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Author Topic: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago  (Read 76691 times)

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Offline Sando

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #90 on: January 22, 2014, 07:08:18 AM »
Hunters vow to overturn hunting ban
T&T Guardian Reports.


For decades, the baying of hounds and a cacophony of shotgun blasts echoed across the hinterlands of northern Trinidad, where hunters chased deer, armadillo and agouti, a cat-sized rodent.
 
But since October, the lands have largely fallen silent, leaving the country's 13,000 licensed hunters fuming and their 26,000 trained hounds idle. Trinidad and Tobago's government, at least on paper, has temporarily transformed the Caribbean nation into a no-trapping, no-hunting zone to give overexploited game animals some breathing room and to conduct wildlife surveys.
 
Conservationists have long argued that the wide-ranging freedoms enjoyed by hunters have depleted the population of wildlife in the twin-island republic, which is home to more than 100 mammals and is internationally famed as a bird-watcher's paradise.
 
Licensed hunters never had bag limits, except for birds, and a flourishing market for "wild meat" for parties meant that almost anything that ran or flew wild was targeted. Even the protected national bird, the scarlet ibis, could end up in a curry sauce.
 
"Hunting here really serves no useful purpose and is really quite ridiculous. I mean, you have six Trinidadians and 15 dogs to hunt down a small animal like agouti! It's not exactly big game hunting in East Africa," said Christopher Starr, a life sciences faculty member at Trinidad's University of the West Indies.
 
But close-to-the-land hunters are fighting to overturn the two-year ban that took effect Oct. 1, and a high court ruling could be handed down in February. They also vow to make the government pay during national elections due next year, passing out bumper stickers that read: "No hunting, no vote."
 
They say the practice of hunting with dogs is a key form of wildlife culling that binds together rural society. They insist it's also a source of income that creates thousands of jobs.
 
Hunting with dogs here is a far earthier pursuit than in Britain, where scarlet-and-black jacketed riders chased foxes with packs of dogs until the sport was banned in 2004. Most hunters in Trinidad transport their packs of hounds and mongrels in scarred pickups and rattling vans. Subsistence hunters often never bothered with getting a state game license, even though it costs just over $3.
 
Hunters insist the ban benefits poachers, timber thieves and marijuana growers who they say are taking over remote hillsides and brazenly setting up "trap guns," crude devices fashioned from steel pipe that can fire shotgun cartridges to kill animals or frighten intruders.
 
"I tell you, the poachers can hunt day and night now and the marijuana farmers are setting up trap guns wherever they want. But the sports hunters, we're the ones made into outlaws," said Shackeer Mohammed, an 86-year-old deer hunter who leads a hunting association in central Trinidad.
 
Buddie Miller, Trinidad's most vocal hunting advocate, argues there is no credible evidence that any of the country's game species are in a state of decline. He insists wild animals such as deer and agouti are flourishing despite habitat loss.
 
But data from forms submitted by licensed hunters show a high number of bagged animals for a Delaware-sized country of just 1.4 million people. More than 65,000 agoutis were caught over the last three hunting seasons, along with 6,385 deer, 13,092 armadillos and 10,161 lappes, raccoon-sized rodents whose meat goes for $19 a pound.
 
Environment and Water Resources Minister Ganga Singh, the architect of the ban, said the moratorium is allowing a much-needed survey of existing wildlife and natural resources, and he believes there is a cultural shift toward wildlife conservation.

Singh told The Associated Press that moratorium enforcement officers have been "vigorously patrolling the forests" and said callers have been using a hotline to report suspicious activity.
 
However, there are just over a dozen official game wardens in Trinidad, along with about 180 honorary wardens, who are basically volunteers. Hunters allege that police are often the biggest poachers, with some stations regularly hosting end-of-the-week cookouts with freshly caught howler monkey or wild hog. (AP)



Very good move by Environment and Water Resources Minister Ganga Singh.

 :applause:

I hope its a long ban and I hope they stick with it. They need to also look out for smugglers from Guyana too.


Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #91 on: January 22, 2014, 07:29:32 AM »
Quote
But data from forms submitted by licensed hunters show a high number of bagged animals for a Delaware-sized country of just 1.4 million people. More than 65,000 agoutis were caught over the last three hunting seasons, along with 6,385 deer, 13,092 armadillos and 10,161 lappes, raccoon-sized rodents whose meat goes for $19 a pound.

Having never seen a deer locally, I am surprised by this number.

Offline Sando

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #92 on: January 22, 2014, 08:51:28 AM »
Quote
But data from forms submitted by licensed hunters show a high number of bagged animals for a Delaware-sized country of just 1.4 million people. More than 65,000 agoutis were caught over the last three hunting seasons, along with 6,385 deer, 13,092 armadillos and 10,161 lappes, raccoon-sized rodents whose meat goes for $19 a pound.

Having never seen a deer locally, I am surprised by this number.

Good call.

I agree.


Offline Sam

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #93 on: April 24, 2014, 03:31:35 AM »
They eating everything in Trinidad now.

I hear GEICO fraid to open a office they, them fellas might eat they mascott de GEICO lizard too.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #94 on: April 24, 2014, 05:14:32 AM »
They eating everything in Trinidad now.

I hear GEICO fraid to open a office they, them fellas might eat they mascott de GEICO lizard too.



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Offline Errol

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #95 on: April 29, 2014, 10:16:48 AM »
They eating everything in Trinidad now.

I hear GEICO fraid to open a office they, them fellas might eat they mascott de GEICO lizard too.



Classic.

 :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:


Offline Flex

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #96 on: June 04, 2014, 02:02:26 AM »
$7,500 fine for having protected birds
By AZARD ALI (Newsday).


MARK MITCHELL, charged for the unlawful possession of 50 protected birds, yesterday told a magistrate that he did not sell these birds but keeps the animals after being given the birds by customers in exchange for exotic fishes he sells at his pet shop in Blitz Village, Pleasantville.

Mitchell’s attorney gave this explanation to a San Fernando magistrate after his client pleaded guilty to having the birds which are protected under the Wild Life Act.

Magistrate Natalie Diop fined the 37-year-old businessman $150 for each bird — a total of $7,500 and was given until today to pay.

Yesterday, the birds — 41 brown-throated parakeets, five rose-headed parakeets, two green- winged macaws, one scarlet Ibis and one yellow-feathered parrot — were taken in cages and placed in the Holding Bay area of the courthouse where prisoners are kept.

The birds appeared to be dehydrated as many were packed into the cages, with almost no wing- room. After Mitchell pleaded guilty, Diop heard that at about 8.30 am on Saturday, Game Warden II Stanley Maraj, led other Wardens from the Forestry Division, together with police officers, to the pet shop. They seized the birds which were in cages.

Mitchell was brought to court in handcuffs and placed in a cell inside the courtroom for most of the hearing yesterday.

