July 05, 2020, 03:31:04 AM

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Will a Premiership side save Kenwyne when Cardiff get relegated?

Yes
6 (18.8%)
No
26 (81.3%)

Total Members Voted: 31

Author Topic: Kenwyne Jones Thread  (Read 173278 times)

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Offline palos

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1530 on: February 12, 2018, 06:26:13 PM »
 ;D ;D
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Offline Flex

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1531 on: September 23, 2018, 12:15:42 AM »
Kenwyne is now QRC's assistant coach.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Mad Scorpion a/k/a Big Bo$$

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1532 on: September 24, 2018, 08:45:27 AM »
Kenwyne is now QRC's assistant coach.



Make sense he would go back and work with Grovy! QRC yutes in line to learn (if they can absorb it) how to be a true aerial threat.

Offline lefty

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1533 on: September 24, 2018, 12:25:30 PM »
wish him well....hope he brings all the good things that he learned in his outside experience to his coaching.....the foreign best practices never seems to come back with the ones that had that privilege 
I pity the fool....

Offline soccerman

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1534 on: June 05, 2019, 12:14:53 PM »

Offline Tallman

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1535 on: November 30, 2019, 10:40:15 AM »
WATCH: Former Premier League and Trinidad and Tobago forward Kenwyne Jones goes in-depth on his career as captain and player from U-15 level, the highs and lows of his career in the T&T uniform, his days in the Premiership, U-17 and 2006 World Cup experiences and where he sees football heading for the Twin-Island Republic.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/nqQds7kVUPQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/nqQds7kVUPQ</a>
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Offline Tallman

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Kenwyne gives the ‘Thumbs’ up to Wallace in new role as TTFA President
« Reply #1536 on: November 30, 2019, 12:43:39 PM »
Kenwyne gives the ‘Thumbs’ up to Wallace in new role as TTFA President
TTFA Media


Former Trinidad and Tobago captain and English Premiership striker Kenwyne Jones has given his blessing and vote of confidence to newly elected Trinidad and Tobago Football Association President William Wallace.

Jones, now retired from playing after 82 international appearances in which he scored 23 goals for T&T, made a brief stop at the TTFA head office on Thursday to see Wallace.

“Of course there is hope because what you are going to get from him is integrity, honesty in his words and actions. So for him I can speak or put my trust in that he would be who I know him to be. Of course he is in a situation where he will have other people to answer to, other people’s ideas to take on board, those who supported him, what ever the case is and they will have to come up with the best plan for Trinidad and Tobago and Trinidad and Tobago football,” Jones told TTFA Media on Thursday.

“But I do believe he is a person, from actually having that experience with him and not being a person reading the news or having that over the fence look of what’s going on in the yard, I know he is going to be himself and put forward those qualities that I know him to have. That in itself for me personally will bring a lot of hope.

“As a man of experience administratively, he has his know how and of course there are things he is going to learn because he is now in a higher position that is going to involve him a little bit deeper in administration in CONCACAF, CFU, FIFA and he is going to have stuff that he will learn along the way. But at the same time I believe he will bring a sort of calming, cohesive, functional administrative framework to the federation and I am happy for that because it is something we have needed for quite a long time,” said the former Sunderland and Stoke City forward.

Jones touched on his experience playing under Wallace as a team manager when he served the team which went on to qualify for two consecutive CONCACAF Gold Cup quarter finals in 2013 and 2015 as well as finish runners up in two Caribbean Cups.

“I think it was fantastic between the technical staff and the other staff and players, we had such a great understanding, bond, moving forward,” Jones said.

“For the entire team and that’s including staff also I think we were going through the same issues. It wasn’t a situation of the coach and members of the technical team and the other staff members being taken cared of and the players not being taken cared of or the players being taken cared of and the technical team not being taken cared of.

“We were all in the same boat having the same frustrations, things not happening for us and what we had in that time in William Wallace as a manager… he fought for everything. Of course he would have a complaint or players or technical staff would have a complaint concerning different things, and he would listen and he would definitely put his best foot forward in trying to achieve if not the exact thing, but as close as possible to it.

