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Author Topic: Dreadlocks Thread  (Read 9579 times)

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Offline just cool

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Dreadlocks Thread
« Reply #60 on: October 09, 2012, 08:08:59 PM »
Word iz that snoop dog lion tun rasta and dun wid rap forever.

never though i'd see something this bizarre.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTqyV5Kw9Ss

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0t6CaN3ifH0&feature=relmfu
« Last Edit: October 09, 2012, 08:23:27 PM by just cool »
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Snoop dog tun rasta??
« Reply #61 on: October 10, 2012, 06:24:18 AM »
I think there's a thread abt this in the Entertainment section.
"How do you feel when you win 6-love twice? --- Mia Amor Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados, delivering a domino reference with a straight bat, upon being asked how it felt to have prevailed 30-0 in consecutive parliamentary elections.

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Offline ZANDOLIE

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Re: Snoop dog tun rasta??
« Reply #62 on: October 10, 2012, 06:48:57 AM »
dunno if he turn ras, but he was outgrowing hip hop for a long time now. he is lucky enough to have a good life and family, the man can't pretend to be a cynical gangster/player anymore. good for him for moving in a new direction. part conviction, part hype...all good.
 
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Offline Touches

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Re: Snoop dog tun rasta??
« Reply #63 on: October 10, 2012, 01:49:21 PM »
I see him in the Fifa 13 ad.

Rasta does play xbox 360 online too...I thought that is babylon ting.


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Offline Bourbon

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Re: Snoop dog tun rasta??
« Reply #64 on: October 10, 2012, 03:56:30 PM »
I see him in the Fifa 13 ad.

Rasta does play xbox 360 online too...I thought that is babylon ting.

Yeah he's a fan....

http://soccernet.espn.go.com/video/espnfc/video?id=1170656&cc=3888

Dat video showing de effects of too much weed.

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Offline Bitter

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Dreadlocks Thread
« Reply #65 on: January 29, 2013, 02:16:04 PM »
This one is for Tallman: Dread thieves cut and run

Dread thieves cut and run

Jan 29, 2013 | POPPY LOUW
http://www.timeslive.co.za/thetimes/2013/01/29/dread-thieves-cut-and-run

Jasper Munsinwa was partying at a Johannesburg club when he noticed his friend was missing. Minutes later, he found him passed out - with all of his dreadlocks shorn off.

Munsinwa's friend, Mutsa Madonko, who was visiting from Zimbabwe early this month and has since left, is one of a growing number of people who have had their dreadlocks stolen in the past few months.

The thefts, said hair stylists, were probably connected to the rising demand for natural dreadlocks as extensions.

Shoulder-length dreadlocks are sold for between R200 and R700, while longer ones cost as much as R2500.

Munsinwa said it was clear that whoever stole his friend's hair - which had taken him 10 years to grow - was after nothing else.

"When we found him, he still had his cellphone and wallet with all his money inside."

Dreadlock stylists outside the Central Methodist Church in central Johannesburg said such is the demand for dreadlocks that few ask questions when the matted locks are offered for sale.

Said John Wushe: "They are becoming very popular. On a busy day we get about 10 people [wanting] to extend their hair."

But not everyone is keen on using a stranger's hair.

Willy Selahla of Soweto said: "I'm using my brother's hair because I know where it comes from and that he wasn't hurt."

For clients wanting the extensions, the dreadlocks are either woven in individually using a thin crocheting hook or sewn together using a needle and thread .

The process usually takes about two hours to complete and costs between R250 and R1500 depending on the length and thickness of the hair.

Although more and more stories of dreadlock theft are coming to light, only one case was reported to the Durban central police station last year.

Johannesburg police spokesman Captain John Maluleka encouraged victims to open cases of assault. He said: "We have only heard stories - no cases have been reported to us."

Maluleka said it could be a case of victims being too embarrassed to report the theft of their hair.

Randburg stylist Lebo Masimong said women were the most vulnerable.