At 2.30 pm, Diop read all 50 charges and Mitchell answered that he was guilty on each charge. So tedious was the exercise of reading and answering the charges in the hot courtroom, that the magistrate propped her head with one hand as she read the charges. Mitchell nodded at times in the affirmative instead of answering when asked if he was guilty. Each charge alleged that he had the birds in his possession without a permit.

Mitchell was then handcuffed and magistrate, police officers and Mitchell’s attorney Shastri Christopher Parsad, left the courtroom and went downstairs to view the birds. Parsad pleaded on Mitchell’s behalf, saying that when confronted, his client readily acknowledged he had the birds, but that he was not aware that some were protected species. Parsad said Mitchell was not in the business of selling the birds nor did he go about the country looking for birds.

However, the attorney submitted that his instructions were that Mitchell operates a fish pet shop and customers who could not pay, would give him “a bird or two” as a form of barter for the fishes.



SEIZED: Some of the 50 protected birds brought to the San Fernando Magistrates Court yesterday for the case of Mark Mitchell (INSET) who pleaded guilty to unlawful possession of the birds and for which he was fined $7,500.
Author: ANSEL JEBODH

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #97 on: June 11, 2014, 05:42:10 AM »
Stranded whale taken out to sea
Wednesday, June 11 2014
Newsday


A melon-headed whale was found stranded yesterday on the shores between the Mayaro and Manzanilla beach.

The Zoological Society, in a release, said this was the fifth whale of its species to be found stranded in the area in the last four years, despite it being a deep sea mammal. The whale was an average of seven feet long and weighed around 250 pounds.

First responders included members of the Manatee Conservation Trust led by Michael ‘Yankee’ James and Sham “Shortman” Ramsubhag. Speaking with Newsday yesterday, James said he got the call about the whale at about 8 am and when he arrived at the beach, he saw the whale was in shallow water and the waves were hitting it.

He said he hired a boat and with the help of the Ortoire fishermen, they took the whale about five miles into the water out from Rabbits Point, and it swam out. He said the whale was not injured and he was not sure why it got stranded.

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Offline Flex

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #98 on: June 15, 2014, 06:12:20 AM »
3 fined $17,280 for protected birds
By AZARD ALI (NEWSDAY).
Saturday, June 14 2014


RECENT oil spills and seismic activity in the Gulf of Paria have dwindled fish catch, so catching birds from across the mainland seems more enterprising for some fishermen.

Two fishermen told this to a magistrate yesterday when they appeared charged along with a construction worker, for unlawfully having protected birds.

The fishermen, Nigel Persad and Shane Deokienanan, and construction worker Kevon Ragoobar, were caught on Thursday with the protected birds at Embacadere near the coast of the Gulf of Paria.

Yesterday, Persad, 37, of Cipero Street; Deokienanan, 40, of Leotaud Street, San Fernando, and Ragoobar, 19, of Embacadere, pleaded guilty before Magistrate Natalie Diop to clipping the wings of 11 Coniors (small species of a parrot); Three yellow- headed parrots; One Toucan, and one red belly Macaw. Game Warden II, Steve Seepersad and Ag Game Warden 11 Stanley Maraj, and Game Warden Rennie Looknath, responded.

It is an offence to clip the wing of a protected species of bird, contrary to Regulation 14 (1) of the Conservation of Wildlife Act chap 67:01.

The three were also charged with having a protected bird in captivity contrary to regulation 9. There were 16 birds and two charges representing the two offences, were slapped for each of the 16 birds. A total of 32 charges were proffered against each of the three.

Diop read the 32 charges and it became a tedious task for the accused men as they announced their respective guilty pleas. Deokienanan interrupted, “My Honour, we pleading guilty to everything.” But the magistrate responded, “It is part of the court’s process that each charge must be read separately, and, the court has a duty to record your plea.”

Court police prosecutor Sgt Chanardath Jhillmit, related to Diop that at about 10.45 pm on Thursday, police officers from the San Fernando CID were on patrol when they spotted a car emerging from Circular Drive. The road leads to the waterfront and the accused men were in a Black 323 Mazda car. In the car police found a plastic bin and a cage, containing the birds.

The magistrate left the bench, and the accused, their hands in handcuffs, were also escorted in the Holding Bay downstairs, to view the birds. When asked to speak on their own behalf, Ragoobar said that handling such exotic birds help to supplement his earnings. Both Deokienanan and Persad told the magistrate they are fishermen, but recent oil spills had taken a toll on their trade in the gulf. “You Honour, we barely getting much in the Gulf with the oil spill,” Deokienanan said.

Diop fined each accused $180 on each of the 32 counts, which amounts to a total of $5,760 per person. In total, the men will pay $17,280.

The birds have been taken to the El Socorro Wildlife Centre for examination and release into the wild.


FINED FOR BIRDS: Nigel Persad who were fined for having protected birds.  ...Author: VASHTI SINGH

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Offline Flex

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #99 on: January 10, 2015, 03:03:12 AM »
Hunting ban may be extended
Sharlene Rampersad (Guardian)


Hunters who continue to ignore the two-year ban imposed by the Ministry of Environment and Water Resources may fuel another ban on hunting. This according to Game Warden Steve Seepersad, who spoke to the Guardian from his office at the Forestry Division’s South office, yesterday. “Based on the data done by the University of the West Indies (UWI) and the Environmental Management Authority (EMA), we don’t know if another ban may be put in place,” said Seepersad.

“If you talk to hunters who have been hunting for years, they will tell you there is not much wildlife left to hunt.” Seepersad spoke following the seizure of three iguanas from hunters in Siparia on Tuesday by officers of the Siparia Police Station. “One of them (iguanas) is pregnant, she has eggs in her stomach. When hunters continue to hunt the mothers, eventually there will be no young left,” said Seepersad.

“There are some areas where these animals no longer exist, the number of hunters have increased while the animals keep decreasing.” He added that once there continues to be a demand for “wildmeat” there will continue to be a supply. Minister of Environment and Water Resources, Ganga Singh, who spoke to the Guardian briefly yesterday, echoed Seepersad’s statement that the number of animals have decreased significantly.

“The density count on animals per capita has been completed in Trinidad and while I don’t want to speculate on the final decision, the preliminary data is not good,” said Singh. Singh said a final decision would be made when all the data is complied. “UWI is currently doing a density count in Tobago, when the data is complied and presented to the Ministry, then we will decide whether to lift the ban or to renew it.”

Latest case

Three men were spotted on the side of the road in Syne Village Siparia with the reptiles and when they were questioned by the officers, they admitted to have hunted the reptiles. They were arrested and the reptiles seized and handed over to Seepersad. The men will reappear before a Siparia magistrate on Tuesday for sentencing. They can face fines of $1,000 for each of the reptiles.

