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Poll

Is a Caribbean Pro Soccer League Feasible ?

Yes
17 (81%)
No
4 (19%)

Total Members Voted: 21

Author Topic: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?  (Read 32712 times)

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Offline Tiresais

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #90 on: March 03, 2014, 08:01:49 AM »
Agreed, lets hope that local contextual knowledge isn't ignored in this consultation. Still sceptical, but hoping something positive comes out of the discussions

Offline Deeks

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #91 on: March 03, 2014, 06:48:33 PM »
So, these people really serious about this. Like I said previously, I hope they have dedicated financial backers......with deep pockets willing to go on for the long haul.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #92 on: March 03, 2014, 07:23:11 PM »
Quote
Mr. Don Garber
Commissioner, Major League Soccer

Intriguing!

Offline elan

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #93 on: March 03, 2014, 07:37:26 PM »
Quote
Mr. Don Garber
Commissioner, Major League Soccer

Intriguing!

There goes Promotion and relegation. It will be the same closed model of the MLS.
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/blUSVALW_Z4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/blUSVALW_Z4</a>

Offline royal

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #94 on: March 03, 2014, 08:11:09 PM »
we well bright we have two competitive leagues MLS and Mexico advising us. Probable they'll show us ways we can be better than them and take some of their players and sponsors

Offline SWF Reporter

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #95 on: March 03, 2014, 09:24:37 PM »
Williams, Shaka on CONCACAF team to launch Caribbean professional league
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868)


DIRECTV W Connection chairman David John Williams and former 2006 World Cup player Shaka Hislop were today officially unveiled as members of a CONCACAF task force mandated to do a feasibility study on the potential of a Caribbean professional football league.

The committee is considered the final step before the possible formation of a full-fledged league, which could offer professional employment for over 200 players as well as referees and administrators.

Williams, whose club remains one of the local Pro League’s most successful outfits, is thought to be a key figure in the push towards the re-introduction of a Caribbean professional competition.

“I submitted a proposal about three years ago to the CFU (Caribbean Football Union) and they are taking it a step further now,” Williams told Wired868. “There isn’t much I can say right now other than they are looking very seriously at forming a Caribbean professional league after extensive discussion at the last (CONCACAF) summit…

“The CONCACAF and the CFU is committed to forming a Caribbean professional league.”
CONCACAF president Jeffrey Webb, in a release, expressed excitement at the possibility of the competition.

“I am certain that there are immense untapped opportunities for football in the Caribbean,” said Webb. “We need to evaluate thoroughly how best to convert potential into a viable structure that could create new futures for clubs, players, fans and the game as a whole.”

Apart from Hislop and Williams, the task force includes: Grenada Prime Minister Keith Mitchell, ex-Jamaica Prime Minister and Jamaican National Premier League chairman Edward Seaga, Mexican league president Decio de Maria, US Major League Soccer (MLS) chairman Don Garber, FIFA official James Johnson, CFU general secretary Damien Hughes, Bermuda Speaker of the House Randolph Horton, Barbados FA president Randy Harris and Cayman Islands attorney Simon Firth.

“Our focus will be to analyze the feasibility of a sustainable business model,” Garber told CONCACAF, “one that can serve as the cornerstone to build a league that provides a platform for Caribbean talent, as it develops equity and value in the long term.”

Haitian Football Federation president Dr. Yves Jean-Bart, who famously accused Warner of failing to relay earthquake relief funds to Haiti, two years ago, will chair the task force while Digicel marketing head Kieran Foley, IMG senior vice president Jefferson Slack will serve as special advisors along with an England Premier League representative.

“The Premier League is honored to be one of the special advisers to this task force,” said England Premier League CEO Richard Scudamore. “We are making our entire executive team available to offer any help we can in realizing the potential for top-class professional football in the Caribbean.”

Williams said he was honoured and humbled by his appointment on the task force while Webb cooed about the perceived strength of the team and the chance to make a significant impact on the Caribbean game.

If successful, Webb would succeed where his Trinidadian predecessor, Jack Warner, failed almost two decades ago.

In 1992, Warner, the CONCACAF and CFU president, founded the Caribbean Professional Football League (CPFL) with Harold Taylor, then CFU general secretary, as the tournament organiser. However the league, which changed names and formats twice in four years, was beset by poor attendances and member clubs incurred heavy losses before it closed in 1995.

