July 24, 2021, 09:01:33 AM

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Should Stern John be playing in this world cup campaign

yes
8 (61.5%)
no
5 (38.5%)

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Offline spideybuff

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1770 on: January 03, 2019, 05:57:19 AM »
Ok, let’s how this plays out. If he is good enough, will he want to for Eng. or TT?

England until he thinks that ship has sailed.
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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1771 on: January 03, 2019, 11:34:55 AM »
Ok, let’s how this plays out. If he is good enough, will he want to for Eng. or TT?

England until he thinks that ship has sailed.

I think that is understood with every player based in England or the US.
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1772 on: November 20, 2019, 07:51:02 PM »
WATCH: Shaun Fuentes and Stern John chat about #14's penchant for scoring goals and his club and national team career.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/qkHrEy2Af0M" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/qkHrEy2Af0M</a>
"My son’s identity has also been reduced to that of ... as a racist. I want this court to know that none of these things are true and that my son is a good man. A lengthy sentence will not serve Derek well.” --- Carolyn Pawlenty, mother of Derek Chauvin, prior to the court issuing a light sentence.

Offline pull stones

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1773 on: November 21, 2019, 06:06:23 AM »
WATCH: Shaun Fuentes and Stern John chat about #14's penchant for scoring goals and his club and national team career.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/qkHrEy2Af0M" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/qkHrEy2Af0M</a>
i like you very much stern and i doubt that there’s another pure goal scorer waiting in the wings anytime soon, you were truly one of a kind our very own carlos pavone our neymar our deigo maradona, World Cup would have been only a dream without you........but...........

this may have came at a very inopportune time when football is dead in TT and the journalist may have jumped the gun on this. right now there are people stewpsing about our team’s performance who may not want to hear about you dennis nor any of our past players ATM, particularly you and dennis.

you may have done yourself a huge disservice teaming up with SCF and dennis lawrence who ran our senior men’s team in the sod. I don’t think you have done yourself any favors in that regard, and whenever people see you now they wouldn’t remember your 8 goals that lead us to a world cup, but instead the side kick who helped to bring football down.

I have never suffered from high blood pressure one day in my life, but since Sunday my pressure was high, and i’m sure i’m not alone in that regard. what you should do is take that experience you got with your coaching stint to build on your CV and continue to learn until the time is ripe, but for now please stick to developmental coaching which is needed in TT more than anything else.


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Catching up with - Stern John
« Reply #1774 on: March 27, 2020, 02:01:32 PM »
Catching up with - Stern John
bcfc.com


Stern John was always a man for the big moments. He scored plenty of goals in his career, more than 200 in total, but seemed to specialise in finding the net when it mattered most. During his two and a half years at Birmingham City he contributed to some of the most significant results in the Club’s recent history.

John earned a reputation for scoring decisive goals with just seconds remaining. Each time he wheeled away in celebration, tore off his shirt and was mobbed by delirious teammates. From the Den to Villa Park, deep in enemy territory, he delivered. It’s easy to forget that there was another injury-time goal against Newcastle United too.

Amongst some stiff competition, the equaliser against Aston Villa stands out. “I’m like a cult hero in Birmingham for scoring that goal, you know? It feels good,” says John. “Even though I’m in Trinidad now, when I come back to Birmingham people still remember it. They sing ‘Stern John in the last minute.’ It’s a great feeling. Whenever I’m at the Bullring I hear people singing it. I’m like ‘Oh my god. Everyone’s looking at me.’ Birmingham is a special, special club. I love Birmingham.”

For someone who dreamed of playing in England from a young age, John certainly left his mark. Growing up on the island of Trinidad that prospect seemed a long way off but he was inspired by the example of Dwight Yorke and managed to follow in his footsteps.

At 16 he was scouted while playing for his local club, Malta Carib Alcons, and offered a scholarship to move to America and study at Mercer County Community College in New Jersey. John went there determined to make the most of the opportunity.

“It was good. It was a different experience. When I was younger, I went to the US to play in the Dallas Cup with my club team, but I’d never had the experience of living there by myself. It was a big culture change. It was a lot better than playing in Trinidad, but my main aim was always to move to the UK to play football.”

After finishing his education, John played in the A-League for Carolina Dynamos and New Orleans Riverboat Gamblers. His big break came in 1998 when he signed for Columbus Crew and went on to win the MLS Golden Boot in his first season.

“They’re fond memories. I scored 26 goals in one season, which was a record in MLS for a  of years. I had a hunger for scoring goals. I used to love scoring goals and I wanted to leave Trinidad to make a better life for myself and my mom. I was hungry for success,” he says.
John’s prolific form continued with another 18 goals the following year and European clubs were taking notice.

“No one ever knew but I signed a pre-contract agreement with Bayer Leverkusen. But I never went. Graham Taylor saw me playing for Columbus and wanted to sign me but David Platt came and hijacked the deal. He flew over to New York and I met him there.”

The interest from Nottingham Forest was too tempting and forced John to break his promise to Leverkusen. His new club helped to foot the bill and ensure his dream move to England could be completed.

