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Offline Jahyouth

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Graduate brain drain threatens poorest nations, says OECD
« on: March 23, 2005, 10:27:12 AM »
Graduate brain drain threatens poorest nations, says OECD
By David Turner in London
Published: March 23 2005 02:00 | Last updated: March 23 2005 02:00

More than half of known graduates from some of the world's poorest nations are living abroad in a brain drain that threatens the countries' long-term development, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development warned yesterday.

 
 In a report entitled Trends in International Migration, the rich countries' think-tank fears "the possibility that emigration of highly skilled workers may adversely affect small countries", by "preventing them from reaching a critical mass of human resources, which would be necessary to foster long-term economic development".

Guyana is the biggest net exporter of skilled staff, with 83 per cent of its known graduates living in OECD countries. Much of the ethnic black elite in Britain, for example, is of Guyanan origin, including Trevor Phillips, chair of the Commission for Racial Equality, and Baroness Amos, leader of the House of Lords.

The next three countries - all with figures above 75 per cent - are also Caribbean states: Jamaica, Haiti and Trinidad and Tobago.
Some anglophone and Portuguese-speaking African countries also come high on the list, such as Mozambique, Ghana and Tanzania.

Emigration of the highly skilled from Asia is moderate in comparison, with only 3 per cent of known Indian and Chinese graduates, and 1.7 per cent of Brazilians, living in the OECD's 30 member states.

The OECD did not count graduates living abroad in non-OECD countries. An OECD analyst who worked on the report said the countries with the highest brain drain tended to be small, and "probably do not have a lot of opportunities in their domestic labour market".

Some, such as Haiti and Cyprus, have also suffered from political instability. The four Caribbean countries at the top of the list "are not far from the United States, which is a huge magnet for graduates".

Danny Sriskandarajah, an international expert on immigration, acknowledged that policymakers should be "concerned" about the exodus of qualified healthcare workers from sub-Saharan Africa, as well as the possible depletion of a governing class in small poor countries. But he warned against "compassionate racism", whereby countries might use such figures to justify limiting immigration, and said opportunities abroad increased the motivation to go to university in small, low-income countries.

Mr Sriskandarajah suggested the best way to address the problem was by improving labour market prospects in small poor countries through aid, investment in education and improved human rights.


Offline Observer

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Re: Graduate brain drain threatens poorest nations, says OECD
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2005, 12:28:51 PM »
Bro I like this article but it is a double edge sword. Look at T&T most of the jobs etc do not go to the best qualified local. Pure nepotism running the job market. Many people with real skills return home only to be rejected in the job market. So they seek employment elsewhere. T&T has never in my knowledge seeked out its own in Universities abroad to fill crucial roles in the country, I know many Nations that do this.
Here is a story from Jamaica, years ago a friend of mine finished his aviation engineering did extensive work abroad for a few years for experience and returned home seeking employment. Air Jamaica rejected his application in favor of a foreigner. As faith would have it one of the leading airlines in the US employed him and gave him the top post operating out of??? You guessed it Jamaica. Just a short story but it is very significant. It is our mentality that contributes to the brain drain (as well).
A lady (from T&T)went to England to have here eyes operated on, because the UK specialist were the top. Upon her prep. the doctor asked her knowing she was from T&T if she knew an eye specialist based in T&t named Dr. George. She replied "yes" and the doctor chuckled and ask does he have a clinic in T&t. yes was the reply. So the doctor asked why did she come here. her reply was she wanted the best. He laughed. "Lady Dr George taught me." In conversation she told me and my parents she almost fainted. The article makes a lot of sense but we have to stop laying blame and seek solutions. Everyday I sit down and ask why especially in a Nation like Trinidad that has resourses, can we not get it right. For me it boils down to "attitude"
To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead
                                              Thomas Paine

Offline AB.Trini

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Re: Graduate brain drain threatens poorest nations, says OECD
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2005, 10:46:24 AM »
Observer: Your story resonates well with me. In 1979 after completing two post secondary degrees in education in Canada, I came home to Trinidad ready to serve.

On my way to  the ministry, I was accosted by a 'white Trindiadian' who invited me into his house and proudly shoed me his involvement in Trinidad politics from thre 50's. The man was encouraging me to come back and give to the country.

I left his home with delight. I entered the ministry and asked to meet with soemone who may review my credientials and the reception was to say the least 'cold' and unwelcoming. A man of my own skin, conversed with me and he gave me the attitude that I was a threat to his position. He demanded degrees. I produced but you know he was not very encouraging. I left and  never pursued the job market again in Trinidad.

Now with 5 years left to retirement, a passion still burns within me to come back and work in some capacity to contribue to Trinidad's society. After working, at the university here and representing  Canada on education mission in Europe, I am left wondering why the opportunities never exist for me to do the same in Trinidad. My home my heritage my paradise.

Offline Savannah boy

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Re: Graduate brain drain threatens poorest nations, says OECD
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2005, 10:30:51 PM »
Sometimes brain drain is good especially when de T&T public is no longer subject to de opinions of de one who does go by de name of Trini InFishNet. Canada could keep him. He and Winnipeg F_ry go make ah nice couple as Canadian laws permit.