Trinidad and Tobago Hawks, Malta Carib Alcons and Trinity Professionals, all Trinidad and Tobago clubs, won the three respective editions of the competition.

“Analysing past attempts to develop such a project in the region will provide important information,” said de Maria, “as we seek to create an entity that serves the good of the game.”

Not all the regional stakeholders appear sold on the project.

In January, Jamaica football president Horace Burrell told the Jamaica Star newspaper that he doubted whether the region had the infrastructure for a professional tournament or if it could deal with the issue of travel and poor attendances at football matches on most islands.

“Frankly and honestly speaking there is no infrastructural development across the Caribbean to accommodate such a football competition in a structured way,” said Burrell, “so personally I don’t see this manifesting itself now.”

There is a potential rival for the Caribbean football market too in the form of Chris Anderson, the chairman and CEO of the Caribbean Football Trust Limited (CFTL) who, last year, vowed to launch a regional Major League Football (MLF) competition by September 2015.

The MLF would supposedly feature 20 teams competing for US$3 million in prize money and Anderson hinted that he could work in tandem with CONCACAF.

However, Williams is unconvinced by Anderson’s plans.

“Up to now, Chris Anderson hasn’t said who are the (20) teams he invited,” said Williams. “The most I know is that the CFU hasn’t been approached for the (MLF) to be sanctioned and that is probably the most important factor regarding his proposed league…

“What we are talking about is a proper structured league that will have the blessings of FIFA, CONCACAF and the CFU. And if you look at the people invited from the MLS, the Mexican Liga and the Premier League, you can see how serious it is.”

He disagreed with Burrell’s pronouncement that the region cannot sustain professional football at this time and pointed to the success of the Caribbean Premier League cricket competition, which supposedly generated over US$100 million in its debut season last year.

“A lot of people thought franchise cricket couldn’t work but it has,” said Williams. “I think there is infrastructure through the Caribbean (including cricket venues) that can be used and purpose-built venues that can be developed.

“The improvement of the standard of play that will come about and so long as the league is properly structured and promoted and there is television involved, there will be fans.”

No proposed date has been given for the Caribbean professional league while Williams said it would premature to speculate about its potential impact on the Trinidad and Tobago Pro League. He did insist that Connection would always be a part of the local top flight game regardless.

 

CONCACAF Caribbean Professional Football League task force:

Chairman: Dr Yves Jean-Bart (Haitian Football Federation president);

Members: David John Williams (W Connection/ Trinidad and Tobago), Shaka Hislop (ESPN/ Trinidad and Tobago), Keith Mitchell (Grenada Prime Minister), Edward Seaga (Jamaica National Premier League chairman), Decio de Maria (Mexico Liga president), Don Garber (US Major League Soccer chairman), James Johnson (FIFA/ Australia), Damien Hughes (CFU general secretary/ Anguilla), Randolph Horton (Bermuda Speaker of the House), Randy Harris (Barbados Football Association president) and Simon Firth (Maples and Calder/ Cayman Islands).

Special Advisors: England Premier League, Kieran Foley (Digicel),  Jefferson Slack (IMG VP).
« Last Edit: March 13, 2014, 09:01:20 AM by FF »

Offline Deeks

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #96 on: March 03, 2014, 10:21:59 PM »
We will see

Offline Tiresais

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #97 on: March 04, 2014, 02:54:02 AM »
Yea definitely a pro team of sdvisors, but really cant' see where the money comes from. If they can get consistently a couple thousand to the games then that'll just about cover travel at TTD$30 a match, but we'll need major sponsors to cover the rest, and a serious merchandising and marketing strategy.

Offline Football supporter

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #98 on: March 04, 2014, 05:48:58 AM »
Yea definitely a pro team of sdvisors, but really cant' see where the money comes from. If they can get consistently a couple thousand to the games then that'll just about cover travel at TTD$30 a match, but we'll need major sponsors to cover the rest, and a serious merchandising and marketing strategy.

This is the only weakness that I can see. The league will need to be funded by private owners and global corporate bodies to make it work. TV money will be essential. This won't be for Caribbean to watch live, it will be for TV audiences world wide. MLS will not offer any solutions there as they will want to maximise their income. The EPL can advise because it will not weaken it's brand. Somebody like Richard Branson or Alan Sugar would have been useful.

Offline Tiresais

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #99 on: March 04, 2014, 06:21:27 AM »
Yea definitely a pro team of sdvisors, but really cant' see where the money comes from. If they can get consistently a couple thousand to the games then that'll just about cover travel at TTD$30 a match, but we'll need major sponsors to cover the rest, and a serious merchandising and marketing strategy.

