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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #120 on: November 27, 2011, 02:55:40 AM »
Misrepresenting the Concordat
Posted: Wednesday, March 19, 2003

By Stephen Kangal, Caroni

I reluctantly intervene to correct certain misrepresentations contained in George Alleyne's commentary on the 1960 Concordat (Newsday March 12, p.10).

Let it me state quite categorically that:

-The annual 20% intake of students facility accorded to Denominational Secondary Schools (DSS) drawn from the CE/ SEA's Pass List as provided in the Concordat did not discriminate against children of poor families in favour of those of the privileged middle/upper class when one considers the objective criteria of the selection process. Students so selected must pass the CE/SEA and must have placed the school in question as their first choice. With the current universal secondary education in force the 20% pales into insignificance as a non-issue.

-The Concordat or denominationalism did not contribute to inequality of educational opportunity but to the very opposite since the building of DSS and primary schools in the rural/ extra-East West Corridor areas that were neglected by the British and the PNM regimes until 1975 substantially increased the opportunities for secondary education. What contributes to inequality of educational opportunity is the building of the Library Complex in Port of Spain instead of 8 smaller libraries across the nation.

-The Concordat was a compromise reached by the Christian Churches in 1960 with late Premier Dr. Williams who wanted to nationalise all DSS and bring them under State control to facilitate his free secondary education programme. The late Archbishop Ryan should not be accused falsely on mere uninformed speculation.

-The Concordat introduced a moratorium on the building of DSS post -1960. The UNC disbanded this moratorium in 1995- 2001 and the PNM re-introduced it in 2001 although the DSS have been outperforming the state schools at lesser costs in the efficient delivery of quality education.

The DSS are not prestige but high performance schools being the first choice of the best students who wrote the CE.

How, Mr. Alleyne can the 1960 Concordat run counter to a later 1965 Johnson Head Start programme? Mr. Alleyne must learn to curb his penchant for citing American experiences/policies that are not even remotely related to the subject in hand.

Let it be known that there are more notorious and important promotions/ inequality of employment issues institutionalised in the Concordat that cannot be terminated with a wave of the hand since the practice on which the Concordat is based is now the prevailing norm with the denominational boards/churches in a strong bargaining position.

http://www.trinidadandtobagonews.com/selfnews/viewnews.cgi?newsid1048051009,40360,.shtml
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 02:58:26 AM by asylumseeker »

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #121 on: November 27, 2011, 03:06:48 AM »
Red herring from Hazel
Trinidad Guardian
Thursday 16th March 2006
Sat Maharaj

Rather than deal with the objections raised by the Association of Denominational Boards to her ministry’s new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), the Minister of Education, Senator Hazel Manning, has introduced the red herring of accountability.

The boards and churches point to the fact that there is in place an agreement between church and State governing their relationship. It is called the Concordat which was signed in 1960. If there is need for new arrangements, changes could be made to the Concordat.

The Trinidad Guardian of May 18, 1955, quoted Dr Eric Williams as saying: “I see in the denominational school the breeding ground of disunity. I see in the state school the opportunity for cultivating a spirit of nationalism among West Indian people and eradicating the racial suspicions and antagonisms growing in our midst. I place the community above sect or the race.”

When the People’s National Movement (PNM) came to power one year later in 1956, the reality of T&T and the world, especially the United States’ influence, caused Prime Minister Williams to rethink his position.

Carl C Campbell, professor of history at the Jamaica campus of the University of the West Indies, wrote a book titled Endless Education—Main Currents in the Education System of Modern Trinidad and Tobago, 1939-1986. In it he analysed Williams’ compromise on church education:

“Although he was a determined politician, Dr Williams knew how to compromise; and one analyst has characterised his policies as ‘accommodative in design and compromising in execution.’ The question has been raised whether this was deliberate strategy or the result of an ambivalent personality.

“Whatever its origin, it enabled Williams to play politics with his opponents instead of insisting on some inflexible predetermined policy. This was part of the secret of his retention of political power for a generation.

“In education policy, for example, the accommodation reached with the churches in the Concordat of December 1960 went a long way in attenuating clerical grievances until 1965.

“Even a measure of accommodation with the Indians under Dr Capildeo was arrived at in respect to the making of the independence constitution; and then came the struggle between Indians and the PNM for the spoils of office in the highly charged election of 1961. Dr Williams won a resounding victory.”

Neither Prime Minister Patrick Manning nor his Minister of Education have the breath nor vision of Williams who is their political guru. But the Mannings know the art of compromise in the interest of the nation’s children and national stability and unity.

The Concordat of 1960 has been revisited and revised twice. In 1979 the Gocking Committee held extensive meetings and submitted recommendations. Dr Williams then appointed a Cabinet foursome of Dr Cuthbert Joseph (Minister of Education), Kamaluddin Mohammed, Mervyn de Souza and George Chambers to meet with the boards.

Subsequently, Victor Bruce, governor of the Central Bank was appointed to refine the relationship. The “Bruce Report” has disappeared but the funding ratio for repairs and rebuilding of new primary schools was changed from 66 2/3-33 1/3 to 75-25 per cent. The larger percentage was Government’s contribution.

Again in 1998 Cabinet appointed a “joint committee to examine the relationship between the Government of Trinidad and Tobago and the denominational boards of education.”

It advised the Prime Minister that it “met on a weekly basis since our appointment on October 30, 1998. We had input from all members appointed to the committee as well as the organisations that they represented. We also had very valuable contributions from members that were co-opted.”

Minister of Education Hazel Manning on January 26 told the Senate:

“We have just taken to Cabinet and got approval of a Memorandum of Understanding, as we have begun to implement the Concordat. For the first time in the history of the country since 1962, the Concordat is now an 18-page document line by line, sentence by sentence, word by word negotiated by the boards.”

Subsequent to this statement, the minister met with the Maha Sabha and other boards to discuss the MOU, not the Concordat. In fact her meeting with the Maha Sabha was on February 3 and we advised that we will deal through the Association of Denominational Boards.

We must conclude that those meetings were in bad faith since a Cabinet meeting had already approved the new MOU.

http://legacy.guardian.co.tt/archives/2006-03-16/sat.html

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #122 on: November 27, 2011, 03:10:48 AM »
The power of church school boards
By Dana Seetahal
Trinidad Express
Nov 25, 2011

The controversy surrounding the attempted removal of the principal of the Tunapuna Hindu Primary School has raised the issue of how the Education Act and the Concordat deal with public denominational schools.

In 1960 the then government signed a Concordat (Agreement) assuring what was termed the "Preservation and Character" of denominational schools. The government had agreed to partially take over several of the established religious schools. These were later designated "assisted" schools in the Education Act. Some schools remained "private", wholly controlled by boards of the particular religious bodies that had created them. Over time some of these private schools have converted to assisted schools.

An assisted school is a public school. An assisted school must have a board of management that consists of persons appointed by the authority which established the school for the purpose of exercising the control of the school. The government provides funds to the boards of management of assisted schools for building, extension, rebuilding, equipment and facilities. There are both secondary and primary assisted schools. The Tunapuna Hindu School is an assisted school.

Under the Concordat it was agreed that in denominational schools (unless the denomination concerned otherwise gives its consent) the religion of the particular denomination which owns the school will be taught exclusively and by teachers professing to belong to that denomination. By contrast, in government schools all recognised religious denominations have access through their accredited representatives for the teaching of religion to the pupils belonging to their faith. The Concordat makes it clear that pupils attending the schools of a denomination not of their own faith will not be compelled to take part in the religious exercises or lessons of that denomination.

It is evident, therefore, that the Concordat envisaged that persons of any faith/religion could attend an assisted school. This could not be otherwise since public funds were to be disbursed to fund the school.

