November 28, 2022, 06:26:19 AM

Poll

Will a Premiership side save Kenwyne when Cardiff get relegated?

Yes
6 (18.8%)
No
26 (81.3%)

Total Members Voted: 31

Author Topic: Kenwyne Jones Thread  (Read 215824 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 17841
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1560 on: February 09, 2021, 04:36:23 PM »
Shaka to Manchester, Kenwyne to Liverpool and Spurs. Who next ?

Steed Malbranque. Always looked like he was missing from a WANTED poster. LOL @ "that would have lifted his mood a bit".  :rotfl:

Good listen.
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/MB2LQlWVWKU" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/MB2LQlWVWKU</a>

Think of the 2022 conversation regarding reparations as the item tabled for future discussion when initially raised for negotiation during talks in 1834. A lot of intere$t has accrued.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1561 on: June 20, 2021, 06:15:56 PM »
LISTEN: Kenwyne Jones shares his views on Trinidad and Tobago football.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/68mSkCGAsHg" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/68mSkCGAsHg</a>
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline pull stones

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 1782
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1562 on: June 21, 2021, 03:53:05 PM »
kenwin saying the very same thing i've been saying for years on end. these administrators have done nothing for football in 30 years since we lose out on italy, and all they have done ever since is restart a process of going to as many world cups  from U15 to senior both men and womens without planning ahead years in advance and hoping for miracles .

they have created no youth development programs, no financial and marketing strategy, no adequate sponsorship drive, no nothing, just quick fix and vaps applying plasters to chop wounds but no surgery.

Offline AZZURRI

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 1486
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1563 on: June 21, 2021, 10:07:33 PM »
LISTEN: Kenwyne Jones shares his views on Trinidad and Tobago football.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/68mSkCGAsHg" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/68mSkCGAsHg</a>

Wonder why it's suddenly private.....

Offline AZZURRI

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 1486
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1564 on: June 21, 2021, 10:09:11 PM »
kenwin saying the very same thing i've been saying for years on end. these administrators have done nothing for football in 30 years since we lose out on italy, and all they have done ever since is restart a process of going to as many world cups  from U15 to senior both men and womens without planning ahead years in advance and hoping for miracles .

they have created no youth development programs, no financial and marketing strategy, no adequate sponsorship drive, no nothing, just quick fix and vaps applying plasters to chop wounds but no surgery.

he seemed to bring across some good pts, before i was able to check out the full clip as it was taken down

But an aspect that is needed (unless he touched on it later in the clip) is a need for a functioning Player's Assoc.
guys like Kenywne with this much first hand experience in the game can be influential in getting it up and running


Offline Reaper2004

  • Warrior Nation Enforcer
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 921
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1565 on: June 22, 2021, 10:24:17 AM »
LISTEN: Kenwyne Jones shares his views on Trinidad and Tobago football.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/68mSkCGAsHg" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/68mSkCGAsHg</a>

Wonder why it's suddenly private.....

I wondering the same thing cause I wanted my mom to hear what he had to say


Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Kenwyne Jones: Racial abuse from Hispanic teams nothing new
« Reply #1566 on: August 13, 2021, 12:43:45 PM »
Kenwyne Jones: Racial abuse from Hispanic teams nothing new
T&T Express


Former national striker Kenwyne Jones believes it is the responsibility of the heads of CONCACAF and FIFA to stop racism in football.

In conjunction with the Equal Opportunities Commission of Trinidad and Tobago, the TTFA held an online forum to discuss racism in sport on Wednesday.

There, former T&T captain Kenwyne Jones. along with current national goalkeeper Marvin Phillip and defender Alvin Jones, commented on the recent experience at last Month’s CONCACAF Gold Cup, where they faced racial abuse and death threats from Mexican fans.

Having had a collision which injured Mexican star Hirving “Chucky” Lozano, goalkeeper Phillip was personally subject to the abuse. But having had a long run in the T&T team, and having seen it before, keeper Phillip did his best to ignore it.

For defender Alvin Jones it was harder to ignore. Jones was playing for the first time against Mexico and was particularly targeted for abuse on social media because it was his tackle which propelled Lozano head-long into onrushing keeper Phillip, resulting in the Mexican star being injured.

“My family, my mom, my dad, they were worried with the messages,“ Alvin Jones said. “Death threats, messages saying they were on the way to the hotel, and they know the room number. So, it was very hard mentally for me to stay focused.”

The retired Kenwyne Jones has also had his fair share of racial abuse over the years.

“The events that took place at this Gold Cup are nothing new, unfortunately,” stated Jones, the former English Premier League striker.

“Anyone who has played for Trinidad and Tobago in the CONCACAF competitions and FIFA competitions, it is something we are used to encountering, whether we go to Mexico, whether we go to El Salvador or Guatemala. It is something that been happening for years. It goes beyond the realm of sport; it goes beyond the realm of humanity.”

Jones said his experience of racism in sport is not limited to Central and North America.

“Also, in England as well. I’ve had face to face encounters with people, whether it be players, fans, institutions exerting racism,” he said. “Even being retired for a few years, after that match at the Gold Cup, I was still subjected to abuse as well and I was not playing.”

Jones said black players from the Caribbean are conditioned to ignore these types of attacks. However, he feels that the authorities need to act.

“It is a massive measure of ignorance, But saying that, the authorities, the heads of the different confederations, they need to actually put some meaningful measures in place so that it would at least stop at the scene of the crime, so to speak, and then forward from there with education.”

Jones felt that racism extended indirectly to the Mexican players as well.

“Only because of the threat of the match being abandoned, that is when a couple of them understood what was taking place, he explained, “but other than that, they wanted to get on with the game as per usual, because this is something that continuously happens when they play against particularly, the black Caribbean teams.”

Jones added “you don’t have this problem with Mexico and they, when they play against the other international teams on the world stage.”
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1567 on: August 14, 2021, 04:34:43 PM »
Kenwyne opens up on Racism - 'Time to take a stronger stand'

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/S43VNu8iLQ8" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/S43VNu8iLQ8</a>
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Kenwyne gets UEFA coaching license
« Reply #1568 on: September 10, 2021, 07:16:53 AM »
Kenwyne gets UEFA coaching license
T&T Express


KENWYNE ‘KJ’ JONES, the former Trinidad and Tobago and English Premier League striker, is now a certified football coach.

Jones has received both his UEFA A and UEFA B licences. Since ending his playing days in 2017, Jones has had coaching stints with Queen’s Royal College and the National Under-17 team as an assistant to former team-mate Stern John.

“Been a rough time the last 18 months or so, but I must give God glory for his grace, and giving me the strength to go forward and add to my knowledge bank,” Jones commented via Twitter.

“UEFA A and B licensed also a Graduand of the 2020/21 class of the FIFA/CIES/UWI Post Graduate Diploma in Sports Management,“ he added.

A former St Anthony’s College pupil, Jones 36, spent 12 years playing with clubs in England and Wales following his 2004 move from local team W Connection. He played for Premier League sides Stoke City and Sunderland, as well as Sheffield Wednesday, Cardiff City and Bournemouth. At the end of his career, he had a 2016 stint with top Saudi Arabia club Al Jazira, before retiring a year later having played a Major League Soccer (MLS) season with American club Atlanta United.