"You are an easy target if you walk around the CBD and your hair is loose. They don't care about your money or fancy phone. They are only after your hair."

« Last Edit: August 06, 2020, 12:35:16 PM by Flex »
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Offline Tallman

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Re: This one is for Tallman: Dread thieves cut and run
« Reply #66 on: January 29, 2013, 04:24:02 PM »
Dem eh go want mine. It too wild and all how.
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: This one is for Tallman: Dread thieves cut and run
« Reply #67 on: January 29, 2013, 09:50:43 PM »
Spare a thought for the victims. Ah know dey feeling naked and stripped of dey identity.
"How do you feel when you win 6-love twice? --- Mia Amor Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados, delivering a domino reference with a straight bat, upon being asked how it felt to have prevailed 30-0 in consecutive parliamentary elections.

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Mia is a boss.

Offline asylumseeker

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Student will be barred from graduation unless he cuts his dreadlocks, school says
By Lateshia Beachum,  The Washington Post


A black Texas student might miss out on his senior prom and his high school graduation ceremony because he wears dreadlocks.

DeAndre Arnold, 18, has been growing his dreadlocks since he was a seventh-grade student in the Barbers Hill Independent School District in Mont Belvieu, he told Fox 26 Houston.

DeAndre’s father, David Arnold, is of Trinidadian descent, and men in his family often grow their dreadlocks past hip length, the teen told KPRC.

As his hair grew, he and his mother, Sandy Arnold, would cornrow it down or intricately tie up his locs in a voluminous dark brown and honey gold bun to make sure his hair was off his collar, away from his earlobes and out of his eyes so he could meet the school district’s dress-code policy.

Her styling was no longer enough for the school, Sandy Arnold told Fox 26 Houston. Right before the school’s winter break, she and her son were called into the Barbers Hill High School principal’s office, where they were given an ultimatum: Cut DeAndre’s dreadlocks or face in-school suspension.

“They say you can’t get around the dress code by having it up,” she told Fox 26 Houston’s Isiah Carey. “We’re at a standstill."

DeAndre is now suspended from school, KHOU-11 reported.

The Arnold family contends the dress-code policy concerning male hair was changed in the middle of the school year, they said in a Monday night school board meeting.

The school district is standing firm on its policy, which states male students can’t have their hair “gathered or worn in a style that would allow the hair to extend below” the collar, earlobes and eyes when let down.

DeAndre and his mother consider the policy to be sexist, something Barbers Hill superintendent Greg Poole disagrees with.

“Every school district in the nation has a dress code,” Poole told KHOU-11, while emphasizing that school districts have the right to make dress codes that meet local expectations of style. “I don’t think you can go to school in your underwear.”

DeAndre’s refusal to cut his hair has stopped him from returning to normal classes, and his mother claims his only other option is to consider attending a nearby alternative school, according KHOU-11.

“My hair has nothing to do with my ‘excellence,’ as we say in Barbers Hill,” the teenager told the station. “How smart I am, what job I’m going to get — my hair doesn’t determine that. I determine that for my character.”

Schane Niemann, a barber, said he has known about the district policy for years and has seen boys in his chair because of the dress code. His shop is across the street from the school.

“Every day we have kids coming in saying that the school makes them come over to get their hair cut because they’re not in compliance,” Niemann said in an interview with KHOU-11. He added, “It’s by far not a race issue.”

Local activists scoff at that assertion, considering the demographics of the district and its city. African Americans make up 3.1 percent of the school district’s population, according to school district data. The black population in Mont Belvieu, the city in which the school district is located, is 8.5 percent, according to census data.

Gerry Moore, the executive director of the United Urban Alumni Association, attended the school board meeting on Martin Luther King Jr. Day to scold the school board for not understanding the religious and cultural meaning of dreadlocks.

“I get it. You don’t understand locs because ain’t none of y’all black,” he said to board members, who are mostly white, amid finger snaps and mumbles of approval.

Other residents in the school district remarked about the reasons the policy should stand or not.