The Concordat also specifies the right of "appointment, retention, promotion, transfer and dismissal of teachers in Primary Schools will rest with the Public Service Commission". It does however, provide that a teacher shall not be appointed to a school if the denominational board objects to such an appointment on moral or religious grounds. Similarly, if a teacher is found to be unsatisfactory on these very grounds, moral or religious, the denominational authority shall have the right to request his removal to another school after due investigation. For these reasons vacancies as they occur in all schools are usually advertised and applications submitted in the first instance to the respective board of management. The board examines them and forwards them all, with their recommendations, to the Public Service Commission for final action.

Since the current principal of the Tunapuna Hindu Primary School is already appointed, one imagines that the procedure was followed. It seems to me that the board of that school has the power to require her removal only if she is found to be unsatisfactory on moral or religious grounds. There is no mention anywhere in the Concordat or the Education Act that the mere recommendation by a PTA or the board in itself is a ground for her removal.

The Education Act makes provision for the operation of boards in all public schools. This includes assisted schools. It gives the boards the power of "the control and management of all matters relating to the establishment and maintenance of new schools, the making of applications for recognition of new schools, the maintenance of existing schools, the rebuilding or extension of schools" and the like. The boards are also responsible for the efficient maintenance of schools under their authority, "for the provision of all requisite furniture and for keeping school buildings in a good state of repair and sanitation".

It is evident, based on the Act, that the board of a denominational assisted school is not responsible for the supervision of a principal who has been properly appointed. If a principal is proving to be unsatisfactory on "moral or religious" grounds the board may request his/her removal. Since assisted schools cannot bar entry to the school of persons of other religions it follows that if a principal allows such persons entry into the school this would not be a "religious" ground for dismissal.

In any event the board is required to act in accordance with any special or general directives of the minister concerning the exercise and performance of its powers and duties.

Under the Act the responsibilities of the principal of a public school are stated to include:

(a) the supervision of the physical safety of pupils; (b) the suitable application of the syllabus (c) allocation and supervision of the duties and responsibilities of members of their staff; (d) the discipline of the school; (e) teaching and the like. The principal is also required to cooperate with "parents and with approved authorities in the execution of authorised schemes".

Co-operation with the PTA or board by the principal is only in relation to carrying out authorised schemes. What does this mean? It could only mean lawful schemes under the Act — and would not include for instance barring other persons from the school.

Under both the Concordat and the Education Act there is no justification for a board or a PTA to prevent any teacher (including a principal) from performing her duties — and by extension from entering the compound — unless, as in the case of any other citizen, she was about to commit a criminal offence. The proper and only course is to take the matter to the Teaching Service Commission. If the Commission finds merit in the complaint on moral or religious grounds only then can the principal be removed.

http://www.trinidadexpress.com/commentaries/The_power_of_church_school_boards-134518323.html
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 03:16:24 AM by asylumseeker »

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #123 on: November 27, 2011, 03:51:21 AM »
Excerpted from Trinidad & Tobago: Democracy and Development in the Caribbean
Scott B. MacDonald
(Praeger, 1986)

For the Catholic Church the Concordat was a temporary victory as the churches were allowed: to maintain their proprietary rights, to veto the introduction of books, curriculum changes, and apparatus in their institutions; to have their religions taught by only one of their own faith; and to have access to state schools at specified times to give instruction to children of their denomination. Moreover, although the authority over retention, appointment, transfer, promotion, and dismissal of teaching staff was given to the Public Service Commission, denominational boards were granted the power to refuse, accept or retain a teacher whose moral or religious conduct did not meet with their approval. The major concession to the state was over the recruitment of students: 80% of those entering the first form of the secondary schools were to be determined by the state on the basis of a standardized entrance exam. The remaining 20% were to be left to the discretion of the various schools, while church-run schools remained eligible for state economic assistance.

The Concordat with the Catholic and Protestant churches and the Hindu organizations had been one of the most complicated problems that Williams faced as he was forced to concede on an issue about which he had strong personal feelings while also overriding a substantial force within the party. The benefit from such maneuvers, however, was that the PNM's movement back to the right had been given a substantial boost, and opinion within the Catholic and Anglican churches was gradually swinging in favor of Williams's party.

By the close of 1960, the PNM had zigzagged from center right to the left and back to the center right. While the radical phase had been marked by a tough stance on most issues, the move to the right was accommodational in nature and disarming to a political opposition that claimed the PNM was rigid and held authoritarian tendencies. With the U.S. and British governments and Catholic and Anglican churches neutralized, the Prime Minister was able to concentrate on the matter of electoral boundaries and getting reelected.

Offline Brownsugar

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #124 on: November 27, 2011, 05:05:54 AM »
I eh know if to  :rotfl:  or  :puking:

Sat: I love Black people
“My wish is that our people would live together”


Q: Mr Maharaj, what do you have against Black people?
A: (A brief astonished expression then a burst of laughter at his Radio Jagriti office off the Churchill-Roosevelt Highway in Tunapuna on Wednesday morning) I love Black people, they are some of the most attractive of our citizens. What I detest is ignorance.

In what context?
Total political ignorance; ignorant about the facts, ignorant of things that they know nothing about, and those who are totally influenced by the negative aspects of the politics of the land.

So those who label you a racist are ignorant?
Not only are they ignorant, they themselves are the racists. They try to throw this on somebody else. Each one of us has natural affinities to our clan, to our communities, to our religion but we don’t use that as a measuring rod for our relationship with other people.

An accusation levelled against you Mr Maharaj, is that you have said if any of your children should marry a Black person you would disown them?
That, my friend, is a total and absolute fabrication.

You can swear to that on the Bhagavad Gita?
I swear by the (raised voice)... I, uh…why should I have to swear to anybody? Why do I have to swear to you or anybody else? I have never said that! What I said is if my daughter marries somebody who the family doesn’t approve of we reserve the right to accept or reject...and that still holds. And that is the case with many families in this country; not only Hindu families...the right to accept or reject.

What do you feel is the cause of this constant vilification of Sat Maharaj?
They need somebody...you see, for the PNM to survive it needs the Black/Indian divide to exist, for they cannot survive because they have no policy, no programmes that can attract people back to their party. What they should be doing is talking about their plans for the future.
 
What do you mean they have no policy or programme, what about the Vision 2020?
(Throwing his arms wide open) What vision? That was a backward vision which they picked up from the waste paper basket of other countries. Since Dr Eric Williams, nobody in that party has had any vision. None whosoever! Their only vision is to rape the treasury.

Mr Maharaj, weren’t you once a strong supporter of the PNM, actually speaking on their platform?
(He explains he parted with the PNM immediately after the 1981 general election campaign during which the PNM had mounted an “Ah Fraid Karl” strategy instilling imaginary fears in the electorate against Karl Hudson-Philips,QC, then political leader of the Organisation for National Reconstruction). That was sufficient because of the fear they aimed against Mr Hudson-Phillips; The same modus operandi the PNM is relying on today. Total fabrication! Fear, racial fear.

In this imbroglio at the Tunapuna Hindu School an agreement was reached that nobody should speak publicly about it?
(Interrupting)  No. No. The agreement is no party will attack the other party, right? Maybe I should give you a copy of the agreement. (He pulls out two copies of the accord which was hand written by Education Minister Dr Tim Gopeesingh who brokered the deal) This is the handwriting of the minister, which states in part:  “TTUTA has categorically denied making any charge of racism against the SDMS and the SDMS has also categorically denied any racism in any of their schools.” The principal was right there when the matter was being discussed.

Did she deny making that statement?
Well, she signed the document, too. She signed it.

Do you agree with the criticism levelled against Dr Gopeesingh that he failed to act in the dispute which allowed it to get out of hand?
Total falsehood. I mean, the same people are saying the Teaching Service Commission has the authority...not the Minister of Education. All the authority he has is what he did in bringing the parties together to effect conciliation. MP McIntosh raised this in the Parliament. Did she first bring it to your attention, particularly the charges levelled against you before taking it to the legislature? Mrs McIntosh told a lot of lies in the legislature in this matter, and I want to tell you that we have written the Speaker of the House this morning requesting that our side of the story be placed into the Hansard (The verbatim record of debates in the Parliament).