“What I thought of him is he was honest in his actions, in his efforts and delivery. He would not sell you dreams because we were all familiar with the situations that we would encounter in future days and dealing with presently. Whatever we proposed to do or get he would go in and try his hardest to deliver. In the end he was not just delivering for one or two, he was delivering for everyone. I believe him to be in my experience, a man of integrity and a man of his word. Having him as a manager was one of the smoothest periods amidst the “bocas” we had as a team. I know that experience will stand him well in the future,” Jones added.
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Offline soccerman

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1537 on: November 30, 2019, 11:39:53 PM »
Very good KJ interview, he opened up and was honest about his experiences throughout his career. He was really getting into the downfall of the team with the last administration change and I wished Shaun had asked more questions into that period because it looked like he had some things to say. Overall I enjoyed it :beermug:

Offline Tallman

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Kenwyne Jones to coach at Atlantic camp
« Reply #1538 on: December 12, 2019, 06:03:40 AM »
Kenwyne Jones to coach at Atlantic camp
T&T Guardian


Some 50 pri­ma­ry school foot­ballers from across the na­tion will get the op­por­tu­ni­ty to hone their skills un­der re­tired na­tion­al and in­ter­na­tion­al foot­baller Ken­wyne Jones at the At­lantic Foot­ball De­vel­op­ment Camp from De­cem­ber 14-15 at the Hase­ly Craw­ford Sta­di­um, Port-of-Spain.

Camp par­tic­i­pants will in­clude the top-per­form­ing boys and girls from the re­cent­ly-con­clud­ed At­lantic Na­tion­al Pri­ma­ry Schools Foot­ball League. The young foot­ballers will be guid­ed through tech­ni­cal drills and ex­er­cis­es such as drib­bling, pass­ing and con­trol, all of which will cul­mi­nate in two match­es at the end of each day.

The ath­letes will al­so ben­e­fit from spe­cial life skills ses­sions aimed at build­ing con­fi­dence and self-es­teem. Jones will al­so lead ses­sions to share in­sights from his ca­reer and life lessons he has learned.

The camp is part of At­lantic’s com­mit­ment to de­vel­op­ing the T&T’s youth through sports.

Re­cent­ly, the LNG pro­duc­er staged the fifth an­nu­al At­lantic Track and Field De­vel­op­ment Camp fa­cil­i­tat­ed by At­lantic Sports Am­bas­sadors Richard Thomp­son, Keshorn Wal­cott, Jereem Richards and Khal­i­fa St Fort.
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Offline Tallman

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Offline maxg

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1540 on: December 20, 2019, 09:47:53 PM »
Good analysis by KJ.

Offline Tallman

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1541 on: February 12, 2020, 03:18:18 PM »
LISTEN: Former Trinidad and Tobago Captain Kenwyne Jones discusses:

- His time at Sheffield Wednesday and Southampton
- Working with Roy Keane at Sunderland
- Having his dream move to Liverpool scuppered by Steve Bruce
- THAT incident at Stoke
- Playing for Tata Martino and Leo Beenhakker
- Coaching the Trinidad and Tobago Men's U-17 Team

https://audioboom.com/posts/7502094-interview-with-kenwyne-jones
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Offline Sam

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1542 on: February 12, 2020, 03:32:09 PM »
If Kenwyne Jones wants to be good, he can be de best thing on de field but if he not interested, he is f00cking Tata like he Atlanta coach name.

He had everything to be de best thing we ever had, but de f00cker too lazy.

He would have been a great athlete because he built for it, not football, too lazy and uninterested.

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Offline frico

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1543 on: February 12, 2020, 03:49:54 PM »
If Kenwyne Jones wants to be good, he can be de best thing on de field but if he not interested, he is f00cking Tata like he Atlanta coach name.

He had everything to be de best thing we ever had, but de f00cker too lazy.

He would have been a great athlete because he built for it, not football, too lazy and uninterested.


I met a bloke from the North East and as usual started talking football,I couldn't wait to ask his opinion about KJ,his response was,KJs name up here is "The plank".

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1544 on: February 15, 2020, 07:48:37 AM »
LISTEN: Former Trinidad and Tobago Captain Kenwyne Jones discusses:

- His time at Sheffield Wednesday and Southampton
- Working with Roy Keane at Sunderland
- Having his dream move to Liverpool scuppered by Steve Bruce
- THAT incident at Stoke
- Playing for Tata Martino and Leo Beenhakker
- Coaching the Trinidad and Tobago Men's U-17 Team

https://audioboom.com/posts/7502094-interview-with-kenwyne-jones

Excellent interview.