This is the only weakness that I can see. The league will need to be funded by private owners and global corporate bodies to make it work. TV money will be essential. This won't be for Caribbean to watch live, it will be for TV audiences world wide. MLS will not offer any solutions there as they will want to maximise their income. The EPL can advise because it will not weaken it's brand. Somebody like Richard Branson or Alan Sugar would have been useful.

MLS might have an interest as a feeder league if they're planning on expanding the Caribbean Combine. Most likely they might target the Caribbean for shirt sales as we grow economically and a cheap talent pool for the MLS. In the long-run they might promote teams like Antigua Barracuda and others who were involved in the American pyramid, in order to capture some of the benefits/profit for themselves.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #100 on: March 04, 2014, 09:39:57 AM »
Ok, so leh meh ask this ... who not on that list allyuh feel would have something to bring to the table?

Offline Tiresais

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #101 on: March 04, 2014, 10:11:38 AM »
Ok, so leh meh ask this ... who not on that list allyuh feel would have something to bring to the table?

President of CONCACAF, Jeffrey Webb
General Secretary of CONCACAF Enrique Sanz
Representative from CONCACAF,
Representative from European Champions League,
Representative from Cuba (as one of the major nations, but they never play anyway),
Representative from Guyana/Suriname,
Representative from the French Antilles,

Tbh happyish about the current list, most of my suggestions are superfluous (except CONCACAF rep) 

Offline Football supporter

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #102 on: March 04, 2014, 02:57:54 PM »
Ok, so leh meh ask this ... who not on that list allyuh feel would have something to bring to the table?

I feel that there needs to be someone who has access at the highest level to global brands. Not to sign up the deals, that will be left to a marketing/sponsorship company, but someone who knows what these brands like to invest in, the sums of money that would be possible and what they would want in return.

For example, British Airways may be keen to open up new routes in the Caribbean. Therefore, in exchange for new slots in, say, Haiti, they may sponsor a Haiti team say, US$1 million per year for 5 years and the stadium in Haiti could be named the British Airways Stadium.

But you need industry insiders to find these facts out and then build them into the proposal. This will take input at a government level and each participating country will need to give concessions to attract the sponsors.

Who, on that list, has any experience in this field?

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #103 on: March 07, 2014, 04:38:46 PM »
Caribbean Inter-Club Football Competition…Slingerz and Boystown draw; Alpha defeat Buxton United

March 7, 2014

http://www.kaieteurnewsonline.com/2014/03/07/caribbean-inter-club-football-competition-slingerz-and-boystown-draw-alpha-defeat-buxton-united/

Two action packed encounters heralded the opening night when the curtains went up on the Caribbean Inter-Club football competition at the Georgetown Football Club (GFC) Wednesday evening last. Anthony ‘Awo’ Abrams continued his good showing for his new club, Slingerz with a 19th minute strike to put Jamaican club team, Boystown, on the back foot. The goal held up for most of the match until Peter Keyes brought the situation back to equilibrium in the 90th minute as the game ended 1-1.

One match earlier, Edison Gomes slammed in a double in the 36th and 56th minute to seal the deal for Alpha ‘The Hammer’ United against Buxton United. The latter team played valiantly but was simply outclassed by a unified force in Alpha who played a superior brand of football.
The action moves over to the East Coast this evening when Buxton would enjoy home advantage to the Jamaica team, Boystown at their Community Centre Ground in the feature attraction of a double header. The curtain raiser will feature Slingerz and Alpha United in an eagerly awaited grudge match. The final set of matches will be played on Sunday March 9, when Slingerz clash with Buxton United from 18:00hrs followed by a Celebrity game at 20:30hrs. The final match for that evening pits the skill of Alpha United against Boystown FC. These matches will be played at the GFC Ground.

Meanwhile, the two Jamaican reggae stars, Duane Stephenson and Ginja were at the touchline rendering full support for their countrymen. Later on, they took centre stage with the microphone, dishing out some of their popular renditions. Whichever way the competition goes for Alpha, they will feel gratified to have had worthwhile match practice as they are now preparing for the all important CFU Club Championship in Jamaica. They are grouped with Habourview and T&T’s Defence Force.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #104 on: March 07, 2014, 05:18:12 PM »
Ok, so leh meh ask this ... who not on that list allyuh feel would have something to bring to the table?