Clevon, what is absolutely stunning is that this honourable lady never bothered to take up the telephone and make some simple inquiries to ascertain if these allegations levelled against me by the principal were true. I just cannot believe that kind of conduct from someone aspiring to high political office. She never made any attempt to send anybody here to check the veracity of the claim that I do not want African children in our school. Deliberate lies! They are not mere fabrications.

Mr Maharaj, is it fair to accuse Mrs McIntosh?
(A sharp interjection, shaking a finger at Raphael’s face) Listen Clevon, stop there man! Let me finish! You don’t guide this discussion. If you go to the Enterprise Hindu School you will find 70 per cent of the pupils of African descent. Seventy-per cent! The dynamics have changed. Right in this school 55 Afro-Trinis are on the roll. Further, in September 1952, when the Tunapuna Hindu School—which was located in a temple next to the Royal Castle outlet—opened, the first pupil admitted was an Afro-Trini who went on to become the principal of the El Dorado Secondary School.

There are 300 children of African descent at the Sangre Grande Hindu School. She is trying to create a racial problem, not trying to find out if there is a racial problem. If she had gone to Arima Hindu School 60 per cent are Afro-Trinis.

These are hard, undisputable facts?
Clevon, I am not manufacturing that. Go and see for yourself and talk to the principal rather than talking to me.

If race is not the issue what exactly is the genesis of this problem, something personal between you and the principal?
We signed this agreement which says that none of us will pursue it further, but if you look at our complaints against the principal you will get an idea why we are so upset. However, there are two other primary schools in this area where the principals are laws unto themselves, the boards have no control over them and I think they have been trying to influence the negatives the principal here want to indulge in.

This current imbroglio has resurrected the debate on whether the Concordat with the Government and the denominational boards should be scrapped. Which side of the argument are you on?
Scrap it? The Concordat has worked well for Trinidad and Tobago but some people believe that it is just a sheet of paper that was signed many years ago. That is not the Concordat. It is also all the conventions in the education system that have been developed since then.

You are aware Mrs McIntosh is in favour of having another look at the Concordat?
Because she has nothing to lose. She has not built a school, she has not developed a community, and she is now trying to mislead a whole country.

So where do you go from here?
The agreement has been signed, and she is to be reassigned so that is now history. Look Clevon, you are now on the compound of the school. Do you hear a sound coming out of that school where there are more than 400 pupils? That is discipline…total discipline.

What sort of danger do you see if the accord should be done away with?
The country would suffer because you would lose a whole cadre of people with experience in running schools. Running a school is not just teaching and writing. Every morning we teach the children to pray, to respect authority. And when you come here at 8.30 in the morning you will hear the children praying together, singing the bhajans together. Part of the problem in the school system is the breakdown in discipline, students becoming pregnant…why didn’t she speak out against those ills?

Mr Maharaj, I wish you will not use this forum to attack the goodly lady in her absence, as it were? (An incredulous stare) She attacked me! She didn’t talk to the Maha Sabha! Nobody spoke to us and she attacked us behind our backs at 10 o’clock in the night in the Parliament. So what you are trying to tell me? Look Clevon, don’t let us fall out here today. (Laughs) Fair is fair. You don’t expect me to stay here and take verbal blows based on complete falsehood and do not respond.

Mr Maharaj, in spite of whatever your detractors might say you have indeed contributed to national development.  What is your greatest wish for the land of your birth at this time?
My wish is that our people would live together. We will share the good times together, we will share bad times together. When the floods come we all cry together, and when the oil starts flowing again we would all benefit together. I am a Trinidadian more than to the bone...a Trini to the marrow. The politician from time to time try to create problems and tensions. But go to the countryside and you will be amazed to see how we all live as one.
 
Mr Maharaj, all your life you have been a magnet for controversy—you have just turned 80—when would your controversial persona end?
(Face lit up and in a very animated state) It will come to an end when I am taken to the banks of the Caroni River for cremation. I built that specially for me (thumping his chest). You better believe that, others are using it right now (a large smile), but that was built for me. I told my wife (deceased), I told my friends I want to be cremated there. I grew up on the banks of that river and that cremation site is where I am going to end my days.­

http://www.guardian.co.tt/news/2011/11/27/sat-i-love-black-people
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Dingolay, ay, ay, ay ay,
Dingolay ay, ay, ay..."

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Offline Quags

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #125 on: November 27, 2011, 11:26:57 AM »
there is lots of racial tolerance in schools..i went a prestige presbyterian school..thing is, when indians made their racist remarks, they tolerated a beating from me..casual casual...and everyone was normal after that...
bring them and let the beatings begin .

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #126 on: November 27, 2011, 12:45:57 PM »
People misunderstand Sat.

He's not a racist. He's a fundametalist.
The greatest single cause of atheism in the world today are Christians who acknowledge Jesus ;with their lips and walk out the door and deny Him by their lifestyle. That is what an unbelieving world simply finds unbelievable.

Offline Dutty

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #127 on: November 27, 2011, 02:13:34 PM »
People misunderstand Sat.

He's not a racist. He's a fundametalist.

I thought allyuh say he was Hindu.
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Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #128 on: November 28, 2011, 07:42:47 AM »
People misunderstand Sat.

He's not a racist. He's a fundametalist.

I thought allyuh say he was Hindu.

 :rotfl: :rotfl:
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Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #129 on: December 12, 2011, 11:36:42 PM »
SITA CLEARED
By Lara Pickford-Gordon Tuesday, December 13 2011

The Teaching Service Commission (TSC) has cleared principal of the Tunapuna Hindu Primary School Sita Gajadharsingh-Nanga of allegations made by the Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS) regarding her conduct.

The TSC found there was insufficient evidence against the principal and directed the Education Ministry to investigate the conduct of a teacher of the school and school supervisors.

The TSC met last Wednesday and considered a report from an investigation done by the ministry.

Education Minister Dr Tim Gopeesingh yesterday said the TSC considered the contents of the report and sought legal advice.

Gopeesingh said the TSC concluded that there was “insufficient evidence to substantiate allegations made against Mrs Gajadharsingh-Nanga.”

However, the TSC has found there was sufficient grounds for the ministry to investigate “one of the teachers at the school.”

Gopeesingh did not disclose what was the allegation against the teacher.

He said the TSC has concerns about issues at the school which should have been addressed by school supervisors.

The TSC has directed the ministry to investigate whether the school supervisors were negligent in their duty and failed to address the issue of the allocation of resources from the ministry to the school and did not have proper oversight of the school.

Gopeesingh said he has given instructions for an investigating team to be established to urgently deal with matters related to the supervisors and a particular teacher identified by the TSC in its report.

Gajadharsingh-Nanga has spent most of the school term away from duty due to the rift with the SDMS and schools’ Parent Teachers’ Association (PTA).

She returned to work last Tuesday, just over two weeks after the Ministry of Education mediated an agreement between her and the SDMS on November 21.

On the issue of the transfer of Gajadharsingh-Nanga, the TSC advised that interviews would take place for principal I for primary schools, which were advertised, and Gajadharsingh Nanga would be invited to be interviewed. Gopeesingh said the ministry was “hamstrung” as it had to wait on the TSC to do interviews. Contacted for comment Gajadharsingh-Nanga said she had not heard anything about the TSC’s report yet and no one has contacted her. She told Newsday that she could not comment further because the teaching service regulations did not allow her to.

SDMS Secretary General Satnarayan Maharaj had no comment to make until he saw the report.

Peter Wilson, general secretary of the TT Unified Teachers’ Association (TTUTA) said he had no idea of what the report said but based on what he heard from Newsday, no action can be taken against the principal and it was up to the ministry to deal with the other matters highlighted.

Wilson said despite the agreement of November 21, Gajadharsingh-Nanga was still having problems at school. Private security guards hired by the SDMS, teaching staff and cleaners have refused to take directives from her.

The principal yesterday attempted to have a staff meeting but it did not happen. Wilson said the principal was responsible for the day-to-day management of the school and would be accountable for anything which happened. He said there seemed to be a deliberate attempt to subvert the agreement mediated by the Education Ministry between the principal and SDMS and the ministry was “aiding and abetting”. The school supervisors are supposed to ensure the principal was able to carry out her duties.

