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Offline Peong

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #780 on: July 04, 2015, 04:21:17 PM »
Higuain does just ups and throw away the ppl good pass.
For no real reason.
That was for the trophy man yuh hadda do better.

Offline soccerman

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #781 on: July 04, 2015, 04:35:58 PM »
Tevez woulda score that
Which one, the Higuain miss?
yeah.
I just ragging on Higuain. He need a bush bath.
LOL he woulda silence de whole ah Santiago for ah week

Offline Bitter

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #782 on: July 04, 2015, 04:37:54 PM »
The ref finds minus 10 seconds of stoppage time. What yuh call that? Moyes time?
Bitter is a supercalifragilistic tic-tac-pro

Offline Bitter

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #783 on: July 04, 2015, 04:44:47 PM »
NAH!

Higuain need a slap!
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Offline Peong

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #784 on: July 04, 2015, 04:46:51 PM »
Shitong for life.
He miss a penalty in the last game of the season for Napoli too.  A game they needed to win to get in the CL.

Offline Bitter

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #785 on: July 04, 2015, 04:48:39 PM »
"Old ladies crying tears the size of pineapple chunks."

Ray Hudson at his best.
Bitter is a supercalifragilistic tic-tac-pro

Offline Dynamite Warrior

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #786 on: July 04, 2015, 04:52:05 PM »
Shitong for life.
He miss a penalty in the last game of the season for Napoli too.  A game they needed to win to get in the CL.

CO SIGN! 100% Comes up small in all big games.  Don't know why he even came on in this game. Personally I would have brought on Tevez. But to allow him to take a penalty is criminal.

Offline soccerman

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #787 on: July 04, 2015, 04:52:38 PM »
He need a bush bath in truth, doubt he can go back to Argentina after this

Offline Peong

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #788 on: July 04, 2015, 04:54:01 PM »
Higuain owe Argentina two trophies now.  One for the WC final miss and one for the Copa.

Offline Peong

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #789 on: July 04, 2015, 04:55:24 PM »
Shitong for life.
He miss a penalty in the last game of the season for Napoli too.  A game they needed to win to get in the CL.

CO SIGN! 100% Comes up small in all big games.  Don't know why he even came on in this game. Personally I would have brought on Tevez. But to allow him to take a penalty is criminal.

Only reason I could think of for Aguero coming off was they had roughed him up a few times, maybe he was hurting.  And I agree, I woulda gone to Tevez.  Tevez just win a double, Higuain led his team to ..........

Offline soccerman

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #790 on: July 04, 2015, 05:01:19 PM »
The ref finds minus 10 seconds of stoppage time. What yuh call that? Moyes time?
Yea I ain't understand that, when Argentina had a corner kick too...

Offline ribbit

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #791 on: July 04, 2015, 05:10:35 PM »
"Old ladies crying tears the size of pineapple chunks."

Ray Hudson at his best.

He had a next one: a challenge as perfectly timed as a Swiss cuckoo clock

Offline Deeks

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #792 on: July 04, 2015, 05:13:59 PM »
There will be serious hoochie coochie going in the bedrooms tonight in Chile. Ray "who else" Hudson.

Offline soccerman

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #793 on: July 04, 2015, 05:24:16 PM »
There will be serious hoochie coochie going in the bedrooms tonight in Chile. Ray "who else" Hudson.
:rotfl:

Offline ribbit

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #794 on: July 04, 2015, 06:12:09 PM »
Twitter saying Fred woulda score that one. Higuain.......wtf

Offline Deeks

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #795 on: July 04, 2015, 08:39:00 PM »
Was Tevez injured? he did not play.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #796 on: July 05, 2015, 02:25:24 AM »
Polarizing yet popular, Carlos Tevez impacts Argentina at Copa America
By Jonathan Wilson (SI.com).


It didn’t take long after his return to the Argentina squad for Carlos Tevez to start drawing the wrong sort of attention again. He is a player stalked perpetually by controversy, particularly when he wears the national shirt. For almost four years the Juventus striker had been exiled from the national team, dismissed as a troublesome presence incapable of playing in the same side as Lionel Messi—frustratingly, given how well they played together at the 2007 Copa America.

For all his fine form for Juventus, his return was a risk. After what happened in La Serena on Saturday, it may be one the Argentina coach Gerardo Martino is regretting.