“As a young kid growing up in Trinidad we always used to get English football games on TV on a Saturday and a Sunday. I wanted to play in England because Dwight Yorke was there and Shaka Hislop too. It was somewhere I’d wanted to go for a number of years.

“It was a culture shock. I came in November and I was freezing my socks off,” he laughs. “But I knew it was something I’d wanted to do for a long time, so I had to adapt and I did. I enjoyed it. I loved every minute of it. The football was really different. It was a lot quicker and a lot more physical. It was way more exciting.”

After signing for £1.5million John scored on his debut for Forest and was doing well until he suffered a cruciate ligament injury. While the club continued to fallshort of promotion, financial  difficulties descended and a clause in John’s contract led to him being left out of the team. Already on 14 goals they couldn’t risk him scoring another one.

“If I scored 15 goals, they’d have to pay the MLS $250,000 and they couldn’t afford it,” says the former Trinidad and Tobago international. “That’s when Steve Bruce came in and I moved to Birmingham. I loved every moment at the club. Nottingham Forest was a special club, but Birmingham was too. I loved my Blues days.”

Mired in mid-table when Bruce arrived, an impressive upturn in form took the club into the play-offs. John’s seven goals in 15 games, including winners against Barnsley and Norwich City, was a big factor. “There was a huge change. Bruce did really well in trying to rebuild and reaching the Premiership changed the face of the Club.”

Promotion had long eluded Birmingham, but their cruel run of play-off semi-final defeats was decisively ended by John’s strike against Millwall. After a 1-1 draw at St. Andrew’s, a tight and tense second leg was heading for extra time when Martin Grainger hooked the ball hopefully into the box, it broke to Steve Vickers and his low cross was turned in from close range.

“I had an opportunity to score before and I messed up. I got a second chance and I buried it. The fans went mad. It was an electric atmosphere. It was an amazing feeling. It’s something that you can’t express but we worked hard for it and we had a great team,” says John.

“Millwall didn’t take it well with what happened after the game. We had to get security to leave the stadium. It was a bit crazy, but we were euphoric.”

That momentum was taken into the showdown at the Millennium Stadium, where Blues recovered from falling behind to take the final to penalties after John set up Geoff Horsfield’s equaliser. In the shootout he stepped up first to score past Rob Green in the Norwich goal.

“It was nail-biting,” recalls the striker. “Oh my god. I was a bit nervous to be fair, but I just did enough to beat the keeper with the pace of the ball. I remember a young Darren Carter scoring the final penalty for us to get to the Premiership.

“It was a huge moment for me and my family. The Premiership is massive in the Caribbean. Back home in Trinidad there were only a few guys who’d played there and I had the opportunity to join them.

“It was a huge step. The Premiership was a different kettle of fish altogether. The Championship is one of the hardest divisions I’ve played in but there was so much quality in the Premiership. You have to be technically better, and fitter than before. I remember going away and training with the military to get myself in good shape.”

The extra work paid off as Blues were able to survive in the top flight after a tough start. John scored the club’s first ever Premier League goal, from the penalty spot against Everton, and also grabbed a well-taken brace in a win away to West Ham United just days after he knocked Leyton Orient out of the League Cup with a hat-trick.

The arrival of strikers like Christophe Dugarry and Mikael Forssell gradually restricted John’s involvement but he still made his presence felt when coming on as asubstitute, most notably with Blues trailing 2-1 to Aston Villa deep into injury time.

With the final whistle imminent Darren Purse thumped the ball forward in hope, Clinton Morrison’s shot was palmed away, and John was on hand to fire into the roof of the net to rescue a point and prolong the club’s unbeaten run in derby games. Only once did Birmingham City lose when he was on the scoresheet.

Although John left the club a few months later to join Coventry City it was a perfect parting gift that will never be forgotten. There was another promotion to the Premier League with Sunderland, followed by spells at Southampton and Crystal Palace. He announced his retirement in 2012 and returned home. After a brief comeback John started to focus on coaching instead.

“I came back to Trinidad and I wanted to help the national team out. With my experience I still had a lot to offer the game. I played a bit, but it was just to give something back to the country that I was born in. I’m just coaching with the Trinidad team now. I’m the assistant to Dennis Lawrence for the men’s senior team and I’m head coach of the Under-17s,” he explains.

“It can be a bit difficult. I was born in Trinidad, but I learned my trade in the UK. We could be a bit more professional but obviously we have a lot of financial problems. We haven’t been paid in months but for me it’s about giving back to my country and helping them as much as I can. I would like to coach a club in the UK or the US one day but I’m not ready yet.”

As a player John was part of his country’s finest moment on the international stage, qualifying for the 2006 World Cup where they faced England. He was unable to score on that occasion but still boasts an incredible strike rate of 70 goals in 115 appearances for Trinidad and Tobago. Although Cristiano Ronaldo has overtaken his total, Lionel Messi lags behind.

John’s understandably proud of being in such elite company. “When I retired from football I was the fourth-highest goalscorer of all-time in internationals. Coming from a small country like Trinidad that’s a fantastic achievement. It’s something I hold close to my heart because I love scoring goals. I was up there with some of the biggest names in the world.”

