkins cuts inside and curls lovely left foot shot into top corner to put Manchester United into 2-1 lead against Brighton and Hove Albion, 1983 FA Cup Final, Wembley Stadium, London.

BBC radio tribute
« Last Edit: April 08, 2018, 04:41:56 PM by asylumseeker »
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Offline rastafari

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Kerwin beckles shot dead ( w connection goalkeeper)
« Reply #763 on: May 14, 2018, 11:24:23 PM »
He was shot dead in chaguanas. Had a good game against chivas 2-1 to w connection in the concacaf champions league. He came on for Jan Michael Williams in 2007.

Offline Tallman

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Community lives in fear
« Reply #764 on: May 15, 2018, 05:21:58 AM »
Community lives in fear
T&T Guardian


Over a dozen people are believed to be marked for death following the murder of millionaire car dealer Sheron Sukhdeo. His associates and residents from his community say they are now living under a self-imposed curfew as they brace for the expected casualties between warring family members.

Among those marked are Sukhdeo’s wife Rachael, several members of her family and people employed by her. So far, four have already been killed. These include Rachael’s brother Phillip Bassant, close friend Joshua Plaza and her driver and confidante Kerwin Beckles, who was shot dead around 10 pm on Sunday (See other story).

The feud has left residents of Caroni Savannah Road, Chaguanas and close environs so terrified that many are closing their businesses early.

“Normally we close about 5 pm but these days because of the crime we closing at 3 pm,” a business owner told the T&T Guardian when a news team yesterday visited the area where Sukhdeo had most of his businesses and his relatives’ home.

A source said a close male relative was almost killed on Friday night while attending a wake for a person associated with Rachael Sukhdeo.

“They started to shoot up the wake and he had to run for his life. He hide in the drain and that was how he escaped,” the source said.

The source said they were now fearful their entire family could be marked for death by the person/s who killed Plaza and Bassant.

“I told him not to go to that wake. Doing so will be dangerous. Right now our whole family is scared,” the source said.

Since her husband’s murder, Rachel has turned her home at Xavier Extension Road into a fortress. Three rolls of barbed wire have been erected on the periphery of the house and surveillance cameras have been placed to cover every angle. Any vehicle that stops in front of the house is usually red-flagged and traced, a source added. Nobody knows the whereabouts of Sukhdeo’s children.

Since Sheron’s death, Rachael has also rarely been seen in the village.

“She used to come and buy in the parlour you know, but not anymore. Not since Sheron died,” a businesswoman said.

When the T&T Guardian visited Caroni Savannah Road yesterday, Sukhdeo’s parents’ home and business-place remained shut tight. One of their neighbours said he was sorry for Rachael’s parents, noting they came from humble beginnings and never benefited from Sheron’s wealth.

Police say his criminal empire was financed by money launderers and the drug cartel spanned 15 years and was well protected by the Muslim Gang.

Sheldon’s Auto, owned by Sheron’s brother Sheldon Sukhdeo, also remained closed yesterday, but business continued at a brisk pace from his mother’s home. Several lots along the stretch housing used vehicles owned by Sheron were barricaded.

A resident said the lots had been illegally occupied by Sheron as he expanded his empire.

“He used to rent there and then he stopped paying the rent and occupied the land as if it was his own. Nobody told him anything because he owned all the officers from the Chaguanas Police Station. People covered for him, including (name called),” she said.

Now that Sheron is dead, anyone who is seen associating with his family could be placed on the hit list, she noted.

Another source said a man threatened to burn down her home if she gave any information to the police. She called on the police to boost patrols in the community saying law-abiding residents were afraid for their lives.

Police said yesterday they had also been hearing talk about a “hit list” going but have been unable to verify if this is accurate or not.

VICTIMS IN FEUD

March 26: Sheron Sukhdeo, 33, aka World Boss, was shot dead outside the home of his in-laws at Caroni Savannah Road, Charlieville, Chaguanas.

April 22: Sukhdeo’s neighbour Joshua Plaza, 21, of Savannah Heights, Charlieville, was shot dead. Like Sheron, he received a phone call and when he walked outside he was killed in cold blood.

May 4: Phillip Bassant, Rachael’s younger brother, received a call of death and when he walked outside was gunned down almost in almost the same spot where Sheron was killed. It is believed both Bassant and Plaza were directly involved in Sheron’s murder

May 13: Kerwin Beckles was shot dead near the New Settlement Savannah in Chaguanas. He had just left the Madhoo Crystal Place Recreation Bar and was crossing the road. He was shot several times and died on the way to the hospital.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

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Fireworks go off after murder
« Reply #765 on: May 15, 2018, 05:22:56 AM »
Fireworks go off after murder
T&T Guardian


Kerwin Beckles’ killers reportedly celebrated his death by sending up fireworks after shooting him on Sunday night. It is believed Beckles was killed because of the close relationship he shared with Phillip Bassant, who was gunned down on May 4, and Bassant’s elder sister Rachael Sukhdeo, whose husband Sheron Sukhdeo was also slain on May 26.

