November 26, 2021, 11:21:04 PM

Author Topic: Terry Fenwick Thread.  (Read 166691 times)

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Offline Controversial

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1410 on: April 04, 2021, 11:46:36 PM »
This is mostly true, but we will always fight an up hill battle as what clubs in their right mind send scouts to our region? We've got a collective population similar to Argentina in the Caribbean but with significantly higher costs of travel, worse infrastructure, worse coaching coaching poor FAs. Our players often go abroad via the US, random agents, and optimistic flights abroad for a trial.

Prior to the pandemic, scouts went everywhere.  Besides....technology rendered much of that travel moot.  If you’re good.....word gets around.  Teams are ALWAYS literally scouring the earth looking for talent.  The Caribbean is no exception.

We’re just not good enough.  Which is interesting because I’ve heard the perception is players from the Caribbean are athletic, strong, and quick.  Characteristics they look for in modern football.

Competition is more stiff today than in Dwight Yorke days......and he was an anomaly. 

Today de yute from Maloney Gardens in competition with yutes from Nigeria, Ghana, Japan, etc.  Not easy.


As for Mexico....the Mexican league is considered an elite foreign league.  At least on par with MLS

Scouts everywhere... but the Caribbean and Oceania. There's a reason it took so long for Joevin Jones and our other players to get discovered. Foreign scouts rarely visit.

Players typically get opportunities overseas through the small number of agents active in the region, or because some team has a Trini/Carib player and takes a chance on their recommendations. When we do well internationally also helps - Yohance Marshall stopping Leonel Messi from 8 yards helped kick off a spate of Central American transfers for example.

Technology hasn't helped us as so few of the FAs actuallly stream games, let alone get accurate stats. It's the biggest issue and one I highlighted 7 years ago (after attending a confidential briefing from Man City's scouting department as part of Football Manager) - the big clubs need that appearance/goals data to run through their software. We can't even get reliable lineups for our games. Global soccer Database have partnered with the National Super League and that has hleped immesurably, but the Pro League is still a total load of crap when it comes to that. How many games did Joevin play in 2012 for W Connection? I can find out how much some random player playing in the 7th tier of English football played in 2009, but we have basically no figures for our top flight.

And what good does that do us if no games are streamed or available to watch? No scouting software has access to our local games, so why would scouts spend several thousands of pounds on the off chance someone's decent here? Scouting in person is mostly the last stage - scouts will see a player in person between 2 and 8 times, but the head of scouting or someone who makes the final decision will see them only once. I'm telling you from personal experience and contacts in the game - it's bloody difficult to know if a Trini player is good or flattering to deceive from outside Trinidad.

I don't buy into the "athletic, strong ,quick" vibe, it's usually a cover for racist attitudes towards black players that have existed for decades. Any country can produce players with those attributes (just think about how many countries, mostly black-majority, this type of stereotype applies to), just check the athletics track - smacks of the old failures highlighed by "Moneyball". One of our advantages is that our youth are blooded in competitive football young and have some of the competitive drives that other nations sorely lack, but often this advantage tapers off as they get old. Unless players leave to get full-time professional coaching this potential dies on the vine, as has happened so many times (Ross Russel Jr., Cyrus, Joevin Jones and Devon Jorsling to an extent off the top of my head).

Competition from abroad would be a non-factor if our youth had a competitive game to develop in domestically, with full time coaches and a full-time job. Even without the English players, Jamaica has been better than us for years now and it's becoming embarassing just how much they have progressed despite the shit-show that their local FA is.

Pro league was streaming games, I had a meeting I believe prior to 2006 to suggest it but the stats are not available nor any real database

But many great points here and a great post.. how can you scout players if you can’t see them, my friend who’s a scout in London was asking but really it was mainly word of mouth and he cant go by that...

Offline Controversial

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1411 on: April 04, 2021, 11:50:12 PM »
Sometimes I wonder if/when Non TTians read this site, they might think TT and football is the worse ppl and attitudes in the world. I won’t bother to grab quotes to show what causes me to think so. I know better, and I don’t wish no noise or debate. It’s just a thought.

The truth hurts maxg, but we have squandered and undermined and thrown away many opportunities, destroyed careers and there is no unity

Plus they support sellouts on top of that that ruins our chances and local football

So per capita I would say yes it’s by far one of the worst in the world... 

Offline maxg

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1412 on: April 05, 2021, 11:25:26 AM »
Sometimes I wonder if/when Non TTians read this site, they might think TT and football is the worse ppl and attitudes in the world. I won’t bother to grab quotes to show what causes me to think so. I know better, and I don’t wish no noise or debate. It’s just a thought.

The truth hurts maxg, but we have squandered and undermined and thrown away many opportunities, destroyed careers and there is no unity

Plus they support sellouts on top of that that ruins our chances and local football

So per capita I would say yes it’s by far one of the worst in the world... 
I don’t agree with your opinion at all. As again you’re blaming and damning everyone in the society. I get the impression there is no one or system you would trust. However, what do you think would be best strategies to improve the seemingly hopeless situation you describe going forward ?

