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Author Topic: Deportation Thread.  (Read 7778 times)

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Offline Disgruntled_Trini

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Re: Deportee struggling against US embassy in T&T!
« Reply #30 on: February 17, 2009, 07:20:32 PM »
30,000 Haitians ordered to leave U.S.
February 16, 2009

FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida — U.S. immigration authorities say they've ordered 30,000 Haitians to leave the country.

Haitian officials, however, say they're not issuing the travel documents needed to process most deportees.

Handfuls of deportees with valid passports have been returned to Haiti since Dec. 5, following a three-month break in deportations, according to the South Florida Sun Sentinel. But Haitian officials say the storm-batted Caribbean country needs time to recover and can't handle the return of its citizens.

A spokeswoman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says the lack of travel documents means some deportees are spending more time in crowded detention centers. According to ICE, about 600 Haitians are being detained and more than 240 others are under a form of house arrest and being monitored with electronic ankle bracelets.
Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Més que un club.

Offline TriniCana

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Re: Deportee struggling against US embassy in T&T!
« Reply #31 on: February 17, 2009, 07:33:01 PM »
30,000 Haitians ordered to leave U.S.
February 16, 2009

FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida — U.S. immigration authorities say they've ordered 30,000 Haitians to leave the country.

Haitian officials, however, say they're not issuing the travel documents needed to process most deportees.

Handfuls of deportees with valid passports have been returned to Haiti since Dec. 5, following a three-month break in deportations, according to the South Florida Sun Sentinel. But Haitian officials say the storm-batted Caribbean country needs time to recover and can't handle the return of its citizens.

A spokeswoman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says the lack of travel documents means some deportees are spending more time in crowded detention centers. According to ICE, about 600 Haitians are being detained and more than 240 others are under a form of house arrest and being monitored with electronic ankle bracelets.
Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

PLATOW.....juss so ???

Offline Flex

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Deportees influx can pose serious threat to society
« Reply #32 on: January 08, 2011, 05:55:40 AM »
Deportees influx can pose serious threat to society
By DARCEL CHOY Saturday, January 8 2011


The increase in domestic crimes has a direct correlation with the influx of deportees coming in to the country, according to Calvin James of the People’s Issues Resolution Unit.

James, acting Co-ordinator in the Unit at the Ministry of the People and Social Development, said so yesterday during the Repatriation Study Commission on Involuntary Migration at the University of Trinidad and Tobago, O’Meara Campus, Arima,

James noted that from 1990 to 2005, there were 2,983 deportees, while from January, 2003 to November, 2010, there were 3,003 deportees from various parts of the world, including the United States, Canada and United Kingdom.

“It is a dire predicament, and it is impacting on our socio-economic position,” declared James, who also noted “there are security concerns, institutional concerns and social concerns.”

He said it was difficult for deportees to be re-integrated into society. Instead he noted, it encourages them to pick up a lot of the bad norms they adopted that “put them in the situation to begin with.”

“There are different categories of deportees and that has to be taken into consideration,” declared James. With regard to those returning, “we need to set up mechanisms to determine their levels of vulnerability; their levels of needs, and the problems they may pose on society,” he said.

James said for this to be achieved, advanced notification from the deporting countries about the individuals would be important.

“This is a group that can pose a serious threat to society, and if we do not treat with our returning citizens who may have been involved in violent crimes, then we would continue to see the ills in our society,” he added.

He noted that the institutional concerns included social workers assigned to deal with deportees, were becoming overworked and stressed.

“They are not well equipped to deal with some of the situations that confront them. There is a need for re-engineering the way they treat with deportees,” he added.

James said the Government has put together a national policy and action plan to address the negative socio-economic impact of deporting persons to TT.

“The focus is to re-integrate deportees into society in a seamless manner. Reverse some of the discrimination that many deportees face.” The objective of this policy, he explained, “was to facilitate easier access to public services; to encourage a greater collaboration among stakeholders, and to encourage linkages with other regional and international stakeholders,” he said.
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Offline zuluwarrior

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Re: Deportees influx can pose serious threat to society
« Reply #33 on: January 08, 2011, 11:10:02 AM »
The increase in domestic crimes has a direct correlation with the influx of deportees coming in to the country, according to Calvin James of the People’s Issues Resolution Unit.