Beckles, whose mother is a police officer, carried Bassant’s casket during his funeral last week. He was also photographed pouring Moet and Chandon champagne on Bassant’s body during the ceremony. A front-liner employee for the Sukhdeos, Beckles, who was Rachael’s driver, became her confidante after her husband and brother were killed. He was also said to be Sheron’s right hand man before his demise.

Police said Beckles went to the Madhoo Crystal Place Recreation Bar, near the New Settlement Savannah, to play cards on Sunday night. Around 10 pm he left when he got a phone call. As he crossed the road near the savannah, however, gunmen opened fire, shooting him several times. A friend hurriedly placed him in the back seat of a car and sped to the Chaguanas Health Facility, but he died shortly after.

A resident said yesterday she heard the gunshots and hid in her home.

“I didn’t even bother to wake my husband. These days with the number of killings here all we can do is stay inside. We see nothing, hear nothing and do nothing,” she said.

Residents said soon after the killing six shots rang off and moments later there was a display of fireworks.

On May 5, Beckles posted a tribute to Bassant which read: “RIP mi brother all ready rest up till we meet again.”

His death was predicted by some while others expressed shock at his passing.

Nadia Jaggernuath wrote on his page, “Kerwin wat d hell boi brother. Jus Saturday u gave me ah drop home n u die d next day? wat d hell really going on in Chaguanas boi.”

Stephen James wrote, “So why can’t these ppl’s friends advise them to leave Trinidad for a year or so or for good? Why they staying here to die? What madness is this? A lot of Revenge going on and the country laughing at them they NEED ppl to tell them to get out !!!”

Police said they were expecting further reprisals linked to the murder of Sheron. In fact, they believe over a dozen people could be targeted in a continuing feud in the wake of Sheron’s killing. Several close relatives are also under watch, they noted.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Big Magician

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Re: Kerwin beckles shot dead ( w connection goalkeeper)
« Reply #766 on: May 15, 2018, 06:52:47 PM »
rip
Little Magician is King.......ask Jorge Campos


Offline Deeks

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Re: Kerwin beckles shot dead ( w connection goalkeeper)
« Reply #767 on: May 15, 2018, 07:57:11 PM »
Is he a current player, or use to be a player for W -Connection?

Offline Tallman

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Re: Kerwin beckles shot dead ( w connection goalkeeper)
« Reply #768 on: May 16, 2018, 05:21:26 AM »
Is he a current player, or use to be a player for W -Connection?

Used to be. At least around 2007-08.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Kerwin beckles shot dead ( w connection goalkeeper)
« Reply #769 on: May 16, 2018, 06:53:56 AM »
Aye, allyuh! Tell me if these recent scenarios making sense. Ah giving allyuh permission to open meh bald coconut and tell meh something otherwise.

Offline Anbrat

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Re: Kerwin beckles shot dead ( w connection goalkeeper)
« Reply #770 on: May 16, 2018, 08:03:04 PM »
Aye, allyuh! Tell me if these recent scenarios making sense. Ah giving allyuh permission to open meh bald coconut and tell meh something otherwise.

*sigh*

Offline Flex

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #771 on: June 30, 2018, 12:43:06 AM »
TTFA pays tribute to ex-1973 World Cup squad member Lawrence Rondon.
TTFA Media.


The Trinidad and Tobago Football Association wishes to extend deepest condolences to the family of Former National Player Lawrence Rondon who passed away at age 68 on Friday morning.

London, a former St Benedict’s College standout was a member of the Trinidad and Tobago team that narrowly missed out on qualification for the 1974 World Cup. He played in all five of the final round qualifying matches in Haiti in 1973 including the famous 4-0 victory over Mexico.

TTFA President David John-Williams paid tribute to Rondon for his services to the country.

“Lawrence was a tower of strength in defence for Trinidad and Tobago during his career. The thoughts of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association and its board of directors are with Lawrence’s family at this point in time. He is someone who made a great contribution to football in this country. We will like to express our deepest sympathy on his passing and our prayers are with his family at this most difficult time,” John-Williams stated.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Anbrat

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #772 on: June 30, 2018, 02:13:32 PM »
TTFA pays tribute to ex-1973 World Cup squad member Lawrence Rondon.
TTFA Media.