About the ban

On October 1, 2013, Minister of the Environment and Water Resources, Ganga Singh announced a two-year ban on hunting. Singh said at the time over 140,000 wild animals were hunted and killed in T&T in the three-year period preceding the announcement and the measure was to keep them from going extinct. Increased fines and jail time were also implemented in an attempt to ensure that wildlife was not hunted during the ban.



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Offline Flex

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #100 on: January 11, 2015, 06:42:27 AM »
Rajasi has 2 cubs
By COREY CONNELLY (Newsday).


After months of anticipation, Rajasi, the white Bengal tiger, yesterday gave birth to two cubs at Emperor Valley Zoo in St Ann’s.

The tiger and her cubs, all of whom are doing well, are currently in isolation, away from the glare of the public as the first-time mother bonds with her young ones.

“They are already nursing and she has been playing around with them,” an enthusiastic president of the Zoological Society of Trinidad and Tobago Gupte Lutchmedial said of the cubs, the newest additions to the zoo’s family.

Lutchmedial and his staff had been monitoring Rajasi’s condition for some time having observed she and her companion, Shere Khan, mating at the zoo.

The female Bengal tiger, which originated in Pretoria, South Africa, arrived at the Emperor Valley Zoo in March 2014 and has been housed at a specially-prepared enclosure built to international standards in accordance with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.

Lutchmedial said the first of the cubs came at about 7.15 am yesterday, while the other came 15 minutes later.

At this stage, they could not identify the sex of the cubs nor have they given them names.

He said a monitor has been set up at the zoo so that visitors can view Rajasi nursing and playing with her cubs.

“It may be another two to three weeks before the public might be able to see her,” he told Sunday Newsday.

Zoological officer Charlene Khan, who monitored Rajasi’s pregnancy around the clock, said the births had created much excitement at the zoo.

She said the tiny cubs will be monitored over a three-month period.

“The most important thing is to keep them here and ensure that they are feeding,” she said. Khan said the cubs have created history at the zoo.

“They are the first white tigers to be born in this part of the world,” she said, adding that there were about 200 white Bengal tigers in captivity throughout the world.

Khan said the zoo usually hosts a competition for visitors interested in naming animals at the facility.

Lutchmedial could not say if the cubs will assume permanent residence at the zoo.

“Chances are they will stay or, if not, for at least a year,” he said.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Flex

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #101 on: January 15, 2015, 03:04:02 AM »
World zoos want TT cubs
By MIRANDA LA ROSE
T&T Newsday


THE TWO white Bengal tiger cubs, born five days ago at the Emperor Valley Zoo — the first such births in this part of the world — continue to draw international attention with at least two zoos in South American countries expressing major interest in adopting the cubs.

This was revealed yesterday by president of the Zoological Society (ZSTT) Gupte Lutchmedial who added that the local zoo is on an international breeding programme of the rare Bengal tigers, and the same way TT is on a waiting list to acquire three of these animals, zoos in South America are waiting to see if they could acquire the two local cubs.

“We have had requests from zoos in Argentina and one from Colombia asking to adopt our two cubs,” Lutchmedial said. Tourism Minister Gerald Hadeed disclosed that the arrival of the tigers contributed to a record breaking number of over 300,000 visitors to the zoo in 2014. In 2013, the zoo attracted 225,000 persons.

Speaking yesterday after Hadeed viewed the cubs and their mother Rajasi at the zoo, Lutchmedial said, “just as we were waiting for Bengal tigers, there are other zoos waiting for Bengal tigers.” A citizen has also expressed interest in rearing one of the cubs, he added.

The sale or exchange of the giant cats, he said, will depend on the animal’s gender. In addition, he said, the zoo has to monitor its cat population.

At present, the giant cats consume 1,200 pounds of meat a week. The cat population includes three lions and two lionesses, a cougar, several ocelots and the three Bengal tigers acquired nine months ago from South Africa.

Although the zoo rears its own cattle and acquires meat from the horse-racing industry, Lutchmedial said with two more mouths to feed, it would be challenging. However, if Minister Hadeed had his way, he would like to see the cubs remain with their mother at the Emperor Valley Zoo. Lutchmedial said the public was not likely to see the cubs who were born last Saturday, for the next two or three months. Asked about their gender, Lutchmedial said the cubs have not been examined as yet. “We want to leave them alone with their mother for now.”

However, Lutchmedial hazarded an educated guess that the cubs may be a male and female.

Rajasi, he said, “is a fantastic mother.”

The tigers breeding within nine months of their arrival tells a story of easy adaptation to their new environment, ZSTT vice president Ben de la Rosa said. The eyes of the cubs are still closed and it would take another ten to eleven days to open.

The birth of the two cubs brings the white Bengal tiger population now in captivity to 202. The zoo has two white Bengal tigers - a male and a female and a yellow female Bengal tigress. It is expected that the male tiger will also breed with the yellow tigress.

Speaking about further upgrading at the zoo, Hadeed disclosed that $15 million has been allocated for phase three of the zoo’s development which will include an animal hospital. Phase two of the project, which includes accommodation for the African exhibits, is due for completion in March. It was also funded to the tune of $15 million. The zoo has plans to import during the summer months a black rhinoceros from the United States. Other animals expected are chimpanzees and merekats to add to the African savannah exhibits. They are expected to co-exist with the giraffes.


SLEEPY CUB: This white Bengal tiger cub along with another, born five days ago to Bengal tiger Rajasi at the Emperor Valley Zoo, continues to draw international attention as zoos in Colombia and Argentina have expressed major interest in adopting it.
Author: RATTAN JADOO

« Last Edit: January 16, 2015, 02:58:32 AM by Flex »
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Offline Flex

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #102 on: February 23, 2015, 05:53:05 AM »
They’re Trinis
By NALINEE SEELAL (Newsday).


Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar is of the firm view that the two rare Bengal white tigers born at the Emperor Valley Zoo on January 10, should remain in this country and not be given to any other zoo which may have made requests for the cubs.

The two cubs a male and female were born to their mother Rajasi and father Shere Khan after careful mating took place at the Zoo.

The cubs which are yet to be named now remain one of the major attractions at the Emperor Valley Zoo and when news of their birth was made known to zoos around the world interest was expressed by two South American countries in acquiring the cubs.

However, Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar who is especially fond of animals and children told Newsday yesterday “I think that since the animals were born in this country they should remain here and be enjoyed by persons in this country, but at the same time I am asking the Zoological Society and the persons in charge of the Emperor Valley Zoo to have some consultation on the matter before making a final decision.”

She said if she had her way she will be very happy to have the cubs remain in this country because after all they were born in this country.

She said based on information the Zoo has facilities to take care of the two cubs and this country has demonstrated that it is adhering to international practice of ensuring the safety and well-being of endangered species.

According to the Prime Minister it is a blessing and a sign of good luck that the cubs were actually born in this country and therefore that good luck should remain in Trinidad and she is hopeful that the Zoo will also have other significant births involving rare animals so that this country can showcase to the world that the Zoological Society can come up to scratch like other Zoological bodies in First World countries.

