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Offline Tallman

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Foul over two-year, $4m deal
« Reply #60 on: June 19, 2020, 08:01:03 AM »
Foul over two-year, $4m deal
By Stephon Nicholas (T&T Newsday)


OUSTED T&T Football Association president William Wallace’s recent tell-all failed to tell all.

Wallace gave details of contracts unilaterally approved by himself, talking to the online news site Wired868. But he left out significant information about the local football body’s legal agreement with English marketing agent Peter Miller.

Wallace had denied that Miller was the TTFA marketing director and said the Englishman’s contract was conditional on the sponsorships he brought in.

He told Wired868, “His payment was contingent on what he brings to the TTFA. It is based on the whole roll out of sponsorships with Miller who then has to pay his other people from that. If you didn’t bring anything then you have nothing to get.”

But according to the contract seen by Newsday, Miller was contracted for 24 months at US$25,000 per month, with options for two one-year extensions. The first page of the contract says Miller is “hereinafter referred to as the Marketing Director.”

Wallace found himself at the centre of controversy after it was revealed he had signed a string of contracts without approval from the TTFA board.

The Secondary Schools Football League boss, Wallace became head of the TTFA in November 2019, replacing the embattled David John-Williams. Wallace, who campaigned on the United TTFA slate, had accused John-Williams of lack of transparency, lack of accountability and dictatorial tendencies.

Wallace is now being accused of the same thing by his fellow United TTFA members and TTFA board members. FIFA removed the Wallace executive on March 17 and installed a normalisation committee after a FIFA/Concacaf fact-finding mission found “extremely low overall financial management methods, combined with a massive debt, have resulted in the TTFA facing a very real risk of insolvency and illiquidity.”

Wallace recently admitted to lying to the TTFA board and the media about Miller’s contract. He also unilaterally changed the contract of TTFA general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan from one year to two years, renegotiated national coach Terry Fenwick’s salary from US$17,500 per month to US$20,000 per month plus perks, and also went behind the board’s back to sign a contract with apparel company Avec Sport.

He also claimed Miller asked for his contract to remain secret, which was why he kept it from the TTFA board.

NO FAITH IN WALLACE

But speaking to Newsday on Thursday by phone, Miller denied asking Wallace to keep the contract secret, saying he was negotiating deals on the TTFA’s behalf with companies in TT, Europe and the United States and signing them at the TTFA’s marketing director/head of international development – so asking for his position to be concealed would have made no sense whatsoever.

“I’m genuinely disappointed. I had faith in William before election. I thought he was a man that stood for honesty, integrity and accountability,” Miller said.

Asked if his payments under the contract depended on sponsorship, Miller said, “No, no mention of commission in the contract.”

According to the contract seen by Newsday, no such caveat is included and Miller is referred to as marketing director throughout the document.

Asked if he felt the FIFA normalisation committee would honour his contract, Miller said, “That is for them to decide, but I see no reason why they wouldn’t.”

Also included in the deal, separate from Miller’s US$25,000 monthly salary, is a US$30,410.95 payment to the “marketing executive” for services provided by Miller on or about November 25, 2019. Miller was instrumental in TTFA’s securing an apparel deal with Avec Sport.

BENEFACTOR UNMASKED

As for coach Terry Fenwick’s contract, Wallace acknowledged changing the terms with a 14 per cent increase but insisted that extra US$2,500 monthly would not be a burden on the TTFA, as it would be paid by a benefactor whom he declined to name.

Fenwick’s contract does not include details of any external arrangement and says only that the TTFA must pay his US$20,000 salary.

Miller claimed he was the mysterious benefactor who would pay US$2,500 a month to Fenwick to make up the US$20,000 salary Fenwick was asking for.

Miller said he mediated the deal between Fenwick and the TTFA and decided to sacrifice $2,500 of his own salary to get the deal done.

TTFA technical committee chairman Keith Look Loy “was negotiating with Terry...It was clear the two were at loggerheads,” he said.

Miller said Fenwick’s pay structure was expected to change after the biennial Concacaf Gold Cup, so he stepped in to make up the shortfall that was being haggled over.

Speaking to Newsday on Thursday, Look Loy acknowledged speaking to Miller, who he said acted as Fenwick’s agent in the negotiations. Look Loy said he was firm that Fenwick must not get more than the US$17,500 paid to his predecessor, Dennis Lawrence.

Look Loy said he screened all the candidates, but added, “I never negotiated that with Fenwick directly. He always used Miller as his agent. I used the word ‘agent’ to mean the person speaking for him. I can’t tell a man who to appoint to talk for him. “To make the deal possible, he (Miller) said, ‘Listen, I would get other money to top up on what he (Fenwick) wants.’

“My position was he could do what he wants. I am not the agent for Fenwick here, I am the agent for TTFA...I told Miller, ‘If you want to go get extra money I have no problem with that, that is not my business.’

“In that sense, if he wants to say that I knew, of course I knew.” But Look Loy was adamant he was unaware of Miller’s own contract.

“The board approves contracts. No contract with Peter Miller was brought before the board...My position back then, under David John-Williams, was that a contract signed by the president alone was invalid....Any contract that is not approved by the board is invalid, and more so a contract that goes against specific conditions approved by the board.”

TTFA general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan on Thursday refused to comment on the details of Miller’s contract or even its existence. The contract, which took effect on January 1, 2020, bears signatures that appear to be those of Wallace and Ramdhan.

But Ramdhan said, “Enough has been said. I have nothing to say. You sure that is my signature? If you see my name on a contract how can I deny that? These are matters not for discussion right now. People have certain agendas, I would not add to the chorus. Let it play out.” Calls and a text message to Wallace’s cellphone went unanswered.
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Offline kounty

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #61 on: June 19, 2020, 10:54:07 AM »
mud on everybody face who supported. making sancho and co look like prophets.

Offline Tallman

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Meeting to discuss Wallace's tenure cancelled
« Reply #62 on: June 20, 2020, 06:48:55 AM »
Meeting to discuss Wallace's tenure cancelled
By Jelani Beckles (T&T Newsday)


LAWYERS have advised the United T&T Football Association (TTFA) to cancel their meeting on Saturday, as the situation involving the former TTFA executive and FIFA is still in court.

United TTFA members (the former TTFA executive) Keith Look Loy, Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick, Joseph Sam Phillip and Anthony Harford distanced themselves from former TTFA president William Wallace earlier this week, who is also a member of the United TTFA.

Look Loy and company said they are disappointed that Wallace made unilateral decisions concerning contracts.

In a media release on Tuesday, signed by Look Loy, Taylor, Joseph-Warrick, Phillip and Harford, said, “We have determined to immediately call a virtual general meeting of TTFA’s membership (via Zoom), on Saturday 20 June at 2 pm.” The release said the meeting is intended to allow the members the opportunity to give their thoughts on the decisions made by Wallace during his tenure.

On Friday, Look Loy said, “No (it is off), the lawyers have said because it is in court don’t worry with that…so we following that.”

The United TTFA, including Wallace, is currently in a court battle against FIFA for taking over the affairs of the local governing body in March, claiming FIFA has no right to interfere with democratically elected officials. Matthew Gayle, Dr Emir Crowne, Jason Jones and Crystal Paul are representing the United TTFA.

Wallace was elected TTFA president in November 2019, replacing David John-Williams. Wallace and his executive led the TTFA until March 2020, before FIFA appointed a normalisation committee to run TTFA which included getting rid of the $50 million debt facing the local football body.

Eyebrows have been raised concerning some of the contracts during Wallace’s tenure.

Wallace said he will address all concerns raised during his time in office over the next week.

Wallace told Newsday on Friday, “Right now I am not speaking about anything, but I will be making a statement when I am ready…I am going to do a full disclosure on all of this in due course along with the supporting documents.”

Among the contracts that are controversial is one currently held by national men’s coach Terry Fenwick.

Englishman Fenwick, who has lived in T&T for over 20 years, was hired in December 2019 to replace Dennis Lawrence as coach after the TTFA board voted 8-1 with the understanding that he would be paid US$17,500 per month with other bonuses. In the incentive package, Fenwick would start earning US$20,000 a month if the team qualified for the 2021 CONCACAF Gold Cup. However, then TTFA president Wallace, general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan and Fenwick signed an agreement that meant the national coach would receive a starting salary of US$20,000 per month and it would increase to US$25,000 if the team qualified for the Gold Cup. This was not approved by the TTFA board.

It was initially reported that the additional US$2,500 per month came through sponsorship (not revealed) as Fenwick was not satisfied with his contract. The US$2,500 extra was included on the main contract instead of a separate contract.

Wallace acknowledged changing the terms of Fenwick’s contract with a 14 per cent increase but insisted that extra US$2,500 monthly would not be a burden on the TTFA, as it would be paid by a benefactor whom he declined to name.

Fenwick’s contract does not include details of any external arrangement and says only that the TTFA must pay his US$20,000 salary.

Englishman Peter Miller claimed he was the mysterious benefactor who would pay US$2,500 a month to Fenwick to make up the US$20,000 salary Fenwick was asking for.

Miller said he mediated the deal between Fenwick and the TTFA and decided to sacrifice US$2,500 of his own salary to get the deal done.

TTFA’s contract with Miller is also being questioned.

Wallace had denied that Miller was the TTFA marketing director and said the Englishman’s contract was conditional on the sponsorship he brought in.

He told online news site Wired868, “His payment was contingent on what he brings to the TTFA. It is based on the whole roll out of sponsorships with Miller who then has to pay his other people from that. If you didn’t bring anything then you have nothing to get.”

But according to the contract seen by Newsday, Miller was contracted for 24 months at US$25,000 per month, with options for two one-year extensions. The first page of the contract says Miller is “hereinafter referred to as the Marketing Director.”
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Offline Flex

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #63 on: June 21, 2020, 08:09:31 AM »
Wallace: I lied about Peter Miller; TTFA president admits giving contract to controversial Englishman
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace lied to his vice-presidents, the board and the media about the relationship between controversial English marketing man Peter Miller and the local football body—because Miller asked him to.

Two months after Wallace told Wired868 that Miller was not the TTFA’s marketing officer, the besieged official admitted yesterday he had not been honest.

His confession came amidst a stream of leaked internal TTFA documents to regional programme, SportsMax. The controversial contracts were handed over by general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan to normalisation committee chairman Richard Hadad last month.

Was a Miller contract among the SportsMax-bound treasure trove?

Wired868 asked Wallace if such a document existed and, after more than a month of denials, the TTFA president admitted that it did.

“There is a Peter Miller arrangement and it is one I didn’t want to talk about, due to him asking me not to disclose it at a particular point in time,” Wallace told Wired868. “His arrangement was that monies to be paid to him would come directly from sponsorships, so it was contingent on what he brought in.”

Wired868: Was it a flat monthly figure—and not a commission as previously suggested?

Wallace: “[It was] flat numbers and the flat numbers were supposed to be worked out based on monies collected from sponsorships. For instance, the Arima deal alone would have been TT$50 million. We were supposed to be getting TT$10 million per year over the next four years; and that was cash.

“[…] So he sent something pointing to specific numbers and he sent a document that we signed—and that is our arrangement with Miller and his team of people.”

(The Arima Borough Corporation did not accept the TTFA’s pitch to redevelop the Arima Velodrome.)

Wired868: Is it true, as has been suggested, that Miller’s contract was for US$20,000 (TT$135,000) per month plus commission?

Wallace: “The figures I can’t remember off the top of my head because that is not money I have to find to pay him. The TTFA is not liable to pay him. His payment was contingent on what what he brings to the TTFA. It is based on the whole roll out of sponsorships with Miller who then has to pay his other people from that.

“If you didn’t bring anything then you have nothing to get. I had no problem with the numbers. The arrangement was based on the monies coming in and his payment would have been based on how hard he worked.”

Wired868: Why did you tell us there was no contract? And why did you not declare it to the TTFA Board?

Wallace: “I gave him my word because he didn’t want his contract revealed to the public. In due course, it would have happened but I gave him my word.

“[…] I am of the belief that the president is responsible for commercial deals and finding sponsorships. The board is not finding us any sponsorship. So my position is if you are bringing $1,000 to the table and you want $500 from it, then I have no problem with that—because I have $500 more than I started with.”

Incidentally, the TTFA Constitution does not include sourcing sponsorship among the responsibilities of the football president. Instead, article 54 says the board should activate a marketing committee to: ‘advise the board of directors with regard to drafting and implementing contracts between TTFA and its marketing partners and analyse marketing strategies that have been devised’.

Miller’s first job in Trinidad, almost 20 years ago, was at the W Connection Football Club, owned by former TTFA president David John-Williams. He then took up an executive role at the Football Company of Trinidad and Tobago (FCoTT) under Jack Warner.

In both cases, Miller is believed to have delivered considerably less than he promised. His departure came after an unflattering two-part series on his record as a salesman by this reporter for the Trinidad Express newspaper.

Miller was subsequently accused of more of the same—and much, much worse—further afield, including at English lower league clubs: Northampton, Luton Town and Port Vale.

Wallace did not get independent legal advice for Miller’s contract or show it to his board or vice-presidents. Incidentally, the Englishman was involved in the TTFA’s deals with Nike and Avec Sport and represented Men’s National Senior Team head coach Terry Fenwick in his salary negotiations—all of which ultimately caused headaches for Wallace’s administration.

When Wired868 asked about Miller on 6 April, Look Loy said the Englishman was involved in the United TTFA’s electoral campaign and he believed that he was working on commission.

“I obviously know that he was involved in organising some of these promised sponsorships that were unveiled when the United TTFA ran its [election] campaign, like the Nike deal,” Look Loy said then. “And when that fell down, he played a part in the Avec Sport contract. He never held a TTFA post but he might have been doing marketing work.