An iconic figure in his own country, John retains important ties to England, both family and friends. “My son was at Nottingham Forest and he’s at Notts County now. He’s 17. I still have my flat in Birmingham and I’m back there every Christmas. I meet up with Dele Adebola and some of the other guys too.”
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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1775 on: May 04, 2020, 02:49:19 PM »
Stern John: I would wash Bertille's car for extra finishing sessions
By Stern John (pushinglimits.net)


There are certain times of the year you always think about playing with the Trinidad and Tobago Team. And these moments are reflected on based on certain matches and what it brought to us as players and the country on the whole.

One of the greatest memories I have playing at the Hasely Crawford Stadium is against Mexico. It's something you dream of as a kid, wanting to play professional football, wanting to play in a World Cup and then hey the dream came true . It was a great feeling.

Against Mexico it was maybe one of the first times we were so focused as a team I think collectively  as a team we knew we could get there. We just needed to get it right. I think the win in Panama set us up nicely for the Mexico outing. We came back home and we just knew we had to leave it all out on the pitch and get the result. From the get go we went at it.

We got a penalty and the ‘keeper saved my penalty.I tried to put it just to his left  but he guessed right and got his body behind it. There was not even a chance of a rebound.  I couldn’t let that get to me and I just had to pick myself and go. I was shocked but of course at the time itself, in a split second you have to decide what’s next. The stadium was packed out and I knew people were looking for something to happen. We had started so well and yea I was thinking I’ve let the country down. But this was no time to go into a shell. I think my experience of playing over the years and playing at a high level helped me. The result in Panama and the fact we were doing well meant my confidence was on a high as well. So it was like ‘hey, forget this and just keep playing.” The pressure heading into the game was immense but we had to deal with it right in those moments.

We went 1-0 down with a blinder from the Mexican on the far side and now you’re thinking okay this can’t get any worse now can’t it. But the script was far from over. Fortunately we came back and what a comeback it was. I still get goosebumps when I'm on the field at the Hasely Crawford Stadium sometimes and I have flashbacks about the game.

Aurtis Whitley took it to them, driving towards goal and his shot came off the post and I was in motion running towards the goal. The ball came in my direction and I was able to control the rebound. It happened perfectly because the goalkeeper was still within the goal. I remember having a similar chance in the match against Guatemala but the ball bundled over and went out. All I could remember thinking was yes Sterny you got them this time but still a lot of football to play.

After that we came out and it was the best second half of football I’d ever seen in my life and to be part of, especially by a Trinidad and Tobago team. I remember in the dressing room at half time there wasn’t much more being said other than  just knowing what we had to come out and do in the second half.

I was able to score a blinder. What a fantastic finish if I could say so myself. One of those finishes you would never forget throughout your entire career. I remember it like yesterday. On the left side Latapy played one into Aurtis coming into the centre of the pitch. He tried to play one into me first time which was blocked out by the defender. Then he went with a tackle to try and win the ball back. It was a collision with him and the Mexican player and the ball ricocheted to me. At the time I was just thinking I needed an opportunity to make amends for the penalty the ‘keeper saved in the first half.  I remember taking the ball on the inside of the foot. I got a sweet bounce and it was set up perfectly for me on my left foot. And I just smashed it into the back of the net.

The feeling was amazing. I think the whole atmosphere in the stadium was amazing. The fans went mad. I remember running to the side of the pitch celebrating with my arms pumping. The Ex-Minister of Sport was on the sidelines and he was the first one to give me a high five. It was chaos at the time. There was still some time left in the game and I remember us saying to each other that we couldn’t let this slip. I think we got even better as the game progressed. We had a couple more great chances to score again. The game was really electric. We know we needed to win to get to the playoffs and once we did that we knew we could be just a couple steps away from qualifying for the World Cup. Our journey was continuing and we had to stay the course.

The Beenhakker Influence

For me Leo Beenhakker was one of the greatest managers I’ve ever played with. Some of the fans used to say he was my dad. He was relaxed at half time in that match. I mean, this is an international manager we’re speaking about who had coached some of the biggest teams in the world and some of the biggest players like Ruud Gullit, Marco Van Basten and others. We came out of the blocks quickly in the second half and the fans were amazing. They were the 12th man in a big way that night.

As a striker you play on confidence. Most strikers are confident people. You always want to score goals and when you are not scoring it can get to you, it plays on your mind especially when the fans are on your back. That’s part of the game and that’s what you signed up for. You just need to keep your head down. I think as a striker you are going to miss more chances than you score. The important thing is to keep playing and staying focused. I told myself during the drought, hey don’t panic. Just keep doing what you know and it’s going to come. I know I am a natural goalscorer. I can score goals. Sometimes all you need is that one break, a ball ricochets and goes into the net and then you start banging them in. For young strikers you just have to keep doing things the right way and work hard. Don’t try to change it up too much. Of course you can try to improve your skill.