Newsday contacted curator of the Emperor Valley Zoo, Nirmal Biptah and informed him of the Prime Minister’s request to have the cubs remain at the Emperor Valley Zoo and he said, “if it is the wish of the Prime Minister then we will have to accede to her request.” On Friday the cubs were 40 days old and the male weighed 12 pounds and the female weighed 11 pounds. He said the public will be given the opportunity to see the two cubs and they are being taken out for public viewing every day but at specific times. Persons wishing to see the cubs can see them at 10. 30, am, 12,30, 1.30 and 4.30 every day.

He said they are still nursing rom their mother and they are playful. The mother and the cubs show no aggression towards their attendants.

Rajasi, the mother is an excellent mother and feeds them every two hours.

They will be separated when they become mature to avoid inter-breeding.

However, President of the Zoological Society of Trinidad and Tobago, Gupte Lutchmedial had a different take on the matter. Lutchmedial said that “ personally I would like to keep the cubs here because they were born here, we are spending a lot of time with them, bonding with them, but one needs to know that the welfare of the animals comes first and because of the conservation programme that are taken by zoos worldwide we were lucky to get a viable breeding pair after four years of waiting.” Lutchmedial said that there are other zoos waiting for young Bengal white tigers and to fulfill that obligation to other zoos will make good biological sense. He said that to keep the animals would mean bringing in two additional white Bengal tigers from different bloodlines to mate with the existing two.

“Keeping them in captivity is already bad enough and by further isolating them to live alone, to live a singular life without a mate is not in the best interest of the animal, nevertheless we have to look at the popular opinion of the stakeholders including the government which has given us a sizeable subvention. A decision will be made in the best interest of the animals.”

“I have heard that the PM would like to have the cubs remain here and that will be given the best consideration, but that means that we will have to extend our tiger collection by bringing in different mates for the two cubs.”

Newsday understands that two South American countries had first expressed interest in acquiring the cubs. The two South American countries Argentina and Colombia have been placed on a waiting list like the other countries which have expressed interest in acquiring the cubs.

Newsday understands that the birth of the cubs resulted in a record breaking number of over 300,000 visitors to the zoo in 2014. In 2013, the zoo attracted 225,000 persons.

Newsday also understands that the sale or exchange of the giant cats, will depend on the animal’s gender. In addition, he said, the zoo has to monitor its cat population.

At present, the giant cats consume 1,200 pounds of meat a week. The cat population includes three lions and two lionesses, several ocelots and the three Bengal tigers acquired nine months ago from South Africa.

President of the Zoological Society Gupte Lutchmedial said that although the zoo rears its own cattle and acquires meat from the horse-racing industry, with two more mouths to feed, it would be challenging.

Even Minister of Tourism Gerald Hadeed agrees with the Prime Minister the cubs should remain here. He has already visited the cubs at the Zoo and expressed interest in using the cubs to attract more visitors, even foreigners.

The birth of the two cubs brings the white Bengal tiger population now in captivity to 202. The zoo has two white Bengal tigers — a male and a female and a yellow female Bengal tigress. It is expected that the male tiger will also breed with the yellow tigress.

Newsday also understands that government has already pledged an allocation of $15 million for phase three of the zoo’s development which will include an animal hospital.

Phase two of the project, which includes accommodation for the African exhibits, is due for completion in March. It was also funded to the tune of $15 million. The zoo has plans to import during the “summer months” a black rhinoceros from the United States. Other animals expected are chimpanzees and meerekats to add to the African savannah exhibits. They are expected to co-exist with the giraffes.


POPULAR CUBS: The adorable white Bengal tiger cubs relax at the Emperor Valley Zoo yesterday.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #103 on: March 01, 2015, 05:50:50 AM »
Home of the threatened Scarlet Ibis
T&T Guardian Reports.


If you are driving along the Uriah Butler Highway near Caroni, you may be fortunate to spot a vivid orange-red bird flying in your midst. It’s the luminous Scarlet Ibis, one of our two national birds which reside in the Caroni Swamp.

Located on the Gulf of Paria, 3.5 km from Port-of-Spain, the Caroni Swamp is the largest mangrove swamp in the country, accounting for over 60 per cent of the country’s mangrove. The Caroni swamp drains the catchment area of a significant portion of northwest and central Trinidad (an area of 675sq km), in which a significant portion of the population lives and where the majority of the non-petroleum manufacturing and agricultural sectors are located.

The Swamp is protected as a Prohibited Area under the Forests Act (Legal Notice No 141 of 1987), and was proclaimed a Forest Reserve in 1936, with three wildlife sanctuaries (200 hectares) declared within the Reserve in 1953 and 1966. A National Wetlands Policy was also passed by Cabinet in 2001 to guide the management of this valuable ecosystem.

This Ramsar Site is approximately 8,398 hectares in total, of which 2405.8 hectares are coastal water and mudflats. It is mainly state owned: 3,197 hectares within a Forest Reserve, 1,854.3 state lands, and 941 hectares are privately owned.

The natural water courses of the swamp are the Caroni River, the Blue River, Catfish River, Phagg River, Guayamare River and Madame Espagnol River. Several rivers and man-made drainage channels form an interesting hydrological network, which is influenced by tides from the Gulf of Paria and by drainage from the catchment area. The most notable of these were cut during the 1930s to control flooding and develop agricultural lands from the lagoon.

The ecological diversity is pronounced due to the existence of marshes and mangrove swamp in close proximity. The wetland provides a variety of habitats for flora and fauna species and supports a rich biodiversity. It is a highly productive system that provides food (organic production) and protection and is a nursery for marine and freshwater species. This wetland also functions as a receiving and absorbing body of land-based runoff and pollutants and is the natural infrastructure for tourism.

More than 90 per cent of the lagoon is inundated for most of the year and water depths range from one to 11 metres. Here, the lagoons and open mud flats are exposed only at low tides.

Mangrove vegetation dominates this wetland, with freshwater marshes including water grasses, sedges and lilies (the reeds). This type of vegetation is important in shoreline stability and flood control.

There is a wealth of fauna species including over 190 species of birds, 24 species of fin fish including several commercially important species such as tarpon (Megalops atlanticus), grey snapper (Lutjanus griseus), and species of shrimp (Penaeus spp) which use the swamp as a nursery.

Other important fauna species include the silky anteater (Cyclopes didactylus), the crab eating racoon (Procyon cancrivorous), oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae), mangrove crab (Aratus pisonii), hairy crab (Ucides cordatus) and the Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber).

Owing to the rich biodiversity, the swamp is utilised extensively particularly with respect to fishing, harvesting of crabs, oysters and eco-tourism. There is a Caroni Swamp Visitor Centre for dissemination of information on the site, as well as boat tours for the avid eco-tourist. A section is also used for agriculture and industrial development. However, these activities have contributed to the degradation of the swamp as over-harvesting of shell fish and fin fish, and poaching of animal and bird species including the threatened Scarlet Ibis harms the ecosystem.