Offline Insider

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1413 on: April 10, 2021, 11:39:13 AM »
Fenwick dating Gary Griffith's sister or some family member, hence the reason his son Gary Griffith III is on the team.


Offline maxg

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1414 on: April 10, 2021, 12:26:09 PM »
Fenwick dating Gary Griffith's sister or some family member, hence the reason his son Gary Griffith III is on the team.


come nah man insider, everybody dun know is actually Gary ahready. 

Seriously doh, it’s not the inside info we can use. We can use contracts is bogus as was signed by Wallace who was legally removed etc... just in case going forward we are not happy with his work. We can use NC doing the job properly and preparing for proper elected group to gradually take over administrative duties.

We can’t use who he foopsin as long as the team not losing, doh matter.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2021, 12:28:21 PM by maxg »

Offline Trini _2026

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Pending passports, tight budget, and inactive players: Fenwick’s WCQ challenge
By:Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


Trinidad and Tobago Men’s National Senior Team head coach Terry Fenwick will have just four days to prepare his outfit for their next Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifying fixture, after the Fifa-appointed normalisation committee rejected his request for an eight-day overseas camp.

The Soca Warriors face the Bahamas in Nassau on 5 June before they tackle St Kitts and Nevis on 8 June—the latter fixture is likely to be played in the Dominican Republic.

Both are must win games for Trinidad and Tobago, who trail St Kitts and Nevis by two points in Group F with two games remaining. Only the winner advances to the next phase of qualifying.

Fenwick, according to a well-placed source, asked the Robert Hadad-led normalisation committee to allow his team to assemble abroad from 26 May. The request was denied.

From Trinidad and Tobago’s 23-man squad that faced Puerto Rico on 28 March, at least 12 players are unattached or inactive while another three players are in their post-season.

The unattached/inactive players are: Andre Boucaud, Michel Poon-Angeron, Duane Muckette, Willis Plaza, Jabari Mitchell, Marvin Phillip, Adrian Foncette, Radanfah Abu Bakr, Brent Sam, Marcus Joseph, Justin Garcia, and Judah Garcia. The players whose seasons have ended are: Levi Garcia, Daniel Phillips, and Robert Primus.

All 15 players should have been available for an early meet-up, along with the returning Alvin Jones and potential new England-bred and based call-ups, John Bostock, Ryan Inniss, Kurtis Cumberbatch, and Tristan Abrahams.

However, the normalisation committee insisted on the standard time frame of five days prior to kick off and have apparently scheduled the Warriors’ departure for 30 May instead. Wired868 understands that the administrator’s counter-argument was that Fenwick would still be without several North America and Europe-based players, and, as such, his proposed get-together was not cost-effective.

The local-based National Senior Team players have not trained since last Friday for fear that one infected person could contaminate the entire pool, with the mandatory 14-day quarantine period effectively ruling out any player or staff member who contracts the virus now.

Still, Fenwick is expected to select his final squad this weekend and hopes to have his picks tested and placed in a live-in ‘bubble’ as early as possible.

The intention is to start a local camp from Monday 24 May, although the timeline might not be realistic as the Ministry of Health is struggling to provide prompt test results at present—due to the ongoing Covid-19 spike.

There is believed to be some excitement within the staff at the potential return of Bostock. The former England national youth team player joined the Warriors in March 2016 for World Cup qualifiers against St Vincent and the Grenadines, but an administrative error by the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) meant he was not properly registered in time.

Bostock has not returned to Trinidad since. However, Fenwick expects to finally have the midfielder’s services after a lengthy wooing period, spearheaded by assistant coach and former World Cup 2006 goalkeeper Kelvin Jack.

Bostock made 18 appearances for England League One outfit Doncaster Rovers this season, which is in the third tier of the English game. His last start was on 20 April, while he last featured as a late substitute on 1 May in a 2-1 away win against Rochdale AFC.

The tall, left-footer can play as a midfield anchor, the position currently occupied by Poon-Angeron, or take up one of the box-to-box assignments handled by captain Khaleem Hyland and Watford FC reserve player Daniel Phillips at present.

While the only thing that kept Bostock out of the squad was his own wavering commitment, the situation is different for Inniss, Abrahams, Cumberbatch, and Scotland-based attacker Rory McKenzie, who all need passports.

Inniss, a 25-year-old central defender and regular for League One team Charlton Athletic, and the 27-year-old McKenzie, who plays for struggling Scotland Premier League club Kilmarnock FC, were both in Fenwick’s squad to play Canada in aborted friendlies on 27 and 30 March 2020.

Remarkably, 15 months later, they still do not have the necessary paperwork to represent Trinidad and Tobago.