“My position to the board was that we should outsource [marketing and sales] to more than one entity on a commission basis, so if you bring a dollar you get 10 cents…”

Up to the time of publication, Look Loy said he knew nothing about any contract to Miller.

Three months ago, Wallace insisted that Miller’s signature as ‘marketing director’ on a document with British developers, Lavender Consulting Limited, was an ‘error’.

“We did discuss outsourcing marketing at the board but we have not yet signed off with any individual or entity,” said Wallace. “Peter [Miller] worked with us before the elections and continued work after the elections; and I am sure when the pre-elections plans started to unfold, he would have been considered and proposed to the board.

“[…] It was originally ‘United TTFA’, so [his signature as TTFA marketing director on a Lavender document] is an error that carried over. The discussion [regarding the Lavender] deal started before the elections.”

Wallace admitted yesterday that he was less than truthful. However, he hopes for the chance to put his view across to the membership and insisted that his actions did not put the local football body at risk.

Last week, Wallace’s United TTFA slate, which included vice-presidents Clynt Taylor, Susan Warrick-Joseph and Sam Phillip, Northern FA president Anthony Harford and Look Loy, said they were stunned to learn that the president signed a deal with Fenwick that included crucial terms not agreed to by the board.

It was the second time that something of that nature occurred, after he kept them—and the board—in the dark about agreeing a deal with Avec Sport in March.

On the weekend, Wallace and his colleagues held a virtual meeting on the Zoom online platform and the president was asked whether there were any other secret contracts that they should be aware of.

He allegedly responded ‘no’.

So, on Monday night, Look Loy hit the roof when SportsMax revealed that Wallace also unilaterally changed the terms of his general secretary’s contract.

Yesterday, the United TTFA fired back by comparing Wallace’s behaviour to that of his predecessor, John-Williams—a broadside that Harford felt went too far.

Today, however, Wallace reveals another skeleton, in the form of a clandestine Miller deal with terms that remain unclear. He said it is his last secret.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline sjahrain

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #64 on: June 21, 2020, 08:59:22 AM »
You lay down with snakes...you end up getting bit...if you are lucky...dead if not...soon we will know which is W W faith..... :devil: :devil: :devil:

Offline Tallman

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #65 on: June 21, 2020, 09:49:07 PM »
Wallace promises to tell on TTFA
By Keith Clement (T&T Guardian)


Beleaguered former T&T Football Association president William Wallace is promising to release a comprehensive statement on his stewardship and the state of the cash-strapped association shortly.

Wallace made the promise on I95FM Sports Show on Saturday, days after being taken to task for signing at least four contracts without necessary board approvals by members of the United TTFA group which was in charge of the TTFA administration before it was removed by FIFA on March 17 and a Normalisation Committee brought in.

"If not on Monday, by Tuesday I will have a comprehensive statement sent out to the entire media about the issues," Wallace told host Andre Baptiste in response to the current woes he was facing.

Asked if he feels he will be able to clear his name, Wallace responded: "Definitely, definitely. After the release let me be judged then."

Wallace also promised to produce documented evidence on all the contracts he is alleged to have signed without board approval.

Last Monday, the United TTFA accused Wallace, who is also the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) president, of signing unapproved contracts for national coach Terry Fenwick, general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan, marketing representative Peter Miller and a $25 million sportswear deal with UK firm Avec Sports without their knowledge and approval from the TTFA board.

The United TTFA group, which includes Keith Look Loy, a former TTFA Technical Committee chairman, North Zone Football Association (NFA) president Anthony Harford and former TTFA vice presidents Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick and Joseph Sam Phillip, condemned his actions, likening them to that of former president David John-Williams, whom the group fought to replace during TTFA election in November last year.

"This pattern of behaviour is unacceptable. It is unilateral. It exceeds the constitutional limits to the president's authority. It is deceptive and deeply disappointing," the group said, even as it noted it was still in support of the fight against FIFA bringing in the Normalisation Committee to restructure the local game in the High Court.

But Wallace defended himself during the radio programme, saying "There is another side to a story and one narrative is out there and as a leader of a group is to absorb some of the things going on but there comes a time when you can absorb no more. When it starts to interfere with your creditability you have to speak out and this is my opportunity to do that."

He said he will be sharing the contents of his promised release with his vice-presidents and the team before it goes out.

Despite the thrashing by the United TTFA group, Wallace, who is challenging FIFA's decision to bring in the Normalisation Committee in the High Courts, said: "The United TTFA is still united. I spoke to my team this morning. I spoke to Look Loy for 45 minutes today (Saturday) on my plan to go public."

FIFA removed the Wallace executive after a FIFA/Concacaf fact-finding mission, which included an independent auditor, in February found that “extremely low overall financial management methods, combined with massive debt (TT$37.4 million), have resulted in the TTFA facing a very real risk of insolvency and illiquidity.”

In its High Court response to the United TTFA legal challenge, FIFA stated that: “The removal of the Normalisation Committee before appropriate controls, policies and procedures are in place at the TTFA will not only jeopardise the achievements to date and reintroduce the threats to the solvency of the TTFA, but it will be a disincentive to FIFA to provide any further funding to the TTFA given the absence of appropriate controls.”

Meanwhile, AC Port-of-Spain business development officer Michael Awai said on Friday that he would attempt to persuade the 49 TTFA members, among them the T&T Pro League, T&T Super League, regional associations, primary and secondary schools, Referees' Association, Futsal and Beach Soccer and the T&T American Youth Soccer Organisation, to write to the general secretary Ramdhan to call an extraordinary general meeting to stop the United TTFA group from taking legal action against the FIFA.
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Offline ABTrini

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #66 on: June 22, 2020, 06:07:29 AM »
This is getting increasingly puzzling with each day, each interview and each press release.

I don't  understand the timing in regards to these public disclosures- especially if these could all be  connected to matters pending before the courts with FIFA.

I could understand wanting to defend ones name but in a storm sometimes it's better to be calm and composed.

Then again what is being revealed typifies the kind of leadership we have come to expect form that position in the TTFA.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2020, 07:10:47 AM by ABTrini »

Offline Tallman

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Miller unpaid: Marketing director hired by Wallace in limbo
« Reply #67 on: June 22, 2020, 06:40:51 AM »
Miller unpaid: Marketing director hired by Wallace in limbo
By Stephon Nicholas (T&T Newsday)


T&T Football Association (TTFA) marketing director Peter Miller says he has not been paid a cent of his US$600,000 two-year contract, which took effect on January 1.

The contract, signed by ousted TTFA president William Wallace, assured the Englishman a salary of US$25,000 a month, with options to extend for a third and fourth year.

Also mentioned is a US$30,410.95 payment to the “marketing executive” for services provided by Miller “since on or about November 25, 2019.”

Speaking with Newsday, on Thursday, Miller said he has received neither the US$30,410.95 payment for those services nor his salary.

“I haven’t been paid at all,” he said.

Miller said the US$30,410.95 payment was for services rendered after the TTFA election and before January 1, 2020.

The TTFA executive led by Wallace,was removed by FIFA on March 17 after a fact-finding mission found poor overall financial management methods and huge debt.

FIFA said the TTFA was facing a very real risk of insolvency and illiquidity.

The TTFA normalisation committee, headed by businessman Robert Hadad, not only has to find a solution for the enormous debt left by the TTFA’s past administrations and the contracts signed by Wallace without board approval, but their task has been stymied by a High Court case initiated by Wallaces’s team challenging FIFA’s intervention.

Miller was expected to play a key role in revitalising the TTFA’s finances and was instrumental in the local governing body securing an apparel deal with Avec Sport after a proposed Nike agreement fell through.

According to the contract, Miller’s role would be extensive in rebranding the organisation and securing income to service its enormous debts.

The contract said the marketing director’s duties were to provide “an objective reasonable standard of care” in handling all aspects of the TTFA’s commercial and marketing operations including securing local and international sponsorships and partnerships; assisting in securing friendlies; assisting overseas training camp facilities and international strategic partnerships; restructuring TTFA’s communications, including social media platforms, website, domestic and international communications and PR; establishing and managing broadcast and digital rights partnerships; and being responsible for special projects to clear TTFA’s historic debt.

Clause 25 (b) of Miller’s contract allows the TTFA to cite “gross misconduct” to terminate the contract without pay for any “inability to complete obligations under this agreement for whatever cause.”

Contrary to claims made by Wallace, the contract refers to Miller as TTFA marketing director throughout its entirety.

Miller, who has been involved in local football for the past two decades, told Newsday a clause he insisted on was that he should train a local understudy.

“My contract was to take someone under my wing, introduce to my contacts...Any overseas person should pass something on to a local person,” he said.

Wallace originally denied knowledge of any contract with Miller, then claimed the Englishman had asked him to keep the deal secret.

Miller has denied any clandestine arrangement with Wallace and expressed dismay at that assertion.

Asked about the relationship between him and the United TTFA before the group won the November 24, 2019 elections, Miller said, “I felt we were moving in a common name, establishing a good structure.”

Miller, a long-time friend of national coach Terry Fenwick, also agreed to give US$2,500 of his US$25,000 salary to Fenwick for six months, to ensure Fenwick and the TTFA came to an agreement.

The local association had only been willing to offer the former England international a US$17,500 deal, no more than predecessor Dennis Lawrence earned.

Miller has been based in the US for the past 15 years and recently moved to Ireland.
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Offline royal

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #68 on: June 22, 2020, 06:54:25 AM »
Could this be the result of Wallace secret meeting with Warner? A meeting that Warner said took please. Warner put him unto Miller? Ah wonder what was Warner's cut from Miller deal? The stupid plot thickens     

Offline ABTrini

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #69 on: June 22, 2020, 07:21:32 AM »
This marketing could have been more cost effective and effective if:
A.   TTFA had hired or commissioned the" Socawarriors on.ine forum and by default those posters who  would have marketed the product worldwide

B.  Hired or commissioned the said forumities to be advisories/ consultants - regarding operations, team selection, coaches, playing facilities and any other said matters pertaining to the efficiency of football in TnT

C.  Continued with the appointment of the Forum stalwarts as head of scouting

D. Hire or commission the said forumities to  promote and to be  board members to set directives and directions for football in TnT

E. Commission the said forumities to  be a local ' normalization committeee' to ensure a corrupt free transition and restoration of a highly functioning TTFA

looking at the past record of TTFA blunders in my humble opinion we could have done no worst than what was and what has been a traversity of mismanagement and inept leadership - under the cloak and veilof alleged corruption throughout the years.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2020, 07:31:58 AM by ABTrini »

Offline Flex

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #70 on: June 22, 2020, 09:16:54 AM »
Look Loy withdraws Wallace support, TTFA president unilaterally handed out TT$7 million.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


The ‘United TTFA’ group said it has postponed a proposed meeting with delegates of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) due to legal advice.

The lobby group, which was formed to contest the 24 November 2019 TTFA elections, had asked members to attend an online meeting from 2pm on Saturday, to discuss recent revelations regarding president William Wallace.

However, TTFA first vice-president Clynt Taylor confirmed tonight that the meeting is off until further notice.

“We were advised by counsel that we should postpone any meeting at this time until the pending court matter is concluded,” stated Taylor. “Therefore, we do apologise for any inconvenience caused and look forward to your continued support through these difficult times for our football and our country.”

The United TTFA group also includes TTFA vice-presidents Susan Joseph-Warrick and Sam Phillip, Northern FA president Anthony Harford, Trinidad and Tobago Super League (TTSL) president Keith Look Loy and the TTFA president, Wallace.

On Tuesday, the group gave Wallace a stinging public rebuke after he signed off on contracts for Men’s National Senior Team head coach Terry Fenwick, general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan and Avec Sport without board approval. Wallace since confessed to also secretly giving a contract to controversial English salesman Peter Miller.

Although the United TTFA has not called for Wallace’s resignation, Look Loy said he will no longer back the beleaguered president.

“I cannot support Wallace any further,” Look Loy told Wired868. “I support the vice-presidents. I support the case. We need to remember why Fifa did what they did.”

Look Loy also said that he considers the contracts unilaterally offered by Wallace to be ‘invalid’. He declined the opportunity to clarify his remarks.

As the TTFA’s legal officer, Wallace is authorised to tie the local football to contracts. However, Wallace could potentially be held personally responsible for debts foisted upon the organisation, through the Companies Act.

Thus far, the local football president, who simultaneously heads the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL), offered Fenwick a salary worth US$2,500 (TT$16,900) more than advised by the board with a further US$5,000 (TT$33,800) if a two year extension is triggered—due on terms that again differed from those proposed by the board.

Wallace also secretly offered Ramdhan an additional year on his US$5,000 (TT$33,800) per month contract and allegedly gave Miller a four year deal in excess of US$20,000 (TT$135,000) per month. Those three deals alone—in the space of four months—could cost the cash-strapped body over US$1,155,000 (TT$7,803,831) more than the board agreed.

At present, the TTFA president and vice-presidents are asking the High Court to block Fifa from implementing a normalisation committee on the twin island republic while the world governing body countered by insisting that the matter be heard in the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

The TTFA officials have vowed to step aside if they lose in court and to turn to the members for guidance if they win. The executive can be removed at any point, according to the constitution, once two-thirds of the members demand it formally.

As far as Fifa is concerned, only its normalisation committee—headed by businessman Robert Hadad—can call a general meeting, since it replaced the TTFA Board on 17 March.

However, the TTFA Constitution does not permit elected officers to be removed through any means other than a vote by local delegates.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Flex

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #71 on: June 24, 2020, 11:06:03 AM »
Best for the defence; why PM Rowley was right and where President Wallace went wrong.
Wired868.com.


“All ah we tief!”

Late PNM minister Desmond Cartey is no friend of mine. I have had no direct contact with him. I know precious little about him. Do not, therefore, expect me to attempt to explain what might have driven him to make his confession. And in so doing to taint a whole generation of politicians. And thus damn—deservedly—some of them.