The habitat is also disturbed by the use of boats for recreation and fishing, drainage issues, pollution from industrial, agricultural and domestic sources, reclamation for road, housing and industrial development, salt water intrusion, and the loss of the freshwater marshes.

To mitigate further destruction of this site, the Forestry Division, National Wetlands Committee, and the Caroni Lagoon National Park and Bird Sanctuary Management Committee have been working towards the management of this protected area.

Additional stakeholder organisations include the Caribbean Forest Conservation Association (CFCA), Caroni Wetlands Scientific Trust, Greenplains Foundation, Pointe-a-Pierre Wildfowl Trust, and the T&T Field Naturalists Club.

Some of the management issues to be examined include the establishment of a study and monitoring programme for the area, the restoration of freshwater marsh habitat, development of an oyster and fisheries management programme, tourism and visitor use planning, strengthening local capacity to manage the site, and the development of educational and awareness programmes.

The Caroni Swamp is of prime ecological value to our nation and should be protected for future generations to come. We must each do our part to protect this site by reducing the negative human impact.

Help protect our local wetlands

• Experience and learn more about this local Ramsar Wetland site

• Educate others—Share what you’ve learned with your family and friends

• Volunteer or form a community group to help conserve or clean up our natural resources

• Report any illegal practices like poaching, squatting, or dumping of garbage.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #104 on: March 08, 2015, 09:32:09 AM »
Most popular names for tiger cubs: Kamla and Rowley
By COREY CONNELLY (Newsday)


These are the most popular choices in names for the two white Bengal tiger cubs that have won the hearts of staff and patrons alike at the Emperor Valley Zoo in St Ann’s.

President of the Zoological Society of Trinidad and Tobago Gupte Lutchmedial yesterday said that of the hundreds of names which have been submitted for the competition to name the lovable cubs, Kamla and Rowley were the most popular thus far.

Lutchmedial said, however, there was a strong possibility that the names will not be ascribed to the tigers even though they may top the competition.

“It may very well be that the names might be withdrawn because that is the Prime Minister (Kamla Persad-Bissessar) and Opposition Leader (Dr Keith Rowley) and it may be seen as disrespectful,” he told Sunday Newsday.

Other popular names for the cubs included Fay-Ann (Lyons-Alvarez) and Bunji (Garlin), J’ouvert and Soca, Trini Boy and Trini Girl and Rajah and Rani, Lutchmedial said.

“These are names that have appeared more than 20 times,” he said.

The competition began last Sunday and is expected to run until March 31 after which a winner will be declared.

Lutchmedial said the winner of the contest will also receive a free pass to the zoo for one year.

“This is an exciting competition. Every day we are receiving hundreds of entries. The cubs are quite popular at the zoo,” he said.

The two cubs were born to Rajasi and Shere Khan on January 10, 2015, and can be viewed thrice daily at the zoo.

Lutchmedial said the tigers, whose health are being closely monitored, were growing rapidly and have begun feeding on meat. The cubs are the first white Bengal tigers to be born in this part of the world.


The Bengal tiger cubs at the Emperor Valley zoo.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #105 on: April 06, 2015, 04:38:01 AM »
Tiger cubs to the rescue of Manzanilla’s turtles
Monday, April 6 2015
T&T Newsday


More than $100,000 in funds collected from the picture opportunity with the white tiger cubs at the Emperor Valley Zoo, Port-of-Spain have been directed by the Zoological Society of Trinidad and Tobago (ZSTT) to the Manatee Conservation Trust (MCT), the community-based non-governmental organisation which has been protecting the nesting leatherback turtles on site for the last 20 years.

This intervention was made to counter a reported 90 percent cut in the funds provided for beach patrols by the Forestry Division this year, although discussions are ongoing with the Conservator of Forests, Couternay Park on the matter. ZSTT, President Gupte Lutchmedial spoke of the close links between both organisations and the opportunity that this situation provided to use donations from the public for a worthwhile cause.

Lutchmedial said, “The great interest generated by the birth of the white tiger cubs at the Zoo and the over-subscription for picture opportunities could not have come at a better time. When the Board met recently it was agreed that in light of the dire situation facing the nesting leatherback turtles at Manzanilla, the best value for the monies collected would be to pay for the beach patrols.” Lutchmedial also indicated that this would take effect retroactively from March until August this year and is estimated at close to $120,000.

The partnership did not cease with this one move and on Saturday April 4 the MCT was joined by the ZSTT in a clean up of the most-frequented nesting areas along the 12-kilometre stretch of the Manzanilla beach. David Boodoo, the MCT’s Vice-President and coordinator of the beach clean up was very appreciative of the support of the ZSTT to work alongside its members and other persons from the community. “We have had patrollers out here since the start of the season in March and realised that a greater effort was needed to clear the beach area as turtles were being obstructed by the debris on the beach,” declared Boodoo.

Nirmal Biptah, Curator at the Zoo and lead member for the ZSTT speaking on its behalf, endorsed the view of Boodoo and said that just in one strip frequented by the turtles, truck loads of debris were carted away.

“The situation at Manzanilla is a sad reflection of how we regard our environment,” Biptah said, ane he added: “This fragile strip of beach, which is so important for the survival of an endangered species is being bombarded from onshore and offshore pollution as we collected plastic bottles, plates and cups discarded by beachgoers and rope and other paraphernalia which would have had to come from ships.” An added problem for the turtles has arisen as well in the form of large strands of Sargassum seaweed washed up onshore in which turtles and hatchlings can get entangled. The stepping in of the ZSTT for a local conservation cause should come as no surprise to those familiar with its role in the rescue and rehabilitation of wild animals across the country. The records reveal that calls come in on a daily basis to the Zoo Hotline for the rescue and collection of a range of animals including snakes, birds and various species of mammals. In the majority of cases, these animals are relocated to safe areas once they are deemed fit for release into the wild.

From viewing the iconic white tiger cubs at the Emperor Valley Zoo to saving endangered leatherback turtles at Manzanilla, the link in the conservation chain has certainly been strengthened, conservationists said.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #106 on: April 21, 2015, 02:14:01 AM »
3-year wildlife survey for Tobago
T&T Newsday


THE TOBAGO House of Assembly’s (THA) Division of Agriculture, Marine Affairs, Marketing and the Environment will undertake a three-year wildlife survey at an estimated cost of $5 million.

Secretary of the Division, Assemblyman Godwin Adams, disclosed this last week at the post Executive Council media briefing at the Administrative Complex, Calder Hall.

He said the Environmental Management Authority (EMA) was originally mandated to carry out the survey throughout Trinidad and Tobago. The venture was expected to be financed using the Green Fund, which was established by Central Government to support environmental projects.