James said the Government has put together a national policy and action plan to address the negative socio-economic impact of deporting persons to TT.



Mr james sir it seems as though the policy and action plan not working properly because crime in the country is increasing  and the gov like they dont have a clue how to handle it .
.
good things happening to good people: a good thing
good things happening to bad people: a bad thing
bad things happening to good people: a bad thing
bad things happening to bad people: a good thing

Offline Sando prince

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Re: Deportees influx can pose serious threat to society
« Reply #34 on: January 08, 2011, 12:14:10 PM »
Deportees influx can pose serious threat to society
By DARCEL CHOY Saturday, January 8 2011


 

James noted that from 1990 to 2005, there were 2,983 deportees, while from January, 2003 to November, 2010, there were 3,003 deportees from various parts of the world, including the United States, Canada and United Kingdom.

“It is a dire predicament, and it is impacting on our socio-economic position,” declared James, who also noted “there are security concerns, institutional concerns and social concerns.”

He said it was difficult for deportees to be re-integrated into society. Instead he noted, it encourages them to pick up a lot of the bad norms they adopted that “put them in the situation to begin with.”


Damn so this has been an issue since 1990...

Offline Flex

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Deportation Thread.
« Reply #35 on: January 04, 2015, 11:27:07 AM »
4,218 Trinis sent home in 10 years.
By Rhondor Dowlat (Guardian).


Deportees beg for better life

In the past 10 years, over 4,000 T&T nationals were deported from the United States (US), Canada and the UK. The rise in deportees came as a consequence of amendments to each country’s respective immigration legislation. For example, the US passed the Illegal Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IRIRA) and the Anti-Terrorism Effective Death Penalty Act (AEDPA) in the 1990s, which all had serious repercussions for lawful permanent residents or green card holders.

Under this specific legislation, the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement was granted unfettered powers, basically allowing it to reclassify minor crimes such as petty theft, shoplifting, drug infractions and drunk driving as deportable offences. Previously, only aggravated felonies such as rape and kidnapping were deportable offences.

The USA Patriot Act, passed after the 9/11 terrorism incidents in New York, also had serious consequences for migrants suspected of being involved in plotting, inciting or aiding terrorism acts.

Statistics obtained from the US Department of State’s Homeland Security show that during a ten-year period from 2001-2010, some 72,371 people with Caribbean links were deported back to their home countries. Of this figure, 44,422 of them were deported for criminal offences. There were 4,218 Trinis among those deported and 2,433 of them were deported for criminal offences.

In the past year, according to records from the Ministry of National Security, there were approximately 175 nationals who were sent back to T&T. According to the ministry, the Government has a Memorandum of Understanding with the governments of the UK, USA and Canada regarding the sharing of information about deportees and the crimes committed in these countries. This information is shared prior to the arrival of the deportees in T&T.

On arrival in this country, deportees are first interviewed by Immigration authorities, then Special Branch and Social Welfare Officers. In addition, the Ministry of the People and Social Development has a Social Displacement Unit that assesses a deportee’s varied needs, best interests and welfare in this country after a comprehensive examination.

Deportees are assisted with housing, identification cards, employment opportunities and educational opportunities, apart from being reconnected with relatives who may still be residing in T&T. Non-governmental organisations such as Vision on Mission, Living Waters Community and St Vincent De Paul also play an integral role in the resettlement and reintegration of the deportees into the society.

Helpless feeling

One deportee, Dave Douglas, 53, of Curepe, was deported from Los Angeles, California, after he served time for domestic violence. He described his return to T&T as “being snatched from Africa and sent to T&T as an outcast and a slave.” Douglas left Trinidad at age 18 in 1978 seeking a better life. But some 27 years later he got into trouble with the law and in October 2010 was deported to Trinidad. Douglas left his seven children behind in the US.

“Being sent back here was one of the worst feelings,” he told the Sunday Guardian. “I was placed on an American Airlines flight with two US marshals, one on each side of me. I was handcuffed. “I felt equated to slaves being snatched from Africa. When I arrived in Piarco I met with customs officials and then I was allowed to leave with no money. I had nothing.”