I had a coach in Leo who was very supportive of me. He kept saying he believed in me and he kept urging me to keep at it. And when you score, celebrate and tell them what you have to tell them. Even my teammates around  kept supporting me in the dressing room as they knew what I was capable of.Of course people give you a lot of stick and maybe I thought it was unfair at times but that’s part of the game.  The fans pay their money. I think they were accustomed seeing me scoring goals and when they were seeing me not putting it in they had all the reason to ask ‘aye what’s going on with Stern.”  My teammates and the staff kept supporting me throughout and I’ll never forget that part of what we’d been through.

Now that I am a manager or a coach I am looking at the game differently. I have tried to parcel my experiences to pass it on. I am a very passionate player and I’m bringing that into the coaching now.  After my first two years I’m adjusting my approach now because it takes understanding the environment and the dressing room a lot more. The culture in Trinidad and Tobago is a bit different. You need to put your hands around some of the players and then some of them need a good extra push to get them going.

There needs to be a balance because we’ve got to be careful also. I try to pass on my experiences of playing in the UK and in the MLS to the players now. Some of our players now never had a solid base so we have to got to start from scratch with them. As a coach in Trinidad we have to be a bit more patient. You don’t want to have too much of a strong go with some players and then you end up losing them and there are others you need to give a little extra in order to get a reaction from them.

I enjoy coaching and I love doing it. I never thought I would enjoy it this much. When I stopped playing I stayed away from the game for a few years because I wasn’t sure. But then I said I could do this. I think just being in Trinidad and not giving back to the game was being a bit selfish. I tried doing other businesses and I just wasn’t enjoying it.  I want to play my part and I enjoy the experience of trying to help create better players and giving them an opportunity to become better and go on to play at a higher level and represent the country.   I can get up at any time in the morning to go to a training session.

David Platt, Steve Bruce and Roy Keane
 
Platty had a massive role in me going to the UK. He came to Columbus Crew and saw me. Actually he hijacked the deal because I was on my way to Watford. The deceased Graham Taylor was interested in me in a big way. I knew David came to Ohio and took me to Nottingham Forest. A lot of people didn’t know that I signed for Bayer Leverkusen. They were actually paying my salary to stay in the MLS and when my contract was over  I was going to head to Germany. I had already signed the dotted line. Then Platty came in and met me in New York. It was then  between Watford, Forest and Leverkusen. I went to Nottingham Forest which was a breach of contract because I had already signed with Leverkusen. The money they were paying for me for the last six or seven months we had to pay it back. Forest had to end up paying it back. I still have my Leverkusen jersey at home. My close friends asked me why I never went to Leverkusen but I had grown up watching English football every weekend. And of course a lot of the guys were in England like Yorkie and Shaka. Not that it wouldn’t haven been enjoyable in Germany but I just felt it was a better and more convenient fit at the time to go to England. It was the place to be and I have no regrets to this day.

When I first met David Platt I was starstruck. Wow this is David Platt. I was accustomed seeing him play for Sampdoria, seeing him play for Arsenal and scoring against Belgium in the 1990 World Cup. I signed the deal and when I got to Forest in November he picked me up personally in his big Mercedes and drove me to the hotel. He looked after me from day one and he was always like a mentor to me. We used to do a lot of extra stuff on the training ground. Even the bicycle goal he scored against Belgium is something he used to practice from what he told me. I was fortunate to play alongside him coming down to the end of his career because he was a player manager at Forest.

He always would say to me that when he played in Italy he would observe the players doing extra work after practice. He used to say this is something I want you to learn and get accustom to doing extra work  and it is something I actually picked up from then, going out there and just doing the little extras to try and get better at it. Personally I wasn’t the quickest so my technical ability had to get better. And he made me a better player technically at that stage of my career.

I remember after training, he would use the belly of the net, put the ball on it and bicycle it out from that spot.  It was amazing just working with him on the training pitch. Going to a club like Nottingham Forest was massive. They were a big club winning the European Cup and having a lot of history. Ian Wright also played at Forest and of course he was one of the big strikers who was black and doing really big things.

I scored on my debut and Dwight and Shaka came down to the game and I was really buzzing. These guys are two legends who are playing in the Premiership and the fans were going crazy to see them there. There is no better feeling than to score on your debut at a new club. The pressure is so high playing in the UK, you have to keep producing and taking the opportunity when it comes because the competition for spots was also so intense. You couldn't be caught sleeping or straying for a second or else you could find yourself in the stands for weeks.

Then tragedy struck with the injury. It was the most difficult time of my career doing my cruciate ligament. I had injuries before but this was by far the most serious. It was really bad keeping me out for six to eight months. I was finally on a big stage playing for Forest and then this happens. It was maybe the most difficult time of my life at that point. Luckily I didn’t have to do surgery and just had to do rehab for six months. But it was intense and I had rehab three times a day. It was a lot of work just to get me to be back on the training pitch. I remember going to Belgium to see a knee specialist and when I walked into the office I got to meet Gabriel Batistuta, an even bigger legend. He had a similar injury and was being treated at the time.  Platty also gave me the chance to come to the US to be with the Gold Cup team in 2000. It was just to be part of the team and support the boys. After a while you get frustrated doing all this rehab. He used to call me Juice. So he said ‘Juice go and be with the boys and get some time away. Take a week and relax. They gave me a programme do to while I was away.