It produced the sort of responses and reflections I've always hoped some local media outlets and some local questioners could elicit, but typically fall short of accomplishing in non-written format.

One reason that comes to mind is that the person questioned was permitted to speak and the interviewers actually listened rather than interrupted. The other takeaway is that the questions represented knowledge of the player ... not uninformed randomness and vooping.  Third,  superficial or ingratiating  questions were not on the table. Of course the amount of time allocated to the interview helped ... rather than stuffing everything into a smaller segment.

There are still a lot of questions that could be asked of Kenwyne. Whoever is up next should deal with the case refining the above. He's an engaging subject.  Easily underutilized in branding TTO.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2020, 07:51:35 AM by asylumseeker »
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Offline Tallman

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Big man, huge talent...On his day, Kenwyne Jones was a match for any defence
« Reply #1545 on: April 24, 2020, 06:59:58 AM »
Big man, huge talent...On his day, Kenwyne Jones was a match for any defence
By Ashford Jackman (T&T Express)


Kenwyne Jones has called time on his professional career but the much-travelled forward is still fondly remembered for moments of brilliance on the field of play that have caused reporters and fans alike to wonder what he might have achieved had he pushed himself to realise his full potential.

That conversation was revived last week when BBC Sport posted highlights of an English FA Cup match that was played on April 17 — exactly 11 years ago — at London’s Wembley Stadium.

Jones scored one goal and recorded one assist as Stoke City trounced Bolton Wanderers 5-0 in a stunningly lop-sided semi-final — the biggest winning margin at Wembley since 1939 — but only to go down 0-1 in the final to Manchester City courtesy a late Yaya Touré strike. Jones had had Stoke’s best opportunity in the 74th minute when he went one-on-one with Joe Hart but the England ‘keeper came out on top.

The nephew of 1988-’89 Trinidad and Tobago Strike Squad centre-forward Philbert Jones, Kenwyne was a starter for the Soca Warriors who made history in Germany, 2006 as the smallest nation to grace the FIFA World Cup.

The big striker from Point Fortin has played professionally for 11 different teams including four English clubs as well as two spells — at Sheffield Wednesday and Bournemouth — on loan. At home, after a trophy-filled Secondary Schools League campaign with St Anthony’s College, he started with the now defunct Joe Public before moving to W Connection.

In the twilight of his career he played with Al Jazira in the United Arab Emirates and had a brief stint with Atlanta United in US Major League Soccer before returning home to Central FC and finally, retirement.

Indisputably, the early years in England’s Premiership were his best and at Stoke, which he joined from Sunderland, that Cup run was one the fans would always treasure.

The Staffordshire club had drawn only one game in their run to the semi-finals and the red-and-white striped shirts were tipped to beat Bolton on Wembley’s “hallowed” turf. But the manner of their victory left even their own fans in disbelief.

After a Bolton effort whizzed just over the crossbar, the Tony Pulis-coached “Potters” took total control.

An ill-advised pass out of defence gifted the ball to Stoke and from just outside the box, Matthew Etherington hit a sweetly-struck left-footer into the far corner in the 12th minute.

Soon after, Gary Cahill’s defensive header, under pressure, fell to midfielder Robert Huth and he volleyed it past Jussi Jaaskelainen for Stoke’s second.

Jones then made it 3-0 on the half-hour. Defender Jermaine Pennant broke down Stoke’s right flank and played the ball diagonally into the box where the Trinidadian, having slipped his marker, controlled it before using a side-foot chip to beat Jaaskelainen’s dive. His trademark double-cartwheel celebration added to the fans’ delight as Stoke went in well on top at the half.

Jones could then have covered himself in glory early in the second half but he was unable to get sufficient power behind a volley as an unexpected deflection came waist-high at him. However, any faint hopes Bolton might have entertained of fighting back were dashed as Jonathan Walters went on a solo run and fired home a low shot to put them four up after 68 minutes. Finally, nine minutes from the whistle, Jones picked up a ball on the right side and burst past one defender before squaring to Walters for his second goal, completing one of the finest wins in Stoke City’s history.

Incidentally, Jones ended the season as the club’s joint top-scorer with Walters, on 12 goals. We’ll never know just how good he might have become. It’s worth remembering that Jones played in defence and midfield at school and he didn’t really catch the eye at the 2001 FIFA U-17 World Cup in T&T.