Abrahams, a 22-year-old forward, represents mid-table League Two club Leyton Orient in the English fourth division. He made 14 appearances for Leyton Orient this season without scoring.

Cumberbatch, a 25-year-old midfielder, plays for Dover Athletic in the National League, which is a fifth tier semi-professional competition.

England has cancelled its non-professional leagues due to the Covid-19 pandemic and Cumberbatch’s last competitive fixture appears to have been a 2-0 FA Cup defeat to Woking on 19 December 2020.

Fenwick was already dealt a blow when Columbus Crew midfielder Kevin Molino was ruled out of the upcoming qualifiers due to injury. Should the English coach stick with his squad from the last match window—although several players are currently inactive—or freshen up his roster with players he has barely seen in the flesh?

Wired868 understands that the United States-based quartet of Andre Fortune Jr, Ajani Fortune, Matthew Woo Ling and Shannon Gomez are in Fenwick’s provisional squad, along with Keston Julien.

Julien, a buccaneering left back, plays in the Moldova top flight with FC Sheriff Tiraspol while Gomez, a right back, and the Fortune brothers, both midfielders, play in the United States’ second tier.

Woo Ling plays in USA’s sixth tier, a semi-professional rung, with Miami United.

Woo Ling and the Fortunes represented Trinidad and Tobago in their 7-0 friendly loss to the United States on 31 January 2021, while Gomez was part of the Warriors training squad in the lead-up to that match.

Of course, the challenge of choosing from a pool that includes players either in their off-season, pre-season, or mid-season is a rite of passage for a Trinidad and Tobago Men’s National Senior Team head coach. It was no different under former coach Stephen Hart.

And Fenwick’s predecessor, Dennis Lawrence, also had the complication of not having an active local league in the build-up to the 2019 Concacaf Gold Cup.

Now, it is Fenwick’s turn to find a solution. He might argue, though, that the normalisation committee has not made his job any easier.

« Last Edit: May 24, 2021, 12:48:39 PM by Flex »
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Offline Trini _2026

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 You know how this would make fenwick look ... :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: Lasana man
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/sh8SeGmzai4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/sh8SeGmzai4</a>

Offline Trini _2026

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<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UQj9yFKRPos" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UQj9yFKRPos</a>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/sh8SeGmzai4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/sh8SeGmzai4</a>

Offline AZZURRI

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You know how this would make fenwick look ... :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: Lasana man

Lasana licking his chops.
Hoping for some more bad news to twist and turn unfortunately

m not a huge fan of Terry in this role, but although Lasana has done some good investigative work over the years, his tone is mostly negative and critical at every turn.
This is even more the NC and DJW
and Im not a supported of any of the above if it pulls down the football. No allegiance to the bachanaal

Offline asylumseeker

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You know how this would make fenwick look ... :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: Lasana man

Lasana licking his chops.
Hoping for some more bad news to twist and turn unfortunately

m not a huge fan of Terry in this role, but although Lasana has done some good investigative work over the years, his tone is mostly negative and critical at every turn.
This is even more the NC and DJW
and Im not a supported of any of the above if it pulls down the football. No allegiance to the bachanaal

In bold: :applause:

Disagree with the analysis regarding Liburd. He reports not invents, not so?
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Offline maxg

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You know how this would make fenwick look ... :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: Lasana man

Lasana licking his chops.
Hoping for some more bad news to twist and turn unfortunately

m not a huge fan of Terry in this role, but although Lasana has done some good investigative work over the years, his tone is mostly negative and critical at every turn.
This is even more the NC and DJW
and Im not a supported of any of the above if it pulls down the football. No allegiance to the bachanaal

In bold: :applause:

Disagree with the analysis regarding Liburd. He reports not invents, not so?
I don’t see how the above article paints a negative picture of Fenwick. On the contrary, I thought it was a exact reporting of the difficult situation he is unfortunately in and demonstrates the lack of control he has over the final outcomes. This is not just for Fenwick but all international coaches of small pool teams at the moment. More so, for the bigger fish teams of those small pools, whose best players are foreign. If ppl don’t see that, then they don’t understand the intricacies and dangers of COVID transmission and infection rates.

Offline kounty

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<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UQj9yFKRPos" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UQj9yFKRPos</a>
From these clips, it don't look like this saddis should be makin our national side...maybe Fenwick Youtube scouting googles sharper than mine :D

Offline Trini _2026

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<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UQj9yFKRPos" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UQj9yFKRPos</a>
From these clips, it don't look like this saddis should be makin our national side...maybe Fenwick Youtube scouting googles sharper than mine :D

remember fenwick was bumping his gums  about bringing in lots of new quality players we never knew who could play for us from the UK  .. is only  kurtis cumberbatch  and tristian abrahams ? I hope not
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Offline ABTrini

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1423 on: May 25, 2021, 02:04:14 AM »
If you chupid enough to pay 20k us ah month then you go keepgetting ah heap of diaherra of the mouth from himwith no  constipation.