Jones had 91 caps and scored 23 goals for T&T and was the youngest member of the country’s team which played at the Germany 2006 FIFA Men’s World Cup.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18445
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1569 on: September 10, 2021, 08:52:46 AM »
Great! :thumbsup: :cheers: :salute:

Offline Bourbon

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5209
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1570 on: October 12, 2021, 02:57:57 PM »
Our latest episode of the Trifactor Podcast features Kenwyne Jones.

We got so caught up it needs to be in two parts. Was somewhat reflective given that it was the night before his birthday.

Enjoy, like, share, follow.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/78ZYYeNfTTo&amp;t" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/78ZYYeNfTTo&amp;t</a>
The greatest single cause of atheism in the world today are Christians who acknowledge Jesus ;with their lips and walk out the door and deny Him by their lifestyle. That is what an unbelieving world simply finds unbelievable.

Offline Bourbon

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5209
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1571 on: October 14, 2021, 09:15:18 AM »
Right...so Part two is up and ready! It was a good one indeed.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/Ykq1b7pcDSk" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/Ykq1b7pcDSk</a>
The greatest single cause of atheism in the world today are Christians who acknowledge Jesus ;with their lips and walk out the door and deny Him by their lifestyle. That is what an unbelieving world simply finds unbelievable.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1572 on: October 18, 2021, 04:09:07 PM »
Kenwyne Jones appointed Interim Head Coach of the Trinidad and Tobago Women’s Senior Team
TTFA Communications


The Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) wishes to advise that former Trinidad and Tobago National Senior Men’s Team captain Kenwyne Jones has been appointed as Interim Head Coach of the Senior Women’s National Team.

Jones, a UEFA A Licence holder, will lead the Senior Women’s Team in the two women’s international friendlies against Panama on October 21st and 25th, 2021 at the Ato Boldon Stadium, Couva. He will be supported by Senior Women’s Team Assistant Coach Charlie Mitchell and the current staff.

After consultation with Constantine Konstin, concerning the demands of the women’s international window and personal commitments and conflicts that require him to return to the USA at the end of October, he has mutually agreed to step down and offer Jones and the team support over the international window.

Jones told TTFA Media in an immediate reaction to the appointment, “I’m absolutely delighted and honoured for the opportunity to coach the Women’s team. Hopefully we will be able to achieve the goals set out for the team in this immediate period. I’ll be trying to bring some stability to the squad and to help them focus on the task at hand against Panama.”

Panama will arrive early Wednesday morning and join the Trinidad and Tobago team in a bio-secure environment,at the Home of Football. The matches are being played at 4 pm with the approval of the Ministry of Health.

Jones’ interim appointment will run until 30th November 2021 while the process for the appointment of the long term head coach of the Women’s Team will begin in early November 2021.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1573 on: October 20, 2021, 05:36:22 PM »
President of the Unified Football Coaches of Trinidad and Tobago, Jefferson George, has joined the rest of the football community in congratulating Kenwyne Jones as the interim Senior Women’s Coach. But Jefferson George says the local game will benefit more from an Association, guided by those with expertise in football-centred decision-making.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/1vn6hi5i6xo" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/1vn6hi5i6xo</a>
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1574 on: October 21, 2021, 10:39:28 AM »
United Coaches of T&T backs Women Warriors interim coach Kenwyne Jones
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (T&T Newsday)


JEFFERSON George, president of the Unified Football Coaches of Trinidad and Tobago (UFCTT), supports the appointment of former national men’s captain Kenwyne Jones as interim head coach of the women’s senior team.

Jones was appointed interim coach on Monday and leads the Women Warriors into their first official match in just over two years, against Panama in two international friendlies at the Ato Boldon Stadium in Couva on Thursday and Monday.

The 37-year-old recently received his UEFA A and UEFA B licences and will coach the team until November 30.

Jones replaced Constantine Konstin, who was installed as T&T’s interim coach eight days ago but stepped down owing to personal reasons on Sunday.

Ironically, Konstin’s appointment came on the heels of Welshman James Thomas ditching the team for an assistant coach position in the English women’s pro league.

Thomas resigned on October 6 and served as national women’s coach for just five months without playing a game.

Konstin however, previously served as T&T men’s futsal team coach for the Concacaf Futsal Championships in Guatemala in May. When he was appointed national women’s coach, UFCTT issued a statement calling his selection “absurd” and hit out at the normalisation committee (NC) for “improper technical decisions”.

With Jones now at the helm of women’s football, George believes the ex-national striker has the knowledge and experience to help guide the team in the right direction.

“We will do all we can to support him and we wish him all the best.

“I think he possesses enough quality to make an impact.

“He led the men’s team for quite some time, played successfully in the English Premiership and this current generation of footballers recognises him as one of our most recognisable players.

“Once he gets good results we’re hoping that would open the door for the normalisation committee to begin to see that local coaches can do the job,” George said.

After the two recent coaching snubs by Thomas and Konstin, George said he still has no issue with the hiring of foreign coaches but added that there are several local coaches with similar certification ready to answer the call to serve in a coaching capacity.

Since Jones ended his pro playing career in 2017, he did some coaching with Queen’s Royal College and the T&T Under-17 team as an assistant coach.

George added, “I think that there is some talent there (on the team) and if he (Jones) does well, it opens the way for other local coaches.

“We have no issues with them bringing a foreign coach but it must be a coach who would be able to add something to our football, (who) the local coaches can learn from and create the possibility to gather education from that person.

“Don’t bring someone who their only justification seems to be because they’re not from T&T. That is disrespectful.”

Heading into the Panama friendly double-header, George said it would impossible to judge Jones’ work with the team based on his recent appointment.

The Women Warriors held three training sessions with Jones prior to the opening match.

These two matches will serve as warm-ups ahead of the February 2022 Concacaf women’s qualifiers.

Their last official competitive game was back in October 2019 where they drew 0-0 against the Dominican Republic in Concacaf Women’s qualifying.

George said, “It’s a tough task for him going into his first official game on Thursday.

That is going to be challenging. Not just with the lack of experience but the lack of time to put together the team properly.”

Both friendlies kick off at 3.30pm.

Experienced T&T women’s footballer Kennya Cordner has also been named on a squad of 23 for both matches.

Other senior players announced to the team are former captain Maylee Attin-Johnson, Lauryn Hutchinson and the Forbes sisters – Kimika and Karyn.

T&T Women’s Squad
Kimika Forbes – Unattached, Tenesha Palmer – Unattached, Malaika Dedier - St Augustine FC, Collette Morgan - UTT, Rhea Belgrave - Police FC, Naomie Guerra – Unattached, Liana Hinds – IBV, Anya Decourcy - Roa W, Karyn Forbes - Unattached, Maylee Attin-Johnson - Atlanta Panthers, Lauryn Hutchinson, Maya Matouk - Police FC, Aaliyah Prince - St Augustine FC, Dennecia Prince, Laurelle Theodore - St Augustine FC, Victoria Swift - Club Leon, Raenah Campbell - Avantes Chalkida WFC, Kennya Cordner - Il Sandviken, Chelcy Ralph – Unattached, Adrianna Arjoon – Unattached, Janelle Mcgee - Sacramento FC, Jonelle Cato - Trincity Nationals, Meyah Romeo - Unattached
« Last Edit: October 21, 2021, 10:46:31 AM by Tallman »
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1575 on: October 23, 2021, 11:15:44 AM »
WATCH: Newly appointed T&T Women's Interim Head Coach Kenwyne Jones ready to lift women's football to the top.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/E0bDXp32yhA" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/E0bDXp32yhA</a>
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Jones willing to listen to TTFA offers on coaching future
« Reply #1576 on: November 22, 2021, 07:56:49 PM »
Jones willing to listen to TTFA offers on coaching future
By Jonathan Ramnanansingh (T&T Newsday)


TRINIDAD AND Tobago women’s football team coach Kenwyne Jones will listen to offers made by the TT Football Association (TTFA) concerning the possibilities of his interim contract being extended, or even the offer of becoming the team's full-time coach.