Adams stated that the survey was never conducted in Tobago. It will now be done in collaboration with the University of the West Indies and other partners, who will be invited to come on board.

According to Adams, the survey is important as it can give Tobago accurate statistics on the game species and their populations. It will inform how Tobago treats with its wildlife ecology and the economic well-being of some citizens as well.

“I feel that a wildlife survey is important to Tobago. A national survey is all right, but what happens in Tobago will be slightly different to what occurs in Trinidad because at the last count in Trinidad, there were some 450 bunkers where hunters hang out.

“You don’t have those things in Tobago. As a matter of fact, the Tobago hunters do it more on game and a sporting activity.” Adams also said the Division welcomed Government’s decision to lift the two-year ban on hunting, beginning in October (2015). “Lifting of the hunting ban will allow us to manage certain species like the agouti, which brings a lot of challenges and frustration to our farmers,” he stated.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #107 on: June 22, 2015, 05:25:17 AM »
Ape hotel
TT Newsday


The Zoological Society of Trinidad and Tobago (ZSTT) is soon expecting the arrival of five chimpanzees from a breeding facility based in Washington, DC and is completing the new enclosure to keep them.

President of the Zoological Society of Trinidad and Tobago, Gupte Lutchmedial said the activities taking place ensures an appropriate space for these animals. “What we are doing is taking a bare structure that was completed by a contractor under the phase 2 operations of the Zoo Upgrade project and converting it to a green space.” Explaining what this meant, Lutchmedial continued, “This is going to be a self-contained area that will be energy-efficient as it will allow for natural lighting and ventilation and rain-water collection. Also the design caters for recycling of the waste water for use in cleaning of the enclosures.” The elaborate roof design of the structure at this moment, although covered for protection from the elements has a section with transparent sheeting and is being prepared for some solar panels as well.

Another aspect to the improvements being done is the outfitting of the enclosure with appropriate fittings and furnishings. It is scientifically accepted that there is a 98 percent genetic similarity between humans and chimpanzees and these animals are thus considered as highly intelligent beings. “The environment we are aiming for is a naturalistic setting outfitted with furniture that is stimulating to keep them from becoming bored,” said Lutchmedial. To this end, webbings made from rope and tiered platforms were observed to be under active preparation during the visit.

Judging from the size of the enclosure which carries a 6,400 sq feet footprint and is well outfitted, it comes as no surprise, sources said, that the cost which is being covered by the members of the ZSTT comes close to four million dollars to bring what was a bare cage to an enclosure fit for these endangered animals.

In light of the recent reclassification of all captive chimpanzees as endangered made by the US Fish and Wildlife Service bringing them to the same status as their wild counterparts, the ZSTT was conscious that nothing but a world class facility will do for these animals.

Lutchmedial explained, “The reclassification is an excellent move that will benefit captive chimpanzees as it will regulate medical research and importantly make them part of the global breeding programmes. To this end, we are onboard with this conservation initiative and not just displaying chimpanzees to the public.”

A rhinoceros is also expected to join the Zoo’s diverse collection and with all these developments, Zoo guests can look forward to the opening of the African Exhibit area in the near future, Lutchmedial said.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #108 on: June 23, 2015, 01:51:59 AM »
Wildlife workers appear in court with protected animals
By Nikita Braxton (Express)


FOUR men hired to collect data on the wildlife population during the hunting moratorium were found in possession of three tortoises in bags in their trunks.

Sherland Finch, Dillon Roopan, Shiva Ramlal and Bhagwandeen Samaroo told the court they were trying to save the animals.

Princes Town Magistrate Avason Quinlan, who said the maximum penalty for possession of protected animals and also hunting a protected animal was $1,000 or three months’ hard labour, asked whether such fines could have the necessary effect.

"I want to ask the question whether that sentence is appropriate in the circumstances and time in which we live in now," she said.

At around 12.20 a.m. on Labour Day last Friday, police Constable Steve Seepersad, who is also a game warden, was with other police officers on mobile patrol duty along Rochard Douglas Road, Barrackpore, where they stopped and conducted a routine search of the men's B14 car.

Sergeant Shazim Mohammed told the court: "The complainant searched the vehicle and found in the trunk in a black knapsack two gallop turtles...and one yellow-footed tortoise, also called a morocoy."

When asked the reason for having the animals, two of the defendants said: "We caught it in Edward Trace, Moruga."

The four were taken to Barrackpore Police Station.

The three animals were shown to the court during the matter yesterday.

Defence attorney Petronilla Basdeo said while her clients admitted they had the animals, they disputed the time of their arrest and the utterances noted.

She said her clients were employed to work by the University of The West Indies and the Environmental Management Authority to survey the forest before the hunting ban is removed.

"They had a duty to traverse the area using GPS and satellites and record their findings and observations."

Basdeo said while doing this, her clients came across carcasses of animals killed by heavy equipment that had been clearing the area. She said they picked up the turtles "in an effort, not to cause harm but to save the animals".

She also said that the men tried contacting their boss via their cellular phones but were unsuccessful.

Basdeo asked for leniency for Finch, 34, Roopan, 22, Ramlal, 29, and Samaroo, 33, who are all from Barrackpore.

Quinlan warned them that when they see a protected animal they believe is in danger, they should make a report to the relevant authorities.

She fined each $900 for each of the animals. In default of paying they will serve three months’ hard labour.

They were given two weeks to pay the fines.

The tortoises were ordered released back into the wild under Seepersad's supervision.

Seepersad said all turtles in this country are protected animals.

Following the matter, the men asked Seepersad and honorary game warden Rennie Loknath to visit the area and try to save the turtles which were in danger of being hurt.

Earlier, before Magistrate Debra Quintyne in the Princes Town First Court, Roopan and Samaroo appeared charged separately with possession of marijuana.

They both pleaded guilty and Roopan, who admitted that he had 0.6 grammes of the drug, was ordered to serve community service. He is to visit a probation officer and return to court on July 17.

Samaroo, who was having difficulty following the proceedings, was advised to contract the services of an attorney and return to court on July 7.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #109 on: June 28, 2015, 04:44:01 AM »
Wildlife species management —Part 2 Enforcement, socio-economic and cultural aspects of hunting.
T&T Guardian Reports.


Socio-economic and cultural aspects of hunting

We frequently encounter stories in the newspapers about citizens being arrested and charged for hunting offences. One such story is an account of two farmers and a labourer being arrested for the possession of a monkey carcass in Biche, April 2014. Another incident was reported in October 2013 whereby game wardens caught a Chaguanas man with 18 carcasses of the Scarlet Ibis, the national bird, and he was sentenced to 18 months in prison.

A third account revealed that during the Christmas season of 2014 (as reported by the Trinidad Guardian) conservationists, environmentalists and game wardens were taken aback over the festive season after photos of a woman kissing the decapitated head of an iguana and a man with the reptile’s head partially in his open mouth surfaced on Facebook.