After four years, Douglas said, he was yet to adopt to the T&T lifestyle and he was finding life very hard. He is still seeking residence at St Vincent de Paul’s in Port-of-Spain. “When I was back home (in the US) I worked as a Class 1 machinist on several US government projects. Compared to here in Trinidad, it is very tough for me. “No one wants to hire me and I am forced to work as a security guard off and on. Readjusting is very hard.”

Douglas said he grieved because of his children and was praying his life would get better one day. Another deportee, Steve Charles, 61, returned to Trinidad about six months ago, having been deported from the US. Charles called on the Government to implement effective and efficient programmes to properly reintegrate deportees into society. “It is really hard for us. When we come here in Trinidad, we feel lost,” Charles said.

“There needs to be programmes to help us in education and training and proper employment opportunities for us so we don’t have to resort to crime and living on the streets, because this is so easy for some of us to do. We just want to live our lives as the average T&T citizen.”

Lack of funding

Supervisor at the St Vincent de Paul home, Selwyn Coutain, admitted that the organisation was going through a tough period but was continuing its efforts to assist the needy, including deportees. “We are not getting the required subsidies to have this place running properly,” Coutain said.

“Staff haven’t gotten a raise of pay for the past eight years and they are still coming out to assist with the residents, and that by itself is a risk for everyone because we are all exposed to residents who have contracted diseases such as tuberculosis, HIV/Aids, herpes and scabies. “We don’t have the proper health care protection and equipment. We also have no insurance.”

According to the Vision on Mission’s Web site, many deportees encounter major difficulties in adjusting after incarceration or upon return to T&T, especially when it came to reconnecting with their families, adjusting to their new environment, finding employment and accommodation.

“Some have even experienced severe mental breakdown as a result of the transition and separation from the families or loved ones they were forced to leave behind. A large number of deportees are unskilled and need to be trained or retrained to work within the society. They may also be plagued with substance abuse and health problems, which may require special dietary needs,” the Web site noted.

Regional problem

In the most recent Caricom Crime and Security Report, criminal deportees were widely viewed as the major force driving the increasing rate of violent crime, introducing new types of crime and generally extending the criminal repertoire of local criminals. The report said it was believed that they helped to extend and intensify the transnational links of ordinary criminals, and were involved in organising and facilitating the trafficking in illegal drugs and firearms.

The report added that deportees presented a new and special danger to Caribbean societies, but the already high levels of unemployment in some of the territories; limited opportunities for acquiring new skills; the stigma of criminal deportation; and difficulty in starting a new, conventional life made the reintegration of a deportee into society difficult.
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Offline Flex

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Re: Deportation Thread Thread.
« Reply #36 on: April 05, 2015, 06:25:22 AM »
Clive Small deported to TT
Sunday, April 5 2015
TT Newsday


AN 80-year-old Trinidadian, who served almost a decade in US federal prison for illegally obtaining machine guns and silencers in Florida, was deported back to this country according to the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) agency.

ICE reported that Clive Lancelot Small was “removed from the United States” on Wednesday by officers of ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO)via commercial aircraft from the Lafayette airport to Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago.

Small had been convicted in US District Court for the Southern District of Florida in August 2005 of conspiracy to possess machine guns and firearm silencers, and possession of machine guns and firearm silencers.

The case against Small began in 2000 with telephone tape recordings done by undercover ATF agents in Florida to a residence in Trinidad. One man, Trinidadian Keith Andre Glaude, who was implicated in the conspiracy, pleaded guilty in 2002 and was jailed for two years. He was one of the key witnesses against Small, 70, a grocery owner of Gonzales and a top member of the Jamaat-al-Muslimeen, the Newsday reported in a November 2004 story.

On May 23, 2002, a grand jury sitting in the Southern District of Florida returned an indictment charging Small in a three-count indictment with conspiracy to possess machine guns and silencers, and possession of machine guns and silencers. The penalty for conspiracy to possess machine guns and firearm silencers carried a maximum penalty of five years imprisonment and a US$250,000 fine. The penalty for possession of machine guns carried a maximum penalty of ten years and a US$250,000 fine. The penalty for possession of firearm silencers carried a maximum penalty of ten years and a US$250,000 fine.