“Something as simple as keys. She can’t even have access to the area where office, equipment and stationary supplies are kept. It is as ridiculous as that,” said Wilson.

The atmosphere at the school has been tense for more than six months and there has been a strong lobby by the PTA and SDMS for the principal to be transferred.

The issues at the school became public when a letter written by Gajadharsingh-Nanga to the TSC requesting a transfer was publicised by a weekly newspaper in August.

In it she alleged that the SDMS Secretary General Satnarayan Maharaj threatened to lock her out of the school for admitting non-Indian children within the catchment area and not to admit black children. She said Maharaj was in an “uproar” because two of eight on-the-job trainees were non- Indian.”

Maharaj wrote the TSC August 10 and described Gajadharsingh-Nanga’s behaviour as disruptive and parents had expressed concern about confrontation.

The Director of Personnel Administration (DPA) wrote to the ministry on September 26 asking for the Permanent Secretary to ensure steps were taken to ensure the principal be allowed to carry out her duties.

Three weeks earlier the SDMS wrote to Gajadharsingh-Nanga telling her to report for duty at the St George East Education District. Maharaj wrote to the TSC on October 10 outlining the reasons the SDMS wanted the principal tranferred: Gajadharsingh-Nanga did not institute a programme for infants to learn prayers, she removed the dress code sign and attempted to frustrate efforts to complete a temple on the school compound, and failed to fulfill obligations to the board.

The DPA wrote the SDMS October 14 informing that unless Gajadharsingh-Nanga was transferred or otherwise directed by the TSC, the SDMS had no authority to debar her from reporting for work. Gajadharsingh-Nanga went to the school on October 24 accompanied by two school supervisors but they were not allowed entry. The police was called and fire service officers cut the locks on door. On November 9, excerpts from Gajadharsingh-Nanga’s letter were read by Port-of-Spain North/St Ann’s West Member of Parliament Patricia McIntosh during a sitting of the House of Representatives.

At a briefing on November 12, Maharaj provided data for the student population of the Tunapuna Hindu School which showed there were 22 children of African descent.

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Offline Bourbon

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #130 on: December 13, 2011, 07:55:41 AM »
I think its really unfair to the Principal to expect her to report to duty under those conditions.The findings of the report may not change this, but as mentioned the occurances of not taking orders etc regrettable and somewhat expected.


Next ting....I guessing the school have 33 douglas? Cause in the interview Sat said 55. I wondering how they got this information...was it on the original registration form or if based on the comess a check was made?

Fact is....things like this usually DONT end well.
The greatest single cause of atheism in the world today are Christians who acknowledge Jesus ;with their lips and walk out the door and deny Him by their lifestyle. That is what an unbelieving world simply finds unbelievable.

Offline Jah Gol

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #131 on: December 13, 2011, 10:02:34 PM »
TIM CRACKS THE WHIP
Originally printed at http://www.trinidadexpress.com/news/TIM_CRACKS_THE_WHIP-135557168.html

By Renuka Singh
December 13, 2011
Education Minister Dr Tim Gopeesingh yesterday lashed out at the Teaching Service Commission (TSC) for its "inaccurate" findings on the principal of the Tunapuna Hindu school.

He also threatened to enforce the Education Act that gives him overarching power over the country's school system.

"This matter is going to come to a head because I intend to deal with the TSC," Gopeesingh said in a telephone interview yesterday.

The TSC has cleared Gajadharsingh-Nanga of all allegations of wrongdoing at the school, which Gopeesingh says is contradictory to the reports from two school supervisors who visited the school.

"The report from the TSC does not reflect accurately the information from the school supervisors. The TSC has arrived at a widely varying view from the supervisors," he said.

Gopeesingh said he has seen a report from the school supervisors appointed to investigate the allegations made against the principal at the school, and they varied from the findings and recommendations made by the TSC. Gopeesingh was also concerned that while the school supervisors recommended an immediate transfer for the principal, the TSC said it would add her name to the list of applicants.

"That could take as much as two years," he said.

Gopeesingh said when he received the TSC report, he considered "going public" with it to highlight the discrepancies between the two reports.

"The question is now over the role and function of the TSC as a so-called independent committee. They are autocratic and high-handed. It was clear from the evidence that things not working out at all at the school," he said.

"I am now questioning the independence of the TSC," he said.

Hyacinth Guy, TSC head, said she was not allowed to speak on the matter, but she acknowledged that the TSC has cleared Gajadharsingh-Nanga of the allegations by the Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS) board.

A source within the TSC said the report sent to the Ministry was "more than a recommendation", adding that "they (the Ministry) are mandated to carry out those instructions".

The minister has, however, quoted Section 5 (g) of the Education Act, which detailed the "Powers of the Minister". Gopeesingh said that section gave the minister the jurisdiction to "do all such other things as may be found expedient from time to time for the carrying out of his responsibilities for education and training", and he intended to use it.

"The TSC's findings are simply not acceptable to me. They made their decisions independent of the evidence before them and did not call the people involved in the situation to even do interviews," he said.

Gopeesingh said the TSC board "flagrantly ignored" the submissions from the school supervisors, and he was not going to let the matter rest.

The Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS) board has alleged the principal was not abiding by the rules of the school and has taken it upon herself to close off the library and computer room from pupils. She was also accused of not handing out Ministry-issued books.

Gajadharsingh-Nanga has accused the SDMS board and its general secretary, Satnarayan Maharaj, of asking her to block non-Indian and non-Hindu pupils and workers from the school.

Offline Bourbon

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #132 on: December 13, 2011, 10:17:13 PM »
Oh great.
The greatest single cause of atheism in the world today are Christians who acknowledge Jesus ;with their lips and walk out the door and deny Him by their lifestyle. That is what an unbelieving world simply finds unbelievable.

Offline Brownsugar

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #133 on: December 14, 2011, 05:06:32 AM »
Alright eh....so hear mih next question.  How is the TSC appointed??  When next are they due for a change??  All yuh see where ah coming from??

Ah next thing, ent at least one of the school supervisors is aligned to Tim or Sat or both??  But didn't Tim heself try to usurp the authority of the TSC when he make big announcement in the media but the issue being resolved when he knew very well that the teacher couldn't go back to work until the TSC gave the all clear??

Hear nah, these people are just a bunch of nasty, stinking, digusting, classless idiots!!   :puking: :busshead:
"...If yuh clothes tear up
Or yuh shoes burst off,
You could still jump up when music play.
Old lady, young baby, everybody could dingolay...
Dingolay, ay, ay, ay ay,
Dingolay ay, ay, ay..."

RIP Shadow....The legend will live on in music...

Offline Jah Gol

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #134 on: December 14, 2011, 07:43:01 AM »
The Minister's statement is highly irresponsible and suggests that he favoured of a particular outcome. I find it peculiar that the Minister unilaterally decided that the decision of the Service Commission was wrong and furthermore imputed improper motives against the Commission by questioning its independence. If even we agree that the Service Commission erred surely the public space is not the correct forum. I am also surprised by this bold and grandstanding tone by the Minister who has been been ever so cautious and reticent on this issue.

Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #135 on: December 14, 2011, 07:50:37 AM »
Of course he favoured a particular outcome he must b on d side of his boi Sat.
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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #136 on: December 14, 2011, 08:21:47 AM »
It is really scandalous and irresponsible that the Minister has now undertaken to criticize the TSC, thereby undermining confidence in the board.  Going forward everybody who disagree with the Commission will question their impartiality, which is what I think Gopeesingh getting at when he talks about their "independence."

Offline Jah Gol

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #137 on: December 14, 2011, 08:29:53 AM »
This was yesterday. Like Tim change he mind or what ? How one day you saying you will  investigate immediately and the next day condemn the decision altogether. Them dem fellas good yes. 