“I lied.”

TTFA and SSFL President William Wallace is a friend of mine. We first met over 30 years ago and I have since watched him move steadily out of the shadows of national sport on to centre-stage. I know a few things about him, first and foremost that he is not a crook.

I shall, therefore, not attempt to explain what might have driven him to produce behaviours that certainly make him look like one. And in so doing, to expose a slew of administrators who have not had the courage to take the leadership bull by the horns and go down fighting. And thus damn—deservedly—a handful of them.

For me, what is troubling is not why Wallace acted as he did in dealing with contracts for national coach Terry Fenwick, TTFA general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan and controversial English marketing specialist Peter Miller. Like TTFA member Anthony Harford, I know the answer to that question.

“Mr Wallace has made some mistakes,” Harford told Newsday earlier this week, “not born out of malice but rather in an effort to get the TTFA out of economic despair.”

I would have added ‘desperate’ in the appropriate place.

The troubling question for me is why did he not tell anyone—including his vice-presidents and/or Trinidad and Tobago Super League (TTSL) president Keith Look Loy—the whole uncomfortable truth and why he only confessed to what he had done when the last cat was already out of the bag. Ergo, under duress.

Harford’s statement to Newsday provides a clue as to what that answer is but the North Zone President leaves it implicit. I shall go further and attempt to get inside Wallace’s indisputably turbulent head in the days between 24 November and 17 March.

Full disclosure: I start from the position that it would be wrong to feel that—as much of the reaction has suggested—in Wallace, we are dealing with another one of those I-men whom we have so often placed at the helm of our national sporting organisations.

Think not just David John-Williams but also former TTFA general secretary Eric James and former TTCB jefe, Alloy Lequay. And, at the head of the queue, Austin Jack Warner.

Research will show a record of long, consistent service in sport administration; first at secondary schools’ level in both cricket and football and then, gradually, reaching into national level. With a solid record of reliability and efficiency. Without a whiff of scandal. Without a hint of untrustworthiness.

Until last week.

Further research will show that, like many of his generation, the young Wallace’s support for all national teams was unconditional. And his commitment to the cause of quietly saving some young citizens through sport was strong, unswerving. But things changed for the 30-year-old teacher in 1989.

In the immediate aftermath of the fateful November encounter against the USA, Wallace lay stretched out on a concrete slab in the National Stadium, a sorry, sobbing heap of self-pity. And by the time he left Mucurapo that Sunday, he had resolved that never again. Not if he could help it.

Fast forward past the tenure of puppet Ollie Camps and Raymond Tim Kee when Wallace was doing his thing quietly, largely under the radar. And to the list of what’s-in-it-for-me-leaders, add the name DJW. The 2015 promise had quickly proved to be fool’s gold.

In 2019, therefore, the crisis was undiminished, as real as it had been four years earlier. And Wallace threw his lot in with the team that came together to solve the persistent problem.

He soon found himself team leader. And in short order discovered, as ‘President Wallace’, that the TTFA crisis was deeper than T&T had realised. Significantly deeper. But the task, herculean though it was, was not beyond the United TTFA. United.

As leader, he thought, he would do what he deemed to be necessary. He would assemble a cadre of competent, capable, trustworthy men who, under his leadership, would put the crisis behind us…

There is a multi-million-dollar hole to be filled. Peter Miller has a solid plan with the potential to quickly reduce the size of that hole. Miller has been here before and knows he has not exactly covered himself in glory.

But if a discredited Miller can fill an all-too-real hole, will a successful Miller still be discredited? The president, the team leader, has a decision to make…

The TTFA Constitution is clear about who is the ultimate authority in the selection of a secretary. The assessment is that Ramdhan is the best man for the job. Ramdhan has conditions; the board has reservations.

If an efficient Ramdhan can do the job, will the board’s reservations disappear? The president, the team leader, has a decision to make…

Having risen as high as the 50s under former Soca Warriors coach Stephen  Hart, the Men’s National Senior Team now has a three-digit ranking. Terry Fenwick has, many are convinced, the wherewithal to haul us back up the rankings by our bootstraps. Fenwick has conditions; the board has reservations.

If an inspired Fenwick can do the job, will the board’s reservations disappear? The president, the team leader, has a decision to make…

Lloyd Best warned us long ago that, in a real crisis, there are no right answers; whatever choice you make is wrong. So as leader, you make your choice and let the chips fall where they may.

In May, we saw where Wallace erred. In the PNM, there is complete unanimity about who the team leader is. Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley, the team leader, made his decision, met with Delcy Rodríguez and sold oil to Vene…, oops, Aruba. Stuart Young had a lot to say; the mask stayed on and social distancing was always observed. Certainly, no Carteyesque admission was ever forthcoming.

But whether or not Young or Franklin Khan or Terrence Deyalsingh or Colm Imbert knew what was going down the Main, nary a dissenting voice was heard.

A real leader, you see, right or wrong, leads from the front and accepts full responsibility for his actions. He doesn’t worry about friendly fire. Particularly in a crisis.

Even if in the end, thanks to Cartey, he may be branded a crook.

Undeservedly.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

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Wallace denies any role in Fenwick's contract
« Reply #72 on: June 25, 2020, 07:23:33 AM »
Wallace denies any role in Fenwick's contract
T&T Guardian


Despite being 24 hours late with his promised response to explain why he signed four contracts contrary to T&T Football Association board decisions, the beleaguered former TTFA president William Wallace delivered his written defence on Wednesday.

On June 15, the United TTFA accused Wallace, who is also the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) president, of signing unapproved contracts for national coach Terry Fenwick, general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan, marketing representative Peter Miller and a $25 million sportswear deal with UK firm Avec Sports without the knowledge and approval from the TTFA board.

The United TTFA group, which includes Keith Look Loy, a former TTFA Technical Committee chairman, North Zone Football Association (NFA) president Anthony Harford and former TTFA vice presidents Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick and Joseph Sam Phillip, condemned his actions to that similar to former president David John-Williams, whom the group fought to replace during TTFA annual general meeting (AGM) election on November 24 last year.

On Saturday during an interview on I95FM Sports Show Wallace had promised to issue a comprehensive statement on his stewardship with regards to his decision for signing the contracts on behalf of the cash-strapped association by Tuesday.

Wallace deems his actions as mistakes

In his six-page response on Wednesday, Wallace wrote: "When a story broke on Sportsmax that the salary signed off on Terry Fenwick's contract is not what we agreed on. My initial thoughts were that Terry unilaterally changed the terms of his contract. In an attempt to get clarity on the situation, an easy solution was put forward; throw Terry under the bus.

Mistakes can be made, but to throw someone under the bus is deliberate and does not come naturally to me.

Further discussions revealed, for the first time to me at least, the details of the negotiations in finalizing the contract. My understanding then and still is that the terms in the contract that came under scrutiny were indeed part of the final settlement but the MISTAKE was that they should not have been reflected in the final TTFA contract. I admitted then that a mistake was made and that it would be corrected.

The facts are as follows:

*I played absolutely no role in the negotiation of Fenwick's contract. This negotiation was left entirely in the hands of the Technical Committee.

*Two emails were sent to me by the GS on Tuesday, December 17th, while I was in Qatar. The Subject: Adjusted terms and conditions.

In one email the GS indicated that there was agreement on the final terms of the contract. The attachment in the email indicated a salary of USD 20,000.

The second email forwarded was from Peter Miller to Keith Lookloy. Details of the second email are as follows;

Dear Keith,

After much discussions, a revised position has been arrived at which is attached for your information prior to our discussions on Thursday. Please feel free to give feedback in order to arrive at a firm position given the urgency of the matter.

Kind regards.

The attachment in this email indicated a salary of USD 20,000.

*I assumed that the final terms would have been sent by the negotiating team to the attorney to prepare the contract.

*When the contract came back to me and was handed over by my General secretary for signing there were no red flags.

*I signed the contract believing that the terms therein were agreed on with my negotiating team.

Wallace acted based on the constitution

With regards to the contract of the General Secretary, he said, "I move to the other issue and that is the Ramesh Ramdhan's contract. As one Senior Counsel puts it; “from reviewing the TTFA constitution it seems as though the General Secretary is the sole responsibility of the President. The discussion with the Board is merely a courtesy”

Even without this interpretation, I acted based on my own interpretation of the constitution, along with common sense and logic. My condemnation in this matter was based merely on the persons who were speaking the loudest and fuelled by their own agenda. Nowhere in the constitution speaks to the Board drawing up the terms and conditions of the GS. The Board role is to appoint or dismiss the GS on the proposal of the President. Ramdhan was proposed to the Board and the Board agreed to his appointment. A suggestion was made by a Board member that the length of the contract be one year, and I say a suggestion because the Board is not empowered to draw up the terms of the GS contract. If this power is ascribed to the Board it means that all the other terms of the contract should have been drawn up by the Board and not just the length of the contract."

Peter Miller won United TTFA the elections

The response continued to the Peter Miller, Wallace stated, "As part of the United TTFA, I was initially asked to consider leading the group but refused to commit. The major reason given for my noncommittal was the financial state of the TTFA. I reasoned that the only way that I am committing is if there is a plan to deal with the debt. During this period, my deceased friend, Raymond Timkee shared with me a very impressive commercial package designed for the TTFA, that was negotiated on his behalf, and which would be implemented if he was elected president. In that package was a plan to deal with the historic debt of the FA, and of course, that piqued my interest. I was also introduced to the name, Peter Miller.

Based on Mr. Timkee's failing health he eventually asked me to go forward with the plan. The package was presented to the other members United TTFA and they were all impressed.

I gave my word to Peter Miller that if I was elected president, I will honour the agreement that he had with Timkee. The truth is Peter Miller's package/presentation was responsible for us winning the elections, our campaign was based on its content and we were heavily dependent on its successful rolling out after November 24th.

Post-November 24th, Peter Miller indicated that he needed an agreement before he moves forward to firm up the pre-election letters of intent. This was not an unreasonable request; however, it presented a dilemma for me to find a way to transition the un-official arrangement with the United TTFA to the TTFA. Settling this quickly was made even more urgent since by then, we realised that the situation that we met in the FA was even more dire than we expected and that we had to depend on Miller to deliver.

The GS and I tried to find a way to navigate the situation, but the options were few. The only workable decision open to us at that time was the one I took and that is a decision to sign an agreement with Miller.

I took this decision as leader of the team and decided not to burden anyone else with it.

Was there an inherent risk? Yes, but there are times when you have little choice."

Wallace further wrote, "Miller position was that no changes be made to the original agreement with Raymond Timkee, however my suggestion to Miller was that the flat rates quoted as a monthly salary would have to be reflected as a percentage of what was delivered and that there were no issues if instead of lumpsum payments the disbursement was done monthly.

It did not matter to me what the percentage was because the numbers were already agreed on with Raymond and I gave my word before the elections that I will honour the agreement. In addition, my own philosophy is that we had nothing so whatever came in would be more than we had.

Via email, Miller asked if any part of FIFA funding could be used for marketing. The GS responded via mail that FIFA Forward funding cannot be used for in any way. (emails available)

The Plan

To sign a letter of intent since any binding contract of this nature has to be approved by the Board. The intent, of course, was to make sure that Miller remained on board and what we campaigned and depended on could still be delivered.

Payment to Miller would come from what he brings to the table so there is no direct risk to the TTFA

We get the Board to agree in principle that we have to outsource marketing. The Board did agree.

The roll-out of the sponsorship was carded for June. Once the successful roll-out commenced, a recommendation would have been taken to the Board to officially contract Miller as the marketing person."

He concluded by stating that, "Since entering office, no action taken by me brought any personal benefits to me, my intentions were that TTFA would always be the beneficiary."

RELATED NEWS

Wallace: I had no role in Fenwick deal
By Jelani Beckles (Newsday).


WILLIAM Wallace has broken his silence. Wallace, who was ousted as TT Football Association (TTFA) president in March when a normalisation committee was appointed by Fifa to run the TTFA, released a six-page response, on Wednesday, to the criticism of his leadership. He mainly addressed the contracts that were signed under his tenure, including those of national senior men’s coach Terry Fenwick, marketing executive Peter Miller and TTFA general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan.

Fenwick’s contract

Explaining the contract of national men’s senior football coach Fenwick, Wallace claims he was not the person responsible.

In a press release, Wallace said, “I played absolutely no role in the negotiation of Fenwick’s contract. This negotiation was left entirely in the hands of the technical committee.”

Fenwick was hired in December 2019 to replace Dennis Lawrence as head coach after the board voted 8-1 with the understanding that he would be paid US$17,500 per month with other bonuses.

In the incentive package, Fenwick would start earning US$20,000 a month if the team qualified for the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup.

It was initially reported that the extra US$2,500 per month came through sponsorship (not revealed) as Fenwick was not satisfied with his contract. The US $2,500 extra was included in the main contract instead of a separate contract. It was then revealed that TTFA marketing executive Peter Miller agreed to donate US$2,500 of his salary to ensure Fenwick got the US$20,000.

Wallace said e-mails were sent saying that Fenwick would get $20,000 and others agreed. “In one e-mail the general secretary (Ramesh Ramdhan) indicated that there was agreement on the final terms of the contract. The attachment in the e-mail indicated a salary of US$20,000.”

The Wallace release then said a second e-mail sent was from Miller to chairman of the technical committee Keith Look Loy.

The e-mail from Miller to Look Loy said, “After much discussions, a revised position has been arrived at which is attached for your information prior to our discussions...please feel free to give feedback in order to arrive at a firm position given the urgency of the matter.”

Wallace said the attachment in the e-mail indicated a salary of US$20,000. Wallace said he just signed it. “I signed the contract believing that the terms therein were agreed on with my negotiating team.”