However, the ex-national men’s striker and captain has placed the uncertainty of his coaching role on the backburner and opted to focus solely on the two forthcoming international friendly matches against Dominican Republic, in San Cristobal, on November 26 and 30.

The 2006 FIFA World Cup player was appointed interim coach in mid-October, and his stint is set to expire on November 30.

During Sunday’s squad announcement, the former English Premier League striker said a lot depends on what the TTFA brings to the table.

“I can say that I’m interested in the women’s job because that is what I’m doing at the moment. Depending on what is offered or opened, I’ll have to make a decision there at that time. All other stuff would be figured out afterwards,” he said.

Jones however, will have an event-filled final day as the interim coach as he leads the Women Warriors into battle against Dominican Republic in the second of two friendlies.

“When you’re in anything, you plan for days ahead. In the coming days, we’ll see what is going to come out of the process of hiring a new coach or not. That is left to be seen. The only thing I can focus on now is the two games against Dominican Republic,” he added.

Jones appointment as interim coach came on the heels of two officially appointed coaches – James Thomas from Wales and Constantine Konstin from the United States – stepping down in early October.

Thomas resigned on October 6 for greener pastures in the United Kingdom after just five months in charge. His departure saw former national men’s futsal coach Konstin hired on October 13.

Strangely enough, five days later, a TTFA statement said Konstin decided to “step down” from the post owing to personal commitments.

A few days later, Jones was appointed as interim coach and has since led the Women Warriors to two drawn results – 0-0 (October 21) and 1-1 (October 25) – against Panama at the Ato Boldon Stadium in Couva.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1577 on: November 26, 2021, 12:27:17 PM »
Kenwyne Jones appointed Head Coach of Women’s Senior Team
TTFA Media


The Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) is pleased to announce the appointment of Kenwyne Jones as Head Coach of the Trinidad and Tobago Senior Women’s National Team.

Jones, who took on the role of interim Senior Women’s coach from October 18 to November 30, will now assume full-time responsibility for the team, commencing December 1, 2021, with a nine-month contract that provides him the option to extend his term for a further year, based on the achievement of KPI’s and a successful performance appraisal.

The TTFA’s decision to appoint Jones follows solid 0-0 and 1-1 performances against Panama at the Ato Boldon Stadium in October, the positive atmosphere that he has created within the team, and the improved dynamic between the players and technical staff.

Commenting on his appointment, Jones said:”I’m extremely grateful for the opportunity to continue to work with the staff and players, proud to continue serving my country, and I look forward to helping push the women’s game forward.”

Normalization Committee Chairman Robert Hadad stated: “Kenwyne has done a really good job with the team during his short stint, as was demonstrated on the field against Panama. We had a meeting with him and he was excited with the prospect of continuing his work with the players. I believe the players are equally excited. We have agreed on clear performance targets, which we all hope will be achieved.”

A UEFA A Licence holder, Jones will now take the team into the 2022 CONCACAF W Qualifiers, with games against Nicaragua on February 17, Dominica on February 20, the Turks and Caicos on April 9, and Guyana on April 12, 2022. The top placed team in the Group will qualify to compete in the 2022 CONCACAF W Championships in July 2022.

In preparation for the qualifiers, the National Women’s team will participate in two friendly international matches versus the Dominican Republic on November 26 and 30 in San Cristobal, Dominican Republic.

The match can be viewed today fom 5:00pm via the following link https://youtu.be/jvqQg4r3DcM
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Flex

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 17619
  • A Trini 4 Real.
    • View Profile
    • Soca Warriors Online
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1578 on: November 30, 2021, 12:58:11 AM »
Women Warriors rally around Kenwyne Jones.
By Jelani Beckles (T&T Newsday).


TRINIDAD and Tobago national women’s senior football captain Karyn Forbes is elated Kenwyne Jones is now the full-time coach of the team as the squad could now develop one philosophy after chopping and changing coaches over the past two months.

Forbes said all the players are thankful to have Jones on board as the head coach.

“All the players are excited. We were actually applauding him when he entered the room that day,” Forbes told journalists on Zoom, on Sunday.

“I think Kenwyne being our coach is really exciting because he can impart his knowledge to us and we will be able to grow as a team. The kind of experience he has as a player and now as a coach, holding the licence that he has, without a doubt I am confident that we are going to do well under him.”

Jones, a member of the Soca Warriors 2006 World Cup squad, was hired as interim head coach of the women’s team for the period October 18-November 30.

T&T have had multiple coaches in 2021.

Welshman James Thomas resigned on October 6 after five months on the job. A week later, T&T men’s Futsal coach Constantine Konstin was hired. Five days after Konstin was hired, Jones was announced as interim coach.

On Friday, a TT Football Association media release said, “Jones…will now assume full-time responsibility for the team, commencing December 1, 2021, with a nine-month contract that provides him the option to extend his term for a further year, based on the achievement of KPI’s and a successful performance appraisal.”

The release also said, “The TTFA’s decision to appoint Jones follows solid 0-0 and 1-1 performances against Panama at the Ato Boldon Stadium in October, the positive atmosphere that he has created within the team, and the improved dynamic between the players and technical staff.”

Jones, a UEFA A licence holder, will get his charges ready for the 2022 Concacaf W Qualifiers. T&T will play Nicaragua on February 17, Dominica on February 20, the Turks and Caicos on April 9, and Guyana on April 12, 2022. The top placed team in the group will qualify to compete in the 2022 Concacaf W Championships in July 2022.

Forbes said the team will become a more settled bunch with the confirmation that Jones will be the full-time coach.

“Now we will be able to learn one philosophy and not have multiple coaches…I think it is really imperative that we have Kenwyne going forward.”

Forbes said the team is showing promise ahead of the qualifiers.

“I think our team is progressing great. Of course, a lot of players have not been playing a lot of games, but that is not something that we are totally focused on. We are focusing on now. We have a coach and he is very committed and we are excited to work under him and without a doubt, I believe this is our time and we going to take it very serious in moving forward…we are very thankful for the opportunity to have this staff and we are very positive that things are going to work out for us.”

T&T are now in the Dominican Republic for two friendlies against that country in preparation for the qualifiers. T&T lost the first match 2-1 in San Cristobal, Dominican Republic, on Friday.

The second match will be contested on Tuesday.

Asha James converted a penalty for T&T in the second half on Friday.

James was satisfied she found her name on the score sheet.

“I feel good (about my performance). It’s not a shock to anyone that I should be scoring in these games. I came off a high from West Texas (in the college season) scoring 14 goals and had three assists. It is always a good feeling to have your name on the score sheet despite the loss.”

RELATED NEWS

Jones looks for reaction from his team on Tuesday.
By Walter Alibey (T&T Guardian).