SITA CLEARED
By Lara Pickford-Gordon Tuesday, December 13 2011

The Teaching Service Commission (TSC) has cleared principal of the Tunapuna Hindu Primary School Sita Gajadharsingh-Nanga of allegations made by the Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS) regarding her conduct.

The TSC found there was insufficient evidence against the principal and directed the Education Ministry to investigate the conduct of a teacher of the school and school supervisors.

The TSC met last Wednesday and considered a report from an investigation done by the ministry.

Education Minister Dr Tim Gopeesingh yesterday said the TSC considered the contents of the report and sought legal advice.

Gopeesingh said the TSC concluded that there was “insufficient evidence to substantiate allegations made against Mrs Gajadharsingh-Nanga.”

However, the TSC has found there was sufficient grounds for the ministry to investigate “one of the teachers at the school.”

Gopeesingh did not disclose what was the allegation against the teacher.

He said the TSC has concerns about issues at the school which should have been addressed by school supervisors.

The TSC has directed the ministry to investigate whether the school supervisors were negligent in their duty and failed to address the issue of the allocation of resources from the ministry to the school and did not have proper oversight of the school.

Gopeesingh said he has given instructions for an investigating team to be established to urgently deal with matters related to the supervisors and a particular teacher identified by the TSC in its report.

Gajadharsingh-Nanga has spent most of the school term away from duty due to the rift with the SDMS and schools’ Parent Teachers’ Association (PTA).

She returned to work last Tuesday, just over two weeks after the Ministry of Education mediated an agreement between her and the SDMS on November 21.

On the issue of the transfer of Gajadharsingh-Nanga, the TSC advised that interviews would take place for principal I for primary schools, which were advertised, and Gajadharsingh Nanga would be invited to be interviewed. Gopeesingh said the ministry was “hamstrung” as it had to wait on the TSC to do interviews. Contacted for comment Gajadharsingh-Nanga said she had not heard anything about the TSC’s report yet and no one has contacted her. She told Newsday that she could not comment further because the teaching service regulations did not allow her to.

SDMS Secretary General Satnarayan Maharaj had no comment to make until he saw the report.

Peter Wilson, general secretary of the TT Unified Teachers’ Association (TTUTA) said he had no idea of what the report said but based on what he heard from Newsday, no action can be taken against the principal and it was up to the ministry to deal with the other matters highlighted.

Wilson said despite the agreement of November 21, Gajadharsingh-Nanga was still having problems at school. Private security guards hired by the SDMS, teaching staff and cleaners have refused to take directives from her.

The principal yesterday attempted to have a staff meeting but it did not happen. Wilson said the principal was responsible for the day-to-day management of the school and would be accountable for anything which happened. He said there seemed to be a deliberate attempt to subvert the agreement mediated by the Education Ministry between the principal and SDMS and the ministry was “aiding and abetting”. The school supervisors are supposed to ensure the principal was able to carry out her duties.

“Something as simple as keys. She can’t even have access to the area where office, equipment and stationary supplies are kept. It is as ridiculous as that,” said Wilson.

The atmosphere at the school has been tense for more than six months and there has been a strong lobby by the PTA and SDMS for the principal to be transferred.

The issues at the school became public when a letter written by Gajadharsingh-Nanga to the TSC requesting a transfer was publicised by a weekly newspaper in August.

In it she alleged that the SDMS Secretary General Satnarayan Maharaj threatened to lock her out of the school for admitting non-Indian children within the catchment area and not to admit black children. She said Maharaj was in an “uproar” because two of eight on-the-job trainees were non- Indian.”

Maharaj wrote the TSC August 10 and described Gajadharsingh-Nanga’s behaviour as disruptive and parents had expressed concern about confrontation.

The Director of Personnel Administration (DPA) wrote to the ministry on September 26 asking for the Permanent Secretary to ensure steps were taken to ensure the principal be allowed to carry out her duties.

Three weeks earlier the SDMS wrote to Gajadharsingh-Nanga telling her to report for duty at the St George East Education District. Maharaj wrote to the TSC on October 10 outlining the reasons the SDMS wanted the principal tranferred: Gajadharsingh-Nanga did not institute a programme for infants to learn prayers, she removed the dress code sign and attempted to frustrate efforts to complete a temple on the school compound, and failed to fulfill obligations to the board.

The DPA wrote the SDMS October 14 informing that unless Gajadharsingh-Nanga was transferred or otherwise directed by the TSC, the SDMS had no authority to debar her from reporting for work. Gajadharsingh-Nanga went to the school on October 24 accompanied by two school supervisors but they were not allowed entry. The police was called and fire service officers cut the locks on door. On November 9, excerpts from Gajadharsingh-Nanga’s letter were read by Port-of-Spain North/St Ann’s West Member of Parliament Patricia McIntosh during a sitting of the House of Representatives.

At a briefing on November 12, Maharaj provided data for the student population of the Tunapuna Hindu School which showed there were 22 children of African descent.


« Last Edit: December 14, 2011, 08:32:06 AM by Jah Gol »

Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #138 on: December 14, 2011, 09:45:47 AM »
This was yesterday. Like Tim change he mind or what ? How one day you saying you will  investigate immediately and the next day condemn the decision altogether. Them dem fellas good yes. 

SITA CLEARED
By Lara Pickford-Gordon Tuesday, December 13 2011

The Teaching Service Commission (TSC) has cleared principal of the Tunapuna Hindu Primary School Sita Gajadharsingh-Nanga of allegations made by the Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS) regarding her conduct.

The TSC found there was insufficient evidence against the principal and directed the Education Ministry to investigate the conduct of a teacher of the school and school supervisors.

The TSC met last Wednesday and considered a report from an investigation done by the ministry.

Education Minister Dr Tim Gopeesingh yesterday said the TSC considered the contents of the report and sought legal advice.

Gopeesingh said the TSC concluded that there was “insufficient evidence to substantiate allegations made against Mrs Gajadharsingh-Nanga.”

However, the TSC has found there was sufficient grounds for the ministry to investigate “one of the teachers at the school.”

Gopeesingh did not disclose what was the allegation against the teacher.

He said the TSC has concerns about issues at the school which should have been addressed by school supervisors.

The TSC has directed the ministry to investigate whether the school supervisors were negligent in their duty and failed to address the issue of the allocation of resources from the ministry to the school and did not have proper oversight of the school.

Gopeesingh said he has given instructions for an investigating team to be established to urgently deal with matters related to the supervisors and a particular teacher identified by the TSC in its report.

Gajadharsingh-Nanga has spent most of the school term away from duty due to the rift with the SDMS and schools’ Parent Teachers’ Association (PTA).

She returned to work last Tuesday, just over two weeks after the Ministry of Education mediated an agreement between her and the SDMS on November 21.

On the issue of the transfer of Gajadharsingh-Nanga, the TSC advised that interviews would take place for principal I for primary schools, which were advertised, and Gajadharsingh Nanga would be invited to be interviewed. Gopeesingh said the ministry was “hamstrung” as it had to wait on the TSC to do interviews. Contacted for comment Gajadharsingh-Nanga said she had not heard anything about the TSC’s report yet and no one has contacted her. She told Newsday that she could not comment further because the teaching service regulations did not allow her to.

SDMS Secretary General Satnarayan Maharaj had no comment to make until he saw the report.

Peter Wilson, general secretary of the TT Unified Teachers’ Association (TTUTA) said he had no idea of what the report said but based on what he heard from Newsday, no action can be taken against the principal and it was up to the ministry to deal with the other matters highlighted.

Wilson said despite the agreement of November 21, Gajadharsingh-Nanga was still having problems at school. Private security guards hired by the SDMS, teaching staff and cleaners have refused to take directives from her.

The principal yesterday attempted to have a staff meeting but it did not happen. Wilson said the principal was responsible for the day-to-day management of the school and would be accountable for anything which happened. He said there seemed to be a deliberate attempt to subvert the agreement mediated by the Education Ministry between the principal and SDMS and the ministry was “aiding and abetting”. The school supervisors are supposed to ensure the principal was able to carry out her duties.