“I won’t stand for anybody bullying my child,” David Arnold said, stating that he and his wife have tried to address school board meetings with no luck to discuss the policy they say was amended in the middle of the school year. "All he wants to do is graduate.”

The issue has caught the attention of high-profile athletes and politicians.

California’s governor, Democrat Gavin Newsom, called the policy “racial discrimination” in a Thursday tweet and touted his state’s reputation as among the first to ban hair discrimination.

Houston Texans wide receiver DeAndre Hopkins, who shares a first name and wears a hairstyle similar to that of DeAndre Arnold, tweeted his support for Arnold on Wednesday.

Arnold has no intention of doing so.

“You can’t just let people walk all over you or anything like that,” he told KHOU-11. “You have to be willing to take a stand, and that’s what I’m going to do.”
« Last Edit: January 25, 2020, 04:08:06 AM by asylumseeker »
"How do you feel when you win 6-love twice? --- Mia Amor Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados, delivering a domino reference with a straight bat, upon being asked how it felt to have prevailed 30-0 in consecutive parliamentary elections.

🔥

Mia is a boss.

Offline asylumseeker

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The family is Trinbagonian.

Another chapter in the queue of matters involving school districts and similar pronouncements. Won't be the last.

He probably shouldn't have gone to a school district named Barbers Hill? :)

De barber smiling all de way to the bank.
"How do you feel when you win 6-love twice? --- Mia Amor Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados, delivering a domino reference with a straight bat, upon being asked how it felt to have prevailed 30-0 in consecutive parliamentary elections.

🔥

Mia is a boss.

Offline asylumseeker

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Quote
California’s governor, Democrat Gavin Newsom, called the policy “racial discrimination” in a Thursday tweet and touted his state’s reputation as among the first to ban hair discrimination.

Went into effect in July 2019. It is powerful in expression and worthy of digesting here - even at the risk of imputing race where it is not explicitly stated in the Texas matter above.

Quote
THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION 1. The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:

(a) The history of our nation is riddled with laws and societal norms that equated “blackness,” and the associated physical traits, for example, dark skin, kinky and curly hair to a badge of inferiority, sometimes subject to separate and unequal treatment.

(b) This idea also permeated societal understanding of professionalism. Professionalism was, and still is, closely linked to European features and mannerisms, which entails that those who do not naturally fall into Eurocentric norms must alter their appearances, sometimes drastically and permanently, in order to be deemed professional.

(c) Despite the great strides American society and laws have made to reverse the racist ideology that Black traits are inferior, hair remains a rampant source of racial discrimination with serious economic and health consequences, especially for Black individuals.

(d) Workplace dress code and grooming policies that prohibit natural hair, including afros, braids, twists, and locks, have a disparate impact on Black individuals as these policies are more likely to deter Black applicants and burden or punish Black employees than any other group.

(e) Federal courts accept that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination based on race, and therefore protects against discrimination against afros. However, the courts do not understand that afros are not the only natural presentation of Black hair. Black hair can also be naturally presented in braids, twists, and locks.

(f) In a society in which hair has historically been one of many determining factors of a person’s race, and whether they were a second class citizen, hair today remains a proxy for race. Therefore, hair discrimination targeting hairstyles associated with race is racial discrimination.

(g) Acting in accordance with the constitutional values of fairness, equity, and opportunity for all, the Legislature recognizes that continuing to enforce a Eurocentric image of professionalism through purportedly race-neutral grooming policies that disparately impact Black individuals and exclude them from some workplaces is in direct opposition to equity and opportunity for all.

Ring ah bell for freedom.



"How do you feel when you win 6-love twice? --- Mia Amor Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados, delivering a domino reference with a straight bat, upon being asked how it felt to have prevailed 30-0 in consecutive parliamentary elections.

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Mia is a boss.

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School can ban dreadlocks, Jamaica’s high court rules

By Kate Chappell
The Washington Post
KINGSTON, Jamaica — Jamaica’s high court ruled Friday that a school was within its rights to demand that a girl cut her dreadlocks to attend classes, a surprise decision that touched on issues of identity and one the most recognizable symbols of the island’s Rastafarian culture.