The ICE report states that Small was taken into immigration custody in February following his release from federal prison. ICE also reported that Small was previously deported from the United States in 1998 as ordered by an immigration judge but was paroled back into the country in 2004 to face the federal weapons charges.

“US Immigration and Customs Enforcement will continue to focus its removal resources on violent criminals and other high-priority aliens who pose the greatest threat to our communities,” said ERO New Orleans field office director David Rivera.

Sunday Newsday contacted National Security Minister Carl Alfonso yesterday via telephone for a comment for this story. Alfonso said he was at a function and was unable to speak.

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Offline Michael-j

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Re: Deportation Thread.
« Reply #37 on: April 05, 2015, 11:18:02 AM »
A Jewel Thief’s Audacious Comeback
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/17/fashion/17CROOK.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1&


Derek Khan, imprisoned in New York for pawning borrowed jewelry, he is now designing a jewelry line.
Daryl Visscher for The New York Times


DEREK KHAN arrived in Dubai last November the same way he arrived in New York nearly 30 years ago — dead broke and determined to be famous.

He was drawn to the desert metropolis by an acquaintance, a freelance writer he had once asked to help write his memoirs, who told him that Dubai was a city so preoccupied with its future that no one would be interested in his past. Mr. Khan, who is 50, was convinced that there he could restart his career as a stylist to the stars, just as soon as he figured out who they were.

“People here, they know,” Mr. Khan said during a late-night phone call this week from a villa where he is staying in an exclusive compound known as Emirates Hills. “But they try not to know. They don’t like to dwell on the negative.”

To a sizable contingent of the hip-hop and fashion worlds, Mr. Khan’s felonious history is so well known that it seemed unlikely he would ever resurface publicly. In 2003, he was imprisoned for pawning more than $1.5 million worth of jewelry he had borrowed from Harry Winston, Graff, Piaget and other companies on the pretense that they would be worn by his celebrity clients.

During the 1990s, he had been the most sought-after stylist in the music business, celebrated for changing the prevailing look of artists like Missy Elliott, Mary J. Blige and Lauryn Hill from street fashion to Prada, Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent (labels that then became a part of the rap lyric lexicon). He had used the money to fuel a lavish lifestyle, supplying an entourage of friends with Champagne and dinners at Mr. Chow.

His downfall, following his arrest, was swift and humiliating. When he was released from prison in 2005, his green card was revoked, and he was deported to his native Trinidad, with, he said, all of $10 in his pocket.

But in Dubai, Mr. Khan is again a star. He has appeared as a commentator and a makeover specialist on Dubai satellite channels and on the covers of celebrity magazines, including OK! Middle East and Mondanité, which have treated Mr. Khan’s arrival as validation of the worthiness of the United Arab Emirates as a stylish destination.

Declared Mondanité: “When one of America’s premier fashion stylists decides to make Dubai his home, you know that we have finally truly become a fashion capital to be reckoned with.”

And from XPress, a style supplement to The Gulf News: “Celebrity designer Derek Khan says he finds Dubai women 100 times more stylish than Los Angeles celebs.”

No mention of his incarceration appears in the accompanying press.

“They’ve never brought it up,” Mr. Khan said. “A lot of people who have a background come here. It’s like a new Australia.”

He has been accepted into the society of wealthy expatriates and Saudi royalty, even by those Mr. Khan said are aware of his prior accommodations. Timm Lemcke, a German property developer, said he invited Mr. Khan to stay, for free, in his villa, which has a swimming pool in the backyard. (“He’s a nice guy,” Mr. Lemcke said. “I had no problem with it.”)

But surely the most surprising development in Mr. Khan’s life in Dubai came shortly after he appeared as a guest on “HerSay,” on the Dubai One network. He was approached by a jewelry company that wanted him to design a Derek Khan collection.

“I thought I’d never see jewelry again,” Mr. Khan said.