“Something as simple as keys. She can’t even have access to the area where office, equipment and stationary supplies are kept. It is as ridiculous as that,” said Wilson.

The atmosphere at the school has been tense for more than six months and there has been a strong lobby by the PTA and SDMS for the principal to be transferred.

The issues at the school became public when a letter written by Gajadharsingh-Nanga to the TSC requesting a transfer was publicised by a weekly newspaper in August.

In it she alleged that the SDMS Secretary General Satnarayan Maharaj threatened to lock her out of the school for admitting non-Indian children within the catchment area and not to admit black children. She said Maharaj was in an “uproar” because two of eight on-the-job trainees were non- Indian.”

Maharaj wrote the TSC August 10 and described Gajadharsingh-Nanga’s behaviour as disruptive and parents had expressed concern about confrontation.

The Director of Personnel Administration (DPA) wrote to the ministry on September 26 asking for the Permanent Secretary to ensure steps were taken to ensure the principal be allowed to carry out her duties.

Three weeks earlier the SDMS wrote to Gajadharsingh-Nanga telling her to report for duty at the St George East Education District. Maharaj wrote to the TSC on October 10 outlining the reasons the SDMS wanted the principal tranferred: Gajadharsingh-Nanga did not institute a programme for infants to learn prayers, she removed the dress code sign and attempted to frustrate efforts to complete a temple on the school compound, and failed to fulfill obligations to the board.

The DPA wrote the SDMS October 14 informing that unless Gajadharsingh-Nanga was transferred or otherwise directed by the TSC, the SDMS had no authority to debar her from reporting for work. Gajadharsingh-Nanga went to the school on October 24 accompanied by two school supervisors but they were not allowed entry. The police was called and fire service officers cut the locks on door. On November 9, excerpts from Gajadharsingh-Nanga’s letter were read by Port-of-Spain North/St Ann’s West Member of Parliament Patricia McIntosh during a sitting of the House of Representatives.

At a briefing on November 12, Maharaj provided data for the student population of the Tunapuna Hindu School which showed there were 22 children of African descent.



Yday was Yday and 2day is 2day dat fella Biopalar so not surprise
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Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #139 on: December 14, 2011, 10:51:42 AM »
Sat: No vindication

 By —Renuka Singh

"Sita was my first mistake in 35 years," said Satnarayan Maharaj, general secretary of the Sana- tan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS). Maharaj was referring to reinstated Tunapuna Hindu School principal Sita Gajadharsingh-Nanga, who has been cleared of all accusations of misconduct by the Teaching Service Commission (TSC).
 
Maharaj said he did not agree with the TSC findings and said it was not a question of vindication for the principal.
 
"The case was not proven; it is not that she was cleared," he said in a telephone interview yesterday.
 
Maharaj said what was clear was that the TSC was attempting to shift blame from the principal to the school supervisors.
 
"If there was nothing amiss at the school, why then would the TSC recommend an investigation into the school supervisors?" he said.
 
"In a roundabout way, they are blaming the supervisors, instead, for what has been happening at the school," Maharaj said.
 
The TSC findings recommended an investigation to "determine whether the school super- visors were negligent in the performance of their duties, in that they failed to address issues of the allocation of resources from the Ministry of Education to the school and did not have proper oversight of the school".
 
He said the parents were unhappy with the decision.

"They would want to take their own action. This situation is totally crazy, but there is a bigger battle going on," he said.
 
Maharaj said the TSC was an arm of the Ministry of Education and should not have the level of autonomy that they enjoy.
 
Gajadharsingh-Nanga, however, said she did feel "vindicated" by the TSC findings. Though Gajadharsingh-Nanga did not want to say more on the issue, a source close to her, who requested anonymity, said the findings and recommendations from the TSC did not change the current situation at the school.
 
"She would be vindicated because an independent board looked at all the evidence and exonerated her. They made an impartial decision based on nothing more than the evidence of the matter," the source said.
 
The source noted that Gajadharsingh-Nanga was not informed of the TSC findings through any formal channels.
 
"She was told informally of the findings. There was no communication from the Ministry of Education or the SDMS board," she said.
 
The school's parent-teacher association (PTA) has called a media conference on the school's compound today.
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Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #140 on: December 14, 2011, 09:06:05 PM »
PUNISH SITA
By Darcel Choy Thursday, December 15 2011

The Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) of the Tunapuna Hindu School is demanding that principal Sita Gajadharsingh-Nanga be moved or else.

Parents are not prepared to work with the principal if she returns in the new school term on January 9, 2012, president of the PTA, Ishwar Muttoo, said yesterday at a press conference at the school, located on the corner of Churchill Roosevelt Highway and Pasea Main Road, Tunapuna.

When asked what the PTA will do if the principal returns to school in the next term, Muttoo said, “wait for January 9.” When asked if they would shut down the school he repeated, “wait for January 9.”

The PTA is adamant that Gajadharsingh-Nanga must be transferred even though the Teaching Service Commission cleared her of allegations of misconduct and management saying there was no evidence to prove the claims made by the PTA and the general secretary of the Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS) Board, Sat Maharaj.

“We do not want this to continue in the next school term...we cannot allow our leaders in society to continue to act in manners (sic) like the principal has been acting, failing to allow our children to use the library and computer rooms, for failing to deliver text books to our children, we see that as misconduct in public office, when that happens you need to be disciplined,” Muttoo said. Muttoo said the activities of the principal during her tenure were an act of misconduct and she needed to be punished.

“When you deprive my child and the 500 children of brand new desks, you need to be punished. If my child comes to this school and drops a piece of paper on the floor they are disciplined they have to stand up and kneel down and write lines. Why can we discipline the children and not the principal?” he asked.

He said the PTA believes her return would only cause tension among teachers and students.

“We cannot allow it, we would not sit idly by and allow our children to go through those kind of disturbances and trauma again,” Muttoo said.

The troubling impasse involving the principal has been ongoing for several months, with allegations of racism and misconduct being made by the principal, PTA and the SDMS, prompting investigations by the Education Ministry and the Teaching Service Commission (TSC).

An agreement brokered by Education Minister Dr Tim Gopeesingh on November 21 in which there was an understanding that Gajadharsingh-Nanga would return to the school on the condition that she would be transferred in the new school term appears to have failed. The principal did not return to school until a week later but has been unable to run the school effectively since staff ignore her instructions and she leaves the compound early out of fear of being locked in by the SDMS’ security.

Amid the rising tension, Gopeesingh yesterday said his main concern was that it could take as long as two years for Gajadharsingh-Nanga’s request for a transfer to be approved by the TSC.

In a statement, he said the TSC’s track record showed that it had not yet filled 65 vacancies for primary school principals, and there were still vacancies for 21 secondary school principals.

Gopeesingh said he has found Gajadharsingh-Nanga should get the transfer she has requested since it appears to be the only way she will be provided with the appropriate professional environment needed to do her job.

“She cannot continue to operate in a hostile situation and the students of the school cannot continue to be affected by it,” he said.

Gopeesingh said he has sought advice from a senior counsel who has noted that under Section 5 (g) of the Education Act, which details the “Powers of the Minister”, the Minister of Education has jurisdiction to “do all such other things as may be found expedient from time to time for the carrying out of his responsibilities for education and training”.

Gopeesingh said he is not challenging the TSC’s “constitutionally-enshrined independence” and proposes to hold a meeting with the commission with a view to resolving the matter at the earliest convenient time.

The minister said he saw it fit to ensure to use every authority vested in him to facilitate a quick transfer of the principal, in the best interest of the education system.

In a statement, the Trinidad and Tobago Unified Teachers’ Association (TTUTA) accused the ministry of failing to ensure that proper measures were put in place to assure a non-threatening environment at the school and the physical safety and security of the principal in keeping with Article 5 of the agreement reached between the ministry, TTUTA and the SDMS Board on November 21.

There have been a series of correspondence between the Permanent Secretary of the Education Ministry, Kathleen Thomas, school supervisors and Director of Personnel Administration (DPA) of the TSC, Yvette Phillip, which have all unveiled a very unhealthy and strained relationship between the principal and her staff and express concerns that her authority had been undermined by the SDMS Board.