National women's football coach Kenwyne Jones will be hoping for a reaction from his charges on Tuesday when his team takes on the Dominican Republic in the second of two international friendly matches in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic.

In the first game on Friday, the home team delivered a lethal blow in the last minute of the game to pull off a 2-1 triumph, but Jones who was confirmed as the full-time coach of the women's team on the same day, expected to contest the World Cup qualifiers in February next year, told the media via a virtual press briefing that he wants to see a reaction from the players from the training pitch, and not based on what happened in the game.

Jones has been attempting to stamp his philosophy and structure on the squad, which is still stashed with a blend of young and experienced players.

"At the pre-match press conference, I said the Dominican Republic was the perfect matchup to give us a test at this present time. The current indication by the squad is that they did not give us any problem that we did not foresee, I just thought it was a basic lack of discipline within our structure that facilitated the defeat.

"But I am glad it happened now because this is the point where you have to iron out a lot of stuff and gain the consistency needed for the upcoming qualifiers and we do have a lot of time to work on that and get it right.

"First of all, I would like to see a reaction from the team but not as far as the game but as far as today's (Sunday's) training session. We had a lot of analysis done, a lot of team meetings were held to discuss the things we didn't do correctly that we were supposed to.

"I am looking forward to the game, I definitely want to see a reaction from the team, in terms of being tactically disciplined in the way we set out our business. That is the most important thing.

"The good thing is that we have another game against the same opponent to put things right," Jones explained.

The T&T women's team is in Group F of the qualifiers, comprising Guyana, Nicaragua, Dominica and the Turks and Caicos Islands, a group that Jones considers to be manageable. However, his biggest task to date will be to lay down a structure of play that all players will be aware of in time for the qualifiers.

According to the former national striker, turn coach, "At this point in time, we are about 65 to 70 per cent there, but it is important that the core group of them understand the philosophy and structure of our tactical plan going forward. The others are going to come along and possibly in the near future, we will work with them as well because this is not a sprint it's a marathon."

Team captain Karyn Forbes said both she and her team were disappointed with the result last Friday, but they have to stay positive moving forward, saying: "We have to learn from this experience as this is how the game is, sometimes you win and sometimes you lose.

"We have a lot of new players and because of that some things might be repetitive, but as we move forward we will have the right squad and with the right squad we will be able to get things down pact, but right now everything is a learning experience."

Forbes was also high in praise for the confirmation of Jones as their full-time coach, saying they can learn a lot from his wealth of knowledge and the team will now, not have to learn different philosophies.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1579 on: December 24, 2021, 03:02:43 PM »
‘I have to lend my experience’ – In conversation with Kenwyne Jones, Trinidad and Tobago Women's Head Coach
By Chris Brookes (shekicks.net)


The growing list of former Premier League names to take on prominent coaching roles in the women’s game had an intriguing recent addition in Kenwyne Jones. The one-time Sunderland and Stoke City frontman in full flight during his career was a sight to behold, and having taken the reins with Trinidad and Tobago’s national team, he feels a big responsibility to try and help others soar.

Defenders who faced him will attest to how formidable Kenwyne Jones was at his best, and his memorable somersault celebration routine is surely as majestic as the Premier League has seen. While his career in English football, and specifically his seven seasons in the top division, elevated his profile to different levels, the former forward was also part of history being made back home.

Among the first – and to this day, only – Trinidad and Tobago team to qualify for the World Cup, he went on to captain the Soca Warriors later in his career, and by the time he retired at 33, had firmly established himself as one of his nation’s most widely-renowned talents. Four years on from his retirement, he was recently appointed head coach of T&T’s women’s national team, following six weeks in interim charge.

“Well, knowing the story of our women’s national team over the years, they needed stability, I think,” he explains when asked of his initial approach with the players after stepping in. “The story has been a bit of a cringer, in a lot of respects, over the years, but during that period where the coach (James Thomas) left (to become Bristol City women and girls development manager) and the interim coach (Constantine Konstin) didn’t last very long, I did have a conversation with them firstly, giving them my commitment that I would not just walk out and leave.

“In terms of knowing what they need, I think I’ve already known that for some time, representing the country and knowing the ins and outs of our footballing teams, association and that type of stuff. The initial thing was just having a conversation with them first-hand, and basically just showing my commitment to the cause.”

The ex-Southampton and Cardiff City man has signed a nine-month contract, with an option for him to extend for a further year. Constantine Konstin, who had been in charge of the men’s futsal team, had been named interim boss just a few days prior to Jones stepping in, with the Trinidad and Tobago FA citing ‘personal commitments and conflicts that require him to return to the USA at the end of October.’

The Soca Princesses came agonisingly close to reaching the 2015 World Cup, with a pair of near misses at 2014’s Concacaf Women’s Championship in the United States. With three qualification places available at the tournament, a semi-final shootout defeat to Costa Rica was followed two days later by 4-2 extra-time heartbreak against Mexico in the third-place match.

That was the tournament in which they lost just 1-0 to the US in the group opener, when goalkeeper Kimika Forbes in particular earned rave reviews. The team had memorably arrived at their tournament training camp in Dallas with just $500 in expenses, leading then-Houston Dash coach Randy Waldrum, who had only inherited the Trinidad and Tobago team a few weeks earlier, to appeal on Twitter for any available help with food and equipment.

Their final chance to qualify came in the two-legged tie with Ecuador, which brought a packed home attendance of 22,000 to Hasely Crawford Stadium for the decisive second game, as Ecuador netted a stoppage-time winner. In 2018’s qualifying competition, when Jamaica had their history-making moment, T&T did not make it out of an extremely difficult group with the US, Panama and Mexico.

When announcing Jones’ appointment, the option to extend his contract by a further year was supplemented with ‘based on the achievement of KPIs (key performance indicators) and a successful performance appraisal’. With regard to his specific remit, does he understand it to be based on on-field results, or more weighted toward what he can help implement around that?

“Well, I think all of that would be in one. My personal ambition is to first of all get out of the group (in next year’s CONCACAF W Championship qualifiers) and move on to the Women’s Championship, to give them that opportunity to be able to qualify (for the next World Cup).

“I wasn’t given that remit by the association, but that’s my personal ambition, because I think that the time is really right for us to be able to make that step. We’ve had two chances to qualify for the Women’s World Cup before and we just failed at the final hurdle, so being able to take a look at that journey and take the experiences from that, and see how we can best tailor it to the group that we have now.”

Trinidad and Tobago have been among the women’s national teams to historically suffer from insufficient support around them. It is somewhat impossible to build necessary momentum when your team becomes inactive for a prolonged spell.

As Kennya Cordner, the team’s now-returned star forward and leading scorer in Norway’s Toppserien in 2019, said last January: “I’ve been playing a very long time, and under the last administration, I couldn’t stay and play, because they did not care about the women’s program. The last game I played was against Mexico in 2018… I really cannot say what the future holds for me with the national team, but I am willing to go back and help, but only if the right things are in place.”

Such a quote really sums it up – players who want to help and be part of progress, but too often have felt it unworkable. Of course, there is also the overarching plight of the country’s football association, which has long struggled financially and made international headlines last year when FIFA imposed a suspension upon them, thereby preventing its teams from internationally competing.