Ent it have those among us that worship EPL and the bloke accent- ent it have those among us that feeel when men like TF talk they accent give them some kinda superior authority on football?
TTFA yuh reap what yuh sow

Offline maxg

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1424 on: May 25, 2021, 11:08:31 AM »
If you chupid enough to pay 20k us ah month then you go keepgetting ah heap of diaherra of the mouth from himwith no  constipation.

Ent it have those among us that worship EPL and the bloke accent- ent it have those among us that feeel when men like TF talk they accent give them some kinda superior authority on football?
TTFA yuh reap what yuh sow
Appps like yuh finally thaw out, AB. Was little worried too, with the licks allyuh just get with the Covid belt. Glad to hear you.

Offline ABTrini

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1425 on: June 02, 2021, 06:20:50 AM »
If you chupid enough to pay 20k us ah month then you go keepgetting ah heap of diaherra of the mouth from himwith no  constipation.

Ent it have those among us that worship EPL and the bloke accent- ent it have those among us that feeel when men like TF talk they accent give them some kinda superior authority on football?
TTFA yuh reap what yuh sow
Appps like yuh finally thaw out, AB. Was little worried too, with the licks allyuh just get with the Covid belt. Glad to hear you.
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Where to bark
« Reply #1426 on: June 07, 2021, 12:23:22 PM »
Where to bark
By Fazeer Mohammed (T&T Express)


So wait, Terry Fenwick is to blame for this?

That seems to be the general reaction in the aftermath of Saturday evening’s goalless draw with the Bahamas in Nassau which ended this country’s Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifying campaign even before tomorrow’s final preliminary group game against St Kitts/Nevis.

Oh, and before everyone goes overboard with how humiliating it is for the Germany 2006 finalists to be eliminated by amateurs who had conceded 15 goals in their previous three group games, just slot this latest setback alongside finishing second to Guyana in the preliminary qualifying group for Brazil 2014 and losing a two-leg playoff with the Netherlands Antilles at the early stages of the journey towards Spain 1982.

Look, I was taken to the Queen’s Park Oval on Independence Day, 1976 to see essentially the same squad that had been robbed in Haiti in 1973 struggle to edge Barbados 1-0 after losing the first leg in Bridgetown 2-1 two weeks earlier.

For the record, they won a playoff 3-1 before having to go the same route with Suriname at the next stage, losing a playoff 3-2 in French Guiana after 1-1 and 2-2 scorelines in Paramaribo and the Oval.

Then, as now, accusing fingers pointed outwards when they should have been curled inwards. But as we see in the government’s Saturday afternoon charades, rambling obfuscation with skeletal specifics works well here because no amount of rainfall is capable of replenishing soil rendered so toxic by a culture of corruption to such a degree that integrity and accountability cannot take root.

Let’s stick with the preferred blame-Terry line though, at least for this paragraph. So I suppose he is responsible for the array of chances—from within the first five minutes to deep into stoppage time —wasted by an assortment of players against the Bahamians. No doubt his tactics contributed to the increasing lethargy and posing on the ball as the game progressed.

And just in case the apparent hostility towards Fenwick has to do with him being white and foreign; did he hire himself? Were the improved financial terms of his contract (a source of much consternation when it came to light) surreptitiously cut-and-pasted in by him and then signed off by then Trinidad and Tobago Football Association president William Wallace?

We all like to make noise, except that it has become a national pastime to bark up the wrong tree because our egos are so fragile, our insecurities so concretised that honest assessment is an absolutely horrific concept.
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1427 on: June 07, 2021, 01:01:03 PM »
Where to bark
By Fazeer Mohammed (T&T Express)


So wait, Terry Fenwick is to blame for this?

That seems to be the general reaction in the aftermath of Saturday evening’s goalless draw with the Bahamas in Nassau which ended this country’s Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifying campaign even before tomorrow’s final preliminary group game against St Kitts/Nevis.

Oh, and before everyone goes overboard with how humiliating it is for the Germany 2006 finalists to be eliminated by amateurs who had conceded 15 goals in their previous three group games, just slot this latest setback alongside finishing second to Guyana in the preliminary qualifying group for Brazil 2014 and losing a two-leg playoff with the Netherlands Antilles at the early stages of the journey towards Spain 1982.

Look, I was taken to the Queen’s Park Oval on Independence Day, 1976 to see essentially the same squad that had been robbed in Haiti in 1973 struggle to edge Barbados 1-0 after losing the first leg in Bridgetown 2-1 two weeks earlier.

For the record, they won a playoff 3-1 before having to go the same route with Suriname at the next stage, losing a playoff 3-2 in French Guiana after 1-1 and 2-2 scorelines in Paramaribo and the Oval.

Then, as now, accusing fingers pointed outwards when they should have been curled inwards. But as we see in the government’s Saturday afternoon charades, rambling obfuscation with skeletal specifics works well here because no amount of rainfall is capable of replenishing soil rendered so toxic by a culture of corruption to such a degree that integrity and accountability cannot take root.