A new development in the saga surfaced this week, that of the role of a teacher who also works for Radio Jaagriti which is run by the SDMS Board on the school’s compound.

The Permanent Secretary (PS) sought to address allegations made against the principal by the Board and of those the principal made against the Board in a letter to the DPA on December 2.

On the Board’s claim that the principal had hired non-Indians as on-the-job trainees who did not follow the school’s dress code, the PS said the information submitted by two school supervisors does not allow for a “definitive position” on the principal’s management of trainees.

Supporting excerpts from a report compiled by a school supervisor I, indicate the supervisor said the principal was not responsible for the hiring of the trainees. These were the roles of the Education Ministry and the Ministry of Science, Technology and Tertiary Education.

It was also alleged the principal collected monies from parents seeking enrolment in the school. The PS said the information submitted did not support the allegation while in the supervisor’s report, it stated there was no “hard evidence” to support the claim.

There were also concerns of the principal’s lack of financial accountability and the PS said it was a valid concern. The supervisor’s report also found the principal’s reporting procedures to staff about the school’s finances needed to be improved.

The principal was also criticised by the Board for not conducting maintenance work on the school. The PS said this responsibility resided with the Board. The supervisor agreed and said there was evidence that repair and maintenance work was done during Gajadharsingh-Nanga’s tenure.

The principal was also criticised for her management of the utilisation of school equipment and resources.

The PS said the principal’s management was deficit but noted such shortcomings would ordinarily be treated with by giving guidance, followed by a verbal warning, a written warning and a final warning. The PS advised that Gajadharsingh-Nanga would require guidance and counselling in this area. In the supervisor’s report it was noted the principal could be considered negligent with regard to the non-use of facilities, equipment and materials including the computer room, library, textbooks and furniture.

Addressing the allegations made against the Board by the principal, the PS said the information received did not substantiate her claim that she had been instructed not to enrol non-Indian children at the school.

Furthermore, among the recommendations the PS received from the supervisor was the need for an audit of the school’s finances, materials and resources.

The supervisor also advised the transfer of the principal be “strongly considered”; the school should be closely monitored by District School Supervisors; there should be closer collaboration between the SDMS Board and the ministry to address school issues in a timely manner; the principal should be also be monitored and supported vis a vis her communication and inter-personal skills.

 
 



 
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Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #141 on: December 14, 2011, 09:29:18 PM »
Education Ministry looks into Radio Jaagriti
Thursday, December 15 2011

A new issue that has surfaced out of the investigations done by the Teaching Service Commission (TSC) and schools supervisors on the impasse at the Tunapuna Hindu Primary School was the complaint that a teacher was spending too much time doing work at Radio Jaagriti.

Radio Jaagriti is run by Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS) on the school’s compound at the corner of Churchill Roosevelt Highway and Pasea Main Road, Tunapuna.

Permanent Secretary (PS) in the Education Ministry Kathleen Thomas raised the issue in a December 2 letter to the TSC. The letter was signed on Thomas’ behalf by the deputy PS Jennifer Daniel.

In the letter to the TSC, the PS included a report from the school supervisor II who noted the following about the teacher:

1. (Name called) is heavily involved in the business of broadcasting and is absent from work on a regular basis.

2. He is the host of different radio programmes, including one that is broadcast every morning.

In light of this the PS said the school supervisor I will be required to provide oversight for the rest of the school year on “the issue of the activities of the teacher.”

“The Ministry of Education will decide on a course of action it will pursue with respect to the issue of the location of Radio Jaagriti,” said the PS.

In a reply on December 9 to the PS, Director of Personnel Administration (DPA) of the TSC Yvette Phillip said there were “sufficient grounds to investigate the activities of (name called), to determine whether any allegations of misconduct should be brought against him.”

The DPA listed four points which she felt should be addressed:

1. Whether (name called) is frequently absent and/or late and whether this is adversely impacting the school.

2. Whether (name called) has absented himself from school without approved leave.

3. Whether (name called) has left the country without permission.

4. Whether (name called) activity is in conformity with the terms and conditions of his employment as a teacher I.

When Newsday checked, the teacher was not a school nor at the radio station.

Radio Jaagriti began operations after the SDMS won a legal battle against the State alleging discrimination when it was not awarded a radio licence. A licence was eventually granted after the SDMS’ successful lawsuit.

Another concern which was raised in review of the school was the role of senior school administrator in impasse involving principal Sita Gajadharsingh-Nanga.

This matter was noted by the school supervisor II in a report to the PS, which was also forwarded to the TSC. The supervisor questioned whether the administrator was used by persons to “carry out their agenda” against the principal.

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Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #142 on: December 14, 2011, 10:17:39 PM »
SITA MUST WAIT IN LINE
No special treatment for transfer of principal, says TSC head
By Renuka Singh

Tunapuna Hindu School principal Sita Gajadharsingh-Nanga will not get any special treatment for her transfer by the Teaching Service Commission (TSC).

Hyacinth Guy, head of the TSC, said yesterday the request for her to be transferred will have to go through the normal channels, and she would not be "jumped to the head of the line", even under instructions from the Ministry of Education.

Guy, in a telephone interview yesterday, said the Ministry of Education's powers do not trump the Constitution, and as such, the TSC remained an independent body, unaffected by political interference.

Guy defended the role and function of the TSC in light of a statement by Education Minister Dr Tim Gopeesingh that he intended to challenge the TSC's findings and recommendations in the matter at the school.

Gajadharsingh-Nanga is claiming she was ordered by the secretary general of the Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS), Sat Maharaj, not to allow pupils and on-the-job trainees (OJT) of African descent into the school.

This was denied by Maharaj, who claimed the principal had removed the dress code regulation sign and closed off several rooms, and did not distribute Government-issues schoolbooks and furniture.

Gopeesingh, in a media release yesterday, said his main concern was the request for the transfer and the pace with which the TSC would be able to facilitate the principal's move.

Gopeesingh said he feared it could take as long as two years to transfer Gajadharsingh-Nanga, but Guy said "no transfer would take that long".

Guy said, however, the TSC had closed off interviews for the rest of the year, and it will not meet again until the first week in January.

"We will begin interviews in January, and that will take all of January. We will then do an order of merit list by the end of January. She may or may not get what she wants," Guy said, referring to Gajadharsingh-Nanga's request to change schools.

"She cannot jump the line of transfer requests already in front of her," Guy said.

Guy said Gajadharsingh-Nanga, who was locked out of the school since July but returned to work in November, following an agreement signed by the SDMS board, the Trinidad and Tobago Unified Teachers Association (TTUTA) and the Ministry of Education, was not aware of the available vacancies which were usually advertised in the schools.

"The most we can do is waive the deadline date for submissions for her. But we have to be fair to everybody," she said.

"However, if she wanted a transfer to another SDMS school, that can be done immediately as it falls under the same denomination, but other than that, it's the same for everybody, regardless of the situation surrounding the request," she said.

A source within the TSC claimed the Ministry of Education was actually responsible for the stalled appointment process.

"The TSC is only responsible for appointments after the Ministry of Education advertises the posts, interviews the applicants and creates a short list. The TSC then uses that short list to fill the vacancies at the schools. The minister must know that," she said.

She said the TSC stood by its report and agreed with Maharaj that the TSC findings put the onus on the school supervisors and not the principal.

"This situation did not happen overnight. If the school supervisors noticed that something was progressively wrong, then it was up to them to report it up the proper channels," Guy said.

Today you're the dog, tomorrow you're the hydrant - so be good to others - it comes back!"

Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #143 on: December 14, 2011, 10:19:06 PM »
Sita should be punished
Tunapuna Hindu PTA gives warning:

The parent-teacher association (PTA) at the Tunapuna Hindu School is threatening to take action if the principal, Sita Gajadharsingh-Nanga, is not removed before the start of the new term.