It was at Southampton that Kenwyne was first used as a striker, in the mould of the traditional bruising, gate-crashing English centre-forwards such as Nat Lofthouse, Malcolm MacDonald, Peter Withe and Alan Shearer, to name a few.

That experience secured his place alongside Stern John up front for the Soca Warriors in Germany before a challenge by England’s David James left him side-lined with an injured knee.

Jones came back from that and other setbacks and went on to lead T&T to some memorable performances under Stephen Hart.

Yet another son of the soil whose star shone with dazzling brightness, if only in spurts.
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Offline Tallman

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1546 on: May 09, 2020, 11:24:53 AM »
Kenwyne Jones lifts the lid on life under Roy Keane at Sunderland and reveals his one big mistake
By Mark Donnelly (Sunderland Echo)


Any professional who played under him has a story - or several - to tell, and Kenwyne Jones is no different.

Keane signed the striker in 2007 and, by Jones’ own admission, brought out the best in him after guiding Sunderland back to the Premier League - only to resign four months into his second top-flight campaign.

He was open, honest and at times brutal - but Jones flourished under his authoritarian leadership.

“He was brilliant for me,” said Jones, speaking to the Echo.

“It all depends on your temperament and what you take seriously.

“At that point, I was pretty young. I respected him 100 per cent, but I didn’t have the fear and emotional vulnerability that other people would have towards him.

“He worked pretty well with me and I think we had an open enough relationship where we could talk and say anything and he got the best out of me.

“He wouldn’t say anything different to me than he would to different players, but it was just how I reacted. I didn’t get down or displeased by the things he said.”

Not everyone was so welcoming of Keane’s ‘feedback’, though.

“Other times I saw him go off at players for not giving their best, and you could see the players literally crumble.

“Some players are different, they’re looking for the arm around the shoulder and what not.”

Jones is able to reel off anecdote after anecdote from Keane’s time on Wearside, as the former Manchester United midfielder looked to stabilise Sunderland in the Premier League.

And one particularly prevalent memory is from a cold, November afternoon at Ewood Park.

A dire first-half performance against Blackburn Rovers - just days after a League Cup defeat against the opposition - brought out Keane’s ruthless streak.

Questions were asked, particularly of Jones and strike partner Djibril Cisse after a turgid performance.

It was an explosive team-talk, and one which the Trinidad and Tobago international can still vividly recall - for all the right reasons.

“At half-time we were down 1-0 and in the dressing room, typical manager, he would come out and say some things.

“But when we went back out, I scored and we won the game 2-1.

“After the match he was in his corner of the dressing room and I was in mine, and he just had a little look at me and then chuckled. He knew the things that he said had made me go out and prove him wrong.

“In that moment, you could tell he was thinking ‘yeah, I got something out of him that changed things for the team’. That was a good moment.”

Another abiding memory for Jones - and indeed, all on Wearside - was the 2008 derby day triumph over Newcastle United.

It was the striker’s first taste of a Wear-Tyne derby, and the afternoon took on a great personal significance as Jones returned from a long-term injury.

So while others remember Kieran Richardson’s stunning winner, Jones’ recollections of the day centre around something far simpler - being able to play football again.

“I came off the bench after being injured for six or seven months with a cruciate injury.

“I was just eager to get back out, and to try and feel as normal as possible.

“When you’re going through a rehabilitation process like that, you’re separated from everyone. You’re trying to regain your fitness and I was anxious, a bit scared at the same time, as I didn’t know how I was going to hold up.

“But it was a crowning moment for us, to win the game.

“I’ve done the south coast derby, the Sheffield derby, the Welsh derby and the North East derby - and it ranks up there for the fans.

“Regardless of if you’re from England or if you’re foreign, when you’re playing a derby in the North East you get a sense for the area, the passion of the fans and what it means.

“Once you come through one of those derbies, you get a better appreciation for the club you’re playing for. There’s a sense of belonging and being a part of something big.”

But not even two months after that victory, Keane was gone.

After talks with chairman Niall Quinn, he opted to resign.

So what went wrong? Jones believes he can pinpoint one area that could have proved Keane’s undoing.

“I enjoyed his time at the club and I sincerely wish that he had an experienced second man with him.