It set me back because when you have those type of injuries it takes you a while to come back and you don’t feel like yourself even when you are back to fitness. I think it did cost me something. It cost me the chance to move to a bigger Premiership club from Forest. But I had to make my mind up to work my socks off to get back into the game. I had two major cruciate ligament and cartilage injuries during my career. Maybe now I can motivate other players who have a down time like I did. I was asking why this happened to me. But I got an opportunity play in England and I wasn’t going to let that be taken away from me. This is where I wanted to be at the time, playing in England. I didn’t want to think about going back to Trinidad or the US.

Steve Bruce and Roy Keane came from that Man United culture and that environment where every single time you go out to train you have to put in heavy work. There was no letting up. You have to put it all in on the training field and then take it into the game.  Brucey was a good manager. I had some big moments under him, taking Birmingham to the playoffs and then moving up to the Premiership. Getting to the playoff finals was something the club was preparing for for number of years and then getting there and winning on penalties made it even more incredible. I remember scoring that goal in the last minute against Aston Villa to equalise in the Premiership. That’s the big derby and up to this day when I walk the streets in Birmingham whenever I am there the fans would sing “Stern in the last minute… in the last minute !!!”  They always talk about it. That one goal gives you legendary status at a club.

Roy Keane was top man. He gives you everything to get the job done.

I remember if we went to a hotel for an away game and the player wasn’t happy with a bed, he would get it sorted because he would say I would do what I need to for you as a player now just go and me results on the pitch.  Again, he is from the culture where they know what it takes to win. He used to join in the boxes to play with us and he demonstrated top skill and technical ability. He would be driving the ball into me to control in the box. I remember staying back with him and Yorkie sometimes  and he would just be firing balls into me.

He was so passionate and maybe over the top at times but he was all about the game. Like younger players had to put that work in. If a younger player was mouthing off a senior player in training he would never have it. He would tell the senior player to send him in. And he would fine him as well. You always had to have respect around him. He is a manager I will never forget. He signed me twice actually. I remember when I had to leave Sunderland to go Southampton he called me into this office and he was honest about it. He said I can’t promise you are going to play every week. He said you’re going to play but I can’t promise you’re going to start.  If you want you can stay and fight for your place but I have an option for you to go and get first team football . I respect him for that. Some managers would maybe run you around for the season. I went to Southampton and Kenwyne came to Sunderland. I shook Roy’s hands and he was honest with me.

Playing with Dwight and Russell

I was always confident. Russell and Dwight were two of the bigger names in the team but I was banging in the goals in the net. I never felt threatened by them or being in their shadows. The team was playing for me because I was the striker. Those guys were also very encouraging. They weren’t coming to the Trinidad and Tobago team to be big players. They were already big players and didn’t need to come in and prove themselves. Even our teammates knew their role and functions and that is what was so special about our team.  Okay, we were the three main guys in the team and the ones who most people spoke about in the country.  But we were all about doing what was necessary in the interest of Trinidad and Tobago football.

I learnt a lot from Dwight and I believe he was one of the best players in the world at one time and definitely the biggest players to come out of Trinidad and Tobago. We never had a striker scoring goals at such a high level in the Premiership and the Champions League. That’s not going to change. I think a lot of people didn’t realise how good he was. His ability to get the ball into the goal and hold the ball up is second to

none. It’s something that you can’t teach. It’s either you are born with it or you don’t have it. You can work on certain things but you have to be born with a certain ability. I remember sometimes Leo would be frustrated in sessions because there were times we three would decide we were just going to use our left foot. My left foot developed more during this time. Up to now people think I am a left footer but I'm not.

Even up to this day I probably strike the ball better with my left foot and you can see Russell, wow, what a left foot he has and Dwight could pipe it with his left as well.

The Bertille St Clair era

I have to give Bertille St Clair so much credit. I think most of my goals playing for Trinidad and Tobago was under him. I remember when I was younger he brought his BMW down from Tobago and I wanted extra finishing sessions I said ‘ coach you know what I will wash your car for you just to get some extra finishing.” He would say alright he didn’t like anything better. He would train whole day. I know he’s passionate about the game. There were some things he wouldn’t stand for because he was old school which people have to understand. He was an old school manager and they have to respect that. If you understand him and what he was trying to do then you would realise hey he is just trying to teach us the right way and have certain principles. He would always say man must have reasoning. He was a philosopher but he also taught us a lot. He taught me a lot on the pitch and also off it. It was harsh they way he treated a bit but that’s football. I’m not going to get too deep into it but he is one of the coaches who has done really well for Trinidad and Tobago football.

I’ve spent a lot of time putting my thoughts together to try and give you a bit to take in. There’s a lot more to write or speak about. I’ll leave here things for now and come back with another column for the site at another time.