The group is also calling on President George Maxwell Richards to get involved to resolve the matter if the impasse continues.

Ishwar Muttoo, president of the PTA, yesterday held a media conference on the school's compound, calling for the principal to be transferred before children start the new school year on January 9.

"We are asking the TSC (Teaching Service Commission) and the Minister of Education to treat this with some urgency and deal with this matter. We want this impasse settled before the start of the new school term," he said.

He claimed the principal was guilty of many wrongdoings at the school and should not be allowed to get away with it.

"When you deprive our children of new desks and new books and have them sitting on termite-ridden desks, you need to be punished," he said.

Muttoo said the PTA was surprised by the findings of the TSC since they, as concerned parents, were never interviewed.

"We submitted letters to the school supervisors, but we were never contacted by the TSC," he said.

Muttoo said the presence of the principal will cause tension at the school, which would threaten the children's continued learning at the school.

Muttoo denied he was the mouthpiece of Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS) general secretary Sat Maharaj.

"Three weeks ago, 150 parents met here at the school, and they gave us the mandate to continue to fight and struggle to have the principal removed," he said.

"We are the voice of the parents and not the SDMS," he said.

He said the PTA was not aware of any misdeeds by the vice-principal and another teacher as charged by the principal.

"The school is being run fine by the vice-principal, and the students are working now, when she is here, there is an obvious tension with the staff and with our children," he said.

Muttoo said the Minister of Education, Dr Tim Gopeesingh, and not the TSC would feel the brunt of action from the parents of the school, and as such, they fully supported him stepping into the continued situation at the school.

"Wait till January 9 and see what happens if that principal comes back here," he said.

Today you're the dog, tomorrow you're the hydrant - so be good to others - it comes back!"

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #144 on: December 16, 2011, 09:22:24 AM »
SITA WANTS TO STAY
Tunapuna principal: I never asked for a transfer
By Renuka Singh (Express)

Story Created: Dec 15, 2011 at 11:47 PM ECT

Story Updated: Dec 15, 2011 at 11:47 PM ECT

Principal Sita Gajadharsingh-Nanga is not moving from the Tunapuna Hindu School.

Gajadharsingh-Nanga, who originally brought the request for a transfer to the Teaching Service Commission (TSC) at the height of the controversy at the school in July, now says she will not be "bullied" from leaving a school she loves.

Gajadharsingh-Nanga maintained that under the guidelines of the Ministry of Education, she was not allowed to speak publicly in controversial school matters, but she did say she will continue to do her job without "fear or favour" at the Sanantan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS) denominational school.

A source close the principal said it has been "really hard" for her to sit by and watch this situation unfold, while the others who signed the memorandum of understanding with the Minister of Education last month were allowed to continue speaking and "dragging her name through the mud".

The source said Gajadharsingh-Nanga has often said she was "not afraid of the Muttoos of this world", referring to the school's Parent Teacher Association (PTA) president Ishwar Muttoo, who has been leading the charge to have the principal removed from the school.

"But she has never formally applied for a transfer and she's not going to do it because she has done nothing wrong," she said. "But she said that some good will come from this."

Among the "good", she said, would be the TSC-led investigation into the actions of one teacher who, while paid to carry out teaching duties, was never assigned to a class and has a programme with the radio station on the school's compound.

"A lot of the internal issues are now coming out and would not come out if she did not take a stand," she said.

She said a key internal issue was the questions of improper conduct by non-Government issued security personnel attached the school.

"As many as ten parents complained to the school that this particular guard, from a private firm hired by the SDMS, has been acting inappropriately with female students," she said.

The source said Gajadharsingh-Nanga raised that issue several times at the school and even wrote to the school supervisors about it.

"But she was locked out of the school so no one knew what happened there," she said.

Education Minister Dr Tim Gopeesingh said he was not aware of any such report.

"If that report was made to the school supervisors, it should have been escalated to me within 24 hours. I have not heard anything like that but I will look into those allegations," Gopeesingh said in a telephone interview yesterday.

With regards to Gajadharsingh-Nanga's decision not to transfer, Gopeesingh said she did request a transfer but not through the appropriate channels.

"It was forwarded to the TSC instead of the Ministry, but we worked that out," he said.

Gopeesingh said the TSC sent the transfer request to his Ministry and it was dealt with and sent back to the TSC.

Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #145 on: December 16, 2011, 02:38:08 PM »
Sita’s husband: I’ll deal with PTA threats
Friday, December 16 2011

Ravi Nanga, attorney at law and husband of Tunapuna Hindu Primary School principal Sita Gajadharsingh-Nanga, has indicated they will address the threats made against her by the Parent-Teacher Association (PTA).

Without giving details, Nanga when contacted yesterday said the threats made by the PTA, “will be dealt with in due course.”

At a press conference at the school on Wednesday, the PTA demanded Gajadharsingh-Nanga be moved or else.

PTA president Ishwar Muttoo said parents were not prepared to work with the principal if she returns in the new school term on January 9, 2012. He said the principal must be punished. When asked what the PTA will do if the principal returns to school in the next term, Muttoo said, “wait for January 9.” When asked if they would shut down the school he repeated, “wait for January 9.”

Davanand Sinanan, Trinidad and Tobago Unified Teachers’ Association (TTUTA), first vice-president yesterday condemned the statements made by the PTA and called on Education Minister Dr Tim Gopeesingh to do the same.

“The language used is intimidating and TTUTA condemns strongly the threats made against Gajadharsingh-Nanga. When the PTA comes out and makes these kind of statements then it reflects contempt and disrespect for the law and authority of the TSC. We would like the ministry to denounce the statements,” he said.

The PTA is adamant that Gajadharsingh-Nanga must be transferred even though the Teaching Service Commission (TSC) cleared her of allegations of misconduct and management saying there was no evidence to prove the claims made by the PTA and the secretary general of the Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS) Board, Sat Maharaj.

On the issue of the transfer of Gajadharsingh-Nanga, the TSC advised that interviews would take place for principal I for primary schools, which were advertised, and Gajadharsingh-Nanga would be invited to be interviewed.

In an interview at TTUTA’s office on Southern Main Road, Curepe, Sinanan said due process must be adhered to.

“Everyone has to abide by the law, the PTA has to be told they have to respect the findings of the commission. If they fail to comply with the principal’s instructions they would be taken to task,” he said.

Gajadharsingh-Nanga has spent most of the school term away from duty due to the rift with the SDMS and schools’ Parent Teachers’ Association (PTA).

She returned to work last Tuesday, just over two weeks after the Ministry of Education mediated an agreement between her and the SDMS on November 21.

Today you're the dog, tomorrow you're the hydrant - so be good to others - it comes back!"

Offline Brownsugar

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #146 on: December 16, 2011, 03:13:30 PM »
Miss Sita, you brave!!!......:notworthy: :notworthy:
"...If yuh clothes tear up
Or yuh shoes burst off,
You could still jump up when music play.
Old lady, young baby, everybody could dingolay...
Dingolay, ay, ay, ay ay,
Dingolay ay, ay, ay..."

RIP Shadow....The legend will live on in music...

Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #147 on: December 16, 2011, 05:46:58 PM »
Today you're the dog, tomorrow you're the hydrant - so be good to others - it comes back!"

Offline fishs

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #148 on: December 17, 2011, 12:45:38 AM »
Miss Sita, you brave!!!......:notworthy: :notworthy:

ENTTTTT
Weary you not working in Min of Edu?
Yuh ent fraid the minister who like to molest woman ent come after you?
Ah want de woman on de bass

Offline weary1969

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Re: SAT BLOCKED BLACK CHILDREN
« Reply #149 on: December 19, 2011, 09:20:53 AM »
Miss Sita, you brave!!!......:notworthy: :notworthy:

ENTTTTT
Weary you not working in Min of Edu?
Yuh ent fraid the minister who like to molest woman ent come after you?

I jumped b4 I was pushed. I did not ask 4 my contract 2 b renewed.
Today you're the dog, tomorrow you're the hydrant - so be good to others - it comes back!"

 

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