It appears that game wardens are constantly challenged to prevent poachers and out-of-season hunting. Hunting is both a livelihood and sport activity in T&T, thus the infamous term “wild meat” has almost become a household name.  However, this activity requires adequate regulation to ensure the survival of wildlife populations whilst facilitating the economic and social importance of this “ritual.” 

Furthermore, social media has undoubtedly fuelled a national call for strong enforcement of wildlife protection legislation. Many users share pictures of indiscriminate citizens posing with deceased wild animals as a means of expressing outrage over the act of hunting, or as a means of calling on enforcement officials to apprehend said people.

The EMA, in understanding the delicate balance between socio-economic activities and wildlife resource management, included stakeholder components in its Species Research and Data Capture Programme to better understand and engage the hunting community. Key stakeholders such as hunters and community members will be engaged through consultations in an attempt to collect data on their knowledge, attitudes and perceptions (KAP) regarding hunting.

Based on this information, an analysis into the socio-economic and cultural aspects will be conducted which will include an examination of alternative livelihoods. This aspect of the project aims to ensure that these people have alternative opportunities for gaining income which would also minimise illegal hunting during the proposed moratorium and reduce the likelihood of a black market for wild meat.

Enforcement

To provide additional support to the game wardens tasked with protecting wildlife species, the EMA is establishing an Environmental Police Post at the Valencia Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre. This post will allow for effective patrols of this area, which borders an important ecosystem—the Matura National Park, an Environmentally Sensitive Area.

This centre will facilitate a 24-hour presence of environmental police, with people in the community being trained and made environmental officers to assist in monitoring and enforcement.  This will allow for further community capacity building and livelihood development.

The EMA’s increased police surveillance is accompanied by an increase in penalties and fines for hunting offences intended to deter citizens from contravening wildlife regulations.

The fines have been increased as per the following:

• Hunting any animal in a game sanctuary: from $1,000 and three months’ imprisonment to $100,000 and one year in jail

• Taking a dog into a game sanctuary for hunting: from $1,000 and three months’ imprisonment to $100,000 and one year imprisonment

• Hunting a protected animal without a special licence from the chief game warden: from $1,000 and three months’ imprisonment to $50,000 for each animal

• Hunting in the closed season, without a special game licence and not under the special conditions to exercise dogs in lands other than the forest reserve and game sanctuaries: from $2,000 and six months’ imprisonment to $100,000 and two years’ imprisonment

Whilst the initiatives outlined in both articles intend to transform the attitudes and practices of wildlife management in T&T, education and awareness remain key tools to conserving our vulnerable species. The EMA’s public education mandate has and continues to serve as a critical role in addressing this issue with increased partnerships with community members and non-governmental based organisations over the years, resulting in greater mutual understanding and more efficient channels for addressing wildlife and other environmental matters.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #110 on: October 11, 2015, 02:53:34 PM »

VIDEO Report; https://www.facebook.com/cnewslive/videos/10153629263080610/

Quote
Young tigers Rani and Raja are growing quickly

Well they aren't cubs anymore! Young tigers Rani and Raja are growing by leaps and bounds since their birth at the Emperor Valley Zoo in January. They are now nine months old, weigh over 100 pounds and are over five feet in length.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #111 on: October 11, 2015, 06:29:33 PM »

Quote
On Monday, the Emperor Valley Zoo welcomed its latest addition! Gloria, a Red Howler Monkey at the Zoo gave birth to her young but the sex of the baby Howler is still not certain, as it's quite early to tell. Mahalia Joseph visited the Zoo and brought back this report.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/dn6nwuJpgX4" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/dn6nwuJpgX4</a>

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The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #113 on: January 11, 2016, 11:50:30 AM »
Raja and Rani, King and Queen of the Zoo, turned one year old on Sunday and the Zoo held a special birthday party in their honour.

The White Bengal Tigers, the first born here in Trinidad, had a special cake made of horse meat and were the attention to dozens who took the time to say Happy Birthday.
WATCH:  https://www.facebook.com/cnewslive/videos/10153804308715610/
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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #114 on: February 29, 2016, 03:23:47 AM »
Zoo’s giraffes take cautious steps into new African exhibit
T&T Newsday Reports.


The African Exhibit at the Emperor Valley Zoo which was recently opened had as one of its early guests, Clarence Rambharat, Minister of Agriculture, Land and Marine Resources who paid a visit on Friday last.

Accompanied on the tour by the President of the Zoological Society of Trinidad and Tobago (ZSTT), Gupte Lutchmedial and other staff members, Minister Rambharat indicated his pleasure at seeing the giraffes and mandrills in their new accommodation.

“I am especially heartened to see that ample space is available for these iconic animals and I look forward to the Zoo continuing apace with its upgrade works,” said Minister Rambharat. He added, “I join with the ZSTT in its achievable vision for the Zoo as a premier conservation and education centre in Trinidad and Tobago.” For Lutchmedial and the entire ZSTT, February 2016 will be recorded as a watershed month in the annals of the Emperor Valley Zoo with the opening of this African Exhibit to the public. Guests to the Zoo now have access to this area which adds to their overall experience. Although the physical infrastructure was ready since January, the pace was set by the iconic giraffes that chose to venture into their new “accommodation” at their own time. “We had no choice but to exercise restraint in the giraffe relocation process and after a patient one–month period, we were rewarded on no lesser day than Valentine’s Day,” said Lutchmedial.

Continuing with further details, Lutchmedial explained, “Mandela was the first to cautiously back into the enclosure having been coaxed with a corridor lined with branches, and shortly after, Melman followed suit.” This milestone was followed three days after with the well-executed relocation of the Zoo’s four mandrills. When asked how the mandrills are settling in, Lutchmedial stated “Monitoring of the mandrills’ acclimatization to their new accommodation was an integral part of the relocation process, and we observed that after a day of cautious exploration, the mandrills began to use their larger space.” Their keepers have observed that they are quite adventurous, climbing onto the several platforms provided and making use of the furniture provided for their enrichment and welfare.

The Zoo’s management has indicated that its guests are pleased with these new developments, with many of them describing the new enclosures as spacious and up to standards seen at other zoos abroad. For Lutchmedial, this is an accomplishment long overdue, since he recalled that this portion of the Zoo was closed to the public for over eight years. “This new giraffe enclosure was modified from an exhibit that was built some years ago to house an Asian elephant expected from India. Since this did not materialise, it was an ideal space to convert into suitable accommodation for our two giraffes, “explained Lutchmedial.

So what’s next on the card for the Emperor Valley Zoo? In what can only be described as good news, Sudi, the lone chimpanzee at the Zoo is scheduled to be relocated into her new enclosure by next month. Guests visiting the Zoo would observe work being done apace to finish up this new structure which is situated adjacent to that of the giraffes.