In an interview,on Wednesday evening with Newsday, Look Loy remained adamant that the salary that was agreed was US$17,500. “Clearly this $20,000 business started with an e-mail that Wallace read and went with when Miller suggested the $20,000...that e-mail is from Miller to Wallace, not from me to Wallace. Wallace was the chairman of the meeting that agreed $17,500.”

Look Loy said he is still unaware of the details of the contract. “I have not seen this contract to date, up to now...I deal with football, things on the field. I have asked different media to let me see the contract.”

Look Loy said other conditions were signed in the contract that were never brought to the technical committee or the board including a car, a phone and paying Fenwick’s taxes.

Miller’s contract

Wallace said he did not give the best answer to a question concerning the contract of marketing executive Miller.

“When asked if Peter Miller had a contract with the TTFA, in an attempt to manage an ongoing situation, I answered no.

"Well, technically the answer was correct, but I do not want to hide behind any technicality and in retrospect, the answer could have been...I would respond to the question at a later date.”
In Miller’s contract, seen by Newsday, the Englishman was contracted for 24 months at US$25,000 per month, with options for two one-year extensions.

Also included in the deal, separate from Miller’s US$25,000 monthly salary, is a US$30,410.95 payment to him for services provided by Miller on or about November 25, 2019. Miller was instrumental in TTFA securing an apparel deal with Avec Sports.

Wallace said he was initially unwilling to lead the United TTFA leading up to the November 2019 elections because of the $50 million debt faced by the TTFA. Wallace said after Raymond Tim Kee (now deceased), who was part of the United TTFA election campaign, shared with him a comprehensive plan to get of the debt, he agreed to work with Miller.

“During this period, my deceased friend, Raymond Tim Kee shared with me a very impressive commercial package designed for the TTFA, that was negotiated on his behalf, and which would be implemented if he was elected president. In that package was a plan to deal with the historic debt of the FA, and of course, that piqued my interest. I was also introduced to the name, Peter Miller.”

Wallace said Miller was instrumental in the United TTFA winning the elections.

“I gave my word to Peter Miller that if I was elected president, I will honour the agreement that he had with Tim Kee.

"The truth is Peter Miller’s package/presentation was responsible for us winning the elections, our campaign was based on its content and we were heavily dependent on its successful rolling out after November 24th.”

Wallace decided to hire Miller, hoping that the latter would deliver on helping reduce the debt.

“I took this decision as leader of the team and decided not to burden anyone else with it.”

In terms of Miller’s contract, Wallace said, “Miller’s position was that no changes be made to the original agreement with Raymond Tim Kee, however my suggestion to Miller was that the flat rates quoted as a monthly salary would have to be reflected as a percentage of what was delivered and that there were no issues, if instead of lump sum payments the disbursement was done monthly.

“It did not matter to me what the percentage was because the numbers were already agreed on with Raymond and I gave my word before the elections that I will honour the agreement. In addition, my own philosophy is that we had nothing so whatever came in would be more than we had.”

Wallace said the board agreed in principle that marketing must be outsourced. Sponsorship was expected to start this month.

“The roll-out of the sponsorship was carded for June. Once the successful roll-out commenced, a recommendation would have been taken to the board to officially contract Miller as the marketing person.”

Concluding the press release, Wallace said, “Since entering office, no action taken by me brought any personal benefits to me, my intentions were that TTFA would always be the beneficiary.”

Ramdhan’s contract

Addressing the contract of Ramdhan, Wallace said he has the right to make decisions on Ramdhan’s contract on his own.

“As one Senior Counsel puts it; ‘From reviewing the TTFA constitution it seems as though the general secretary is the sole responsibility of the president. The discussion with the board is merely a courtesy.’

“Nowhere in the constitution speaks to the board drawing up the terms and conditions of the general secretary.”

Ramdhan was given a two-year contract, not the one-year contract agreed to.

Wallace said because other people were given two-year contracts it made sense to give Ramdhan the same contract.

“The reason for giving the general secretary a two-year contract was not shrouded in any conspiracy and is in fact more than reasonable. Factors such as the two-year contracts agreed on for the national senior team staff; the role the general secretary had to play in the role out of the activities of the FA; and average term given to previous secretaries, were all taken into consideration.”

Wallace: “The facts are as follows…” TTFA boss ‘clears air’ on Fenwick, Miller and Ramdhan.
Wired868.com.


“[…] The only workable decision open to us at that time was the one I took and that is a decision to sign an agreement with [Peter] Miller. I took this decision as leader of the team and decided not to burden anyone else with it.
“Was there an inherent risk? Yes, but there are times when you have little choice…”

The following press statement was issued today by Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace with regards to his tenure and, in particular, deals with head coach Terry Fenwick, general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan and marketing director Peter Miller:

The elegant twin towers that decorate the POS horizon are both the same height. If one is looking at them from the west one looks taller than the other; to the observer from the east one also looks taller than the other, except that if both persons compare notes there will be an argument as to which tower is taller.

It is a matter of perspective.

The issue arises when perspectives are being peddled as facts and more so when there is an attempt to use these ‘FACTS’ to reshape an individual’s character.

Mistakes are a fact of life. It is the response that counts.

Leadership is about being humble enough to admit your mistake.

(Terry Fenwick)

When a story broke on Sportsmax that the salary signed off on Terry Fenwick’s contract is not what we agreed on. My initial thoughts were that Terry unilaterally changed the terms of his contract.

In an attempt to get clarity on the situation, an easy solution was put forward; throw Terry under the bus. Mistakes can be made, but to throw someone under the bus is deliberate and does not come naturally to me.

Further discussions revealed, for the first time to me at least, the details of the negotiations in finalising the contract. My understanding then and still is that the terms in the contract that came under scrutiny were indeed part of the final settlement but the MISTAKE was that they should not have been reflected in the final TTFA contract.

I admitted then that a mistake was made and that it would be corrected.

Mistakes are a fact of life. It is the response that counts.

Leadership is about being humble enough to admit your mistake.

Even with this explanation the matter refused to die and the narrative changed to one that said, the president unilaterally changed the terms of the contract and this narrative was given more life when a member of my own team endorsed it.

The facts are as follows:

I played absolutely no role in the negotiation of Fenwick’s contract. This negotiation was left entirely in the hands of the Technical Committee;

Two emails were sent to me by the GS on Tuesday December 17th, while I was in Qatar. The Subject: Adjusted terms and conditions.

In one email the GS indicated that there was agreement on the final terms of the contract. The attachment in the email indicated a salary of USD 20,000.

The second email forwarded was from Peter Miller to Keith Look Loy. Details of the second email are as follows:

Dear Keith,

After much discussions a revised position has been arrived at which is attached for your information prior to our discussions on Thursday. Please feel free to give feedback in order to arrive at a firm position given the urgency of the matter.

Kind regards.

The attachment in this email indicated a salary of USD 20,000.

I assumed that the final terms would have been sent by the negotiating team to the attorney to prepare the contract. When the contract came back to me and was handed over by my general secretary for signing there were no red flags.

I signed the contract believing that the terms therein were agreed on with my negotiating team.

Questions:

Were the terms agreed on at the end of the negotiations and sent to the attorney for the preparation of the contract altered?

If the answer is yes then the action could not be ascribed to me, since I played absolutely no part in the process but just signed off on the product.

If the answer is no: Is it that clear directions were not given to the attorney as to what should have been put into the contract?

How could it then be concluded and supported by persons who are aware of the facts that the president changed the terms of Terry Fenwick’s contract?

(General secretary)

I move to the other issue; and that is the Ramesh Ramdhan’s contract. As one senior counsel puts it: “From reviewing the TTFA constitution, it seems as though the general secretary is the sole responsibility of the president. The discussion with the Board is merely a courtesy.”

Even without this interpretation, I acted based on my own interpretation of the constitution, along with common sense and logic. My condemnation in this matter was based merely on the persons who were speaking the loudest and fuelled by their own agenda.

Nowhere in the constitution speaks to the board drawing up the terms and conditions of the general secretary. The board’s role is to appoint or dismiss the GS on the proposal of the president.

Ramdhan was proposed to the board and the board agreed to his appointment. A suggestion was made by a board member that the length of the contract be one year—and I say a suggestion because the board is not empowered to draw up the terms of the GS’ contract.

If this power is ascribed to the board it means that all the other terms of the contract should have been drawn up by the board and not just the length of the contract.

Just to draw on a bit of logic, if in my discussions with Mr Ramdhan, he refused a one-year contract, is it that I had to search until I find someone who agreed with the proposed one year.

Even with that said, the reason for giving the general secretary a two-year contract was not shrouded in any conspiracy and is in fact more than reasonable. Factors such as the two-year contracts agreed on for the National Senior Team staff; the role the GS had to play in the roll out of the activities of the FA; and average term given to previous secretaries, were all taken into consideration.

As one of the framers of the constitution said in a recent article, once the decision was made and taken back to the board, the board had to accept. This position is consistent with the senior counsel who indicated it’s a matter of courtesy.

(Editor’s Note: Osmond Downer, TTFRA vice-president and one of the framers of the constitution, suggested that Wallace should have taken his desire to give Ramesh Ramdhan a two-year contract back to the board. Downer did not say that the board had to accept Wallace’s wish to give general secretary a two year contract.)

Unfortunately, the courtesy to the board was curtailed by the Covid-19 shut down. Just to note the GS has never been paid.

Did the president’s preparation of the general secretary’s contract—based on the interpretation of the constitution—[mean he] unilaterally changed the terms of the general secretary’s contract?

Unfortunately, the two acts above were responsible for my team making a statement that they have lost confidence in me. Even more unfortunate, this position was made public before I was given the chance to be heard. The team has since met and recommitted to moving forward.

(Peter Miller)

As part of the United TTFA, I was initially asked to consider leading the group but refused to commit. The major reason given for my noncommittal was the financial state of the TTFA. I reasoned that the only way that I am committing is if there is a plan to deal with the debt.

During this period, my deceased friend, Raymond Tim Kee shared with me a very impressive commercial package designed for the TTFA, that was negotiated on his behalf, and which would be implemented if he was elected president.

In that package was a plan to deal with the historic debt of the FA, and of course that peaked my interest. I was also introduced to the name, Peter Miller.

Based on Mr Tim Kee’s failing health, he eventually asked me to go forward with the plan. The package was presented to the other United TTFA members and they were all impressed.

I gave my word to Peter Miller that if I was elected president, I will honour the agreement that he had with Tim Kee. The truth is Peter Miller’s package/presentation was responsible for us winning the elections—our campaign was based on its content and we were heavily dependent on its successful rolling out after 24 November.

Post 24 November, Peter Miller indicated that he needed an agreement before he move forward to firm up the pre-election letters of intent. This was not an unreasonable request—however, it presented a dilemma for me to find a way to transition the un-official arrangement with the United TTFA to the TTFA.

Settling this quickly was made even more urgent, since by then, we realised that the situation that we met in the FA was even more dire than we expected and that we had to depend on Miller to deliver.

The GS and I tried to find a way to navigate the situation, but the options were few. The only workable decision open to us at that time was the one I took and that is a decision to sign an agreement with Miller.

I took this decision as leader of the team and decided not to burden anyone else with it.

Was there an inherent risk? Yes, but there are times when you have little choice.

(Agreement)

Miller’s position was that no changes be made to the original agreement with Raymond Tim Kee. However my suggestion to Miller was that the flat rates quoted as a monthly salary would have to be reflected as a percentage of what was delivered and that there were no issues if, instead of lumpsum payments, the disbursement was done monthly.

It did not matter to me what the percentage was because the numbers were already agreed on with Raymond and I gave my word before the elections that I will honour the agreement. In addition, my own philosophy is that we had nothing so whatever came in would be more than we had.

Via email, Miller asked if any part of Fifa’s funding could be used for marketing. The GS responded via mail that Fifa Forward funding cannot be used for [that] in any way. (emails available)

(The Plan)

To sign a letter of intent since any binding contract of this nature has to be approved by the board. The intent, of course, was to make sure that Miller remained onboard and what we campaigned and depended on could still be delivered.

Payment to Miller would come from what he brings to the table so there is no direct risk to the TTFA

We get the Board to agree in principle that we have to outsource marketing. The Board did agree.

The roll out of the sponsorship was carded for June. Once the successful roll out commenced, a recommendation would have been taken to the board to officially contract Miller as the marketing person.

Since entering office, no action taken by me brought any personal benefits to me, my intentions were that TTFA would always be the beneficiary.

A major part of our relationship with Miller was the proposed project to finally eliminate the historic debt of the FA. Everyone would agree that this has to be addressed.

A headline in Wired868 that said I lied, was unfortunate. When asked if Peter Miller had a contract with the TTFA, in an attempt to manage an ongoing situation, I answered no. Well, technically the answer was correct, but I do not want to hide behind any technicality and in retrospect the answer could have been… I would respond to the question at a later date.


Mistakes are a fact of life. It is the response that counts.

Leadership is about being humble enough to admit your mistake.

Of major importance is that even though these matters may have originated in-house, there is a very important reason why they are playing out like this in the public domain. In the coming weeks, the picture would be made much clearer.

« Last Edit: June 29, 2020, 04:05:11 AM by Flex »
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

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United TTFA election victory only benefitted their friends
« Reply #73 on: June 26, 2020, 06:19:59 AM »
United TTFA election victory only benefitted their friends
T&T Guardian


Dear Editor,

The recent statement by former president of the T&T Football Association (TTFA) William Wallace, to me, was just a list of poor excuses that left us with more questions than answers.

While I think Wallace did make some unforced errors and mistakes out of naivety, he has confirmed that some of his actions knowingly disregarded the TTFA board and possibly his United TTFA colleagues.

