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Offline A.B.

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Bolt "situation" response
« on: August 20, 2008, 01:40:28 PM »
No-one on the planet has used more superlatives to praise Bolt since May when I called his 100m world record in New York.   A month ago, I said he would win three gold medals in Beijing, and during both NBC broadcasts, I correctly predicted his World Records. 
No one who saw the NBC broadcasts I have done on Bolt could possibly ever say I have begrudged the man his wins or his success, or even his exuberance, because quite to the contrary, as I walk to the stadium every day with my Jamaican mother, I am excited and thrilled for the Jamaican team's success this year - as I am for all those who are excelling in Beijing.

Prior to the start of the Games, I said in an article that it would only be fitting that Jamaica have their first men's and women's 100m champion ever, since Jamaica is the mecca of track and field.  That has since happened. In my several visits to Jamaica this year, Jamaicans, in many ways, embraced me as a fellow Caribbean brother in a way no other island has, which was a great feeling.  To imply that I am anti-Jamaica or anti Bolt simply flies in the face of the facts.

So, despite the numerous articles in which I have been complimentary to Bolt and my calls of his races on NBC, some have chosen to single out my opinion that he should have celebrated after the line as a 'sour grapes' rain on his parade, or disrespect for Usain Bolt's achievements.
 
Nothing could be further from the truth.

It has further descended into a 'USA vs Jamaica' issue, which is lunacy, since when watching the replays of the 100 I said aloud off-air "that was great television, but I think it was poor sportsmanship".  That assessment was discussed on NBC during Bolt's early rounds and another commentator said it was just youthful exuberance - and it was left at that.
Since that time, and since my Bob Costas interview, Jamaicans, as well as people from other Caribbean countries and the USA, have written to me, to say either one of the following two things - that I was stupid for allowing Costas to 'bait' me into a derogatory statement about Bolt, which is false, since I thought it myself on the night in question, OR, that I should 'stand my ground' because they, too, thought the pre-finish line celebration a bit excessive.  People clearly feel differently about the race.

It is perfectly ok to disagree with my opinions, and many Jamaicans here in Beijing have sought me out in the stadium to say that I would have to know the man Bolt more to understand that he would never disrespect his competitors.  I can certainly entertain or accept that possibility, but I will not apologize for an opinion, especially since it seems that the 999 favorable ones I have had of Bolt have been ignored - to focus on this one - which has been blown totally out of proportion. 

I have no interest in a needless controversy which seeks only to overshadow the unprecedented performances of this Jamaican Olympic team, and I wish to state categorically that I respect opinions contrary to my assessment of Bolt's celebration, while maintaining my own opinion.

My stance as a track purist is that an athlete should celebrate as much as possible before and after, not during a race - simple as that. I celebrated as much as was possible during my own career and I find Bolt's antics here truly entertaining.  I was unaware that he had THIS much personality, in all honesty.  NBC has devoted much airtime to showing the fun Bolt is having in Beijing - but that does not mean I can't state an opinion that I wanted to see him celebrate after the finish line was crossed.  By celebrating 'post finish-line' tonight, Bolt broke a 200M WR I thought would never fall.  I congratulate him wholeheartedly.

I will remind those who seek to falsely make this out to be an issue of one man or one country being singled out that it was NBC that was most harsh when the victorious USA men's 4x100 Olympic team celebrated in a most unbecoming manner in 2000, a sentiment quickly echoed by the US media, leading to an apology by said team.

Anyone who might question my praise and admiration for Bolt need only look at my broadcasts of his races dating back to May of this year, or any of the countless articles in which I have spoken in glowing terms about him.

Ato Boldon
Beijing.
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Offline STEUPS!!

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2008, 01:52:01 PM »
ato, doh take on nobody, especially d people on dis board. kill everybody dead dey track analysts all of ah sudden. other dan u, flash an one or two others, d rest ah we, like somebody say before, is a setta track and field waggonists. doh let nobody try to determine wat opinion u shud have.

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Offline Sando prince

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2008, 01:53:44 PM »
ato, doh take on nobody, especially d people on dis board. kill everybody dead dey track analysts all of ah sudden. other dan u, flash an one or two others, d rest ah we, like somebody say before, is a setta track and field waggonists. doh let nobody try to determine wat opinion u shud have.

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Offline Bakes

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2008, 02:11:58 PM »
No-one on the planet has used more superlatives to praise Bolt since May when I called his 100m world record in New York.   A month ago, I said he would win three gold medals in Beijing, and during both NBC broadcasts, I correctly predicted his World Records. 
No one who saw the NBC broadcasts I have done on Bolt could possibly ever say I have begrudged the man his wins or his success, or even his exuberance, because quite to the contrary, as I walk to the stadium every day with my Jamaican mother, I am excited and thrilled for the Jamaican team's success this year - as I am for all those who are excelling in Beijing.