President of CONCACAF, Jeffrey Webb
General Secretary of CONCACAF Enrique Sanz
Representative from CONCACAF,
Representative from European Champions League,
Representative from Cuba (as one of the major nations, but they never play anyway),
Representative from Guyana/Suriname,
Representative from the French Antilles,

Tbh happyish about the current list, most of my suggestions are superfluous (except CONCACAF rep) 

There's something about the composition of those named that strikes me as having achieved an uncomfortable imbalance. Still thinking about it.

No need for Jeffrey Webb to be on it ... it's a task force reporting back to CONCACAF, and he's adequately represented. For this reason, I also like the "distance" of not having Sanz at this primary stage. I think his contributions by way of review would/could be valuable at a secondary tier of inquiry.

Alternatively, I think the contribution of participant actors from Colombia, Venezuela or even Ecuador should be considered at some stage (particularly Colombia's Dimayor). There are some synergies there to be explored. Solicit same in feedback from Panama and Costa Rica. Then bring in ppl who can interpret that information objectively.

Presumably, a broad range of regional opinions will be solicited ... in this respect, there should be a commitment to getting into the weeds.

Offline Tiresais

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #105 on: March 07, 2014, 05:31:16 PM »
You might be right about the other SA countries, but I think CONCACAF representatives are important because the Caribbean is so important - our block bosses the elections due to sheer numbers so anything that happens here has an impact over there.

Offline Deeks

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #106 on: March 07, 2014, 06:45:19 PM »
Just read in the cricket section where the TT Red Steel part ways with their sponsor. The team lost 1.5 mil. last year and the sponsors did not like that. So although cricket and football may be like orange and banana, when it comes to the business side of the sport, business is business. There are no sentimentalities!!!

Offline Flex

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #107 on: April 02, 2014, 01:59:59 AM »
A League of our own
By Christophe Brathwaite (Express).


Talk has become action or so we hope. David John Williams, owner of Trinidad and Tobago Pro League club W Connection, and former 2006 World Cup player and ESPN football analyst Shaka Hislop are the chosen members on a CONCACAF task force designed to begin a feasibility study on the potential of a Caribbean professional football league.

The sceptics have already begun showing their red cards at the initiative shouting that this has been tried before and has failed to score. They believe that the parsimonious desires of each Caribbean state to hold on to their football patrimony; the poor attendance at games; and the failure of member clubs to attract funding from corporate coffers to pay for players’ salaries, coaches and overall administration is the reason behind the previous attempt at establishing a league falling flat.

One such sceptic is Jamaican Football president Horace Burrell. The Jamaican Star newspaper reported his circumvallation on the grounds that it was his opinion that the Caribbean lacked the infrastructure across the board to sustain such a league at this time.

President Burrell’s view then begs the question when is the right time? Given that the Caribbean has over 25 FIFA member nations, over 100 stadia and enough economic wealth to sustain such an initiative thrice over. In addition, FIFA and the English Premiership league have promised that they would lend their know-how to develop the structured framework. Given the aforementioned why can we not try again?

A structured framework is exactly what a Caribbean Professional Football League (CPFL) needs to survive. In this regard the proper survival of the CPFL can be divided into two components to render success; issues that are essential and those that are fundamental.

The essential category can be tabled as the foundation of the CPFL and has nothing to do with infrastructure, monies and full stadiums as Burrell and others would have us believe, rather it is the preparation of the CPFL as a premier package worthy of commercialisation. Any CPFL initiative will need the right mix of sport attorneys, marketing gurus, public relations advisers and sport and non-technocrats to fulfil a successful mandate--to achieve a unified and sustainable Caribbean Professional Football League.

The first order of business should be effective communication to each member team that they cannot operate independently but must cooperate with one another in order to sell the entire package to the public. The hierarchy of the league must also walk the talk. Accordingly, they must give incentives geared toward team collaboration.

According to Sharp, Regis and Grimes in their presentation on the ‘Economics of Professional Sports’ one such incentive lies in the shared disbursement of broadcasting rights revenue. They noted that the more successful leagues were the ones who sold their national TV and radio broadcast rights to all the games played by their members as “packaged deals” to the highest bidder and then divided the revenue amongst their members. This simple yet effective measure will address some of the financial worry woes of the less popular teams.