Let’s stick with the preferred blame-Terry line though, at least for this paragraph. So I suppose he is responsible for the array of chances—from within the first five minutes to deep into stoppage time —wasted by an assortment of players against the Bahamians. No doubt his tactics contributed to the increasing lethargy and posing on the ball as the game progressed.

And just in case the apparent hostility towards Fenwick has to do with him being white and foreign; did he hire himself? Were the improved financial terms of his contract (a source of much consternation when it came to light) surreptitiously cut-and-pasted in by him and then signed off by then Trinidad and Tobago Football Association president William Wallace?

We all like to make noise, except that it has become a national pastime to bark up the wrong tree because our egos are so fragile, our insecurities so concretised that honest assessment is an absolutely horrific concept.

Fazeer, players do what you let them do. But that is a separate issue from the profligacy in front of goal. If we really wanted to go into tomorrow vs St Kitts with something to play for we would have had an authoritative and vexing personality on the field. We didn't. Which player on the field held any teammate to account?

We are beyond the players. At least I am. Dahis too easy. Yet to see a post with a player's name called.

It is long-established that we have a legacy of failing at clutch moments but never to a team of this high school pedigree. No contrarian view or rewriting of coaching responsibility will successfully exalt the draw as the players' fault. Fenwick watched that train wreck unfold for 92 minutes and wasn't sure whether he was an innocent bystander, a culpable bystander to the wrong side of history or capable of rescuing any saving graces.

If we want to be ridiculous we could also blame Dave Sarachan. I'm betting he ain't too surprised by his counterpart's inability to triage the situation. Those first 60 minutes were not Fenwick's to squander, it was ours. Nor was it the players' but today is Fenwick time.

Some players are on a short leash with the end of the line in sight. It will pain them more than Fenwick who has been to a WC.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2021, 01:08:18 PM by asylumseeker »
There is a direct line between historical exploitation and the ongoing commercialization of and profiting from images of dead Black people, over which their descendants often have little control, few claims, and few rights. --- Latria Graham, The Dark Underside of Representations of Slavery.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1428 on: June 07, 2021, 01:27:40 PM »
Where to bark
By Fazeer Mohammed (T&T Express)


So wait, Terry Fenwick is to blame for this?

That seems to be the general reaction in the aftermath of Saturday evening’s goalless draw with the Bahamas in Nassau which ended this country’s Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifying campaign even before tomorrow’s final preliminary group game against St Kitts/Nevis.

Oh, and before everyone goes overboard with how humiliating it is for the Germany 2006 finalists to be eliminated by amateurs who had conceded 15 goals in their previous three group games, just slot this latest setback alongside finishing second to Guyana in the preliminary qualifying group for Brazil 2014 and losing a two-leg playoff with the Netherlands Antilles at the early stages of the journey towards Spain 1982.

Look, I was taken to the Queen’s Park Oval on Independence Day, 1976 to see essentially the same squad that had been robbed in Haiti in 1973 struggle to edge Barbados 1-0 after losing the first leg in Bridgetown 2-1 two weeks earlier.

For the record, they won a playoff 3-1 before having to go the same route with Suriname at the next stage, losing a playoff 3-2 in French Guiana after 1-1 and 2-2 scorelines in Paramaribo and the Oval.

Then, as now, accusing fingers pointed outwards when they should have been curled inwards. But as we see in the government’s Saturday afternoon charades, rambling obfuscation with skeletal specifics works well here because no amount of rainfall is capable of replenishing soil rendered so toxic by a culture of corruption to such a degree that integrity and accountability cannot take root.

Let’s stick with the preferred blame-Terry line though, at least for this paragraph. So I suppose he is responsible for the array of chances—from within the first five minutes to deep into stoppage time —wasted by an assortment of players against the Bahamians. No doubt his tactics contributed to the increasing lethargy and posing on the ball as the game progressed.

And just in case the apparent hostility towards Fenwick has to do with him being white and foreign; did he hire himself? Were the improved financial terms of his contract (a source of much consternation when it came to light) surreptitiously cut-and-pasted in by him and then signed off by then Trinidad and Tobago Football Association president William Wallace?

We all like to make noise, except that it has become a national pastime to bark up the wrong tree because our egos are so fragile, our insecurities so concretised that honest assessment is an absolutely horrific concept.

That Bajan team was the best ever team they had. About 8 of the starting team played for PanAm Wales, the top club in Bim. The BFA brought a German guy by the name of Fisher to coach the national team. The Bajan team even went germany for about 3 weeks.  The BFA was putting out money to fund that  team. Take it from me guys, that Bajan team was no push over. And Suriname was even better than them.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2021, 01:31:22 PM by Deeks »

Offline ABTrini

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Re: Where to bark
« Reply #1429 on: June 09, 2021, 06:18:44 AM »
Where to bark
By Fazeer Mohammed (T&T Express)


So wait, Terry Fenwick is to blame for this?