The ruling by the Supreme Court of Jamaica capped a two-year battle after the girl — then 5 years old — was told she must cut her dreadlocks for “hygiene” reasons to study at Kensington Primary School in a Kingston suburb.

A rights group, Jamaicans for Justice, had initially lent support to the family, saying the order for the girl to cut her dreadlocks amounted a denial of her freedom of expression and her access to education.

Others viewed the court battle as a stand against rules seen as discrimination against people who wear “natural” hair, including Rastafarians whose dreadlocks are part of their religious tradition.

The girl and her parents, Dale and Sherine Virgo, who both wear dreadlocks, plan to appeal, said their lawyer, Isat Buchanan.

“I will not be cutting my daughter’s hair,” Sherine Virgo said immediately after the ruling. “If they give me that ultimatum again, I will be moving her.”

Virgo’s daughter — now 7 years old and identified in court papers only as Z because she is a minor — was attending classes at the school after the courts delivered an injunction against the Ministry of Education, allowing her to go to school with her dreadlocks intact.

When the school closed this spring because of the coronavirus pandemic, the girl was home-schooled.

“I am more than surprised. It is most unfortunate,” Buchanan said. “It is a most unfortunate day for Black people and for Rastafarian people in Jamaica.”

The girl’s father called the ruling another sign of “systemic racism.”

“A child was refused because of her Black hair, you know?” said Dale Virgo. “It’s so weird that right now in the current climate of the world, in 2020, we are having protests, and Black people are fed up.

“This is an opportunity the Jamaican government and the legal system had to right these wrongs and lead the world and make a change,” he continued. “But they have decided to keep the same system.”

The judgment was delivered in a small courtroom populated mainly by lawyers and the girl’s parents.

The minister of education, Karl Samuda, declined to comment on the ruling, which came on the eve of Emancipation Day, celebrated in Jamaica and elsewhere to mark the end of slavery in the British Empire.

“I’m very cautious about where I tread,” he said, “especially on a sensitive enough subject like that.”

Verene Shepherd, director of the Center for Reparation Research at the University of the West Indies, said the Ministry of Education is debating issues of student clothing and hairstyles, including dreadlocks.

The Virgos say they do not identify as Rastafarian, but they say that wearing dreadlocks is an expression of their identity. All Virgo family members wear that natural hairstyle, as do many Jamaicans who identify as Rastafarian.

Though Rastafarians account for only about 2 percent of Jamaica’s population, the movement has an outsize influence in the culture. Made popular by perhaps the world’s most famous Rastafarian, Bob Marley, it is a political and religious movement that was founded in the 1930s, drawing from African, Revivalist and Christian traditions.

Despite its popularity, Rastafarians, and people who wear natural hair, still face discrimination in Jamaica.

Some schools, including Kensington Primary, explicitly state that dreadlocks are not allowed, and other schools have banned students who refuse to cut them. In the wake of the challenge, the Ministry of Education issued guidelines for hairstyles, including a directive that if children wear dreadlocks, they must be “neat.”

“In general, I think that discrimination on the grounds of hairstyle is wrong,” Shepherd said. “I do not think our children who are Rastafari and who express their culture through their hair should be discriminated against.”

Offline asylumseeker

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Look how much has changed since Bustamente,  Sangster and Shearer.  :flamethrower:
"How do you feel when you win 6-love twice? --- Mia Amor Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados, delivering a domino reference with a straight bat, upon being asked how it felt to have prevailed 30-0 in consecutive parliamentary elections.

🔥

Mia is a boss.

Offline soccerman

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Re: Dreadlocks Thread
« Reply #74 on: August 10, 2020, 08:57:39 AM »
Like I saw someone on social media posted, Jamaica and other Caribbean Islands use images of Rastafarians in their tourism ads to North America and Europe, portraying an image to come to the islands to relax, have a good time and all that jazz. Now they're going against their very own people whose images they use to sell.