The second essential component should be the willingness of all regional governments to subsidise the league. The high level of participation and expenditure in football in the Caribbean should be a signal to regional governments that it is time to step up and get into the game. Governments should be made aware of the fact that 18 billion and 50 billion euros are spent globally on sponsorship and TV rights respectively.

Furthermore, there is also the positive externality argument. According to a paper entitled “Government Subsidies for Team Sports in Australia” written by John Wilson and Richard Promfret,  the argument had been made that the principal economic argument for subsidising an industry is that in the presence of positive externalities the market will under-supply a good or service.

The positive externalities they speak of range from such things as the public health aspect of sport to reductions in poverty and crime as a result of participating in sport and the various jobs created to facilitate the establishment of a league. In our case, an additional positive externality may even extend as far as indoctrinating Caribbean solidarity.

The fundamental component of the package is the players. They are the ones who put the icing on the package and are the economic and social drivers behind the demand for the package. Accordingly, their welfare and interests must be first and foremost on the agenda. The task force must seek out sport attorneys who will be charged with the duty to protect the welfare and interest of the player.

The sport attorney has a pivotal role in erasing the jumbie that looms over the Caribbean football player and sees him as a non-professional unthinking tool. In addition to protecting the interests of the player, the right sport attorney would be an asset to the task force in terms of advising on event management contracts, players and coaches’ contracts, transfers from in and out of the CPFL to other international Leagues, advice on anti-doping, anti-trust and anti-corruption regulations and a host of other regulatory needs which will provide the necessary ingredients for a sustainable CPFL.

What is both essential and fundamental to the success of the CPFL is the establishment of a regulatory framework through an independent authority designed with numerous powers to investigate all irregularities and be to the CPFL the main inspector and guarantor of accountability and transparency.

The task force must consider how to substantiate the role of this authority. One way would be to lobby every Caribbean member government to write into their legislative and public policy that they recognise this body as the supreme authoritative body to control the affairs of the league in terms of sanctions and investigative powers.  From the global perspective, such recognition will give the authority and vicariously the CPFL, the efficacy and international recognition it needs to open the doorway to international assistance both financially and in the form of professional services.

In closing, as a talented and industrious people, we should not allow past failures to inhibit us from moving forward. Notwithstanding that there are many more essentials and fundamentals which need to be explored before the first whistle is blown and given that more and more the global economy will be relying on people rather than refined resources, the time is now to pursue and make the CPFL a Caribbean agenda. It is time for a League of our own. Christophe Brathwaite is an attorney-at-law who specialises in corporate, commercial, sport and entertainment law.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Tiresais

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #108 on: April 02, 2014, 02:27:03 AM »
My biggest worry (ignoring the feasibility for now) is about the national leagues - where are the pool of players for the national teams going to come from with only a very select few clubs from each nation (hell one club for several islands for the Windies)? You can bet the CPL won't have a type of promotion or relegation, so what's left for the home clubs when the CPL captures the domestic attendance market?


Offline AB.Trini

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #109 on: April 02, 2014, 11:56:17 PM »
In fulfilling FIFA's mandate to promote and develop sport in the region. Could not funds be infused into this initiative ?  This way the region could built capacity thus benefitting all the islands? Oops the minnows as them 'big ' countries like to refer to us .

Offline Tiresais

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #110 on: April 03, 2014, 12:09:34 AM »
In fulfilling FIFA's mandate to promote and develop sport in the region. Could not funds be infused into this initiative ?  This way the region could built capacity thus benefitting all the islands? Oops the minnows as them 'big ' countries like to refer to us .

Minnows are fun to look at for a short period when they do something interesting, then they get bored and move on. We can't rely on FIFA funds, especially now we don't have an official to bribe...

Offline Tiresais

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #111 on: April 09, 2014, 05:18:44 AM »
CONCACAF PRESIDENT VISITS T&T
TTFA Facebook Page


FIFA Vice President and President of CONCACAF Jeffrey Webb visited Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago on Tuesday en route to French Guiana.

Webb’s visit lasted for five hours during which time he met with President of the Republic, His Excellency Anthony Carmona, Government Ministers and President of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association Raymond Tim Kee.

Webb used the opportunity to discuss the way forward for football in this country and to also relay what he felt was a fair level of progress made by the TTFA over the past year and some months considering some of the circumstances under which the Association has been forced to operate.

Also involved in the meetings were FIFA Development Officer Howard McIntosh and TTFA General Secretary Sheldon Phillips. Additional details and comments on President Webb’s visit to T&T will be released shortly.