The game’s governing body had removed the TTFA’s administration and appointed a normalisation committee in March 2020, citing ‘various acts of serious mismanagement’. That decision was contested at the country’s High Court, leading to the FIFA-imposed suspension in September for breach of its statutes. The Court of Appeal later ruled the TTFA had acted unlawfully by appealing to a local court. The suspension was lifted last November after the action against FIFA was withdrawn.

Players who have been there, seen it and lived it helping to shape the future for the better seems an ideal scenario, especially when those players have, like Jones, witnessed life at the highest level. He has spoken previously about the glaring need for improved infrastructure and development for the game in Trinidad and Tobago, with fresh ideas and new life being breathed into the system to ultimately haul the nation into the footballing present.

Having been given an authentic glimpse into the sport’s ‘business’ and all that surrounds it over a number of years, in truth, it would be understandable if he chose to step away permanently when hanging up his boots. Whether it is coaching or another role, though, does the possibility of staying in the game and having a genuine impact stir some passion within him?

“To be honest, I think I have to. As you said, after being involved in football at the highest level, I think it would be a pretty bad thing if I don’t try to help football move forward, especially at home, and in the region itself.

“There’s always room for improvement. As we can see, a lot of places are getting saturated, and a lot of restructuring is always necessary at some point in time, but for me, especially at home, I think I have to lend my experience.

“It’s more like duty, but the passion is there, because I was born, I met football, and I’m going to die and leave football here, but of course you want to see it be able to grow and be in a better place than it was before. We definitely need something like that to happen.”

He not only rubbed shoulders with, but ruffled the feathers of some of the best during his time on the pitch. Ex-Chelsea and England captain John Terry suggested at one point that Jones was the best aerial player in the Premier League – some praise, considering he had Didier Drogba on his side. Liverpool, meanwhile, were trying to push through a deal to bring him to Anfield from Sunderland during Rafa Benítez’ tenure.

As well as Chelsea and Liverpool, his time in the top flight brought goals against Manchester United, Manchester City, Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur (another club who made an approach for him). There was also an FA Cup final appearance for Stoke City in 2011, after he had scored in the Wembley win over Bolton Wanderers in the semi.

To speak only of his physical prowess would be to dismiss a player who could link intelligently and finish, with understanding of multiple positions from playing in midfield, and occasionally at the back, during his development. Growing up, he was already watching football with an analytical eye, down in part to a father who played for leading domestic side Defence Force, and an uncle who was part of the national team’s ‘Strike Squad’ who came so close to reaching the 1990 World Cup.

For T&T at the 2019 CONCACAF (men’s) U-17 Championship, the UEFA A-licenced coach assisted his former teammate Stern John (who went the other way in the 2007 deal that took Jones from Southampton to Sunderland). Having also been an assistant at Queen’s Royal College back home, he embarked upon and completed a post-graduate diploma in sports management when the pandemic put on-field action on hold last year.

Upon his full-time appointment as women’s national team coach, the official announcement cited ‘the positive atmosphere that he has created within the team, and the improved dynamic between the players and technical staff.’ He is excited about taking that on into 2022.

“I think more than anything else, coaching comes with managing personalities. I’ve been in football all my life, and at a national level I’ve captained the team for a number of years, so I’ve had to manage personalities there as well.

“Being on the other side of it now, it’s just about the total preparation that goes into preparing any team on any match day or training day. That is very detailed, and I think I have a great coaching staff.

“I have an assistant coach who’s also a performance analyst, by the name of Charlie Mitchell; he’s involved with Analytics FC, driving force behind Kevin De Bruyne’s massive contract at Man City. I also have James Baird, who’s an ex-Scottish international, played for various teams, and he’s been here in Trinidad and Tobago for some time.

“The players are very resilient, they’re very willing to learn and take things on board. They can only get better on the journey.

“We have our first qualifier in February (v Nicaragua), so we’re working pretty hard to get prepared for that first test. As we speak, we’ve had two games in October (v Panama) and two games in November (v Dominican Republic); we came out with one defeat and three draws so far, but I do think that things are progressing and that we’ll definitely make some strides going forward.”

He is one of two former Sunderland players just recently to take on head coaching duties in the women’s game, with ex-Black Cats loanee Darren Carter becoming interim boss at Birmingham City. Players he came up against in the Premier League, meanwhile, have also taken up positions with FA WSL sides, with Paul Konchesky assistant at West Ham United, Frédéric Piquionne doing likewise at Everton, and Emile Heskey the head of women’s football development at Leicester City.

In no small part, the experiences, good and bad, that a player had with their managers are taken into their own coaching careers. Jones spent time working under the likes of Roy Keane, ex-Barcelona boss Gerardo Martino, Steve Bruce, Harry Redknapp, Tony Pulis, Mark Hughes, Ole Gunnar Solskjær and Eddie Howe. He considers what got the best out of him from a manager.

“For me, I think my most disappointing times or mental states were when you had dishonesty from managers, and I had that a lot. Dishonesty from, to me, just human beings at the end of the day.

“I’m the type of character where, if you tell me the situation, I can understand it and I can adapt to suit, but dishonesty is something that I don’t regard at all. I try to be that to my players, to be as honest as I possibly can, about any situation.

“I think people respect that more, ‘this is the situation, this is how I’m gonna deal with it’, because I think that helps the person determine what type of characteristic they’re going to portray. Whether or not they’re going to fight, work harder, or just crumble under the circumstance, because football is just like life.

“You meet situations that you have to work around, where you might crumble or get stuck. It’s a ball of different experiences, so the most I can do, which I try to deliver to every single person that I come into contact with, is honesty.”

He shared a couple of years ago how he had been enjoying taking a step back from the relentless machine of football, finding joy in simple moments like taking his children to school in the morning. For someone who felt the rush of scoring in front of big and sometimes mammoth crowds, the adulation of supporters along the way, and having his name sung from his sensational loan at Sheffield Wednesday through the majority of his career, does he miss anything now about playing?

“Absolutely not; I think I lived that life to the fullest. Of course, you might sit back and think ‘what if this move happened?’ and that type of stuff, but at the end of the day, I always believe that things go as they’re supposed to, and it went like that for me.

“Being the person that I am, and being involved in football in the way that I have, it’s difficult for me to sit down and actually enjoy a football match as a fan, because I see the game differently. I understand the things that happen behind the scenes every day before you go and play a match.

“For the rest of the world, it’s entertainment, you get to sit and enjoy a game of football and watch your team win, but I know all the hard work and details that go into that, so it’s really difficult for me to sit down and watch football as a fan, really and truthfully. I think now, I look more at coaches and team set-ups, and that analyst point of view, pretty much.”

As we bid farewell to 2021, those CONCACAF W Championship qualifiers are a mere eight weeks from getting underway. Coming out on top in their group will take them to the Championship itself, and while it still seems some way off at present, plotting a route to the World Cup in Australia and New Zealand in 2023 is of course the ultimate aim. Twice in a lifetime for Jones to be at the heart of history for his country’s football would be quite something.

He has been happily restored to sunnier climes in recent years, but could he see himself one day returning to coach or manage, on the men’s or women’s side, at one of his old clubs in the UK?

“Oh, wow, you’re putting me on the spot with that question! You know, I don’t know what the future holds.

“If an opportunity like that arises, of course I’m going to go through it and see how best it serves myself and my family, but I’m also not being biased towards anything. Coaching is a long career, but it’s just about taking it one step at a time.