The company, Hof Jewellery, once had a store on Old Bond Street in London (hence, the British spelling), but it has focused almost entirely on its wholesale business since the 1990s, often designing diamond necklaces anonymously for other stores.

Maria Oustwani, the Dubai-based general manager at Hof, said that the company plans to reassert its brand over the next three years by opening stores in Saudi Arabia and that she believes Mr. Khan will help draw attention to its collections. His 35-piece collection will be sold this fall. Ms. Oustwani said Mr. Khan would not be paid until the designs go on sale.

“He took Dubai by storm,” she said. When they began discussing the collection, she said, he confessed that he had pleaded guilty and been in jail for reselling borrowed jewelry.

“We think Derek has paid his dues,” Ms. Oustwani said.

Some who knew Mr. Khan in New York would disagree.

“I am sick to my stomach,” said Eve Goldberg, a vice president at the William Goldberg Diamond Company, one of the concerns involved in legal action against Mr. Khan that was unable to recover the jewelry he borrowed. Ms. Goldberg described Mr. Khan as a “con man.” “If he was smarter and not a criminal, he could have been very successful,” she said.

“It’s funny. I kept imagining him getting out of prison and having the nerve to call me.”

The worst part of prison, Mr. Khan said, was losing his friendships from the fashion world. Despite the nature of his crime, he was surprised to find that none of his former clients visited him at Rikers Island, or at two upstate prisons, the Watertown Correctional Facility and the Ulster Correctional Facility. Mr. Khan continued to follow their careers in the pages of Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, and his reading selections — along with the awareness of his formerly pampered lifestyle — made him a target of other prisoners and also guards.

“I was given the worst things to do, like scrubbing the toilets,” he said, “even though I was capable of helping G.E.D. students.”

When he was released and returned to Trinidad, Mr. Khan, for the first time, allowed himself to feel depressed.

“It was at that moment that I realized that this was worse, even, than jail,” he said. “It was hot and humid and alien to me.”

Mr. Khan had not been in Trinidad since his teenage years. His mother, who died in 2002, and his siblings had long ago settled in Canada. As a youth he had moved to New York and worked as a sales assistant at Yves Saint Laurent and Givenchy. In the ’80s, as he tells the story, he met Madonna and made a deal to manage her backup dancers. His big break came a few years later, dressing Salt-N-Pepa in borrowed Chanel, a makeover that caught the attention of Motown Records, which hired Mr. Khan to work with new artists as they were signed.

“He had a very powerful following in the fashion world,” recalled Brian Jones, a friend from that period who was working in Motown’s video production department. Artists would demand Mr. Khan’s services as part of a “glam squad”; he would go on tour with them to style their clothes and imagery, and also to entertain them. He appeared on countless talk shows and on “America’s Next Top Model” as a guest judge.

Cheryl Lala, a childhood friend, remembered seeing Mr. Khan talking about Pink on a VH1 special. Years later, after his return to Trinidad, she was surprised when driving down a street in Trincity to see Mr. Khan walking the other way.

“What impresses me about Khan is that he is never down,” said Ms. Lala (who is not related to the professional golfer of the same name). “You would think he would be depressed, back in Trinidad, no money, no place to live, but he is always looking up.”

Ms. Lala invited Mr. Khan to live with her. A successful copy writer for political campaigns, Ms. Lala used her own money to pay for Mr. Khan’s ticket to Dubai, a visa, hotel rooms and other travel expenses worth more than $20,000. She said the money was not a significant amount to her, “no skin off my nose.”

“I said, Way hey, Khan, the only way I’ll get you out of my house is to pay,” she said, laughing. “I wanted to help him get back on his feet again.”

Mr. Khan has landed. All that weighs on his mind today is whether to order up more diamonds, more rubies or more pearls.

Offline capodetutticapi

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Re: Deportation Thread.
« Reply #38 on: April 06, 2015, 08:19:29 AM »
Clive Small deported to TT
Sunday, April 5 2015
TT Newsday


AN 80-year-old Trinidadian, who served almost a decade in US federal prison for illegally obtaining machine guns and silencers in Florida, was deported back to this country according to the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) agency.

ICE reported that Clive Lancelot Small was “removed from the United States” on Wednesday by officers of ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO)via commercial aircraft from the Lafayette airport to Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago.