That seems to be the general reaction in the aftermath of Saturday evening’s goalless draw with the Bahamas in Nassau which ended this country’s Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifying campaign even before tomorrow’s final preliminary group game against St Kitts/Nevis.

Oh, and before everyone goes overboard with how humiliating it is for the Germany 2006 finalists to be eliminated by amateurs who had conceded 15 goals in their previous three group games, just slot this latest setback alongside finishing second to Guyana in the preliminary qualifying group for Brazil 2014 and losing a two-leg playoff with the Netherlands Antilles at the early stages of the journey towards Spain 1982.

Look, I was taken to the Queen’s Park Oval on Independence Day, 1976 to see essentially the same squad that had been robbed in Haiti in 1973 struggle to edge Barbados 1-0 after losing the first leg in Bridgetown 2-1 two weeks earlier.

For the record, they won a playoff 3-1 before having to go the same route with Suriname at the next stage, losing a playoff 3-2 in French Guiana after 1-1 and 2-2 scorelines in Paramaribo and the Oval.

Then, as now, accusing fingers pointed outwards when they should have been curled inwards. But as we see in the government’s Saturday afternoon charades, rambling obfuscation with skeletal specifics works well here because no amount of rainfall is capable of replenishing soil rendered so toxic by a culture of corruption to such a degree that integrity and accountability cannot take root.

Let’s stick with the preferred blame-Terry line though, at least for this paragraph. So I suppose he is responsible for the array of chances—from within the first five minutes to deep into stoppage time —wasted by an assortment of players against the Bahamians. No doubt his tactics contributed to the increasing lethargy and posing on the ball as the game progressed.

And just in case the apparent hostility towards Fenwick has to do with him being white and foreign; did he hire himself? Were the improved financial terms of his contract (a source of much consternation when it came to light) surreptitiously cut-and-pasted in by him and then signed off by then Trinidad and Tobago Football Association president William Wallace?

We all like to make noise, except that it has become a national pastime to bark up the wrong tree because our egos are so fragile, our insecurities so concretised that honest assessment is an absolutely horrific concept.
An informative article which serves to remind us that we have been down this road before. When e pectations arehigh andwhen the opposition is perceived to be ones we ought to do I ate then the ensuing reactions is filled with disappointment and outbursts of fury against anyone insight.

Let's say we had played Brazil instead of the Bahamas and held them to a0-0 draw the reaction would behoove different. When we oust USA from qualifications the reaction was different. When the stakes and expectations are high naturally you get the response that are targeted against a coach. I do t think ones ethnicity has anything to do with it as is suggested in the article - what we have seen from this coach at times is a bit of arrogance a mightier than thou and at times a stubbornness to adapt to opposition's style of play.

It was interesting listening to the first five minutes of his press conference after the Bahamas game- it was like a distancing from the team as he pointed out that TnT did not perform up to par- you would think that he would  have said " we" failedand take some responsibility but there just seems to be a distancing and a lack of accepting that asacoach he may have considered doing some things differently. Granted coaches don't  play the game  but with  preparing the team, devising a strategic plan , motivation. Inspiring players to perform and adjusting to the opposition are within his domain .  Don't make it out that a coach is beyond reproach. Furthermore if this pattern of underachieving against lesser opposition is inour football DNAit'sti e we take a closer look at the impact of our football culture on our ability to achieve success.














Offline gawd on pitch

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1430 on: June 09, 2021, 08:09:25 AM »
To be fair to Fenwick, I feel he made the mistake of thinking that the Bahamas game was going to be a cakewalk. He did not think scouting the opposition or reviewing their past performances was worth the time. Complacency 

Offline Deeks

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1431 on: June 09, 2021, 09:00:38 AM »
To be fair to Fenwick, I feel he made the mistake of thinking that the Bahamas game was going to be a cakewalk. He did not think scouting the opposition or reviewing their past performances was worth the time. Complacency 

He in town too long to make mistake. From the first and especially the 2nd game he should have known that his team eh all that.

Offline pull stones

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1432 on: June 09, 2021, 09:50:07 AM »
To be fair to Fenwick, I feel he made the mistake of thinking that the Bahamas game was going to be a cakewalk. He did not think scouting the opposition or reviewing their past performances was worth the time. Complacency 

He in town too long to make mistake. From the first and especially the 2nd game he should have known that his team eh all that.
oh my goodness people for the last time the Bahamas played for a draw! why don’t you all go back and watch the game, their midfield was flooded with bodies and played a flat five man back line. they played deep into their half all game long and did not commit bodies forward, a classic case of parking the bus if I’ve ever seen it. they did not come to play but instead save face, and there’s not much you could do about those circumstances other than take your chances well, and we didn’t.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1433 on: June 09, 2021, 10:00:02 AM »
To be fair to Fenwick, I feel he made the mistake of thinking that the Bahamas game was going to be a cakewalk. He did not think scouting the opposition or reviewing their past performances was worth the time. Complacency 

He in town too long to make mistake. From the first and especially the 2nd game he should have known that his team eh all that.