“I’ll see what tomorrow brings.”
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Kenwyne Jones interview: Seven steps in a Wednesday wonderland
« Reply #1580 on: December 31, 2021, 12:14:35 AM »
Kenwyne Jones interview: Seven steps in a Wednesday wonderland
By Christian Brookes (beatsandrhymesfc.com)


He lined up for his nation at their very first World Cup, played his club football in five countries, and for a time, was soaring high in elite company in the Premier League. Somewhere amongst it all, though, Kenwyne Jones can still hear the sound of a buoyant, wintry Hillsborough serenading him.

Many a defender struggled to keep Kenwyne Jones at arm’s length when the Trinidad and Tobago international was at his formidable best. It became widely recognised across his seven seasons in the Premier League, but his majestically-executed somersault celebration had its introduction to English football some two divisions lower, and in a time that he will never quite forget.

That first viewing followed a volley from outside the box for Sheffield Wednesday against Walsall, as a drop of Caribbean class warmed a frosty Hillsborough on Boxing Day 2004, with almost 27,000 exactly in attendance. When people summarise the former Sunderland and Stoke City man’s career, that loan spell is mostly overlooked from the outside, but there are reasons why a player who regularly went up against some of the best around in later years always kept seven games in League One close to his heart.

Despite having already played for his national team, the Southampton youngster was, as yet, unknown in senior football in England, yet to make any appearances, but the goals flowed at Wednesday as if he was an accomplished old campaigner. In all sorts of ways, though, this was really the beginning for the 20-year-old, including the first time that he heard a club’s supporters singing his name – ‘Kenwyne Jones, my lord, Kenwyne Jones…’

“Yeah, it was actually, and to be honest with you, I hold Wednesday so close to my heart, because it’s my first introduction into competitive league football,” he recalls with a smile. “It was my first loan stint, and I took to the people at the club at the time really, really closely.”

“I’m happy even now to see Darren Moore being the manager. Lee Bullen I still talk to often, but I have an affinity with the club and it’s something that I’ll never let go.

“It was my first opportunity and we did well for each other at that point in time. Of course, the fans of Wednesday, I love them to bits, even though every time I played them after that, I scored!

“But at the same time, that respect and that love for Wednesday is something that will never leave.”

Although he might quite conceivably have carved out the same stature of career regardless, timing and opportunity are everything in football, and his spell in S6 elevated him in the minds of many, with a stunning record of seven goals in seven games. A top-division side just four years earlier, gloom and decline had since been so consistent at Wednesday that they probably merited a Player of the Year award or two.

In the month prior to Kenwyne’s arrival, though, something had just begun to spark under the stewardship of new boss Paul Sturrock, before starting December with back-to-back home losses. Long-term injury to Adam Proudlock, who had just been showing the most promise of his Owls career, brought the need for reinforcement up front.

Enter Kenwyne, and from a debut goal and assist for Steve MacLean in the 4-0 South Yorkshire derby win at Doncaster Rovers, he and Wednesday shared a whirlwind romance over the next few weeks.

“First of all, before I went up there, I was down at Southampton, the sun was coming out still, it wasn’t bad weather. When I took that opportunity to move to Wednesday, I think the drive was like four-and-a-half hours, got up there to the hotel, and the very next morning, when we had training, snow fell, and I was like ‘my goodness’.

“It wasn’t heavy, it was just trickling down, and I was thinking ‘this is not so bad’, but it started off one of the worst periods of my life for weather! Obviously, that didn’t show when it came to playing the game.

“The fans taking to me, I had my song with them and that is something that sticks with me, I was happy to hear that. It’s obviously the first experience that I had of that, and like I say, it’s something that I’ll hold dear to my heart until the day I die.”

His attributes would regularly trouble – and earn praise and respect from – leading Premier League defenders in future seasons, notably including Chelsea’s John Terry, but Wednesday fans were the first to see it in action. For an untried youngster, he was brushing various experienced opponents aside. Current Norwich City boss (and ex-Owls captain) Dean Smith was among those left sprawling, against Port Vale, while he even beat 6-foot-7 international teammate Dennis Lawrence in the air for one of his two goals against Wrexham!

In the days where fan forums were football’s social media, Wednesday supporters were left to piece together the limited information that was available at that time on their new signing, with midfielder, forward and even defence listed as his positions. While he had played a great deal up front beforehand, it is not inaccurate to say that this was the spell that properly cemented him as a specialist striker in England.

“Well, the thing is, I’ve always been a midfielder/striker. For a little stint with my senior national team and youth teams, I played defence, so I was very versatile in those positions.

“The reason why it happened (playing striker at Wednesday) is because Paul Sturrock obviously became the manager there after leaving Southampton, but while he was at Southampton, we had training matches and would be involved with the first team, and I would always score, playing up front. I think the thing that solidified it for them was we had a training match one day and I scored four.

“That’s why for Wednesday, and for the task they had ahead, he reached out and said ‘I’ll take you on loan for a month and you come and enjoy football’. I’m like ‘hell yeah, I’m happy to come’, because I came to the country to play football.

“I was playing reserve football for Southampton a lot, so I was really, really happy for that.”

While promotion still seemed a very distant dream at this point, this was the time when Wednesday began to arrive in the conversation. It was far from a sprint to the finish – even the play-off final had to be hauled back from the brink of a Hartlepool United win – but the Class of ’05 would indeed go down as heroes, one May afternoon in Cardiff.

The impact of Kenwyne’s goals on the points tally, in a spell of five wins and two draws, was obvious – he was even joint-third top scorer for the club that season – though so too was the lift of energy he brought to the place. There were gleeful celebrations with Jon Paul McGovern in particular, the Scottish winger who became a fan favourite that year, ever-present, and ultimately, pivotal in promotion.

“Yeah, JP’s my boy! We had a really good relationship.

“Also, Chris Brunt was there, I had (Paul) Heckingbottom as well, Lee Bullen. I think after my debut against Doncaster, where I had an assist and a goal, everything was relaxed, because you’re getting a loan player, most of the players had never heard of me before, it’s a new situation, and our first game’s a derby.

“We won that game 4-0, and having that type of debut, I think it relaxed everything, and we just had a fantastic relationship from then. I value that experience so highly in my career, and my life.

“I was a little bit sour that I didn’t get to go back after the month, I guess that Southampton wanted to get me at a higher division (to Stoke on loan in the Championship), but I always look back on Sheffield Wednesday and think of it as one of my homes.”

Out of all the games he played either for or against the club, there were only three he did not score in: the last game of his Owls stint (against Bournemouth), for Cardiff City in September 2014, and in April 2015 for Bournemouth, where he helped Eddie Howe’s side seal promotion to the Premier League. Seven goals in seven games for the Owls, and six in seven against – so that settles it…he really was that bit better in a Wednesday shirt!

“If I’m being honest, the moments when I scored, especially at Hillsborough, it was like ‘okay, well, I’ve just scored, and that’s that’. I think within myself, I was very respectful.

“Sometimes I would sit back and laugh, thinking ‘how uncanny is this that every time I play against Wednesday, whether it be home or away, I’m always scoring?!’ Some people might think of it as a curse or whatever, but for me, it was never a joyous moment, so scoring against them was not something that put me over the top in terms of emotions, at all.”