Small had been convicted in US District Court for the Southern District of Florida in August 2005 of conspiracy to possess machine guns and firearm silencers, and possession of machine guns and firearm silencers.

The case against Small began in 2000 with telephone tape recordings done by undercover ATF agents in Florida to a residence in Trinidad. One man, Trinidadian Keith Andre Glaude, who was implicated in the conspiracy, pleaded guilty in 2002 and was jailed for two years. He was one of the key witnesses against Small, 70, a grocery owner of Gonzales and a top member of the Jamaat-al-Muslimeen, the Newsday reported in a November 2004 story.

On May 23, 2002, a grand jury sitting in the Southern District of Florida returned an indictment charging Small in a three-count indictment with conspiracy to possess machine guns and silencers, and possession of machine guns and silencers. The penalty for conspiracy to possess machine guns and firearm silencers carried a maximum penalty of five years imprisonment and a US$250,000 fine. The penalty for possession of machine guns carried a maximum penalty of ten years and a US$250,000 fine. The penalty for possession of firearm silencers carried a maximum penalty of ten years and a US$250,000 fine.

The ICE report states that Small was taken into immigration custody in February following his release from federal prison. ICE also reported that Small was previously deported from the United States in 1998 as ordered by an immigration judge but was paroled back into the country in 2004 to face the federal weapons charges.

“US Immigration and Customs Enforcement will continue to focus its removal resources on violent criminals and other high-priority aliens who pose the greatest threat to our communities,” said ERO New Orleans field office director David Rivera.

Sunday Newsday contacted National Security Minister Carl Alfonso yesterday via telephone for a comment for this story. Alfonso said he was at a function and was unable to speak.


like I always say not everybody born to b doctor or lawyer,yuh choose a path deal with whatever comes with it.....I personally know small Infact he is my brother godfather,spend yuh last few years chilling Fire.
soon ah go b ah lean mean bulling machine.

Offline Flex

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Re: Deportees influx can pose serious threat to society
« Reply #39 on: April 07, 2017, 01:46:24 AM »
1,793 deportees back from US.
By Gail Alexander (Guardian).


Over the last 10 years, some 1,793 Trinidad and Tobago nationals were deported from the United States back to T&T, National Security Minister Edmund Dillon confirmed yesterday.

Dillon gave the figure in Parliament while replying to queries from Opposition Caroni East MP Dr Tim Gopeesingh on the issue.

Gopeesingh had sought the deportee levels from 2007 to 2016.

According to Dillon’s figures, the highest level of nationals deported from the US over the ten-year period was in 2008, when 325 were sent back. The lowest figure was 2015 when 77 returned.

Dillon listed the following deportee levels.

• 2007 - 260

• 2008 - 325

• 2009 - 264

• 2010 - 227

• 2011 - 157

• 2012 - 148

• 2013 - 125

• 2014 - 114

• 2015 - 77

• 2016 - 96

Dillon said returnees are placed in different categories according to the reasons/crimes they were deported.

Police and Special Branch follow up cases accordingly, he said.

The most serious category of deportees are those concerning murder and terrorist activities, who are monitored on return by TT intelligence forces and police, he added.

On another query, Dillon said acting Police Commissioner Stephen Williams is now actively considering use of non-lethal weapons for police. Dillon had been asked by Opposition MP Dr Lackram Bodoe if he was satisfied with the recent reported shooting of a mentally ill patient within the precincts of Point Fortin hospital.

Dillon couldn’t say if he was satisfied, since he said the matter is under police probe and he didn’t have the facts.

He also said over 2015 and 2016, there had been an approximately 350 per cent increase in interdiction exercises by the T&T Defence Force.

This was due to seizure of over $18m worth of drugs in 2015 and $65m worth in 2016.

Listing system improvements responsible for this, he noted six new Defence Force vessels plus heightened aerial and radar surveillance denying smugglers freedom of action.

Coastal land patrols had also been increased, including in Los Iros, Cedros and similar areas.

Dillon also cited strengthened collaboration with foreign agencies and authorities, including the US, Venezuela and the UK.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.