« Last Edit: April 09, 2014, 05:38:44 AM by Flex »

Offline Tiresais

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #112 on: April 09, 2014, 03:24:58 PM »
A Sit Down with FIFA Development Officer Howard McIntosh

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/0vxoNN6_qqI" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/0vxoNN6_qqI</a>

Offline Deeks

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #113 on: April 09, 2014, 07:29:58 PM »
Howard McIntosh did go to Howard. I think he played also under Keith Tucker?

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #114 on: October 04, 2014, 03:13:12 PM »
W Connection President & CEO David John-Williams to speak at 2014 SoccerEx Americas Forum
W Connection Press Release.


Point Lisas Industrial Estate, Friday 3rd October 2014. President and CEO of DIRECTV W Connection FC Mr. David John-Williams has been invited to speak at the SoccerEx Americas Forum, a two day Football Conference which takes place from October 21st through 22nd in Barbados.

Mr. John-Williams, who was recently appointed to CONCACAF’s Caribbean Professional League Task Force will feature on the "Expanding Into Footballing History" session alongside fellow task force member MLS Commissioner Don Garber, former Chairman of Arsenal FC & the English FA David Dein, and panel Moderator Ben Grossman – Principle, Selhurst Media Ventures as they discuss the rapid expansion of the MLS and the proposed Caribbean Premier League which has been high on the industry agenda.

Of his invitation to feature at the forum, John-Williams says that he is honored to be considered alongside his Task Force colleagues and such an esteemed panel and he looks forward to making a contribution that can further push the Caribbean up the ladder of World Football. 

The two day forum will feature some of the football industry's most respected professionals and leaders including FIFA President Joseph Sepp Blatter and CONCACAF President Jeffrey Webb and takes place at The Lloyd Erskine Sandiford Centre (LESC) in Barbados. Topics of discussion will include “Changing Soccer’s Status Quo”, “The Home of Women’s Football”, and “Sport Tourism: The New Shop Window” to name a few. SoccerEx is a leading organization in the world of Football that has hosted over thirty industry events across five Continents since 1995. This year’s America’s forum was done in partnership with Barbados Tourism Marketing Incorporated with an aim to promote football growth and development across the CONCACAF regions.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline AB.Trini

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #115 on: October 16, 2014, 08:00:17 AM »
 The proposed Football team: "Caribbean Hurricanes"
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2005, 10:03:27 AM »

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Once more I raise the question as to the merits of having a strong formidable REGIONAL Caribbean football team.

Realistically, would any of our national football team reach the level to compete consistently with the likes of Brazil, England, France, Germany, Italy Argentina OR Spain?

Let's carefully examine the development and growth of soccer in our region with an objective mind set. With the exception of Jamacia at a WCQ appearance, what have the other islands been able to accomplish? As individidual islands do we have the depth and players resources to keep going out on our own with the hope that one day we'll be consistently be on the big stage?

Could we not develop  and train a strong regional contingent to compete  internationally at a level that would be successful?

What are the merits and down side to a venture as proposed? Given the players we have in the region today what would the make up of a regional team look like? I am proposing we call the team the "CARIBBEAN HURRICANES"
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« Last Edit: July 09, 2005, 10:21:34 AM by AlbertaTrini »


[/quote]

Once more I raise the question of the viability of any one team from the Caribbean ever having a major impact when it comes to WC never mind just qualifying but getting through the preliminaries.  Putting aside national pride- who would not like to see their nation on the WC stage? However  is the reality one that will ever be a consistent factor? Or will the Caribbean nations continually be pouring  huge amounts of funds into a bottomless pit hoping for a solid footing?

 What advantages could realized if the regional bodies pooled their resources- financial and players to build on a team for WC qualifiers?

Reality check from the Jamaica Gleaner

Burrell says it takes more than a miracle to qualify for World Cup

Kwesi Mugisa, Staff Reporter


Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) boss, Captain Horace Burrell, has warned the nation not to expect miracles when it comes to consistently qualifying for the FIFA World Cup, as odds are consistently stacked against the team based on the resources invested in the programme.

Since the historical appearance of the team at the 1998 World Cup in France, Jamaica's Reggae Boyz have struggled to make any significant impact on subsequent qualification campaigns.

The team has managed to make the final round in only two of the four subsequent qualifiers and even in the 2002 and 2014 versions, when the Boyz did find themselves numbered among the region's final six, the team finished in second to last and last spot, in respective campaigns.