Tuesday’s game against Uruguay, the Rioplatense derby, was always going to be tense. After Argentina threw away a two-goal lead to draw against Paraguay it may also have a significant bearing on the group. Whichever team finishes second will face a quarterfinal against the side that finishes top in Group C–which after Sunday’s results now looks like being Brazil. Finishing top means a game against a third-placed side. The punishment for Argentina’s slip-up could be severe.

For 55 minutes against Paraguay, everything was going perfectly for Argentina. It was playing with verve and intelligence and led 2-0; the only criticism would be that it had been a little wasteful in front of goal, a little lacking in edge. Even when Nelson Haedo capitalized on some defensive laxity and strange positioning from the goalkeeper Sergio Romero to lash in a goal for Paraguay, it seemed little more than a blip. But then Argentina panicked.

Rather than closing the play down and asserting its authority, it let the game become more ragged. There were chances at both ends and then came the substitutions: Martino, to widespread disbelief, brought on Tevez and Gonzalo Higuain.

Martino later claimed his intention was to try to score a third goal and finish the game, but that was a mystifying explanation. Argentina was already creating chances; its issue was that it wasn’t able to check the flow of Paraguayan chances. Shuffling Angel Di Maria back into midfield was never likely to change that. Which raises the suspicion that Higuain and Tevez were brought on for political reasons: both to appease them and their supporters among the media.

And that is part of the problem of Tevez. He is popular, destabilizingly so. He wouldn’t even have made the 2011 Copa America but for a public outcry and the intervention of the governor of Buenos Aires, Daniel Scioli. Coach Sergio Batista has since said he wouldn’t have selected Tevez but for “political pressure.”

The decision to pick him was initially greeted with glee. Tevez, short and stocky and with his shock of black hair, was the model of the pibe, the archetype of Argentinian football as set down by Borocoto, the editor of El Grafico, in 1929.

Tevez had made his name with Boca Juniors (unlike Messi, who went to Barcelona when he was 13). He had friends in the media.

Early in that Copa America, there was no question that fans cheered his name louder than that of Messi when the lineups were read out before kickoff—Messi, as the stadium announcer in Santa Fe said, was “el mejor del mundo” (the best in the world), but Tevez was “el jugador del pueblo” (the player of the people). It soon became apparent, though, that Messi and Tevez were getting in each other’s way, making the same runs. Tevez was left out, and, after making a petulant substitute appearance in the quarterfinal that culminated with him missing a penalty in the shootout as Argentina lost to Uruguay, public opinion turned against him.

Governor Scioli was at it again before the World Cup, describing Tevez as “a great motivator, with great spirit,” but the coach Alejandro Sabella, who had taken advantage of Tevez’s exile from Manchester City in the middle of the 2011-12 season not to recall him, refused to countenance his return. After all, it’s not as though Argentina is short of attacking talent.

Martino, though, brought him back for the friendly against El Salvador in March. The theory was that now, with Messi so obviously the key figure, Tevez would accept his back-up role, that he would not be the difficult, sulky presence he has been in the past. But Tevez is one of those figures who seems to cause trouble even when on his best behavior.

The Argentinian sports paper Ole has been notably supportive, a feature last week describing Tevez as thinner, stronger and more mature than in 2011, while even after the Paraguay draw it detailed how he had scored three goals in training. But that, in a sense, is the difficulty. Newspapers wouldn’t produce that sort of analysis for anybody else and, even if it’s indirect, the subtext is clear: Tevez is there, ready and available, to be a savior, to force himself into the side as he did in the Copas of 2004 and 2007.

And that, in turn, especially in a team that is stuttering, can undermine morale. That it’s even being considered that Martino might have made a substitution with the thought of what the media may say in mind is evidence of that.
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #797 on: July 05, 2015, 02:36:00 AM »
Argentina's painful title drought continues with loss in Copa final
By James Young (SI.com).




SANTIAGO, Chile — As the last penalty of this Copa America final was taken, Lionel Messi stood slightly apart from the rest of the Argentina team, hands clasped tightly behind his back. When Alexis Sanchez’s shot hit the back of the net and the sea of red-clad fans inside the Estadio Nacional here erupted, Messi remained motionless for a few long, poignant seconds, staring straight ahead, before walking away. There was just time enough for a slow gaze over his shoulder at the wildly cavorting Chilean players near the corner flag before he was embraced by a supportive teammate.