Prior to the start of the Games, I said in an article that it would only be fitting that Jamaica have their first men's and women's 100m champion ever, since Jamaica is the mecca of track and field.  That has since happened. In my several visits to Jamaica this year, Jamaicans, in many ways, embraced me as a fellow Caribbean brother in a way no other island has, which was a great feeling.  To imply that I am anti-Jamaica or anti Bolt simply flies in the face of the facts.

So, despite the numerous articles in which I have been complimentary to Bolt and my calls of his races on NBC, some have chosen to single out my opinion that he should have celebrated after the line as a 'sour grapes' rain on his parade, or disrespect for Usain Bolt's achievements.
 
Nothing could be further from the truth.

It has further descended into a 'USA vs Jamaica' issue, which is lunacy, since when watching the replays of the 100 I said aloud off-air "that was great television, but I think it was poor sportsmanship".  That assessment was discussed on NBC during Bolt's early rounds and another commentator said it was just youthful exuberance - and it was left at that.
Since that time, and since my Bob Costas interview, Jamaicans, as well as people from other Caribbean countries and the USA, have written to me, to say either one of the following two things - that I was stupid for allowing Costas to 'bait' me into a derogatory statement about Bolt, which is false, since I thought it myself on the night in question, OR, that I should 'stand my ground' because they, too, thought the pre-finish line celebration a bit excessive.  People clearly feel differently about the race.

It is perfectly ok to disagree with my opinions, and many Jamaicans here in Beijing have sought me out in the stadium to say that I would have to know the man Bolt more to understand that he would never disrespect his competitors.  I can certainly entertain or accept that possibility, but I will not apologize for an opinion, especially since it seems that the 999 favorable ones I have had of Bolt have been ignored - to focus on this one - which has been blown totally out of proportion. 

I have no interest in a needless controversy which seeks only to overshadow the unprecedented performances of this Jamaican Olympic team, and I wish to state categorically that I respect opinions contrary to my assessment of Bolt's celebration, while maintaining my own opinion.

My stance as a track purist is that an athlete should celebrate as much as possible before and after, not during a race - simple as that. I celebrated as much as was possible during my own career and I find Bolt's antics here truly entertaining.  I was unaware that he had THIS much personality, in all honesty.  NBC has devoted much airtime to showing the fun Bolt is having in Beijing - but that does not mean I can't state an opinion that I wanted to see him celebrate after the finish line was crossed.  By celebrating 'post finish-line' tonight, Bolt broke a 200M WR I thought would never fall.  I congratulate him wholeheartedly.

I will remind those who seek to falsely make this out to be an issue of one man or one country being singled out that it was NBC that was most harsh when the victorious USA men's 4x100 Olympic team celebrated in a most unbecoming manner in 2000, a sentiment quickly echoed by the US media, leading to an apology by said team.

Anyone who might question my praise and admiration for Bolt need only look at my broadcasts of his races dating back to May of this year, or any of the countless articles in which I have spoken in glowing terms about him.

Ato Boldon
Beijing.


Yuh need to send dis tuh de facking Jamaican Observer...

Offline kicker

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2008, 02:23:45 PM »
Ato sometimes silence makes the most noise....just ignore the flock of fools and keep doing your thing.

If your opinion on this issue is unpopular, then so be it...

I personally don't have an issue with Bolt's mannerism during the race.  If he wanted to cartwheel to the finish line more power to him but that's just me- showmanshp & gamesmanship add as much to the game as sportsmanship in my opinion... In football when a team is up 4-0 and start to play possession to the tune of the crowd's "OLE!!!!" throwing in some flicks and tricks for good measure....it's the same thing... It's not about Track & Field, football, you or me...it's about human beings and our different personalities, and just like personalities differ, opinions differ, so who want to crucify you for yours could HTMC....

Congrats on your NBC assignment at the bird's nest - you're doing a great job  :beermug:
Live life 90 minutes at a time....Football is life.......

Offline Peong

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2008, 02:28:19 PM »
Probably Ato just post this here but is already having it published on some news outlet.
I doubt he would bother to write this just for the forum.
I wouldn't.
Plus he repeat some points he made before.

Offline A.B.

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2008, 02:28:46 PM »
Bolt chases the Holy Grail: Michael Johnson's record in the 200 meters Story Highlights
Jamaica's Usain Bolt may be closer than anyone to Michael Johnson's 200m record
Johnson set a mark of 19.32 seconds at the '96 Atlanta Games
U.S. legend believes his record will be broken, but not by Bolt in Beijing
 

 
 
Jamaica's Usain Bolt (left) is chasing down Michael Johnson's 1996 world record time of 19.32 seconds in the 200 meters.
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BEIJING -- It remains the most arresting track and field moment I have ever witnessed live.