"People have been saying we are our worst enemies, because we should not have qualified for the World Cup in 1998. I say 'no', I cannot agree with that," Burrell said.

"World Cup qualification is a competitive environment. No country has the right to continue to qualify for the World Cup, I think we are doing the best that we can."

The JFF boss pointed to the levels of investment made by the teams that have had the most success in recent times - Mexico , the United States and to a lesser extent Costa Rica and Panama.

Burrell stressed that it was increasingly difficult to compete with those teams, which have not only developed better infrastructure, but competed in friendly internationals, a key part of preparing teams for competition on their own terms.

financial backing

"It is not easy, we are playing against countries whose economies are way ahead of ours. Competing against Mexico, for instance ... when you look at their football budget it is almost as huge as the national budget of Jamaica, believe it or not.

"I was speaking with the United States Soccer Federation (USSF) president and he said to me that money in terms of their football development is no issue; they have funds to do anything they want to do as it relates to football," he related.

"They can travel to play any day of the week anywhere to play anyone they want, that is the size of their budget. In Mexico it is similar, in Costa the same. They are just way ahead."

Figures released by the USSF indicated expenses related to the country's national soccer teams for 2014 stood at US$50,823,920 (J$5,704,985,020).

Last year, the JFF received somewhere in the region of $30,000,000 from the Sports Development Foundation.



   
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 08:07:55 AM by AB.Trini »

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #116 on: October 16, 2014, 08:37:52 AM »
ABT, this would never happen. If we had a "West Indies" or Caribbean team, the 23 (I think) CFU members of FIFA would be reduced to 1. So, CFU would have no power in CONCACAF.

Also, FIFA would only financially support one association, so the US$250k would be divided between all 23 nations. No association would vote for that!

Finally, the number of WC places would be drastically reduced as there would only be 13 teams competing.
(Please allow for errors in the exact numbers!!)

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #117 on: October 16, 2014, 03:22:39 PM »
Not happening, unless there is a political union. That definitely not happening either, so an All Caribbean team for WC is not happening. Maybe for exhibition or Copa America?
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 03:25:01 PM by Deeks »

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #118 on: October 16, 2014, 07:27:28 PM »
ABT, this would never happen. If we had a "West Indies" or Caribbean team, the 23 (I think) CFU members of FIFA would be reduced to 1. So, CFU would have no power in CONCACAF.

Also, FIFA would only financially support one association, so the US$250k would be divided between all 23 nations. No association would vote for that!

Finally, the number of WC places would be drastically reduced as there would only be 13 teams competing.
(Please allow for errors in the exact numbers!!)

Not good enough reasons in my opinion from creating a formidable team to challenge the so call " super powers" of football - if we cyar see different then we are in a no win system designed to benefit the " haves" in this world. Not only that  it smacks of divide and conqueror. Keep them apart so they doh get powerful in unity.

This WC thing starting to feel like the Winter Olympics what chance we have of wining a gold medal in ice hockey or downhill skiing?

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Re: What about a: CARIBBEAN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE?
« Reply #119 on: October 16, 2014, 09:37:04 PM »
ABT, this would never happen. If we had a "West Indies" or Caribbean team, the 23 (I think) CFU members of FIFA would be reduced to 1. So, CFU would have no power in CONCACAF.

Also, FIFA would only financially support one association, so the US$250k would be divided between all 23 nations. No association would vote for that!

Finally, the number of WC places would be drastically reduced as there would only be 13 teams competing.
(Please allow for errors in the exact numbers!!)

Not good enough reasons in my opinion from creating a formidable team to challenge the so call " super powers" of football - if we cyar see different then we are in a no win system designed to benefit the " haves" in this world. Not only that  it smacks of divide and conqueror. Keep them apart so they doh get powerful in unity.

This WC thing starting to feel like the Winter Olympics what chance we have of wining a gold medal in ice hockey or downhill skiing?

Imagine if WI cricket didn't exist? How would T&T, Jamaica, Guyana do on their own? Maybe, every now and then, a golden team would emerge a win a few tests. That's where Caribbean football is right now. A Caribbean team would, in my opinion, fare much better than individual nations. But the facts I mentioned before will prevent it. Every country has it's president who wants first class travel to CONCACAF & FIFA events. By merging the nations, only one or two fellas will get that treatment. Benefiting football comes second if you're the F.A. president in Turks & Caicos or St Kitts & Nevis.

 

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