Such disappointment is not an unfamiliar feeling for Messi—after the 2007 Copa America and the 2014 World Cup, this was the third time he has tasted defeat in a major international final. Accustomed to success as he is with Barcelona, such a record of failure will be hard for the world’s greatest player to stomach. Placed in the context of Argentina’s long trophy drought, which now stands at 22 years and counting, it becomes even more painful.   

The country’s last taste of international glory came on July 4th, 1993 when Alfio Basile’s side beat Mexico 2–1 in the Copa America final in Ecuador. Gabriel Batistuta was Argentina’s hero that day with two goals, thumping home the first after a driving run, then smacking in current Atletico Madrid manager Diego Simeone’s throw-in for the winner. A couple of thousand miles away in the Argentine city of Rosario, Messi had just celebrated his sixth birthday and was playing for the junior team of local side Grandoli.

If Batistuta’s goals did not ultimately become shots heard around the world, it is for two reasons. One is the often less than starry global profile of the Copa America. The other is that in those days Argentina winning trophies was hardly headline news. Carried by such stars as Daniel Passarella, Mario Kempes, Batistuta and the incomparable Diego Maradona, the team lifted the World Cup in 1978 and 1986, reached the final in 1990 and won the Copa America in 1991.

Although Maradona was soon to enter the troubled, drug-shadowed twilight years of his career, there was little to suggest that Argentina’s success would come to an end any time soon. As well as its established stars, the country’s stocks of talent were seemingly being constantly replenished, with wins in five out of seven FIFA U-20 World Cup triumphs between 1995 and 2007.

Nine of Gerardo Martino’s squad in Chile emerged from the triumphant 2005 (Fernando Gago, Ezequiel Garay, Pablo Zabaleta, Lucas Biglia, Sergio Aguero and Messi) and 2007 (Sergio Romero, Ever Banega and Angel Di Maria) sides. In the semifinals, that 2007 team beat a Chile side containing Gary Medel, Mauricio Isla, Arturo Vidal and Sanchez on its way to glory.

No one watching Batistuta’s goals that day in Guayaquil in 1993 would have imagined the prolonged, harrowing trophy drought that Argentina was about to suffer. Since that year, one of the world’s proudest footballing nations has gone six World Cups and seven Copa Americas without tasting success.

In the last two Copa Americas, for example, Argentina was thrashed 3–0 by Brazil in the 2007 final in Venezuela, and then lost on penalties to Uruguay on home soil in the 2011 quarterfinals.

Losing in the South American tournament, however, is a mere bee sting compared to the pain of being knocked out of the World Cup. In 1994, Argentina lost 3–2 to a Gheorghe Hagi and Ilie Dumitrescu-inspired Romania in the Round of 16 in Pasadena after Maradona had been sent home for testing positive for the banned substance ephedrine. Then, in 1998, Dennis Bergkamp’s wonder goal for the Netherlands knocked out Daniel Passarella’s team in the quarterfinals.

Four years later Argentina slumped out of the 2002 World Cup in South Korea and Japan in the group stage after failing to score a goal from open play, but greater things were expected in 2006 when, led by that great midfield grand master Juan Roman Riquelme, Jose Pekerman’s team crushed Serbia and Montenegro 6–0 in the group phase in a match remembered both for Esteban Cambiasso’s second-half goal that followed a sublime team move and for Messi’s substitute appearance in the same game, which made him the youngest player ever to represent Argentina at a World Cup.

Once again, however, Argentina was to disappoint, losing to Germany on penalties in the quarterfinals after leading the game until the 80th minute. There was further heartbreak in 2010, when a side shambolically coached by Maradona was thrashed 4–0 by the same opposition in the same round.

Alejandro Sabella sacrificed some of his team’s attacking flair for greater defensive diligence to reach the World Cup final in Brazil last summer, but the ultimate result was the same: A disconsolate Messi, who had dragged his team through the group phase before tiring in the knockout round, standing with his hands on his hips as the light bled from the Rio de Janeiro sky and he faced the prospect of once again returning home empty-handed.