Thanks for reading. Remember to always say true to yourself, keep supporting our football because we all want to see us rise again.


Sincerely,
Stern
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1776 on: May 08, 2020, 06:44:55 AM »
'They couldn’t afford it' - the prolific striker that Nottingham Forest couldn't keep
By Barry Cooper (Nottingham Post)


Few on English shores were too familiar with the name Stern John when he arrived at Nottingham Forest from the MLS in 1999.

A powerful centre forward from Trinidad and Tobago, John had blitzed a goal trail in the United States, scoring 26 times for Columbus Crew which caught the eye of then Forest boss David Platt who stole a march on German Bundesliga side Bayer Leverkusen in a bid to see the Reds return to the top flight.

So keen to sign the striker, Platt flew to New York to meet John and sealed the deal, paying Crew £1.5m to bring him across the Atlantic, though clauses in the deal would later prove to be a stumbling block and see him sold for a relative pittance.

Having just been relegated from the Premier League, John was one of a host of new City Ground arrivals under the much-maligned Platt, which also included the likes of David Johnson, Jim Brennan, Riccy Scimeca and failed Italian trio Moreno Mannini, Gianluca Patrachi and Salvatore Matrecano.

John became a popular figure on Trentside, scoring 18 times in 49 starts, but Forest failed to secure a return to the Premier League which saw the club suffer dire financial problems.

Returning from a cruciate knee ligament injury, John went on to fire 14 goals for the Reds in what proved to be his final season.

A tale of what might have been...

With 14 goals to his name, Forest would have been forced to pay his former club $250,000 had he netted a 15 - the frontman was then sold to Birmingham City for a cut-price £100,000.

After leaving Forest for St Andrew’s in 2004 and helping Steve Bruce's Blues win promotion to the top flight, John moved across the Midlands to Coventry City, where he scored 29 goals in three years.

During that three-year spell, John made his way back to the East Midlands, spending a short loan spell at the Reds’ arch-rivals Derby County.

Stints at Sunderland, Southampton, Bristol City, Crystal Palace and Ipswich followed before joining non-league outfit Solihull Moors in 2012, though that move didn’t last and he opted to retire and move back home.

Internationally, John was a big success for his country and helped them qualify for the 2006 World Cup, playing in all three group games including the defeat to England in Nuremberg.

The 43-year-old netted 70 times in 115 outings for his country, seeing him ranked 11 in the list of all-time top international scorers, above the likes of Lionel Messi, Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Luis Suarez and Derby County’s Wayne Rooney.

His son, Stern Irvine used to be on the books at Forest, but now plays in Notts County’s Under-18s.

How did the move to Forest come about?

“No one ever knew but I signed a pre-contract agreement with Bayer Leverkusen. But I never went. Graham Taylor saw me playing for Columbus and wanted to sign me but David Platt came and hijacked the deal.

“He flew over to New York and I met him there,” John told bcfc.co.uk in March.

“As a young kid growing up in Trinidad we always used to get English football games on TV on a Saturday and a Sunday. I wanted to play in England because Dwight Yorke was there and Shaka Hislop too. It was somewhere I’d wanted to go for a number of years.

“It was a culture shock.

"I came in November and I was freezing my socks off.

“But I knew it was something I’d wanted to do for a long time, so I had to adapt and I did. I enjoyed it. I loved every minute of it.

“The football was really different. It was a lot quicker and a lot more physical.

"It was way more exciting.”

Speaking in January 2002, John spoke of his desire to stay in Nottingham…

"My contract is up at the end of the season but we haven't been able to talk yet because of the financial situation," the former Trinidad international said after a 0-0 draw with Barnsley.

"I'd love to stay at Forest but if they can't afford me I'll have to move on because I've got my career to think about."

Why did his career at the City Ground come to an end?

“If I scored 15 goals, they’d have to pay the MLS $250,000 and they couldn’t afford it.

“That’s when Steve Bruce came in and I moved to Birmingham.

“I loved every moment at the club.

“Nottingham Forest was a special club, but Birmingham was too. I loved my Blues days.”

On promotion with Birmingham City…

“It was a huge moment for me and my family. The Premiership is massive in the Caribbean. Back home in Trinidad there were only a few guys who’d played there and I had the opportunity to join them.

“It was a huge step. The Premiership was a different kettle of fish altogether.

“The Championship is one of the hardest divisions I’ve played in but there was so much quality in the Premiership. You have to be technically better, and fitter than before.

“I remember going away and training with the military to get myself in good shape.”

What now?

“I came back to Trinidad and I wanted to help the national team out. With my experience I still had a lot to offer the game. I played a bit, but it was just to give something back to the country that I was born in.

“I’m just coaching with the Trinidad team now. I’m the assistant to Dennis Lawrence for the men’s senior team and I’m head coach of the Under-17s,” he explains.

“It can be a bit difficult. I was born in Trinidad, but I learned my trade in the UK.

“We could be a bit more professional but obviously we have a lot of financial problems.

“We haven’t been paid in months but for me it’s about giving back to my country and helping them as much as I can. I would like to coach a club in the UK or the US one day but I’m not ready yet.”