Better than either of Usain Bolt's world records this year. Better than Jonathan Edwards' 60-foot triple jump at Göteborg, Sweden, at the 1995 worlds. Better than Haile Gabrselassie holding off Paul Tergat to the win the 10,000 meters at the Sydney Olympics. Better than the 800-meter Oregon sweep at the Olympic trials at Eugene's Hayward Field two months ago.

And don't get me wrong: Those things -- and many others -- were breathtaking and memorable.

None of them resonates like Michael Johnson's 200-meter gold medal and generation-skipping world record of 19.32 seconds on the night of Aug. 1, 1996, at the Atlanta Olympic Games.

The gold medal came on top of Johnson's 400-meter victory, fulfilling a double-gold quest he had undertaken not long after food poisoning sabotaged his '92 Olympics. It came after Johnson had chased Pietro Mennea's 17-year-old world record of 19.72 seconds and finally taken it down with a 19.66 at the '96 Olympic trials.

The entire experience was surreal. Johnson wobbled a step from the blocks, ripped through the turn marginally in front of the very dangerous Frankie Fredericks of Namibia and Ato Boldon of Trinidad and Tobago and then exploded in the stretch. As always, spectators watched Johnson blast through the line and then turned back to the clock, which froze 19.32. Not since Bob Beamon jumped 8.90 in 1968 has a time looked more incongruous.

It seemed at that moment -- and until very recently -- to be unassailable in any near future. "I remember thinking about it that night,'' said Boldon, who took the bronze medal. "And I said to myself, 'When I die, that's still going to be the record.''' Boldon was 22 years old at the time. No sprinter has come within three-tenths of a second since that night.

Now, of course, there is talk that it will happen Wednesday night at the Olympic Stadium known as the Bird's Nest, when Jamaica's remarkable Bolt races in the Olympic final one day before his 22nd birthday. After all, Bolt has previously been a 200-meter specialist (World Junior champion at age 16) and he has run 19.67 this year, into a modest headwind. That, and the world saw how easily he ran a world record 9.69 seconds to win the gold medal last Saturday night in the 100 meters, while celebrating for the last 15 meters.

The case can be made that Bolt is ready to take down MJ's record long before it's time. In this week's Sports Illustrated, I quote Jamaican-born Canadian Donovan Bailey, the '96 Olympic 100-meter champion, as saying, "If he gets someone to push him through the corner [turn], we could see something unbelievable. I'm thinking between 19.22 and 19.26.''

Bolt is already a respectable and a solid turn runner. And he will have somebody to push him through the curve. "Shawn,'' said U.S. 200-meter runner Wallace Spearmon, referring to '04 Olympic deuce champion Shawn Crawford, who always takes it out.

On Tuesday in Beijing, I sought out and talked to the three men who landed on the medal stand in that Atlanta race: Johnson, Fredericks and Boldon. They share an appreciation for the race, skepticism that Bolt will take down the record in the Games and various levels of certain that he will get it eventually.

"I think he'll run 19.5-something,'' said Johnson, who is in Beijing as Jeremy Wariner's manager. "Will he be able to sustain what we saw the other day, which was incredible? I just don't think he's been doing the type of training he needs to do that. I put what he did the other day down to the fact that the guy has got an incredibly long stride and he's figured out how to make that long stride technically efficient.

"Speed endurance is something different, where you've got to hold that speed for a much longer time and that doesn't come into play in the 100 meters,'' Johnson said. "It becomes an endurance issue. The 200 is just a different feel.

"But he's run in the 19.6s already this year, and he's going to run faster here,'' said Johnson. "And now, eventually, does he run faster than 19.32? I think it's inevitable.''

Fredericks was Johnson's foil in '96, having beaten him in Oslo, Norway -- 19.82 to 19.85 -- just before the Games. Fredericks was a world champion, an Olympic silver medalist and a fast, reliable performer. And he was in a lane outside Johnson in the Olympic final.

"Michael was running against somebody who had just beaten him and on a track where he had already broken a very old world record,'' said Fredericks. "This made for very good conditions for him to run fast.''

Fredericks and Boldon both recall that Johnson ran the turn 100 in 10.12 seconds. Fredericks was close behind in 10.14 and Boldon next in 10.19. Then Johnson blew out the last 100 meters in 9.20 seconds (obviously with no block start to slow him down). "We all ran an extremely good bend, but Michael ran away from me in the final 100 meters,'' said Fredericks. "Nobody else ever did that to me before in my entire career. But I feel blessed and happy that I was part of such a great race.

Fredericks, who is also in Beijing as a member of the International Committee, hesitates to anoint Bolt. "At the time, in 1996, I thought that Michael's record would stand for a long time,'' said Fredericks. "It could still stand for a long time. There is no guarantee.''