History repeated itself for Messi and Argentina here in Santiago. Jorge Sampaoli’s admirably high-intensity Chile side may lack some of Germany’s smooth elegance, but as the shadows crept over the Estadio Nacional pitch in the second half, the crowd, sensing that victory was a real possibility, grew louder.

Its optimism was caused by the fact that Argentina and Messi, notwithstanding a few scintillating attacking moments from the latter, had failed to reproduce the fluidity and cohesion of its 6–1 crushing of Paraguay in the semifinals. 

This final, played amidst a hectic, raucous atmosphere in front of a sea of almost unrelenting Chilean red, neatly reflected the tournament that had come before it: fiercely competitive and occasionally acrimonious, but with no little skill and attacking flair on display from both sides.

There were chances at both ends, notably when Charles Aranguiz dropped a long pass into Sanchez’s wheelhouse in the second half, the forward spinning and smashing a volley just wide, and then when Gonzalo Higuaín failed by inches to turn in Lavezzi’s cross in stoppage time. There was pressure from both sides in extra time, and then it was on to the fear and loathing of penalties.

Argentina’s footballing pedigree, and the all-world status of some of its players, meant Chile had assumed the role of the underdog here, and the fighting spirit that such status engenders may have given Sampaoli’s players mental strength in the penalty shootout. When Angel Di Maria was substituted in the 29th minute, there were rowdy cheers of relief from the stands, and Messi, normally treated with respect, even deference, by fans of Argentina’s South American rivals for all that he has achieved in club football, received howls of derision every time he touched the ball, and when tumbling to the ground after being fouled. When Higuaín smashed his penalty over the bar and Banega’s effort was stopped by Bravo, there was an almost inevitable feel to the proceedings.

Now this talented generation of Argentina players must face not only another empty-handed return home from a tournament, but the prospect that they will not be able to add a major international trophy to their storied club resumés. The future of the proposed “centenary” Copa America in the USA in 2016 looks in doubt now that the competition has been identified by the FBI as a key part in the FIFA corruption scandal, and the three years between this gripping competition in Chile and the next World Cup in Russia will feel terribly long for Argentina, its fans and its players. Mascherano will be 34 by the time the final is played, Messi 31 and Di Maria and Aguero 30, their bodies bruised and buffeted by the incessant demands of top-level club soccer. It will be their last big international tournament, if they make it that far.

A number of big, passionate soccer-obsessed countries have endured similar or worse droughts. England fans, for example, are unlikely to have much sympathy for Argentina’s tears. And plenty of gifted international generations have failed to turn their talent into trophies—the Holland team at the 1974 and 1978 World Cups, for example, which boasted legends such as Johan Cruyff, Johan Neeskens and Johnny Rep, was arguably more talented, and undoubtedly better coached, than some of these Argentinian sides, but ended up losing in the final of both competitions.

By their very nature international sides are born, not bought, and weaknesses cannot be fixed with the flash of a checkbook. The standard take on the Argentina sides of last year’s World Cup and this Copa America is that they have been rich in attacking firepower but poor in defensive nous, although ironically enough it was a lack of goals when it counted, rather than a porous defense, that cost the team dear in Brazil and now here in Chile.

And then there is Messi. The trophies he has won and the footballing miracles he has performed at Barcelona are now the stuff of legend, and he had a good tournament here in Chile, producing a virtuoso display in the team's semifinal against Paraguay, and even providing a number of thrilling moments in the final, when not shackled by Chilean defensive watchdogs such as Vidal and Aranguiz.

Yet as in Brazil, Messi stood alone and sorrowful at the end, his shoulders slumped. The contrast with the celebrating Chilean players and fans, who had just seen their own 99-year Copa America drought come to an end, could not have been greater. Other than the gold medal he won at the 2008 Olympics and that 2005 U-20 World Cup win, the international trophy cabinet of this greatest of players stands empty, and after this Copa America, the sixth major tournament where he has failed to taste victory, it may now remain so permanently.