Not to mention, someone in the mix had to have it least seen the match highlights. A few minutes of that and you shouldn't be rudderless or clueless. How much specific preparation for Anguilla would Tappa have to dedicate if Jamaica was up against them? You play your best match and make sure your players are motivated to "done dem" early and frequently. Especially since there's no luxury of a home and away series.

It was a cakewalk. We walked and left de cake for SKN. The match for a return to dignity was the crumbs from the table.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2021, 10:02:34 AM by asylumseeker »
There is a direct line between historical exploitation and the ongoing commercialization of and profiting from images of dead Black people, over which their descendants often have little control, few claims, and few rights. --- Latria Graham, The Dark Underside of Representations of Slavery.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1434 on: June 09, 2021, 10:10:26 AM »
To be fair to Fenwick, I feel he made the mistake of thinking that the Bahamas game was going to be a cakewalk. He did not think scouting the opposition or reviewing their past performances was worth the time. Complacency 

He in town too long to make mistake. From the first and especially the 2nd game he should have known that his team eh all that.
oh my goodness people for the last time the Bahamas played for a draw! why don’t you all go back and watch the game, their midfield was flooded with bodies and played a flat five man back line. they played deep into their half all game long and did not commit bodies forward, a classic case of parking the bus if I’ve ever seen it. they did not come to play but instead save face, and there’s not much you could do about those circumstances other than take your chances well, and we didn’t.

From WHEN in de match? At the point when they realized we were harmless?
There is a direct line between historical exploitation and the ongoing commercialization of and profiting from images of dead Black people, over which their descendants often have little control, few claims, and few rights. --- Latria Graham, The Dark Underside of Representations of Slavery.

Offline pull stones

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1435 on: June 09, 2021, 11:08:56 AM »
To be fair to Fenwick, I feel he made the mistake of thinking that the Bahamas game was going to be a cakewalk. He did not think scouting the opposition or reviewing their past performances was worth the time. Complacency 

He in town too long to make mistake. From the first and especially the 2nd game he should have known that his team eh all that.
oh my goodness people for the last time the Bahamas played for a draw! why don’t you all go back and watch the game, their midfield was flooded with bodies and played a flat five man back line. they played deep into their half all game long and did not commit bodies forward, a classic case of parking the bus if I’ve ever seen it. they did not come to play but instead save face, and there’s not much you could do about those circumstances other than take your chances well, and we didn’t.

From WHEN in de match? At the point when they realized we were harmless?
sure harmless and they already had 4 try’s on their goal. I don’t think you understand the concept of parking the bus, but just allow me to elaborate. that was a favored tactic in English football during FA and carling cup fixtures where the teams in the lower tiers were matched against stronger teams in a higher division who would flood the midfield and create a defensive wall giving up possession to the stronger team, I’ve seen this quite a few times and the purpose is not only to block goal access, it also serves to frustrate the stronger team into forcing errors.

I bet you anything that if the Bahamas came to play just like guyana, PR and even st kitts we would have given them an even bigger beating, those Bahamians was on a mission not to lose and they put all their effort into accomplishing that. but I digress, you’re a very hard sell mate so believe what you want, I’m through trying to explain myself.

Offline maxg

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1436 on: June 09, 2021, 12:05:42 PM »
You have seen the ‘park the bus’ strategy quite a few times as some of us have. What has been the most final results ? Draws, wins or losses ? In my experience and observations, it’s losses, it mostly restrict the amount of goals scored. Maybe different in what you may have observed in lower English leagues.
Secondly, with your experience and observations, what is the strategy(ies) used to counter the ‘park the bus’ scenario. ? Your personal opinion would be welcomed. As a past coach mine would be to attack the weakest panels of the ‘bus’. I imagine you would know how this is done or have an idea how you would have a team do it, given the amount of times you have seen it.

So how could a ex-WC player and long time experienced coach not have an idea or ability to adjust his charges to do what is required, even if they are unable to determine themselves what needs to be done. I propose that is because this coach over the years main strategy is head-butting any obstacles in his way, when sometimes what is required is a cool head and appropriate adjustments.

Moving forward, water under the bridge, let’s see what adjustments are made for our next competition.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1437 on: June 09, 2021, 12:55:37 PM »
pull stones, the difficulty you are having is not distinguishing between (a) playing to minimize conceding a huge number of goals and (b) playing for a draw.