“That, for me, was probably his undoing - not having someone more experienced in the coaching side of the game next to him.

“No disrespect to the coaches that he had, but for me - for a new manager like that when he’s taking on such a huge task - he needed someone a bit more experienced that would command his attention.

“He’s very headstrong in his ideas and his ideals, but he needed someone like that with his.

“But it was probably my best time under any manager, and I totally respect him.”

Jones is keeping safe during the current global pandemic, and is back among the caribbean islands after calling time on his playing career.

But he always keeps an eye firmly fixed on Wearside.

“Sunderland are part of my life, they were part of my journey, so at no point in time am I going to throw that aside.

“I always stay interested and see how they do, what their next moves are and the players they’re bringing in. I’m pretty much locked in all the time.”
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Offline Tallman

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1547 on: May 10, 2020, 09:19:26 PM »
Kenwyne Jones reveals why he snubbed interest from Chelsea and Liverpool to stay at Sunderland
By Mark Donnelly (Sunderland Echo)


The Trinidad and Tobago international spent three years at the Stadium of Light, netting 28 times before departing for Stoke City.

But had things gone differently, Jones could have found himself playing for one of the Premier League’s big boys.

His impressive form in the 2007/08 campaign – his first on Wearside – brought interest from Chelsea and Liverpool. There were talks over a swap deal which would see Jones head to Anfield, with Peter Crouch moving the other way, but Roy Keane moved quickly to deny that the striker would leave Wearside.

So why did Jones opt to stay at the Stadium of Light?

Roy Keane was a factor, but so too was a desire to be a part of a club that seemed to be on a firm upward trajectory.

“Me staying at the club was down to me wanting to settle a little bit and to become a part of something that was building.

“Sunderland always has the potential to be a massive, massive club and for whatever reasons - or for a combination of reasons - things don’t seem to have worked out as they should have.

“But the fanbase, the facilities and the stadium are all second to none. It’s magnificent, really. I love the place, so that was my main reason for staying.

“It wasn’t like he [Keane] brought me in and then he left so I wanted to leave, it was nothing like that.”
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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1548 on: May 20, 2020, 11:36:23 AM »
WATCH: Former Trinidad and Tobago Captain Kenwyne Jones is interviewed by former English player and manager Micky Adams (Southampton, Leeds United, Coventry City)

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/jdv2iDJjhnQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/jdv2iDJjhnQ</a>
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Offline Flex

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1549 on: June 17, 2020, 06:03:41 AM »
Jones,Lewis discuss racism in sport.
By Narissa Fraser (Newsday).


FORMER professional footballer and captain of T&T’s senior men’s national team Kenwyne Jones says racism was something he experienced throughout his career.

In a public, virtual discussion, hosted by the Futsal Association T&T, titled Sports for Social Justice, on Sunday, Jones delved into his experiences as well as the current racial tension in the US following the killing of George Floyd.

In addition to the T&T leg of his career, Jones also made a name for himself in England, playing for teams like Southampton, Stoke City, Sunderland, Stoke City, Cardiff City and Bournemouth.

He said he was exposed to racism “from day one” in England, which continued for several years.

“When you’re in a system that is not designed for you, when you get involved, there are a lot of things you are going to be dependent on. So even though you are being paid, you have issues such as the fact that you’re not from there, so you have to walk, talk, act a certain way in order to be able to stay in that system.”

He said within his first five years, it almost felt like he was doing “a lot of puppeteering” owing to the power certain officials held.

Jones said racism was something he experienced at every level of the sport. “From administration organisations, on the field, from fans, inside the stadium. Even ‘til this day I still get messages from all ranges of social media that have a lot of racist undertones.”

TT Olympic Committee (TTOC) president Brian Lewis also chimed in on the issue, recalling growing up in the days of the Black Power movement. He said even while holding leadership positions within the sporting industry, he still faced discrimination solely because of his skin colour.

“People crossed the road (when they saw you), it didn’t have anything to do with money or possession…I’ve gone to a sports-related meeting and waiting for an elevator, people refused to come in – not once nor twice. I have been racially profiled at immigration during travel.”

He also used T&T as an example, saying there are still people who consider certain sports as “black people sports” and others as “Indo or white sports.”

Jones said many stand against racism behind closed doors, but remain silent in public because they do not want their streams of income or character to become damaged.