Wallace confirms that he appointed Peter Miller because of a promise made to Raymond Tim-Kee (deceased) and as a reward to Miller for his support with the TTFA election campaign leadiung up to the November 24, 2019 annual general meeting (AGM).

While Wallace’s loyalty to former TTFA president Tim-Kee’s memory is admirable, his loyalty should always be to the sport and his board and the promises he made to the stakeholders who elected him to lead. One also has to ask the question of the US$30,000 bonus promised and if this is TTFA money being spent on the United TTFA campaign?

It seems very clear that a promise may have been made to both Peter Miller and Terry Fenwick that they would be rewarded with contracts should United TTFA win the election.

Both apparently, were instrumental in developing marketing strategies and alleged sponsors. As long time friends, they had worked together on previous ventures including Fenwick’s first coaching position at Northampton Town in England. Miller then helped to negotiate Fenwick’s national team contract.

While Fenwick may have been the best coaching option anyway, there certainly appears to have been some latitude awarded to him, not least the ability for him to have his contract drawn up by his own legal adviser. It appears that the board approved contract was totally disregarded by Wallace.

But the fact that Miller was appointed to work for TTFA and was simultaneously negotiating for Fenwick could have been regarded as a conflict of interest. Red flags should have been raised and stringent checks on their collaboration should have taken place.   

Keith Look-Loy and the rest of the United TTFA was meticulous and relentless in pursuit of the former president David John-William for what they termed possible wrongdoings and rightfully so, but where were the similar traits to run the affairs of the Association. “who was guarding the guards?” Why did the members of United TTFA allow contracts to be issued without any oversight?

For such a close-knit group of comrades, wasn’t anyone interested in what was being offered?

Questions must also be asked of the General Secretary who apparently blindly co-signed these contracts without any reference to the board’s requirements and prior decisions taken. But then, he was awarded a contract that also went against the board’s specific instructions, so perhaps that was motivation enough to not raise any protests or bring this to the attention of the three vice presidents.

Despite several emails from board members many of them (myself included) seeking and requesting transparency in vetting all contracts before being signed all fell on deaf ears and in some instances met with animosity.

It is abundantly clear to me, after witnessing events under both David John-Williams and William Wallace that there are operational loopholes in the TTFA constitution that need amending immediately before going forward.

The board should have a power of veto over all contracts and obligations agreed by the president or executive and every contract should be vetted by a TTFA legal representative and viewed by the board before being handed out in the future.

The requirement that a president should have a minimum of three (3) years’ experience of local football is not required. Similarly, the General Secretary is a redundant position and should be replaced by a chief executive officer (CEO) who is legally responsible for the actions of the executive.

The TTFA board need not be the rubber stamp authority, but instead should be guiding the long term strategies of the association. The current board structure is too large, with board meetings regularly running more than five hours long. An operational seven-member board including only three TTFA members along with three independent board members should be created with certain business skills required such as a marketing director, legal adviser and medical adviser.

The management of TTFA should be streamlined, with greater responsibilities allowed, yet more intense oversight invoked, with gross misconduct such as we have witnessed recently attracting severe penalties.

In the rush to remove David John-Williams, we have learned harsh lessons. But football is a game where you can learn from your mistakes and return stronger than ever. Trinidad and Tobago football has just endured an embarrassing thrashing. It’s now time to take what we have learned, build a solid foundation, and get back to winning ways.

Brent Sancho

Owner Central FC

Chairman T&T Pro League, Ag.

TTFA Board Director
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Flex

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #74 on: June 27, 2020, 12:39:50 PM »
“Questions not asked”.
By Kevin Harrison.


After a flood of revelations concerning William Wallace and his United TTFA colleagues, there has been a deafening silence, not only from the beleaguered president and his cohorts, but also from the media.

The intense onslaught of social media endured by David-John Williams has been woefully unrepeated in the matters of United TTFA, with barely a follow up question to either the alleged perpetrators or the stakeholders, who’s faith in the new regime now appears to have been totally misplaced.

Sportsmax, who raised the concerns over several contracts issued by Wallace and co have apparently lost interest now the EPL has restarted and even the local print and television sports journalists appear to have avoided an opportunity to track down anyone with any knowledge of, or opinion about, the latest scandal to rock the TTFA.

But why the silence when there are so many questions unanswered, some of them vital for any new administration in the future? If we don’t know what happened, how can we prevent this from happening yet again?

Some of the events, as reported by those involved, do not appear to make any sense.

For example; if an administration creates a budget and the president decides to operate outside of this budget, somewhere there will be a shortfall. So if nobody outside of Wallace was aware of the Peter Miller US$25,000 per month contract, where was Wallace going to find the TT$2 million per year? We’re not talking about an occasional roti lunch out of the petty cash, no, this salary is higher than the traditional TTFA highest salary-that of the senior men’s head coach. How on earth did Wallace expect that line item to slip past the entire board?

We are led to believe – by Wallace’s own admission and United TTFA’s statement - that the president failed to read Terry Fenwick’s contract before he signed it. That, in itself, is a frightening statement for such a large financial transaction, but even worse when we realise that the contract wasn’t drawn up by the TTFA lawyer, TTFA Technical Director, Keith Look-Loy, or the TTFA General Secretary. Unbelievably, the contract was created by Fenwick’s own lawyer! So we have the TTFA president and General Secretary signing a contract that was written by the employees lawyer that they didn’t proofread or discuss with the Vice-Presidents or Technical Director, or their own lawyer.

Then we have the Avec Sports contract, prepared by Avec’s lawyers, which stipulates that TTFA’s sponsors and/or official sportswear retailers spend over TT$1 million up front to purchase equipment. If they fail to do this, TTFA will have to pay around TT$5 million to Avec to supply uniforms for 4 years. Yet, these sponsors are not named in the contract and, therefore have no legal obligation to honour that contract. The “free” equipment to be supplied is so padded out it includes 120 tracksuits per-year for each of the 10 national teams. This contract was made available to the United TTFA leadership, so why did they not spot the glaring financial minefield contained in the deal?

And where is the contract with Sports & Games and what does it include? Surely, you would not risk $5 million on a handshake deal over a couple of bottles of Stag? While United TTFA rush to distance themselves from Wallace’s “errors”, how can they distance themselves from a kit deal so weighted against TTFA that you would find it difficult to uncover a potentially worse national kit deal.

After the above questions were raised, one would expect closer scrutiny of any other contracts that may have been issued. Keith Look-Loy, as Technical Director, presumably working to an original budget, announced the signing of a whole plethora of coaches and technical staff. Given that Millers contract alone has put a $2 million hole in that budget, will there be enough funds to honour those other contracts? The line up of employees appears to be extravagant for an organisation with a $50 million debt, including dedicated goalkeeping coaches for each age group and whispers of a

Trinidadian former EPL player added to the payroll in some capacity. Why hasn’t United TTFA been asked about their solutions to honour these commitments?

After all, they seem committed to continue their fight with FIFA in the High Court, which could result in the suspension of FIFA funding – the only guaranteed source of income for TTFA.

Considering the massive amounts of column inches given to United TTFA, and specifically, Keith Look-Loy, in the year running up to the November TTFA elections, and thereafter when those same appointments were announced, it now seems strange that these questions are not being asked.

In fact, the whole question of governance and transparency needs to be addressed, if the public are to have any faith in any future TTFA administration.

United TTFA, and, again, specifically, Keith Look-Loy, have stated that they were unaware of some of these contracts. We are therefore led to believe that Look-Loy, vice presidents Clynt Taylor, Sam Phillips and Susan Warwick and Tony Harford were just patsies whose blind faith and trust in William Wallace was abused. Even if we believe the lone gunman narrative, Wallace’s actions would eventually be uncovered, so what could his end game have been? Didn’t any of the famous five think to ask a question of Wallace in the many meetings they would have had?

It is hard to accept that Wallace’s actions took place in a vacuum. Questions were raised by board members, but generally ignored by the United TTFA personnel. William Wallace did not win the November election, United TTFA did. TTFA members did not put their faith in one man, but in the collective hands of Wallace, Look-Loy, Taylor, Warwick and Harford. They expected oversight and checks and balances. No more one mannism was the battle cry.

If united you stand, then united you must fall. Because if you cannot keep a check on your closest friends and colleagues and steer them back onto the right path, what is your purpose? We still don’t know all of the details of this disastrous three-month reign, but we need to.

We do know that the TTFA debt has increased under United TTFA. We know that the TTFA payroll appears to have increased under United TTFA, so how will that be covered? We know that the fanciful Arima plan to remove the entire $50 million debt is dead in the water, so what is the plan B? We know that board decisions have simply been ignored, so how will that be prevented in the future?

Despite FIFA removing the United TTFA administration and appointing a normalisation committee, Wallace and company refuse to go quietly, though it would appear that they have lost the mandate of the general public, as well as many of T&T football’s stakeholders. If, as they believe, they win the High Court battle with FIFA, it is hard to imagine how they would manage the new inflated payroll.

Our media needs to step up and find the answers to some of these questions, as well as other issues that may arise.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline pull stones

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #75 on: June 27, 2020, 10:37:04 PM »
These are brent sancho’s concerns huh? I wonder what and where was his concerns from nov 2016 - nov 2019 when fatso had football bent over a barrel when everything that could gone wrong did? this is the same man who voted for the fat boss in the last election, supported him and is still in support of him, but because there’s a bit of a storm in the newly elected ttfa camp, this wanker saw it fit to mount a soap box and campaign against the association in about his 3rd article on the ttfa in a matter of months, if not more.

TBH I hate most of those guys who went to germany, no wonder jack warner shat on them. for the most part they turned out to be a bunch of arseholes with the exception of a few. people like Brent, russel, dennis, stern, dwight, birchall, carlos and nakid have all said and done some shady shyte that make themselves out to be blokes all looking for an easy way out.

and just yesterday I saw kenwin Jones in the arms of basdeo panday looking for a political entrance, yes of all people mr panday while David nakid is wrapped up in unc regalia. these guys are only out for themselves, no wonder we haven’t won anything in 20 hrs.

ps. I have to exclude shaka and kelvin jack for now, I’m keeping my fingers crossed that these two stay clear of the BS and keep their noses clean.

Offline Flex

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #76 on: June 28, 2020, 01:38:12 PM »
Sancho on Wallace's statement: A list of poor excuses
By Jelani Beckles (Newsday).


FORMER board member of the TT Football Association (TTFA) Brent Sancho described the media release by former TTFA president William Wallace explaining the contracts signed under his tenure as poor and it led to more questions than answers.

“It is a list of poor excuses and it has left more questions than answers really,” Sancho told Newsday, on Thursday.

For the past few weeks, Wallace was criticised for some of the decisions he made under his tenure. The contracts signed under Wallace’s leadership that raised eyebrows included those of national senior men’s coach Terry Fenwick, marketing executive Peter Miller and TTFA general secretary Ramesh Ramdhan.

Wallace was criticised for making decisions without board approval which included Fenwick’s deal.

On Wednesday, in a six-page response, Wallace admitted he made mistakes, but also said other TTFA members were aware of the contracts that were signed under his leadership. Wallace said he had nothing to do with Fenwick’s contract and that was the responsibility of the TTFA Technical Committee, led by Look Loy. Look Loy has stated Wallace was involved in Fenwick’s contract.

Sancho said he thinks the decisions by Wallace may have been kept hidden if these were not leaked. “It’s hard for me to get past the fact that if all of this did not come out into the public domain if they would have mentioned any of this to anyone. Whether it be the board members, the membership of the TTFA, the fans of the TTFA, the players, if anybody would have known.”

The United TTFA, led by Wallace, defeated the David John-Williams administration in November 2019 and took over the running of the TTFA.

Wallace led the TTFA until March 2019, before Fifa appointed a normalisation committee to run T&T football. Fifa decided to take control of the TTFA because of low financial management methods and a massive debt facing the local football body, which is understood to be $50 million.

The United TTFA is currently in a court battle against Fifa. The United TTFA says Fifa does not have the right to remove democratically elected officials.Sancho said it is time that the United TTFA give up on their case against Fifa. “I think it is mind-boggling that these guys have the audacity to even continue with this court case.”

The former T&T footballer said this is not strong leadership. “At the end of the day the membership and the stakeholders entrusted them with running the association and they have shown nothing but a lack of respect to the membership, a lack of respect to the board and total disdain to every moral fibre that is supposed to surround leadership.”

Richard Quan Chan, president of the Southern Football Association, said the United TTFA seems disorganized. “The whole thing is too disjointed. I recognize these two people as two intelligent people. Keith has been involved in football for a long time (and) William is even president of the (Secondary) School (Football) League. They should understand what contracts are all about and…as they call themselves the United TTFA there should be some kind of conversation between them as to what is going on.”

Look Loy said if the United TTFA wins the court battle against Fifa, Wallace’s future would depend on the membership of the TTFA at a meeting.

“It is the membership that put him there and it is the membership that will determine his future,” Look Loy told Newsday on Wednesday.

Members of the United TTFA, including Look Loy, are not pleased with some of the decisions made by Wallace, but as a group they are fighting Fifa on their decision.

“We looking at this in two separate lenses. William Wallace as the president was elected and has undertaken some actions (and) he will face the consequences for that.”

Look Loy continued, “Wallace remains part of United TTFA, we (United TTFA) remain part of TTFA. We (are) fighting the case, if we lose the case we walk away and Fifa could do what they want…but if we win the case our next and first immediate action after winning the case is to call a membership meeting to address all that has happened and to address the presidency of William Wallace and the Wallace administration. That is the position we are taking.”

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Flex

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #77 on: August 27, 2020, 02:55:17 PM »
No, William.
By Ian Prescott (Express).


Businessman and former club owner Arthur Suite is urging ousted Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace to call off legal action against FIFA for sidelining him and his executive.