Teams playing for a draw - especially a scoreless one - tend to decline attacking situations in the opponent's half. Perhaps you noticed that was not the circumstance on Tuesday. When did that circumstance arise?
There is a direct line between historical exploitation and the ongoing commercialization of and profiting from images of dead Black people, over which their descendants often have little control, few claims, and few rights. --- Latria Graham, The Dark Underside of Representations of Slavery.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1438 on: June 09, 2021, 01:15:05 PM »
Quote
TEAM Bahamas suffered a 4-0 loss at home to St Kitts and Nevis in round one, Group F of the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 Qualifiers.

Keithroy Freeman led the scoring with his brace to lead the visitors to their second win of the current qualifying stage at the Thomas A Robinson Stadium on Saturday night.

Freeman’s first goal opened the scoring in the game’s 25th minute. Kimaree Rogers gave his team a 2-0 average at 53’ followed by Freeman’s second goal at 65’. Late substitute Omari Sterling-James scored the game’s final goal at 82’. (NB: SECOND HALF GOALS! my emphasis)

St Kitts and Nevis now lead Group F at 2-0 with six points.

“It was a major result because we have six points now, three points against Puerto Rico and then three points against The Bahamas. Five goals scored and no goals against. It was also two games away because it was so it was very important. Our formation was 4-4-2 without the ball, medium block. The first 50 minutes we just waited on the mistake, after 50 minutes we allowed the team to start the pressure,” said St Kitts and Nevis coach Leonardo Neiva.

“Because of the restrictions of COVID in St Kitts, we were not able to do international friendly games so our preparation process was very difficult. That is also why it was satisfying because we believe that we can go forward. After we quarantine we will refresh and continue moving forward for those two matchups against Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago.”

Neiva said one of his team’s main point of coaching emphasis was to limit Bahamian striker Lesly St. Fleur, who he previously coached as a member of Montego Bay United in the Jamaican National Premier League.

“I know the Bahamas because I studied so many videos of Bahamas before and I coached St. Fleur in Jamaica in 2015-16,” Neiva said, “I know he’s a skillful and fast player so we had to protect ourselves.”


It will be a short turnaround for team Bahamas as they travel to face Guyana tomorrow in Santo Domingo, The Dominican Republic tomorrow at 3pm at Felix Sanchez Olympic Stadium.

“It’s an adjustment we have to make, we have great players we just have to execute,” St. Fleur said, “I have faith in the team. We just have to go back to the drawing board and correct the mistakes we made. I believe in the players we just have to go out there.”

Guyana also lost their first match in Group F play, a 3-0 result against Trinidad and Tobago.

“Come Tuesday, we should be able to come out with a better result, just play hard,” St. Fleur said, “I know they are going to bring a good team down. It’s going to be a challenge but we will work. Once we step on the pitch anything can happen. We just have to be prepared.”

Despite the opening loss, players like Elijah Mitchell were able to get their first cap as a senior men’s national team player.

“It is always a pleasure to represent the national team at any level,” he said, “I got to play the last 15 minutes of the game and although it was difficult it was a moment I will cherish for the rest of my life.”

http://www.tribune242.com/news/2021/mar/29/bahamas-endures-4-0-loss-st-kitts-and-nevis-home/

« Last Edit: June 09, 2021, 01:26:16 PM by asylumseeker »
There is a direct line between historical exploitation and the ongoing commercialization of and profiting from images of dead Black people, over which their descendants often have little control, few claims, and few rights. --- Latria Graham, The Dark Underside of Representations of Slavery.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #1439 on: June 09, 2021, 01:17:54 PM »
Quote
TEAM Bahamas suffered their second consecutive shutout loss in the current group stage of the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 Qualifiers.

Guyana blanked The Bahamas 4-0 Tuesday night at the Felix Sanchez Olympic Stadium in Santiago, Dominican Republic.

It was the first World Cup qualifier win for Guyana since November 2011.

Terence Vancooten opened the scoring after eight minutes, but the goal spree came in the second half when Kadell Daniel, substitute Omari Glasgow and Emery Welshman delivered the final margin.

The Bahamas is the lone team in Group F without a point. They are currently in fifth position at 0-2 with a -8 goal differential following last week’s 4-0 loss at home to St Kitts and Nevis.

St Kitts and Nevis lead Group F at 2-0 (six points), Trinidad and Tobago is 1-1 (four points), Guyana is also 1-1 (three points) and Puerto Rico is fourth at 0-1-1 (one point).

The winner of the group will advance to the next round.

Team Bahamas will take to the pitch again on June 2 when they travel to face Puerto Rico, followed by a home game against Trinidad and Tobago on June 6 at the Thomas A Robinson National Stadium.

http://www.tribune242.com/news/2021/apr/01/bahamas-soccer-suffers-2nd-straight-shutout-loss/

« Last Edit: June 09, 2021, 01:25:45 PM by asylumseeker »
There is a direct line between historical exploitation and the ongoing commercialization of and profiting from images of dead Black people, over which their descendants often have little control, few claims, and few rights. --- Latria Graham, The Dark Underside of Representations of Slavery.