“They want to keep their position, keep that economic flow, be invited to the same parties, they don’t want to go against the grain…

“A lot of corporations jumped on the (Black Lives Matter) bandwagon because they want to maintain that economic fluidity. They want to keep consumers and workers.”

Asked about sportsmen who are now publicly stating their views on the issues and taking a stand, he said, “I believe it because of their experience and they want to see something change, not only in the present time they’re in but for future generations.”

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Flex

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1550 on: June 21, 2020, 07:59:17 AM »
Ex-T&T skipper Jones takes pride in fatherhood.
By Narissa Fraser (Newsday).


A TEACHER, a supporter and a protector – these are but some of the roles retired T&T footballer and former men’s team captain Kenwyne Jones takes pride in when it comes to being a father. Newsday spoke with the 35-year-old who has had the experience of being a leader both on and off the pitch

Jones was born in Point Fortin but grew up in La Brea. He said during his childhood, his own father Pamphille, along with other father figures, taught him the importance of a parent wanting the best for their children.

He said while he wasn’t against it, having children was not particularly a plan he had set in stone. And at age 18, he welcomed his first son. He said that moment was an “amazing feeling,” adding that he was elated to have “a piece of representation” of himself.

“It wasn’t a thought that I grew up with, like when kids say ‘When I grow up, I wanna have kids.’ But as soon as they came, I was elated. Being able to add experience, add knowledge on top of what I’ve learnt and had been learning along the way, to be able to pass on that to my child is something I enjoy doing every day.”

He now has a total of five children – two sons, ages 16 and eight, and three daughters – two 13-year-olds and a four-year-old.

He said he has always and will continue to emphasise to his children that they should follow their own dreams and not feel obligated to follow in his footsteps.

“I never grew up any of my kids into being pressurised because I played football. At the end of the day, I think the pressure of not being able to follow in footsteps or even take legacy further could be very damaging to an individual. I have seen it happen so I never wanted to place that kind of burden on my children. I did what I did because I wanted to do it, not because I had an uncle or a father that used to play. My father never pressured me into playing football even though he was a footballer.”

He added, “You have to understand that they are individuals and will possess different qualities, so you have to be able to take and love them for who they are.”

Jones headed to England in 2005 and played for Southampton, Stoke City, Sunderland, Stoke City, Cardiff City and Bournemouth. His professional career stems back to around 2002 when he began playing with local club Joe Public (he also had stints with W Connection and Central FC), and he retired at age 32 in 2017.

He said it was difficult to balance being a parent and a professional footballer who was at the prime of his career.

“I’m the father that will make breakfast for you, say your prayers with you at night, be involved in your schoolwork, plays…But when you’re a professional at that level, a lot of that gets taken away from you because the schedule is so crazy. People don’t understand that, people think it’s all glamorous. But a lot of times you’re away from home so you get to miss out on a lot of stuff and it’s hard.”

He said since retiring, he has been “enjoying it so much” since he no longer has those time-consuming commitments.

“I’m able to see every step of the way which is important to me because I like to guide based on experience. I like to be there because I can understand where they are at in life.

“I like to see the “firsts.” I like to be part of it and sometimes engineer it. Something as simple as your kid’s first climb, first step, first words, first tooth coming out, anything I would deem a major milestone in a parent’s life and a child’s life. You’ll be on the road for like a week because you have two or three away games and you missed something like that. I missed simple things like being able to put them to bed at night, pick them up from school do homework for them. It truly bothered me at the time so it’s a lot of sacrifices you have to make. To some it may not seem like a major deal so to me it was very major.”

He said protecting his family was something he not only took seriously during his professional career, but it is something he continues to do.

“There’s a difference between protecting and hiding. I’ve always protected my family. You have to be very careful when it comes to children and I want my kids to grow up as normal as possible.”

Asked if there were children who viewed him as a father figure, he said yes as such instincts have become natural to him.

“It’s not something you go out there looking for, it’s something that comes to you. I just try to be myself and give the advice necessary.”

He added, though, “One thing I don’t do is cross boundaries unless I’m invited to. But at the same time, I try to be able to give comfort, educate, it’s just gonna be natural to have that happen.”

Asked if he plans to have more children, Jones made it clear: “Oh, no no no. I’m done. I am far by finished.”