“Sorry, Mr William Wallace. I have tried very hard but have failed to come up with a reason that I can support your actions to oppose FIFA’s appointment of a “normalisation committee”, Suite wrote in an open letter yesterday.

In his letter, Suite was clear in his view that FIFA was not the enemy.

“Sorry, Mr Wallace, but your fight is not against FIFA but the state of the bankrupt TTFA that you inherited,” he wrote.

In the late 1970s and early ‘80s Suite, the owner of Aviation Services Limited, was the driving force behind the establishment of the Trinidad and Tobago Premier Soccer League, an attempt at professional football that was short lived.

In his letter, Suite suggested that Wallace’s team would lose their case at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS). Noting that the Act of Parliament granted the TTFA the right to regulate and control football in the country under FIFA, he argued that in so doing, it surrendered all the TTFA’s rights to the world body.

Suite also described the local FA as bankrupt, with a debt of approximately US$5.5 million that it is unable to liquidate. He added, “...and as such, this debt affects TTFA’s ability to operate on a daily/monthly basis without one of its creditors seeking and obtaining judgment against the TTFA and the threat of one of its creditors foreclosing on the TTFA. This could be a major embarrassment, not only to the Government of Trinidad and Tobago but to FIFA as well.”

The TTFA’s current debt actually lies in the vicinity of US$7 million.

Suite stated it was well known that the TTFA’s financial state was not created by Wallace and his executive but he added that no one knew how Wallace intended to liquidate the organisation’s massive debt.

The former football promoter then raised the question of whether it was more than that debt that prompted FIFA to move against Wallace and his executive.

“Was there such an insurmountable problem after the official opening of this joint venture, ‘Home of Football Hotel’ between FIFA and the Government of Trinidad and Tobago that caused the closure of this Football Hotel immediately after Mr Wallace was elected into office?” he asked.

“Could Mr Wallace not have fixed this problem quietly, quickly and peacefully in order to save any embarrassment to (the) FIFA president, the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, the Minister of Sport and the former president of TTFA who attended the official opening of the Hotel?” Suite continued, adding: “It’s the last straw that breaks the camel’s back.”

Suite added:”TTFA is totally dependent on finances from FIFA and the Government of Trinidad and Tobago, and as such the TTFA cannot be disrespectful at any time to FIFA or the Government of Trinidad and Tobago.”

He urged the Wallace-led executive to withdraw its action, accept change and “do what is best” for the country’s football.

RELATED NEWS

FIFA gives Wallace until September 16 to withdraw
Ian Prescott (Express).


BAN COMING

FIFA yesterday threatened that suspension proceedings will be initiated against Trinidad and Tobago should TTFA president William Wallace not withdraw the country’s High Court proceeding against the international body by September 16.

Without compliance, Trinidad and Tobago could likely be banned from international football and frozen from FIFA funding on September 18 when the governing body for world football holds the 70th FIFA Congress. Yesterday’s FIFA ultimatum came on the same day Wallace wrote directly to FIFA president Gianni Infantino seeking an avoidance of impending High Court action by negotiations between the TTFA and the world governing body for football.

Through general secretary Fatima Samoura, FIFA communicated in a letter to Robert Hadad, chairman of the normalisation committee it set up to run football in T&T after dissolving Wallace’s executive on March 17, 2020.

Samoura’s letter said: “We firmly request the TTFA to ask to the TTFA former leadership for an immediate withdrawal of the claim at the Trinidad and Tobago High Court by 16 September 2020, at the latest.”

“We deem that a failure to comply with this directive would result in the commencement of suspension proceedings via the relevant FIFA bodies.”

A mere four months after winning the TTFA elections, Wallace and his vice-presidents were booted from office when FIFA intervened and appointed its own committee to run T&T football.

Wallace’s exiled executive has since initiated High Court proceedings against FIFA, contrary to the world body’s statutes which mandate suspension from international football for such action. On August 13, High Court judge Carol Gobin ruled in Wallace’s favour, giving the former executive leave to challenge FIFA’s action.

In his letter to Infantino yesterday, Wallace vowed to continue court proceedings unless FIFA negotiates. “If you will not talk and if no agreement is reached, the TTFA is left with no choice but to continue on the path FIFA has forced us down through the courts,” wrote Wallace.

“That being said, together with my executive, I remain willing and ready to work with FIFA to resolve the outstanding issues in the interest of Football in Trinidad and Tobago. By refusing to work together with us and by repeatedly refusing to engage in mediation as we have called not less than six times for FIFA to do, you run the risk of irreparably damaging football in Trinidad and Tobago.”

Wallace described normalisation is a draconian and unfair act which he felt “seeks to undermine the independence of the TTFA and ride roughshod over the will of the electorate who voted for the United TTFA slate in November, 2019. Normalisation should not have been an option in this instance but rather, to allow the newly elected executive to work hand in hand with FIFA for and in the best interest of the TTFA.”

Meanwhile, Infantino’s general secretary Samoura was only interested in laying down FIFA law.

“FIFA is extremely concerned regarding the decision of the claim and the arguments used to dismiss FIFA’s application. In this context, we draw your attention to art. 59 of the FIFA Statutes, which expressly contains the prohibition of recourse to ordinary courts of law unless specifically provided for,” said Samoura.

“FIFA takes such a principle with the utmost seriousness and therefore considers that it is the responsibility of its member associations to ensure that this principle is implemented. We further wish to underline that the failure to meet these obligations may, according to art. 14 par. 4 of the FIFA Statutes, lead to sanctions as provided for in the FIFA Statutes, including a possible suspension.”

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Flex

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #78 on: September 17, 2020, 08:31:32 AM »
Ex-TTFA head: TTFA does not owe Mepham
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (Newsday).


Removed TT Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace has again denied claims that the disenfranchised local football fraternity owes money to English media consultant Phil Mepham.

On Wednesday, Wallace issued a document entitled “Statement of Contract Issue” reiterating that Mepham was an external employee of TTFA’s marketing manager Peter Miller and the local administration was not responsible for his remuneration.

Wallace’s decision to release a statement on this matter follows a recent financial claim by Mepham against the TTFA.

According to article published on wired868.com, Mepham says the TTFA owes him £23,419 (TT$205,388), calculated at £6,000 per month from January to March plus £5,419 for December 2019.

Wallace, however, fired back at Mepham’s claims stating he was hired by Miller and not by the TTFA, thus the local organisation owes him nothing for services rendered.

The ousted president’s document read, “It is more than unfortunate that I am once again required to deal with this matter when both TTFA secretary Ramesh Ramdhan and I have already clearly stated that Mepham was brought on board by Peter Miller.

“As is the case with Miller, any payments for services rendered by him was directly hinged on income accruing from sponsorship and was, in any case, to be handled by Miller.” Wallace also stated that he unilaterally signed a contract with Miller and that the Mepham issue was a clear “byproduct of that”.

The former TTFA head also called out FIFA-appointed normalization committee chairman Robert Hadad on his recent remarks confirming that TTFA’s accounts had been in receipt of “FIFA monies intended for the Home of Football as well as expenditure on same”.

He added, “It is my view that the TTFA membership is the competent body to settle matters connected to the TTFA leadership and the unilateral signing of contracts etc. I stand ready to account to that body in a properly constituted forum.”

Wallace concluded by saying he would address this pledge and other matters on Thursday morning during a local televised morning programme.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Flex

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #79 on: September 20, 2020, 01:13:09 AM »
Dear editor: Why did satisfying Fenwick and Miller matter so much to you, Mr Wallace?
Wired868.com.


“[…] William Wallace has sought to clarify that he felt he was acting in the best interest of TTFA. However […] principle, if nothing else, dictates that you cannot campaign on something and then, upon being elected, do the exact thing that was being done by your predecessor.

“No declaration of intent can erase that fact…”

In the following Letter to the Editor, Louis Carrington offers questions to Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace and shares his wish for the normalisation committee, football delegates and the future of the local body:

‘Organisations take on the characteristics of the head’ is an all too familiar statement that we should have heard at some point in our lives. The current impasse between Fifa and the TTFA has brought a sharp focus on the policies of Fifa and the professional conduct of both David John-Williams and William Wallace.

Close examination of Fifa’s policies indicate that while they preach certain things they appear to only practice them conveniently. The recent investigative report by Mark Bassant, if proven correct, places Fifa in a position with egg smeared all over its face.

This is because they have stated that audits of the TTFA’s use of funding received from Fifa were conducted annually; yet they did not discover any wrong doing on the part of the former president, David John-Williams. Let me hasten to remind all that the contents of the investigative report still have to be proven correct.

If proven correct, it would be difficult for Fifa to not be complicit in its role in facilitating the misuse of their funds.

Enter David John-Williams. How could it be acceptable, if proven correct, that as president of the TTFA and a businessman he would not be aware of his responsibilities as it relates to the Board of Directors of the TTFA?

Corporate governance reminds us of these duties and responsibilities, which include the following:

1. To act within your powers: the powers conferred are to enable management of the entity in accordance, in this case, with the constitution of TTFA not the satisfaction of personal interest. Allegations have been made previously about the use of the emergency committee to circumvent the Board of Directors.

2. To promote success: In promoting success of the TTFA, how does Mr Williams explain the inability of national teams to participate in tournaments due to insufficient funds, despite the apparent diverting of funds intended for that purpose to a private account. Again this is making the assumption that the investigative report is correct.

3. To avoid conflicts of Interest: the Home of Football project is a controversial issue for many reasons and the apparent role of the former president in the acquisition of material and equipment for the construction of the HOF, according to the investigative report, suggests that he would have failed in avoiding such a conflict of interest.

These three duties would leave Mr John-Williams with plenty questions to answer once the allegations contained in the investigative report prove to be correct.

Let’s move closer to the present day. The specifics of the controversy in the building of the HOF were not know to the public; however, we were well aware that there were concerns, since at least one board member continually complained of a lack of transparency and accountability and the perceived misuse of the emergency committee to circumvent the board.

It was on that basis that the United TTFA contested and won the elections to lead the TTFA with the promise of transparency and accountability. Suffice it to say that prior to and thereafter, there are things that have occurred that appear questionable.

Examine the allegations that have been made and you will end at a point of more questions than answers.

The first allegation that must be examined is the suggestion that the intention of Fifa to implement a normalisation committee. Allegation are that a member of the John-Williams slate, prior to the election, mentioned a normalisation committee.

Incidentally, this individual represents an organisation that the writer is not convinced, from observation, is functional. Whenever, this organisation is mentioned only one name is associated with it.

Is it that Fifa intended to implement a normalisation committee regardless of the outcome of the election in November? If the answer is yes, on what basis was it going to be done and why not earlier?

The timing and the presence of the Fifa president at the opening of the HOF, days before the TTFA elections, suggest that not only was this to be used as a drawing card for DJW to be re-elected, but also an opportunity for Infantino to endorse DJW.

In light of the revelations in the investigative report, to do that was to endorse wrong-doing that Fifa ought to have been aware of—if they were acting with due care and diligence.

Elections complete, DJW is replaced and United TTFA is now in control, with the same responsibility to adhere to the duties that were applicable to DJW. William Wallace has sought to clarify that he felt he was acting in the best interest of TTFA.

However, there are questions that he must address more specifically. Principle, if nothing else, dictates that you cannot campaign on something and then, upon being elected, do the exact thing that was being done by your predecessor.

No declaration of intent can erase that fact.

Mr Wallace, while you are asking to be judged on your intent, it is difficult for anyone to show you that level of compassion in the face of the glaring evidence. Your actions for the short period that you were actually at the helm without Fifa’s intervention suggest that you had already begun to mirror your predecessor in lacking transparency and accountability.

All the contracts that were not approved by the board inclusive of those that were approved by the board and unilaterally changed by you, negates any request by you to ask forgiveness from the football loving public of Trinidad and Tobago.

While I understand your stance towards Fifa and, in principle, I support your position, I have no choice but to say that I cannot support you as president of TTFA—given the revelations of your short tenure.

You ought to tell us why you, as the employer, allowed the employee to dictate the terms and conditions of his employment. In this instance, I refer to Mr Terry Fenwick’s contract.

What is the importance of Mr Fenwick to your Presidency that an alternative national senior team coach could not be sought if agreement could not be reached on terms and conditions of employment?

Why would you align yourself with Mr Peter Miller, who has a very well documented checkered history and involvement in football both locally and in Europe?

His promise of sponsorship is not sufficient. Remember a promise is a comfort to a fool.

In closing, it is my view that there is no big sin and no small sin. On the evidence, neither David John Williams nor William Wallace—on the face of it, once the allegations are proven correct—can be seen as fit to lead Trinidad and Tobago Football into the future.

The organisational culture in Fifa and TTFA is so tainted that to rekindle confidence requires a fresh start. Fifa may be well advised to withdraw the normalisation committee, allow United TTFA as the duly elected executive to lead the TTFA.

To the delegates of the TTFA, correct the issue of the the change of delegates that were not properly communicated to the TTFA and petition the EGM through the correct channel.

Once this is done, both David John Williams and William Wallace may be well advised to remain far away from the election process.

Allow a fresh start without any perception of tainted individuals. Any persons offering themselves for service must do better.

RELATED NEWS

Wallace: I was confident we would benefit from Miller arrangement; TTFA boss clears air.
Wired868.com.


“[…] Peter Miller and company promised us TT$9.5 million per year worth of sponsorship for four years. Along with a project that was proposed to eliminate the TTFA’s TT$50 million debt, this represented—or seemed to—an ideal platform for doing business with Miller.

“Let me reiterate here that I didn’t think we had anything to lose by engaging Miller. If he were successful, I reasoned, the TTFA would also be successful; if he failed, then we would simply have remained in the hole that previous administrations had dug us into…”

The following is a press statement from Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace regarding secret deals with controversial ‘marketing director’ Peter Miller and recommended parties:

So another issue has arisen involving the arrangements with persons engaged in providing services to the TTFA and my good name. It is therefore necessary for me to state my position once more.