The Zoo’s management is assuring that the upgrade work continues beyond this as its ultimate goal is to have all its animals kept in exhibits that meet the standard of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums which is the standard bearer for the Americas.

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #115 on: April 07, 2016, 08:05:52 PM »



A Facebook post of a group of men trying to pull a large grouper into the back of a pick-up truck, has attracted tens of thousands of viewers.

The video was uploaded by ENT! BREAKING NEWS with the title: "Huge Grouper like fish caught at Mayaro, Trinidad"

The video appears to have been shot by Pooran Ramlakhan.

The fish is still alive as the men struggle to load the new catch into the truck.

Read More: http://www.cnc3.co.tt/press-release/huge-grouper-caught-mayaro
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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #116 on: April 08, 2016, 01:28:43 PM »
Liar the lion say that is them small fish he father does use for bait.
Bitter is a supercalifragilistic tic-tac-pro

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #117 on: March 31, 2017, 03:20:44 PM »
The dolphins were beaten, hacked to death
...humans, not disease were the perpetrators
By Susan Mohammed Multimedia Desk


It turns out that humans, not disease, killed the dolphins found on the beach in La Brea on Thursday. Necropsies done on the carcasses of the animals found that the juvenile had been beaten and the adult had been cut in half.

The two Spinner dolphins were found on the Carat Shed Beach, La Brea.

According to the Trinidad and Tobago Marine Mammal Stranding Network, the adult animal had been cut in half and only the cranial (front) half was found on the site.

The juvenile and the remaining half of the adult animal were retrieved by the TTMMSN's veterinary team, Dr. Carla Phillips (Clinician, Marine Mammal Medicine and Aquatic Animal Health), Dr. Rod Suepaul (Veterinary Pathologist) (both Lecturers at the University of the West Indies, School of Veterinary Medicine (UWI-SVM)), and Dr. Wade Seukeran (Private Veterinary Practitioner).

The carcasses were transported to the UWI-SVM where examinations were performed on Friday.

“Both animals were found to be in very good body condition and were both actively feeding at the time that they became distressed, as evidenced by the presence of feed in the oesophagus and stomach. Markings and indentations on the body of the adult animal were consistent with that of fishing nets” said the organisation.

“The juvenile male dolphin had lesions consistent with severe blunt force trauma along the entire right side of the body. Both animals had haemorrhaged into the thoracic (chest) cavity. The juvenile animal had extensive pulmonary haemorrhage, especially in the right lung, again consistent with blunt force trauma to the right side of the body.

The adult animal had been cut in half just behind the dorsal fin. Abdominal organs were found to be crudely severed and removed. The sex of the animal therefore could not be determined”.

Necropsy findings strongly suggest that both animals perished as a result of human interaction, stated the TTMSN, which strongly encouraged to avoid interaction with marine mammals that may wash ashore.

“Desist from the practice of mutilating the animals and avoid consumption of the carcass as these animal often harbour harmful micro-organisms that can be transmitted to humans and can be detrimental to human health”.

The public was also reminded that marine mammals are protected and it is illegal to handle or be in possession of these animals (or parts thereof) without a permit.

Reports of strandings should be immediately made to the Wildlife Division (Trinidad: 662-5114, 645-4288; Tobago: 639-2570; 735-4369) and the TTMMSN (466-2709, 735-3530). It is best that the public await the assistance of trained personnel before trying to intervene.


A member of the T&T Marine mammal Stranding Network examines the juvenile dolphin that, it was later determined, was beaten.


Veterinarians examine the dead dolphin washed ashore in La Brea on Thursday.


A village take a photograph of the dead dolphin washed ashore in La Brea on Thursday.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Flex

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #118 on: July 30, 2017, 08:23:49 AM »
Two zebras arrive at Emperor Valley Zoo
T&T Newsday Reports.


THE EMPEROR Valley Zoo welcomed two new animals on Friday night - a pair of zebras.

The Zoological Society of Trinidad and Tobago (ZSTT), in a release yesterday, announced the safe arrival of the zebras. The animals landed at 8pm on Friday night and on hand to receive them were Agriculture Minister Clarence Rambharat and ZSTT president Gupte Lutchmedial.

Accompanying the animals on their journey was John Seyjagat, the ZSTT’s international director, the release said.

Lutchmedial in a statement yesterday morning said: “The zebras have adjusted nicely in its enclosure and our thanks to John for looking after their well being on the journey overland from Texas and by air from Miami.” “The ZSTT is committed to enhancing our guest experiences and this newest arrival to our African Exhibit is in keeping with our strategic thrust.”

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Re: Animals in Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #119 on: April 05, 2019, 12:42:20 AM »
$24,500 for bird lover held with illegal cargo
by Sascha Wilson (Guardian)


A mar­ket ven­dor who was held with 81 birds in Ce­dros has been slapped with $24,500 in fines.

Akash Ram­per­sad, 23, of Pe­tit Bourg has to pay the fines with­in three months oth­er­wise he could go to prison.

Ram­per­sad plead­ed guilty to 80 of­fences of keep­ing bullfinch and pi­coplat birds in an un­der­sized cage and pos­ses­sion of a pro­tect­ed bird, a yel­low-head­ed par­rot, with­out a li­cence when he ap­peared in the Point Fortin Mag­is­trates Court.

He was joint­ly charged with Za­man Hu­sain, 20, and Cur­tis Hart, 20, both of Aranguez, but they plead­ed not guilty. Sec­ond Court Mag­is­trate Tara­matie Ram­dass grant­ed them each $10,000 own bail and ad­journed their mat­ter to May 2. The men were rep­re­sent­ed by at­tor­ney James Philbert. The court heard that around 10.30 am po­lice stopped a white car at Bonasse Vil­lage, Ce­dros, af­ter re­ceiv­ing in­for­ma­tion.

The po­lice found three oc­cu­pants in the car, in­clud­ing Ram­per­sad who was the dri­ver. The of­fi­cers al­so ob­served 20 bullfinch­es in a cage, 60 pi­coplats in an­oth­er cage and a box with a yel­low-head­ed par­rot.

They were charged by se­nior game war­den Steve Seep­er­sad. The birds were pro­duced in the court. Ram­per­sad claimed that he and his friends went to the beach where they saw a drunk man with the birds. Ram­per­sad, a bird lover, claimed he felt sor­ry for the birds and bought the birds from him.

Ram­per­sad re­leased some and de­cid­ed to take the rest home to care for them. Pros­e­cu­tor Sgt Manoolal con­formed he had no con­vic­tions or pend­ing mat­ters. The mag­is­trate fined him $500 for hav­ing the pro­tect­ed bird and $300 each on the 80 charges of hav­ing birds in an un­der­sized cage. The of­fences car­ry a max­i­mum fine of $10,000.

The birds were hand­ed over to the Em­per­or Val­ley Zoo.


The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.