But he is grateful for the extra time he is now able to spend with his family.

“The lessons we teach our children is what is going to shape us in the future. I wanna make sure I’m able to teach them and make them strong enough for the world they are about to face. Being a father is wonderful.

“I have enjoyed my professional career, yes but being able to enjoy something else other than the thing you do in your career is wonderful and I enjoy being able to raise my kids, to be there, to be able to see the characteristics coming out, see the things they pick up from to…It’s been no short of amazing, honestly.”

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Tallman

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1551 on: June 26, 2020, 11:42:40 AM »
Like Kenwyne going and run for office?

The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1552 on: June 26, 2020, 12:39:20 PM »
Yep!  And good for him.  :applause:
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1553 on: June 26, 2020, 03:18:52 PM »
Patriot Front???

Unfortunate choice of name  :o
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Kenwyne Jones Thread
« Reply #1554 on: June 26, 2020, 09:11:07 PM »
Patriot Front???

Unfortunate choice of name  :o

It's actually "Patriotic Front". There's precedent for use of Patriotic Front in the political arena (for instance, it's the "PF" in ZANU-PF in Zimbabwe). However,  more often than not "PF" has been Popular Front. Nonetheless, it's a name I would have avoided, or suggested not using, because of the concern to which you allude. Of course,  the use in Zimbabwe is decades old and the argument for its use would be that of not letting a divisive group co-opt the use of the term. Perhaps the solution would be "Patriotic Front Trinidad & Tobago".
« Last Edit: June 26, 2020, 09:19:45 PM by asylumseeker »
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

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Racism taught, Education is key, says Kenwyne Jones
« Reply #1555 on: June 30, 2020, 07:41:21 AM »
Racism taught, Education is key, says Kenwyne Jones
By Ian Prescott (T&T Express)


FORMER national football captain Kenwyne Jones believes that racism is taught and that the only way to defeat it is through education of the young and re-education of older persons.

Jones comments came during an online discussion forum on the theme ‘sport for social justice’ which took place a week ago on Futsal868, the Facebook website of the Trinidad and Tobago Futsal Association.

The panel consisted of Futsal Association president Geoffrey Edwards; Trinidad and Tobago Olympic Association (TTOC) president Brian Lewis; Ken McCue, from Sport Against Racism Ireland; ex-English Premiership footballer Jones; and social media influencer Keevan Lewis. Jones touched on issues of race and explored some solutions to social injustices that exist everyday in society.

“People are taught racism. You are not born with it,” Jones declared.

“If you are taught not to dislike anybody, you would not do it. You would like everybody, because you would have qualities you would like from Tom, Dick, Harry, green, black, blue, whatever” the former English Premiership footballer said.

“But if you were taught by someone to stay away from a black person and black people are violent... stay away from Indian people because Indian people are not nice...stay away from white people. Of course, you are going to, from the time that you are a child, develop concepts in your head.”

Jones said the choices he has made, both as child and adult stemmed from values parents instilled and also what he was taught in school.

“I was never taught about racial indifference. During school I had Indian friends, black friends, white friends, Chinese friends, however many different races it had in Trinidad, I had those friends,” Jones pointed out.

The former T&T captain said that even when upset, he had never made race an issues when having a disagreement with someone. “I was not taught it and I never express it. Even to this day. No matter whatever,” he noted.

Jones said there are those who practise racism, some who are victims of racism and other who are indifferent to it. He felt some people never identify racism because privilege allow them not to have experienced it. He cited recent local examples. Therefore some people are untouched by the equal justice movement sweeping across the world.

Jones said that change would come only through education. “It is going to be down to education of the younger ones and the re-education of and reprogramming of the people who are already set in their ways. It is a tough job, but it has to happen we will continue down this slippery slope that we are going,” he lamented.

Admitting to having faced racism himself, Jones said people need to stand up against inequality. However, many are still in a ‘single individual mindset’ and are often are scared to act out of fear of losing popularity and economic prosperity. He believes players who stand up for the cause, do so largely because of their experiences. He urged persons in position of influence to “be the change that you want to see”.

But it takes courage. “Those that can affect change need to use the courage that you have to stand again or go against the grain... to swim upstream like the salmon,” said Jones, adding, “The great things about us athletes, in whatever sport, is that you have a platform to try and drive that change.”
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.