For the fans not fortunate enough to have had the early-to-mid-90s, or the best from decades gone by, 2004/05 grew into the first time Wednesdayites really had something to properly be proud of, instead of brief flickers in the darkness. Kenwyne had his own little part, a spectacular cameo, in that reawakening.

The rumours of him returning to the club thereafter were never too far away, even a full decade on while at Cardiff, but were the wheels ever genuinely in motion at any point?

“I don’t know, I don’t know. If they ever did (make an approach), it never really got to me.

“I wish it did happen, because I would have loved to go back and play in front of the Owls one more time, because like I say, that place holds a very special place in my heart.”

He continued on his rise, making the kind of career he had set out to do when leaving home for England. The 15 he wore at Wednesday would later become his squad number at Southampton, and for Trinidad and Tobago in the 2006 FIFA World Cup, as he started against England in front of a worldwide audience.

Almost as worthy as that, and the seven seasons he played in the Premier League, were feats such as appearing as an answer on BBC’s Pointless, next to the likes of Grace Jones and Robert Smith of The Cure, no less. Quiz shows apart, music has come into his journey in various ways and is a valued part of his life, not to mention the fact that three-time Grammy winner Ludacris welcomed him to Atlanta United on Twitter after he signed in 2016.

With his link to Trinbagonian artists, plus the sway that footballers can have when it comes to making inroads into other industries, has Kenwyne ever been involved in music in any way?

“I haven’t, but I have some friends that do music, and sometimes I might sit in a studio session with them and I might just make an inference on something, but I like to leave that up to the professionals! I’ve never really ventured into doing that, but I love to listen and to understand, and I think I have a good knack for when things might be hits, or if a production is right, that type of thing.

“I’m not saying I’m a genius or anything like that, but just based on how I listen to artists and songs.”

Having captained Trinidad and Tobago during his career, he feels a duty to help elevate the game back home wherever possible, and recently became women’s national team head coach. His strength of feeling also runs deep for their music, which is of course synonymous with T&T as a nation.

“Soca music, that’s my first love. Reggae music/dancehall, I also listen to rap/hip-hop, and some of what you might call classical.

“I listen to everything, to be honest, so things like your Ed Sheeran, and my number-one r&b artist of all-time is Sade, and Toni Braxton. Soca artists, I love all of them, because that’s our music, it’s something that I’m very proud of.

“Reggae also, it’s part of our Caribbean community, but it’s also something that I grew up on, having been influenced by a lot of that. I’m a world music lover, actually; different things to different moods.”

His ex-Soca Warriors teammates Shaka Hislop and Carlos Edwards have featured on here previously, with former Newcastle United and West Ham goalkeeper Hislop telling how Brent Sancho would often lead the way as dressing-room DJ. Kenwyne also recalls the former Gillingham and Dundee defender being part of a lyric-laden tradition they shared.

“With Brent, there was a group of us, and according to our genre of music, we used to sing, and it’s sort of like a freestyle. It’s something called extempo, and we used to do that a lot within the team environment, back from matches, on the way to matches, training.

“That was the type of atmosphere we would have going along in the national team.”

He did, on occasions in his career, take the pre-game playlist reins himself, though he hasn’t quite taken it to professional levels since he stopped playing, like his old Sunderland teammate Djibril Cissé. He laughs as he pauses to try and remember the first music he ever bought.

“That’s a long time ago! I had CDs I used to buy all the time; reggae, dancehall, soca, hip-hop, I bought everything.

“When artists that you know came out, to dive in and see what they’re about, I’d go out and I’d buy their stuff and listen to their album repeatedly. Maybe like ten times, because I like to hear the production in music, the different sounds and that type of stuff, apart from the artist’s lyrics and voice.

“I like to see how music comes together and how it’s produced, so I listen to stuff deeply, over and over and over again.”

Signed during Roy Keane’s tenure, his three years at Sunderland included goals against Manchester United and Manchester City (both twice), as well as Chelsea and Arsenal. Besides playing in an FA Cup final (scoring at Wembley against Bolton Wanderers in the semi), his first full season at Stoke City (2010/11) saw him on target in games with Tottenham Hotspur and Liverpool (two clubs who made attempts to sign him in his career), plus Arsenal, Everton and others.

When at the top of his form, the ever-popular term ‘unplayable’ was used by fans and pundits alike. Whether it is football or music, to see a performer going into their respective arena, entertaining and bringing joy, is an undoubted privilege (even if you had to pay handsomely for it!).

For Kenwyne, there have been many times when he has reveled in swapping centre-stage for a watching brief.

“I’ve been to a Rick Ross concert that stood out, and what was most amazing for me was the fact that how his voice sounded on his records and production, it sounded exactly like that at the live concert. I’m talking about him performing it, not the song playing in the background with his voice; that is something for me that is really important for an artist.

“Also, Beres Hammond, he is a legend and that was amazing. Buju Banton, that was amazing for me.

“Damian Marley and Nas, they did their tour in the UK and I went to that concert. Also, Chronixx was ridiculous; I saw him in Atlanta.

“I went to a Drake concert, and at the time, I had some mixed feelings about it! Because at the end, he was doing some shoutouts to melody for half-an-hour/45 minutes, and me and my missus were like ‘come on Drake, bang out the rest of the hits!’”

Given his pick of any artist or group from all-time to see perform, one of his aforementioned favourite acts, whose understated yet legendary, soul-centred allure has resonated with millions for decades, would win out for Kenwyne over any departed greats.

“The only concert that I desperately want to see is Sade, that’s my number one of all-time. I like live performances more than the song or the video playing, because it’s for me when you see the true nature of an artist.

“Let’s say Chronixx, for instance. How a song is put together is totally different to how it would be on one of his records, so you would add a lot of soundbites from other songs, but totally be able to slip that in and make it like a new mix, of whichever song he’s singing; he’s totally amazing at that.

“Damian Marley and Stephen Marley are two that I listen to heavily. I kind of grew up a lot on Damian Marley, from the first day that I was able to see his video on TV, and I was able to meet him after that concert with him and Nas, which was amazing.”

As well as Sunderland, Stoke and Cardiff, he recalls having to sing when he first stepped up to the senior national team, for whom he made his debut at just 17. In another of the regular questions on here, he is asked which teammate(s) from his career he would call upon to collaborate with him, if he ever found himself heading to the studio to record a song cover.

“Absolutely none! Actually, no, there’s one person I would record a cover track with…actually two: Daryl Murphy and Andy Reid.

“Daryl can sing and Andy could play a guitar. I remember at one of our Christmas dos at Sunderland, we went to Leeds one night, and the next night to Manchester; he had his guitar and they were going off for a few hours!

“So, them two, I’d definitely do that with.”

Crossing paths with musically-blessed Irishmen aside, his time in England – and Wales – brought a lot into his life. It would be far wrong to paint those years as nothing but positive; he certainly saw the other sides of the industry that surrounds the game. Dishonesty from managers at times was one aspect that disillusioned him, which he says he is now out not to replicate in his own coaching career.

Some of the highs he had, nevertheless, were magnificent. This year marked the 15th anniversary of that very first World Cup for Trinidad and Tobago, the experience of which at just 21 years of age stands today as one of the proudest accomplishments in his life.

At this time 17 years ago, meanwhile, he was in the midst of his Sheffield Wednesday adventure, with the goals quickly starting to stack up. Announcing his retirement in November 2017, he says he does not miss playing today, feeling he ‘lived that life to the fullest’.