The Trinidad and Tobago Football Association wishes to extend deepest condolences to the family of Former National Player Lawrence Rondon who passed away at age 68 on Friday morning.

London, a former St Benedict’s College standout was a member of the Trinidad and Tobago team that narrowly missed out on qualification for the 1974 World Cup. He played in all five of the final round qualifying matches in Haiti in 1973 including the famous 4-0 victory over Mexico.

TTFA President David John-Williams paid tribute to Rondon for his services to the country.

“Lawrence was a tower of strength in defence for Trinidad and Tobago during his career. The thoughts of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association and its board of directors are with Lawrence’s family at this point in time. He is someone who made a great contribution to football in this country. We will like to express our deepest sympathy on his passing and our prayers are with his family at this most difficult time,” John-Williams stated.




You were one of the best!  :salute:
RIP Fred.

Offline Deeks

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #773 on: June 30, 2018, 04:29:10 PM »
Condolences to the Rondon family.RIP.

Offline Sando prince

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #774 on: July 01, 2018, 07:23:20 PM »
TTFA pays tribute to ex-1973 World Cup squad member Lawrence Rondon.
TTFA Media.


The Trinidad and Tobago Football Association wishes to extend deepest condolences to the family of Former National Player Lawrence Rondon who passed away at age 68 on Friday morning.

London, a former St Benedict’s College standout was a member of the Trinidad and Tobago team that narrowly missed out on qualification for the 1974 World Cup. He played in all five of the final round qualifying matches in Haiti in 1973 including the famous 4-0 victory over Mexico.

TTFA President David John-Williams paid tribute to Rondon for his services to the country.

“Lawrence was a tower of strength in defence for Trinidad and Tobago during his career. The thoughts of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association and its board of directors are with Lawrence’s family at this point in time. He is someone who made a great contribution to football in this country. We will like to express our deepest sympathy on his passing and our prayers are with his family at this most difficult time,” John-Williams stated.



he was a poster here as well right?

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #775 on: July 02, 2018, 05:50:43 PM »
Muhammad Isa, Director of Football at the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association has passed away. (A.Y.)
« Last Edit: July 02, 2018, 05:53:13 PM by asylumseeker »
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Offline soccerman

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #776 on: July 02, 2018, 09:54:26 PM »
Muhammad Isa, Director of Football at the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association has passed away. (A.Y.)
Damn. RIP!
Was he sick or something?

Offline Tallman

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #777 on: July 03, 2018, 02:34:01 AM »
Tributes pour in for deceased Muhammad Isa
TTFA Media


Tributes have continued to pour in as the Trinidad and Tobago Football fraternity was plunged into mourning earlier today following the passing of longstanding football coach Muhammad Isa.

The now former Director of Football for the T&T Football Association passed away on Monday morning while warded at the San Fernando General Hospital at the age of 69.

In an immediate reaction, President of the TTFA David John William described Isa as a pillar of local football.

“Isa’s passing came as a shock to the TTFA and myself. He was a pillar of football in Trinidad and Tobago at club and national level. He was particularly strong in the current TTFA grassroots programme. He served in several different capacities in the TTFA as a national coach, technical director and lastly as Director of football. When I visited him last week he was doing pretty well and it really is a sad day for Trinidad and Tobago Football. We have a lost a pillar in local football,” John Williams stated.

“I will like to extend condolences to his immediate and extended family. Our prayers and thoughts are with them at this trying time,” he added.

T&T Senior team head coach Dennis Lawrence expressed similar sentiments, saying “To lose a guy like Muhammad Isa, I think from a footballing perspective we all understand that we have lost someone with enormous experience and knowledge about the game. I have had the pleasure of working with Muhammad as head coach of the national senior team for the last year and a half,” Lawrence said.

“He has always been very supportive and very enthusiastic about trying to improve Trinidad and Tobago football. I think at this time it is more important to support the family because it is a very sad time for them. We need to help them and pray for them to get through this time of need. I am sending out my condolences and prayers to them . May God bless them and help them to get through the moment and bond together.”

Isa is a past senior team coach and assistant coach, and also led Police FC, at one time reaching the Concacaf club championship final in 1991 where they lost to Mexican club Puebla 4-2, Joe Public, San Fernando Technical Institute and St Benedict’s College of which he was also a former student. He also coached and served as technical director of Club Sando.

The following are  further  words of sympathy from local football stakeholders.

Anton Corneal, TTFA Technical Director
“His passing has come as a major shock to me and on behalf of the football fraternity, local coaches and the Corneal family, I would like to extend sincerest condolences to his family in this most difficult time. Isa was someone you could always anticipate running into at any football event. He was always present and eager to be part of something that had potential to contribute to the development of local football. I had the pleasure of working with him in several grassroots clinic throughout Trinidad and Tobago and I am certain that his presence will be missed in these communities when future programmes are held.”