“My son was at Nottingham Forest and he’s at Notts County now.

“He’s 17. I still have my flat in Birmingham and I’m back there every Christmas.

“I meet up with Dele Adebola and some of the other guys too.”
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Flex

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1777 on: November 13, 2020, 01:57:52 PM »
Anguilla snap up Stern, ex-Warriors star will lead minnows into 2022 WCQ campaign.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


The Anguilla Men’s National Senior Team have never scored a World Cup qualifying goal from open play, after five successive campaigns dating back to 5 March 2000.

However, for the Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifying series, Anguilla are set to be steered by one of the most prolific men in the business, as record Trinidad and Tobago international goalscorer Stern John has already agreed terms with the Anguilla Football Association (AFA).

Wired868 was unable to reach John for comment. However, an AFA source confirmed John’s new position which was agreed at the football body’s AGM on 31 October, with only ‘red tape’ due to Covid-19 restrictions delaying his unveiling.

Anguilla, which has a population of just under 15,000 and still recognises Queen Elizabeth II as its monarch, had a total of three Covid-19 cases since the onset of the pandemic, with its last infection on 30 March. However, the tiny island did not take chances and only re-opened its international borders six days ago.

For John, a former 2006 World Cup player and England Premier League striker with Birmingham City and Sunderland, the Anguilla job is only his third appointment as a head coach.

The ex-Soca Warriors stand-out was promoted to head coach at Central FC in the midst of a mini-exodus of players and staff—including coach Dale Sanders—over unpaid salaries at the Pro League outfit in September 2017.

By then, John had already served seven months as assistant to then Soca Warriors head coach Dennis Lawrence. And, in March 2019, he steered the Trinidad and Tobago Men’s National Under-17 Team to the Round of 16 in the Concacaf Championship, after group stage wins over Bermuda and Jamaica.

His last international posting was as assistant to Derek King for the Men’s National Under-20 Team in January 2020. However, the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic meant the squad never played an international game before their coaches’ short term contracts expired in July.

And, with the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) paralysed by normalisation and then suspension by Fifa, Anguilla offered the 44-year-old coach a job.

It is not a task for the faint of heart. Anguilla are 209th from Fifa’s 210 active member associations—ahead of only San Marino—and rock bottom of Concacaf’s 35 nations which are full members of the world governing body.

Infamously, Lawrence agreed to a friendly with Anguilla on 10 November 2019, as a means of snapping a record 14 game winless streak. And, at the Ato Boldon Stadium in Couva, the Warriors romped to a 15-0 win, which is simultaneously Trinidad and Tobago’s highest margin of victory and Anguilla’s largest defeat.

Anguilla hope to have better luck with John in their technical area, rather than on the opposing side. In the process, the former El Dorado East Secondary student should become the fourth Trinidadian to head a Caribbean outfit at present—while Englishman Terry Fenwick is in charge of the Warriors.

Former Morvant Caledonia United coach Rajesh Latchoo has led the Dominica football team since 2017, while Morvant Caledonia technical director Jamaal Shabazz is the St Lucia head coach and Russell Latapy, arguably Trinidad and Tobago’s most gifted former player, is the Barbados Men’s National Senior Team head coach.

John is regarded as a competent, promising coach, albeit one renowned for a prickly, combative personality. His often abrasive style did not hold him back as a player.

The two-footed frontman, nicknamed ‘Johnny Bravo’ by teammates, banged in a national record 70 goals from 115 international appearances, which makes him the world game’s 16th highest goal scorer of all time—alongside Argentina sensation Lionel Messi, who played 23 games more.

Concacaf’s second best international scorers are Americans Clint Dempsey (57 goals from 141 caps) and Landon Donovan (57 goals from 157 caps), while the next highest Caribbean marksman is Antigua and Barbuda forward Peter Byers, with 43 goals from 86 appearances.

John also leads all Trinidad and Tobago scorers with 20 World Cup qualifying goals from 49 outings, followed by Steve David (16 goals/14 WCQ caps) and Angus Eve (12 goals/35 WCQ caps).

In contrast, Anguilla have played 10 World Cup qualifying matches in total with the action usually confined to the wrong end of the field. The minnows have conceded 41 times with just two successful penalties to show for their endeavours.

Anguilla’s first qualifying goal was scored by Kenneth Hughes in a 3-1 loss to Bahamas at their Webster Park headquarters on 5 March 2000. And their second and last item at this level came in the return leg against Bahamas, when Richard O’Conner also scored from the spot in a 2-1 loss at Nassau. They are on a 10-year scoring drought at present in that particular competition.

AFA president Girdon Connor will hope things are different in the 2022 campaign for more reasons than one.

Concacaf’s new World Cup qualifying schedule was derided by mid-tier football nations like Trinidad and Tobago for offering a trickier route to Qatar. However, it looks to be a revelation for less fancied football nations like Anguilla.

In previous campaigns, Anguilla had one home-and-away playoff tie to advance to the group stages—and, one goalless draw to the Dominican Republic apart, lost every outing. However, the new format sees the minnows drawn automatically in Group D.