Is it only since he stepped away, though, that he has been able to take in the true impact that his goals and certain moments he was part of gave to people?

“When you call out the years like that, it seems such a lifetime ago, but like you say, it’s only probably a year or two after you retire that I started soaking in the things that I did. Coming from Trinidad and Tobago and playing professional football, plus playing on the international stage, it’s only at that time that little moments start to sink in.

“I mean, when I go to different places in our region and you’re recognised, you understand how much you probably impacted people’s lives. That’s something that I’m grateful for, and I never set out to do that, but I’m grateful that my career had that type of impact, and hopefully by what I’m involved in now, we can have that impact on someone else, in a positive way that will help them to go on and achieve their best.”

At the very forefront of those current endeavours for the UEFA A-licenced coach is, as alluded to, looking to lend his experience to the women’s national team, following his official appointment late last month. The dream of a historic World Cup qualification is there all over again.

The UK chapter of his career drew to a close in 2016, as he initially joined United Arab Emirates side Al Jazira on loan from Cardiff, before signing for Atlanta United for their inaugural Major League Soccer season. He also went back home to turn out for Central FC on loan, ahead of Atlanta beginning play.

One of the great unseen and unappreciated parts of football is the sacrifice of long spells away from family, and the moments that can be missed for those who are parents. Grateful to have now returned home, Kenwyne, who became a father before his career in England even started, spoke a couple of years ago about savouring being able to take his children to school since he retired from playing.

As we end here, the Stadium of Light’s ‘Caribbean king’ is named in one more team line-up, though he won’t even have to leave his seat for this one. The regular closing question to these interviews over the years has seen the interviewee asked to suggest a small-sided team, made up not of the ‘best’ players they played alongside, but simply some examples of those they would relish getting out there again with. Over to you, Mr. Jones…

“I’d love to play with Darren Bent. I would say Anders Svensson.

“Gareth Bale. Nathan Dyer.

“How many’s that? I would say…Fábio da Silva.

“I have some more but I’ll probably blurt out about ten teams!”
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 17841
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1581 on: April 05, 2022, 04:49:03 AM »
Kudos to KJ on advocating for an international match in Tobago. :applause:

Other than that, he is also to be commended for stabilizing the ship and bringing thoughtful and broad perspective to his role. What's needed is for the media covering the WNT to match his stride.
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/MB2LQlWVWKU" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/MB2LQlWVWKU</a>

Think of the 2022 conversation regarding reparations as the item tabled for future discussion when initially raised for negotiation during talks in 1834. A lot of intere$t has accrued.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 24571
    • View Profile
Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1582 on: November 04, 2022, 10:33:19 PM »
Played for Both: Former Sunderland and Cardiff Striker Kenwyne Jones
By Christopher Nicholson (si.com)

Born in Point Fortin in Trinidad and Tobago, Jones Jones attended St. Anthony's College, which he attended with fellow future Black Cats teammate Carlos Edwards.

Jones started his football career in his homeland for TT Pro League team Joe Public. He then moved to W Connection, also in the TT Pro League, where he spent two years.

In 2008 during an interview with Simon Bird, Jones explained that he spent months in 2004 touring Europe looking for a club or face a career in the Trinidad army.

"I was on the road for three and a half months travelling round Europe, spending two weeks in different places having trials.

"It was hard because I'd just had my son and it was make it - or join the army."

Jones stated he had trials at several British clubs including Manchester United, West Ham, Southampton and Rangers. "I went to Rangers and Southampton and had trials with Manchester United and had my photo taken with Roy Keane, West Ham and went over to Holland."

In the interview we also found out the origin of that flipping (yes, I've used the pun again) good celebration. As Jones explains, it was his football-playing Uncle Philbert that inspired him.

"My dad and uncle played football and they became quite famous, and I liked that. My uncle did back flips and he inspired me to do that.

"I was about seven and I saw him doing doing some sit-ups and, bang, just like that, out of nowhere he did a back flip. Most incredible thing I ever saw!

"I wanted to do it. I played in school tournaments at the age of 13 and the first time I scored did the back flip. I scored, ran to the corner and just flipped over.

"Everyone stood back, they'd never seen it before, and that was the start of it."

Jones got his chance in July 2004 when he signed for Southampton for a nominal fee. After a couple of impressive loans spells at Sheffield Wednesday and Stoke City, Jones returned to Southampton.

That proved to be his breakthrough at Southampton, and he scored and impressive 16 goals in during the 2006-07 season as the Saints Southampton reached the Championship play-offs.

Interest in Jones' services quickly emerged, and it was rumoured that Derby wanted to sign him. Upon hearing this Jones, submitted a transfer request and reportedly went on 'strike' until an exit could be engineered.

It never materialised, but he soon got his move in August 2007 when Jones signed for Sunderland in a reported £6 million deal with countryman Stern John going the other way.

Jones made his Sunderland debut against Manchester United on the 1 September however he couldn't help the team escape a 1-0 defeat. Two weeks later Jones scored his first goal for Sunderland as the Black Cats beat Reading 2-1 at the Stadium of Light.

An impressive start to his career at Sunderland attracted a lot of interest in Jones. In November 2007 it was rumoured that Liverpool were set to sign Jones in £12 million deal with Peter Crouch coming to the Black Cats (one of many times Crouch was been linked with a move to Wearside).

As we know, that never happened. However only a month later Jones was linked with moves to Liverpool (again) and Chelsea. Black Cats boss Roy Keane was quick to quash the rumours stating Jones would be going nowhere. However, things were about to change dramatically for the striker, and not in a good way.

In June 2008, Jones suffered a horrific injury which kept him out for around five months. He was playing a post-season friendly for Trinidad and Tobago against England, and he collided with Three Lions stopper David James. It left his knee in tatters, and he was never quite the same ever again.

Jones returned to first team action as a substitute against local rival Newcastle, helping the team to a 2-1 win over their rivals.

More links to other clubs still came, with Jones was linked with a move to Tottenham. However, those links were put to bed when he signed a new four-and-a-half-year contract with the Black Cats.

Jones ultimately scored 28 goals for Sunderland in his 101 appearances, and some of them were flipping good (I had to squeeze it in again - the last time I promise). One goal that comes to mind was a cracking 22-yard curler against Wolves on 27 September 2009.

Jones eventually left Sunderland on 11 August 2010 when he signed for Stoke for a club record fee of £8 million. He signed a four-year deal taking a pay cut to make sure the move went ahead.

Jones spent four seasons at Stoke racking up 28 goals across 117 appearances before he exited for this weekend's opponents Cardiff.

While at Cardiff Jones spent time on loan at Bournemouth and Al Jazira. He left Cardiff permanently in 2016 when on 15 July, moving across the Atlantic to join newly formed MLS side Atlanta United.

He spent one season at Atlanta, during which he had a six-game loan spell at TT Pro League side Central. Jones left Atlanta when he was traded by the club to Kansas City, although he never actually made an appearance for them before retiring.

During his 18-year career, Jones had an excellent international career where he scored an impressive 23 goals across 90 caps. This included two goals in the 2006 FIFA World Cup qualifiers.

His involvement in the world cup earned him the Chaconia Medal (Gold Class) which is the second highest state decoration in Trinidad and Tobago.

Jones is still very much involved in football, he is currently the manager of the Trinidad and Tobago women's national team, a role he has held since October 2021.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.