“Love is so short, forgetting is so long,” wrote the great Chilean poet Pablo Neruda. The career of a soccer player, even one as great as Messi, is short too, and lives on only in the warmth of memory and the coldness of historical record. It is to be hoped that he may yet get one more chance to bring World Cup glory to Argentina and end his country’s long trophy drought. If not, the forgetting of the failures of Messi and this talented group of players will be long indeed. 
« Last Edit: July 05, 2015, 02:41:03 AM by asylumseeker »
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #798 on: July 06, 2015, 02:14:16 PM »
These guys arrived in total silence. They went from the plane, onto a bus that was waiting on the tarmac, directly to the national team training complex (which is about 2 to 2.5 miles straight shot from the airport). Probably had cars parked there etc. Iz only this afternoon Messi broke his silence in thanking fans for their support. Meanwhile, iz Higuaín taking nuff licks. And I mean, NUFF licks.

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline soccerman

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #799 on: July 06, 2015, 02:21:12 PM »
Did you see the footage of the boy taking a selfie with Messi after the game? Small man had real belly...Messi didn't even budge, it was like he was in another world.
As for Higuain, it will be interesting to see if he'll recover from this. He'll need some time for sure.

Offline Deeks

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #800 on: July 06, 2015, 02:56:40 PM »
Everybody feeling sorry for Messi and Argentina and this socalled title drought. This tournament is 99 yrs and this is the first time Chile win it. As far as Lionel goes, he has time on his side. He is still the best.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #801 on: July 06, 2015, 04:45:06 PM »
Shitong for life.
He miss a penalty in the last game of the season for Napoli too.  A game they needed to win to get in the CL.
CO SIGN! 100% Comes up small in all big games.  Don't know why he even came on in this game. Personally I would have brought on Tevez. But to allow him to take a penalty is criminal.

The last TWO were pks @ Napoli from what I gather.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2015, 04:46:59 PM by asylumseeker »
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #802 on: July 06, 2015, 04:50:35 PM »
Did you see the footage of the boy taking a selfie with Messi after the game? Small man had real belly...Messi didn't even budge, it was like he was in another world.
As for Higuain, it will be interesting to see if he'll recover from this. He'll need some time for sure.

Didn't see that.

Higuaín recovering is one thing. I wonder whether Martino can survive the entire cycle till 2018.


#9950
« Last Edit: July 07, 2015, 04:50:24 AM by asylumseeker »
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline palos

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #803 on: July 06, 2015, 05:20:34 PM »
As far as Lionel goes, he has time on his side. He is still the best.

By some distance.

I go as far to say the best EVER
Carlos "The Rolls Royce" Edwards

Offline pull stones

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Re: 2015 Copa America Thread
« Reply #804 on: July 06, 2015, 10:02:14 PM »
As far as Lionel goes, he has time on his side. He is still the best.

By some distance.

I go as far to say the best EVER
hhmm....... that's debatable to say the least. the best for now yes i am on board, best ever is a different story. you must show me success with club and county in order to claim that title for instance phenomino, winner at barca, real madrid, inter milan, corintians and a world cup title with brazil, he also won two copa america titles. now this man in my humble opinion could easily be counted as the best ever, and even with all his injuries and set backs he still managed to put in work that bore fruit in abundance.

messi has to win something with another club and his national team in order to wear that crown, but for now it will remain on ronaldo's head. messi still has time on his hands to make it happen though.

Offline jai john

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Copa america penalty
« Reply #805 on: June 27, 2019, 09:06:34 PM »
Can anyone explain why gabriel jesus' winming penalty was not retaken ? As far as i am aware he started his run took a step back then continued his run...that is not allowed is it ?

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Copa america penalty
« Reply #806 on: June 28, 2019, 03:36:59 AM »
Can anyone explain why gabriel jesus' winming penalty was not retaken ? As far as i am aware he started his run took a step back then continued his run...that is not allowed is it ?

Is your concern the step back or whether he was in continual motion?

If you compare his kick in Man City colours with the PK in question, you'll see a similar action.

https://youtu.be/5B_mba9VsDg

https://youtu.be/YwokflZM_S0
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Copa America Thread
« Reply #807 on: June 30, 2019, 06:29:18 PM »
jai, yuh make out what went on?
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline soccerman

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Re: Copa America Thread
« Reply #808 on: July 03, 2019, 09:33:42 AM »
Messi can't catch a break. I really want him to win something with Argentina, he deserves that.

Offline ffisback

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Re: Copa America Thread
« Reply #809 on: July 03, 2019, 05:49:45 PM »
Messi is overrated !