So, for the first time, Anguilla are assured of eight qualifying matches rather than just two. And if John can spring a surprise in just one of them, it would be an unprecedented feat for his employers.

Ironically, John’s pain is likely to mean despair for at least one of his compatriots.

Anguilla are drawn with Latchoo’s Dominica and Latapy’s Barbados in Group D, along with the Dominican Republic and clear favourites, Panama. Shabazz’s St Lucia are in Group E alongside Haiti, Nicaragua, Belize and the Turks and Caicos Islands.

Trinidad and Tobago are seeded in Group F where, once their Fifa suspension is lifted, they will face St Kitts and Nevis, Guyana, Puerto Rica and Bahamas. Concacaf’s 2022 World Cup qualifying rounds are due to kick off in March 2021.

John’s team comprises solely of amateur players, led by 39-year-old goalkeeper Ryan Liddie, who has 31 international caps.

Anguilla, a Fifa-recognised member association since 1996, have played a total of 42 full international games with one win apiece against Montserrat (ranked 184) and the British Virgin Islands (ranked 208), four draws against the Bahamas, Dominican Republic, United States Virgin Islands and Montserrat and 36 losses—including two defeats to Trinidad and Tobago at an aggregate of 25 goals to zero.

John, who is expected to travel with a strength and conditioning coach, has his work cut out. However, unlike the Soca Warriors, at least Anguilla are certain of seeing action for the Qatar campaign.

« Last Edit: November 13, 2020, 05:39:09 PM by Tallman »
The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1778 on: November 13, 2020, 02:28:32 PM »
Well, at least someone got something out of that Anguilla match.
"My son’s identity has also been reduced to that of ... as a racist. I want this court to know that none of these things are true and that my son is a good man. A lengthy sentence will not serve Derek well.” --- Carolyn Pawlenty, mother of Derek Chauvin, prior to the court issuing a light sentence.

Offline soccerman

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1779 on: November 13, 2020, 02:53:35 PM »
Good for Stern.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1780 on: November 13, 2020, 03:56:26 PM »
Congrats and Good luck!!!

Offline ABTrini

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1781 on: November 13, 2020, 05:56:28 PM »
Instant move to earn credibility by his appointed team position?

Organize a friendly against TnT right now we ripe for the picking.


Offline Tiresais

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1782 on: January 05, 2021, 01:23:30 AM »
Stern gave an interview with The Athletic here;

Fancy playing for Anguilla? Stern John needs you.
By Gregg Evans


A wonderfully-worded answer rolls off the tongue of Stern John as he tackles the testing early question about his new job as manager of Anguilla.

Why would you want to manage one of the worst teams in the world with a FIFA ranking of 209 out of 210?

“Because I started at the bottom as a player and made it into the Premier League and I want to do the same as a coach.”

It would be easy to assume that a sweet-sounding reply as good as the one John delivered had been manufactured over time. But this is the 44-year-old’s first interview since moving to the tiny Caribbean island to take over the national team, and any doubts over his commitment were extinguished quickly.

Pleasantries had barely been exchanged before his work phone started ringing. On the opposite end was a staff member keen to know more about the training schedules for the week ahead. Another call, this time from the kit man, quickly followed, and it wasn’t long...

https://theathletic.com/2300508/2021/01/05/stern-john-anguilla-interview?source=user-shared-article
« Last Edit: January 05, 2021, 02:01:15 AM by Flex »

Offline ABTrini

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1783 on: January 06, 2021, 12:41:55 AM »
Stern gave an interview with The Athletic here;

Fancy playing for Anguilla? Stern John needs you.
By Gregg Evans


A wonderfully-worded answer rolls off the tongue of Stern John as he tackles the testing early question about his new job as manager of Anguilla.

Why would you want to manage one of the worst teams in the world with a FIFA ranking of 209 out of 210?

“Because I started at the bottom as a player and made it into the Premier League and I want to do the same as a coach.”

It would be easy to assume that a sweet-sounding reply as good as the one John delivered had been manufactured over time. But this is the 44-year-old’s first interview since moving to the tiny Caribbean island to take over the national team, and any doubts over his commitment were extinguished quickly.

Pleasantries had barely been exchanged before his work phone started ringing. On the opposite end was a staff member keen to know more about the training schedules for the week ahead. Another call, this time from the kit man, quickly followed, and it wasn’t long...

https://theathletic.com/2300508/2021/01/05/stern-john-anguilla-interview?source=user-shared-article

Want to move up in the ranking ?  Take on TnT Ina friendly-
 Ripe for the picking
Then again " Burris"  always had an inflated ego

Online Tallman

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The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

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Re: Stern John Thread
« Reply #1785 on: January 10, 2021, 09:39:10 AM »
"My son’s identity has also been reduced to that of ... as a racist. I want this court to know that none of these things are true and that my son is a good man. A lengthy sentence will not serve Derek well.” --- Carolyn Pawlenty, mother of Derek Chauvin, prior to the court issuing a light sentence.