The only reason I decided to lead the United TTFA was that I firmly believed there was finally a real opportunity to make Trinidad and Tobago football debt-free. I and many others were of the view that the commercial package presented to the football fraternity in November provided such an opportunity and we were willing to hinge our hopes on it.

The roll-out of this package was to commence within six months of the elections. In the event, we were never even given the chance to fail since FIFA’s attempt to unceremoniously remove us from office came after a mere three months. But we feel certain that the real reasons for this attempt to remove us will become clearer to Trinidad and Tobago in the coming months. Already, that process has begun.

Peter Miller and company promised us TT$9.5 million per year worth of sponsorship for four years. Along with a project that was proposed to eliminate the TTFA’s TT$50 million debt, this represented—or seemed to—an ideal platform for doing business with Miller.

Let me reiterate here that I didn’t think we had anything to lose by engaging Miller. If he were successful, I reasoned, the TTFA would also be successful; if he failed, then we would simply have remained in the hole that previous administrations had dug us into.

I would like to make it clear as well that funding provided to the TTFA under Fifa Forward cannot be used to pay for these types of services, a fact that was clear to Miller and his team. There were therefore no risks involved in an agreement that payment for the services to be provided would come from the promised sponsorship.

Let me repeat as well that TTFA money would not and, more than that, could not have been used to pay for this service. It is a matter of record that the general secretary so informed Miller in discussions and via email.

Since the expected sponsorship dollars were to come directly to the TTFA, we agreed that commissions, salaries, payments, etc would have been paid by us. The amount to be paid to Miller was established before I accepted to go forward with the arrangement, so I honoured same.

My position was—and still is—that, even if only 50% of what was promised was delivered, whatever remained after payout would have been more than we originally had.

It is only fair for people to be judged on their actions, past and present. However, unfortunately, sometimes we do not give people a chance to make amends for past mistakes.

I was confident that we would have benefited from our arrangement with Miller. The Arima arrangement, for example, that spoke to clearing the debt got us to the point of signing an MOU. And even after the normalisation committee was set up, the company involved wrote to the Prime Minister indicating their continuing interest in the project.

I can—and will—walk away from national football eventually, in the full knowledge that I did not come to take from Trinidad and Tobago football but to give to it.

All I ask is that you not judge my choices without attempting to understand the reasons for my actions.

Editor’s Note: Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) ‘marketing director’ Peter Miller, media consultant Phil Mepham and Men’s National Senior Team head coach Terry Fenwick all claim to have contracts with the TTFA for flat monthly salaries, which are unrelated to sponsorship income.

Wired868 has seen Fenwick’s contract and can confirm same in his case.

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Offline ABTrini

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #80 on: September 20, 2020, 08:47:45 AM »
"Braveheart". The.eg d of WW


This type of engagement conducted by Wallace and his band of u tied followers  is  characterised by opportunistic tactics and the strategic use of  an outside conqueror promising deliverance from past atrocities- to a road paved with gold. Too good to be true.

This too reeks of backdoor deals not unlike previous administration- now this epic saga unfolds as to how promises were made- how a man who yearning for the national coach's position may have also be part of this  transaction.

How could a governing body- not do their due diligence to see if the " basket of goods could hold water?"

What we have here is another traversity of incompetence a saga of  sound and fury amounting to nothing. The greater good of TnT football is once more kicked and bounced around for those self seeking goals of a few.
The lineage and legacy of " W's" have run its course over the TTFA landscape- w " The lionheart" W- " The conqueror" W " The braveheart"

Indeed the English have landed and have played the peasants to civil disobedience corruption and doom- divided the nation and left it in tatters- All hail king Peter and his Prince Terry

The kingdom of FiFE -  A  rules again. A clever plot indeed. This is stuff for the movies- Get the popcorn showtime continues
 
 

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #81 on: October 03, 2020, 04:04:49 AM »
National football coaches to Wallace: How will you help us to get paid?
Wired868.com.


The steering committee of the nascent coaches association has asked Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace to explain how he intends to help them be remunerated for their work thus far.

The TTFA’s technical staff members were hired under the Wallace-led administration, via the board, and began work between December 2019 and January 2020. However, they are yet to be paid.

Wallace initially said he was waiting for Fifa Forward Programme money to start paying the technical staff, however the funding never materialised. While the Fifa-appointed normalisation committee, which comprises of chairman Robert Hadad, vice-chair Judy Daniel and ordinary member Nigel Romano, promised to look into paying the coaches since April but did not keep its word.

Ironically, the normalisation committee did pay technical director Dion La Foucade and director of football Richard Piper as well as office staff—but snubbed the coaches.

The coaches steering committee, which consists of Wayne Sheppard, Clayton Morris, Richard Hood, Angus Eve and Jefferson George, said the normalisation committee has since blamed Wallace’s resumption of the TTFA’s High Court case against Fifa, last Friday, for the non-payments.

Wallace was asked to find a solution, via an email that was copied to the media.

(Coaches steering committee email)

Good Day Sir

The Trinidad and Tobago technical staff members have been locked in negotiations with the Fifa-appointed normalisation committee for the better part of the last month. At present, we believe that we have an understanding and agreement (between both parties) of the payment amounts due to us and mechanism by which we will be paid.

In previous newspaper articles and interviews, you and other members of the United TTFA have indicated that you were not opposed to the office staff and coaches being paid by Fifa or Concacaf and would not interfere or act in any manner to negatively affect the payment of staff.

On Saturday 26th September, however, we were informed by the Normalisation Committee that FIFA is unwilling to make these payments because of the reinstated court action by the United TTFA.

We, the national staff members, would appreciate hearing from you how you can assist us with regard to our remuneration in the existing circumstances.

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #82 on: October 04, 2020, 12:48:56 AM »
Wallace accuses Fifa of using coaches as pawns, Fifa allegedly paid TT$492k to NC.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


Fifa-appointed normalisation committee chairman Robert Hadad is still mum on the salary that he and his fellow members collect monthly from the world governing body, even as coaches and players remain unpaid.

Hadad admitted in a recent SportsMax interview that he and his colleagues are paid by Fifa but did not reveal his remuneration package. However, media reports in Pakistan and Ghana suggest that the going rate for the job is US$6,500 (TT$44,000) per month for the normalisation committee chairman and US$4,000 (TT$27,000) for members.

Fifa appointed Hadad, vice-chair Judy Daniel and Nigel Romano on 27 April. At the aforementioned figure, Hadad, the co-CEO of family-owned business HadCo Limited, would have received US$32,500 (TT$220,501) from Zurich by now, while Daniel and Romano may have pocketed US$20,000 (TT$135,700) each.

It is unclear whether that money, which amounts to just over TT$492,000 so far, is deducted from Fifa’s annual remittance to the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA)—as suggested in the Ghanian press. Hadad did not respond to Wired868’s questions on the subject.

Fifa’s mandate to its normalisation committee in Trinidad and Tobago included:

to run the TTFA’s daily affairs;

to establish a debt repayment plan that is implementable by the TTFA;

to review and amend the TTFA Statutes (and other regulations where necessary) and to ensure their compliance with the FIFA Statutes and requirements before duly submitting them for approval to the TTFA Congress;

to organise and to conduct elections of a new TTFA Executive Committee for a four-year mandate.

In theory, the normalisation committee can remain in place until March 2022 and, ironically, they are replacing unpaid board members. The TTFA president is the only elected member who is compensated by Fifa, although it is estimated to be just US$2,000 (TT$13,600) per month.

The technical staff members of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) have not been nearly as fortunate as the normalisation committee members.

Today, besieged TTFA president William Wallace accused the normalisation committee of trying to exploit its football coaches for political mileage, in a bid to increase pressure on the elected officials. And, in an emailed statement, he begged the coaches steering committee for their ‘indulgence over the next two weeks’, while they await remuneration.

The coaches steering committee comprises of Wayne Sheppard, Clayton Morris, Richard Hood, Angus Eve and Jefferson George.

On Monday, the coaches steering committee wrote to Wallace—on behalf of the technical staff members of the national teams—to relay word from the normalisation committee that Fifa is unwilling to pay them ‘because of the reinstated court action by the United TTFA [slate]’.

At present, Wallace and vice-presidents Clynt Taylor and Sam Phillip are contesting the Bureau of the Fifa Council’s decision to replace them with a normalisation committee on 13 April. The elected officers expect a verdict from High Court Judge Carol Gobin on 9 October.

If the High Court rules that Wallace remains the rightful head of local football, the president promised to call an extraordinary general meeting within 10 days to take counsel from member delegates on his next move—although Fifa president Gianni Infantino, via secretary general Fatma Samoura, has said repeatedly there would be no reconciliation with the estranged administrator.

Wallace said he ‘empathises’ with the coaches but noted that Fifa said it will only release funding to its normalisation committee. He insisted that the United TTFA slate has ‘done nothing to impede the NC (normalisation committee) in those functions that contributed to the welfare of staff’.

“It is passing strange that the NC got money to pay office staff, promised coaches payment, all this while our matter is before the court,” stated the TTFA president, “and suddenly, with no change in the status quo, is now using the court matter as an excuse to justify reneging on the commitment made to coaches.”

In fact, the normalisation committee has paid technical staff members too; but only selectively.

On 27 April, Hadad promised Soca Warriors coaches to initiate steps towards their remuneration in a virtual meeting. However, in July, the coaches discovered—through the media—that the normalisation committee secretly put through payments to technical director Dion La Foucade and director of football Richard Piper, along with office staff, without getting back to them.

After public protests by technical staff members in August, the normalisation committee granted meetings to the various head coaches to discuss their grievance.

On 10 September, the coaches steering committee informed the public that there had been a breakthrough.

“[…] The commitment was given by the normalisation committee to return to our group with a final proposal for settlement in a couple days,” stated the coaches. “[…] We believe there is good reason to be optimistic of this process being completed within the time frame suggested by the normalisation committee.

“This optimism is borne out of the productive and transparent nature of the meetings between both parties thus far.”

Three weeks later, though, there has been no change to the situation.

In the interim, on 24 September, the Bureau of the Fifa Council suspended the TTFA from international football—a move that saw the local body lose all its membership rights while Fifa warned members ‘not to enter into any sporting contact with the TTFA’.

Within hours of the suspension, Concacaf president Victor Montagliani, who serves on the Bureau alongside Infantino, informed the TTFA that they would remain in the 2021 Gold Cup draw, on the understanding that the twin island republic bends to the world governing body by 18 December.

Fifa has not disbanded its normalisation committee in Trinidad and Tobago either.

Wallace suggested that Fifa and its normalisation committee are playing games, and using the coaches as pawns.

“We are fully cognisant that the reason for this recent position by the NC is to continue their public pressure on us to withdraw the matter from the court,” stated Wallace. “This new strategy is to add the voice of the coaches to those voices out there that are singing for their supper, which amounts to the crumbs that fall from the table of ‘massa’.

“We are asking the coaches to allow us the opportunity to right a wrong and to put football back into the hands of the membership where it belongs. We beg your indulgence over the next two weeks and whatever the outcome, what is due to you will be honoured.”

Wallace did not state how he intends to ‘honour’ the coaches’ contracts, since the TTFA is functionally bankrupt and Fifa made it clear that not a cent of its allocation money would be put within his reach.

However, the TTFA president is expected to either resign or face a move for his ouster, after the High Court ruling in two weeks’ time.

(Coaches Steering Committee letter on 28 September)

Good day sir,

The Trinidad and Tobago technical staff members have been locked in negotiations with the Fifa-appointed normalisation committee for the better part of the last month. At present, we believe that we have an understanding and agreement (between both parties) of the payment amounts due to us and mechanism by which we will be paid.

In previous newspaper articles and interviews, you and other members of the United TTFA have indicated that you were not opposed to the office staff and coaches being paid by Fifa or Concacaf and would not interfere or act in any manner to negatively affect the payment of staff.

On Saturday 26th September, however, we were informed by the Normalisation Committee that FIFA is unwilling to make these payments because of the reinstated court action by the United TTFA.

We, the national staff members, would appreciate hearing from you how you can assist us with regard to our remuneration in the existing circumstances.

(TTFA president William Wallace response on 30 September)

Dear Members of the Coaches Steering Committee,

On behalf of the executive FIFA has deposed within FIFA, and by extension members of the UTTFA, we fully understand your plight and more than that empathise with you, during a most difficult time in our football history.

We have always indicated that we will do what has to be done to make sure that all staff both administrative and technical be paid for their services.  That was demonstrated back in February when FIFA refused to release funding to us, resulting in us borrowing money to ensure that the office staff was paid.

FIFA has clearly stated that the Normalisation Committee (NC) is in charge of football and while our challenge to FIFA’s position is in the hands of the court, we have done nothing to impede the NC in those functions that contributed to the welfare of staff.

It is passing strange that the NC got money to pay office staff, promised coaches payment, all this while our matter is before the court and suddenly with no change in the status quo, is now using the court matter as an excuse to justify reneging on the commitment made to coaches.

We are fully cognisant that the reason for this recent position by the NC is to continue their public pressure on us to withdraw the matter from the court. This new strategy is to add the voice of the coaches to those voices out there that are singing for their supper, which amounts to the crumbs that fall from the table of ‘massa’.

We are asking the coaches to allow us the opportunity to right a wrong and to put football back into the hands of the membership where it belongs. We beg your indulgence over the next two weeks and whatever the outcome, what is due to you will be honoured.