TT Pro League CEO Julia Baptiste
“On behalf of the Chairman, Board of Directors, Chief Executive Officer and staff of the TT Pro League, we extend our deepest condolences to the wife and family of Muhammad Isa on his passing.  We pray for strength in this time of bereavement.”

SSFL President William Wallace
“On behalf of the SSFL, we too extend sincere condolences to the family and the football fraternity on the passing of Muhammad Isa.We use this time to recognize the tremendous contribution that Isa has made to football in the SSFL and moreover to the game in Trinidad and Tobago.

Richard Hood, Head Coach of Police FC, Isa’s former club
“I am really saddened having awaken to the news of the passing of Muhammad Issa. His influence on the fortunes of Police Football over the years cannot be overstated in his roles as Coach and Technical Director. He shall forever be immortalized in our memories. On behalf of the management of Police FC, I would like to offer our deepest condolences to his loved ones and the entire football fraternity.”

Sharon O’Brien, President, TT Women’s League
“On behalf of the Trinidad & Tobago Women’s League Football (TTWOLF) our deepest sympathies and heartfelt condolences go out to the family of Mr. Muhammed Isa and Ms Ingrid for their sudden loss.We pray that God may give the family the strength, comfort and peace during this difficult.”

Keith Look Loy, President, TT Super League
“This is indeed bad news. Isa played his part over many years in our football. Please convey the condolences of TTSL and my own to his family.”

Osmond Downer, Ex-Referee
“ I wish to join with the General Secretary of the TTFA in extending condolences to the wife and family  of Muhammad Isa on his passing. Isa and I go back a very long time, indeed, as true colleagues in football in T&T.”

Boni Bishop, General Secretary of the T&T Football Referees Association
“On behalf of the President and Members of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Referees Association, I wish to join you in extending condolences to the family of Mr. Isa Muhammed, on his passing. This loss will certainly, also be felt by the football family of Trinidad and Tobago.”
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

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Re: The In Memory Of Thread
« Reply #778 on: July 03, 2018, 02:37:28 AM »
Funeral of former T&T footballer Rondon tomorrow
T&T Newsday


THE funeral service for former national footballer Lawrence Rondon will be held at St Paul’s RC Church, Couva Main Road, next to the Couva Police Station, tomorrow at 2 pm.

Lawrence “Fred” Rondon was a former captain of St Benedict’s College in 1967, and represented the Colleges League Football Team, South Trinidad, and Caroni Limited Football Team, before representing the Police Service with distinction. He was a member of the national football team that participated in the FIFA World Cup 1974 CONCACAF qualifiers.

The Veteran Footballers Foundation of TT (VFFOTT) expressed sadness after hearing the news of Rondon’s death at age 68 on Friday.

A release by the VFFOTT said, “Lawrence Rondon was a gentle giant, a man of integrity, with the desired moral fabric and a gentleman with his God as his guide.

He was as an exemplar, a father figure who moulded young boys into men of principle and good character.

He was a knowledgeable coach, a motivator, and excellent strategist.”
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

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Huge turnout for Isa’s funeral
« Reply #779 on: July 10, 2018, 11:16:57 AM »
Huge turnout for Isa’s funeral
By Joel Bailey (T&T Newsday)


THERE WAS a huge turnout of past and present national footballers at the funeral of ex-national coach and director of football at the TT Football Association (TTFA), Muhammad Isa.

The funeral took place yesterday at the Point Fortin RC Church, Cap de Ville, Point Fortin.

The 69 year old Isa died from stomach complications at the San Fernando General Hospital on July 2.

Among those at his funeral were current national men’s team coach Dennis Lawrence and his assistant Stern John, TT youth team coach Russell Latapy, former TT defender Cyd Gray and midfielder Clint Marcelle.

Isa’s son Kevon delivered the eulogy at the service, which was led by Fr Gerald Bernier.

Mayor of Point Fortin Abdon Mason, former Fyzabad MP Arthur Sanderson and ex-SWMCOL executive chairman Ray Brathwaite were also present.

Isa, who was a member of the police from 1974-1998, held coaching roles at Police FC, Trintoc Sports Club and Joe Public at the local club level, as well as San Fernando Technical Institute and St Benedict’s College at the secondary-school level.

During a brief stint as TT coach, he guided the national men’s team to the 1994 Shell Caribbean Cup.

Isa was buried at the Point Fortin Public Cemetery.

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The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.