Regards,
William Wallace
TTFA President (Elect)

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Offline Tallman

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Wallace: Systemic reform needed
« Reply #83 on: October 18, 2020, 10:17:12 AM »
Wallace: Systemic reform needed
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (T&T Express)


Systemic reform of T&T’s youth development programmes and professional league is the only solution to facilitate a smoother transition of younger players into world-class footballers.

Reinstated T&T Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace believes last-minute preparations ahead of major international tournaments and unsatisfactory financial incentives on the local pro circuit serve as major detractors to this nation’s potential footballers.

Wallace reassumed his role at the helm of local football on Tuesday after Justice Carol Gobin ruled FIFA’s March removal of the TTFA executive and installation of a normalisation committee null and void.

He has already begun formulating strategies to chart a way forward.

However, many of his plans rely on the outcome of TTFA’s extraordinary general meeting (EGM),on October 25, when the restored executive reconnects with the 47-delegate membership to discuss the future of T&T football and its legal quandary with the sport’s global governing body, FIFA.

Looking ahead, Wallace said, “I would like to see that we do some introspection and soul-searching to reassess football in T&T. We need to be honest and look at where our football has gotten to over the last four or five years. Then it means that whatever we had been doing over that duration, that we cannot continue doing that and expect to improve.”

Wallace insists more emphasis must be placed on the holistic development of youngsters as they search for avenues to elevate their playing careers. He admitted that participating in major youth (U13 – U21) international competitions is necessary for athlete growth.

But, he said. a lack of preparation ahead of tournaments of this calibre, backed by shoddy performances owing to these deficiencies, only serves as discouragement for a budding footballer.

“We cannot continue to halfway prepare teams just to enter competitions.

"The better thing might be to sit down and properly put some development programmes in place for our young people so that they can develop their game properly. This goes against running into competition at every minute.

"When this happens, the players emerge disillusioned. This is one way of disenfranchising youths. If the only thing that people could think that because we are suspended, that this is the only thing that can disenfranchise youths, then they are not being honest.”

Wallace was also critical of the T&T Pro League, which he believes has been significantly non-progressive for the past five to six years. While he is aware the covid19 pandemic has had a negative impact on sport investment, both locally and internationally, the stipends paid to players by domestic clubs are minuscule.

These shortcomings, the former Secondary Schools Football League president said, are also a deterrent to potential players working towards securing pro contracts.

“We have a professional league in T&T that has not really grown in any significant way. If our youths in T&T are intent on going into pro football and all they can see is playing for $1,200 or $3,000 per month, that is not an incentive for young footballers.

“Our systems need to be realigned and reassessed. What is really the motivation for a young man who wants to develop his game to be asked to play professional football in T&T? If he plans to do that, the money is insufficient. He cannot live on these stipends.

"These are the things that we have to be honest with. We’re talking about pro footballers.”

After being elected to run T&T football in November 2019, Wallace and his three vice-presidents – Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillip and Susan Joseph-Warrick (resigned) – were removed from their post by FIFA on the grounds of financial mismanagement and massive debt.

A normalisation committee, led by businessman Robert Hadad, was set up by the governing body to run the FA’s daily affairs.

Wallace then contested FIFA’s decision to remove his executive and shift power to Hadad in the local court. Tuesday’s judgment by Gobin returned Wallace, Taylor and Phillip to the helm of T&T football.

Although he is pleased to have won against the mighty FIFA, T&T still remains indefinitely banned by the Gianni Infantino-led organisation, “for grave violations of the FIFA Statutes,, and still runs the risk of missing out on 2022 World Cup qualifiers.

On August 13, Gobin denied FIFA’s request to have the previous dispute remitted to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) and ruled that the local officials were not bound by an arbitration clause with the CAS and could take the world governing body to court in T&T.

One week later, FIFA appealed the decision to have the matter dealt with locally. FIFA’s hearing at the Court of Appeal is set for Monday. Additionally, after previously questioning the impartiality of the CAS, the TTFA returned to the Swiss court to fight FIFA’s August 24 decision to indefinitely suspend T&T.

The pursuit of this matter in Zurich will be decided at the upcoming EGM, where members will decide whether to drop or continue the case. Depending on the outcome of this meeting, the Government may consider stepping in to assist the still-embattled Wallace-led TTFA unit.
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Re: Wallace: Systemic reform needed
« Reply #84 on: October 18, 2020, 04:15:08 PM »
Wallace: Systemic reform needed
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (T&T Express)


Systemic reform of T&T’s youth development programmes and professional league is the only solution to facilitate a smoother transition of younger players into world-class footballers.

Reinstated T&T Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace believes last-minute preparations ahead of major international tournaments and unsatisfactory financial incentives on the local pro circuit serve as major detractors to this nation’s potential footballers.

Wallace reassumed his role at the helm of local football on Tuesday after Justice Carol Gobin ruled FIFA’s March removal of the TTFA executive and installation of a normalisation committee null and void.

He has already begun formulating strategies to chart a way forward.

However, many of his plans rely on the outcome of TTFA’s extraordinary general meeting (EGM),on October 25, when the restored executive reconnects with the 47-delegate membership to discuss the future of T&T football and its legal quandary with the sport’s global governing body, FIFA.

Looking ahead, Wallace said, “I would like to see that we do some introspection and soul-searching to reassess football in T&T. We need to be honest and look at where our football has gotten to over the last four or five years. Then it means that whatever we had been doing over that duration, that we cannot continue doing that and expect to improve.”

Wallace insists more emphasis must be placed on the holistic development of youngsters as they search for avenues to elevate their playing careers. He admitted that participating in major youth (U13 – U21) international competitions is necessary for athlete growth.

But, he said. a lack of preparation ahead of tournaments of this calibre, backed by shoddy performances owing to these deficiencies, only serves as discouragement for a budding footballer.

“We cannot continue to halfway prepare teams just to enter competitions.

"The better thing might be to sit down and properly put some development programmes in place for our young people so that they can develop their game properly. This goes against running into competition at every minute.

"When this happens, the players emerge disillusioned. This is one way of disenfranchising youths. If the only thing that people could think that because we are suspended, that this is the only thing that can disenfranchise youths, then they are not being honest.”

Wallace was also critical of the T&T Pro League, which he believes has been significantly non-progressive for the past five to six years. While he is aware the covid19 pandemic has had a negative impact on sport investment, both locally and internationally, the stipends paid to players by domestic clubs are minuscule.

These shortcomings, the former Secondary Schools Football League president said, are also a deterrent to potential players working towards securing pro contracts.

“We have a professional league in T&T that has not really grown in any significant way. If our youths in T&T are intent on going into pro football and all they can see is playing for $1,200 or $3,000 per month, that is not an incentive for young footballers.

“Our systems need to be realigned and reassessed. What is really the motivation for a young man who wants to develop his game to be asked to play professional football in T&T? If he plans to do that, the money is insufficient. He cannot live on these stipends.

"These are the things that we have to be honest with. We’re talking about pro footballers.”

After being elected to run T&T football in November 2019, Wallace and his three vice-presidents – Clynt Taylor, Joseph Sam Phillip and Susan Joseph-Warrick (resigned) – were removed from their post by FIFA on the grounds of financial mismanagement and massive debt.

A normalisation committee, led by businessman Robert Hadad, was set up by the governing body to run the FA’s daily affairs.

Wallace then contested FIFA’s decision to remove his executive and shift power to Hadad in the local court. Tuesday’s judgment by Gobin returned Wallace, Taylor and Phillip to the helm of T&T football.

Although he is pleased to have won against the mighty FIFA, T&T still remains indefinitely banned by the Gianni Infantino-led organisation, “for grave violations of the FIFA Statutes,, and still runs the risk of missing out on 2022 World Cup qualifiers.

On August 13, Gobin denied FIFA’s request to have the previous dispute remitted to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) and ruled that the local officials were not bound by an arbitration clause with the CAS and could take the world governing body to court in T&T.

One week later, FIFA appealed the decision to have the matter dealt with locally. FIFA’s hearing at the Court of Appeal is set for Monday. Additionally, after previously questioning the impartiality of the CAS, the TTFA returned to the Swiss court to fight FIFA’s August 24 decision to indefinitely suspend T&T.

The pursuit of this matter in Zurich will be decided at the upcoming EGM, where members will decide whether to drop or continue the case. Depending on the outcome of this meeting, the Government may consider stepping in to assist the still-embattled Wallace-led TTFA unit.
This guy sounds delusional I hope these guys are not so gullible to fall for this crap they need to show William Wallace Trump the door as soon as possible.

Offline maxg

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #85 on: October 18, 2020, 05:49:34 PM »
This guy sounds delusional I hope these guys are not so gullible to fall for this crap they need to show William Wallace Trump the door as soon as possible.
Could you give an eg. of some soundbites of the delusion that you are hearing, please ?
« Last Edit: October 19, 2020, 06:34:10 AM by maxg »

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No word
« Reply #86 on: October 24, 2020, 10:33:13 AM »
I was told many years ago by an elder that there’s only one thing that a man truly owns in this life, and that’s his word, and he must protect his word with his life. he said that a man without word is as dishonorable as a hungry dog in a butcher shop, which brings me to this point.

Last week william wallace was in an interview where he claimed that if the judge ruled in his favor or against him he will let the members decide on a way forward, ok......yesterday the judge ruled against him and it’s not even 24 hours later and he’s contemplating going to the privy council, would somebody please tell me in case I’m missing something, is this someone that you really wants to support?

he gave his word that this is the final leg of the journey, he even asked the coaches and the membership to be patient this thing will be over soon, now he’s singing a different song after being told by his foolish lawyers that the privy council might be an option to explore.

listen mate if you decide to take this any further I sincerely hope that the membership vote you out and fifa ban your ass for life, all because of your stupidity and desperate attitude to hold on to power. you should have gone to CAS and left it there, but you took bad advice and now your left holding the bag. come on mate stop acting like DJW, football don’t belong to none of you. just walk away mate you have no support, it’s over.

« Last Edit: October 24, 2020, 10:41:24 AM by pull stones »

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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #87 on: October 25, 2020, 04:40:18 PM »
Concerning the notion that Wallace will bear personal liability re: the costs pronounced on by the Court of Appeal ... Forget about it!
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Re: William Wallace Thread
« Reply #88 on: November 24, 2020, 01:57:19 AM »
Wallace: Enough time for Fenwick to prepare.
By Joel Bailey (T&T Newsday).


WILLIAM Wallace, ousted president of the TT Football Association (TTFA) is not worried over the inactivity of the national men’s football team.

The national squad last played an international match on November 17, 2019, when they suffered a 4-0 trouncing by hosts Honduras in the Concacaf Nations League.

Terry Fenwick, who replaced Dennis Lawrence as T&T men’s coach in January, is yet to guide T&T in an official match, due to the coronavirus pandemic and FIFA’s suspension of the TTFA, which lasted from September 24 to November 19.

FIFA suspended the TTFA after Wallace and his former executive challenged the global governing body’s decision at the local courts, instead of the Switzerland-based CAS (Court of Arbitration for Sport) to remove them, on March 17, and implement a normalisation committee, headed by Robert Hadad.

FIFA’s decision to remove the TTFA executive was due to the $50 million debt accumulated by the local body.

The suspension was lifted after last week’s FIFA window, and the next FIFA window is carded for March 2021, which is the start of the 2022 FIFA World Cup Qualification Concacaf First Round.

During an interview on Monday, Wallace was asked if the FIFA ban may have robbed T&T of the likelihood of friendly internationals in October and November.

He replied, “Even with the suspension lifted at this point in time, I think that the coach has enough time to prepare a team for football competition. I believe there is enough time between now and when we have to play.”

Wallace and his executive (vice-presidents Clynt Taylor, Susan Joseph-Warrick and Joseph Sam Phillip) took office on November 24, 2019.

The group, who campaigned under the United TTFA banner, only had less than four months at the helm before the normalisation committee (comprising Hadad, Judy Daniel and Nigel Romano) took over.

Wallace, the former Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) president, was asked if he will like to return to local football administration when the normalisation committee’s two-year term ends in March 2022.

“At this point in time, no,” he responded. “It doesn’t make sense.”

Wallace elaborated, “A major issue right now in T&T football is the debt. When I (decided) to accept the position to run (for) TTFA president, there was a plan in place to deal with that. If that was the least I could have done for T&T football, was to be able to do (my best) to pay that debt. I would have walked away at the end of that. There is no real reason for me to get back into football.”

Looking back at his executive’s legal challenge against FIFA, Wallace said, “We think we did the right thing. We indicated that whatever the outcome is, we would abide by it and that is what we are doing. I will always keep a keen interest in what is going on in football in T&T.”

However, Wallace confirmed that he is yet to contact Hadad to extend good wishes, as the normalisation committee deals with the off-field issues of T&T football.

“I haven’t (contacted Hadad),” said Wallace. “I always said that I never supported the appointment of the normalisation committee and I would not support it in any way. That is FIFA’s decision and that’s it.

“T&T football will always be my primary concern. I wish the committee all the best.”

Tuesday will make it a year since his election as TTFA president. Does Wallace have any regrets over challenging the incumbent David John-Williams for the presidency?

“I would have preferred that if FIFA had any intentions of putting up a normalisation committee in place, that information should have been given to the TT Football Association before the elections,” Wallace said. “Therefore, there may not have even been an election, or if persons had decided to run for election they would have known that was coming. They allowed an election to take place. That was an unfortunate thing.

Asked if he thinks that the normalisation committee would have been implemented if John-Williams had retained office, Wallace replied, “I would reserve my answer on that.”

He continued, “Before the election, we heard that a normalisation committee would be coming in and our joy would be short-lived. If was said that if we won the election, the normalisation committee would have been coming in, it also implies that if we didn’t, then they would not have come in.”

Reflecting on his year-long experience after winning the TTFA presidential election, Wallace said, “Right now, politics is more important than football. For me, that is unfortunate.”

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.