Here he references Bolt's celebration at the end of the 100 meters. "I think it was a spectacular performance,'' Fredericks said. "Most of us, as track fans, would have liked to have seen what he would have run if he had run through the finish. I did stupid things when I was young, too. You think it will always be easy and you'll never have injuries and you'll always be strong and healthy. But this is not the way it works. You have to take chances when you have them.''

Boldon, who is in Beijing working as a sprint analyst for NBC, doesn't see Johnson's record falling on Wednesday night either. "I see 19.39, 40, 41, something like that,'' said Boldon. Told of Johnson's prediction of 19.50-something, Boldon says, "That's too slow.

"I see him running the curve in 10.05, which is faster than Michael,'' says Boldon. "But then I don't see him coming home as fast as Michael did, maybe 9.35 or so. That would be 19.40 and I think he'll be right around there. Michael had the fear factor with Frankie in the race, and that's something that Bolt definitely does not have because he's not afraid of anybody in the race.''

Like Fredericks, Boldon disapproves of Bolt's celebratory let-up in the 100. "There was just a little too much 'I'm better than you,' to the other guys,'' he said. "I said that on air and I've been getting hate mail from Jamaicans for three days.''

Johnson looks at Bolt's future and sees at least two world records, with a shot at a third. "It if was me, I'd take down the 100 even further this year,'' Johnson said. "Because he can take that down somewhere that nobody else is going to get it for a while. Then train next year for the 200 until he takes that one down. Then start training for the 400. I don't know if he can run 43.18 [Johnson's world record, set in 1999], but he can run 44 for sure.'' (Bolt was a Jamaican champion in both the 200 and 400 in high school).

On Tuesday night in the Bird's Nest, Bolt won his semifinal heat in a cruising 20.09 seconds. Crawford worked the curve hard and Bolt eased past him just as they straightened out. Spearman ran up on a slowing Bolt at the finish and afterward suggested Bolt could be caught in the final strides by a natural 200-meter specialist, as had happened to him in previous seasons. "Same old Bolt,'' said Spearmon. Asked if he planned to run Bolt down, Spearmon said, "Yes; I'll say yes to that.''

It should be said that Bolt himself was skeptical in post-race interviews about his chances at getting 19.32. "I'm going to run my heart out, but right now it's kind of hard,'' said Bolt. "I've run four rounds of the 100 and now three rounds of the 200. So it's kind of hard to go out there and set the record.''

Johnson, who always approached his events scientifically, says he always thought he would see his record fall. The 200-meter mark was broken once in 28 years before the summer of 1996, which is much too seldom. In the last three summers, five runners -- Bolt, Spearmon, Tyson Gay, Walter Dix (who is also in the 200 final) and Xavier Carter -- have broken 19.70.

"These guys have been running in that gap between the old record and my record,'' Johnson said. "Guys should have been doing more even before they did.''

I asked him if he thought, even back in '96, if his record would last, say, 50 years. "Nah,'' he said. "You can't think that. People are going to keep running fast.''

The larger point is this: Twelve years ago on the floor of a track stadium that would become Turner Field, a record was set that seemed it might endure at least as long as Beamon's (23 years). It is remarkable to even discuss the possibility that it will not.
 
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Offline palos

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2008, 02:35:04 PM »
since Jamaica is the mecca of track and field. 

Jamaica MIGHT be the mecca of track.  Dat debateable.

Dem have nutten to do with field doh.  8)
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Offline maxg

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2008, 02:39:14 PM »
Mr Boldon, well said, I for one respect your opinion (and belief), even though I felt differently - I felt it, as Bolt explained it....Winning at the Olympics, especially 1st time, is enuff to make any 21 yr old, play heself, even if not seemingly appropiate, (welcome to old folks/kids generation gaps) but I personally didn't see it as disrespectful to the sport or fellow athletes...me doh know whey ppl have to talk all this mess for, I suspect many harping on your every word, and trying to find what they percieve as errors, using their own personal measurement of  degrade, cause you dare stand in the spotlight....Everybody never will please eveybody..
Shim if he didn't break the record I personally woulda be damn upset he playin d ass, buh it won't be my place to comment or take away the accomplishments of any Olympic Champion regardless of what type of person he might be....Thanks for being strong enough to call it as you see it, regardless of popular or not...ah feel Bolt is like that too...
Just lastnight CBC (the best Olympic channel, ;) )  do ah piece on Tommy Smith & John Carlos, many couldn't and up to today cannot relate to their display, but many of us even in lil T&T could...and I believe to this day, it benefitted many young Black Americans from then to now....but that is just my opinion.

Offline morvant

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2008, 02:43:19 PM »
iz ah island ting

shaka score in ah semi-final in de church league on angostura grounds and pull down he pants and wine in front ah Daybreake pastor and he wife.
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Offline Deeks

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2008, 04:26:13 PM »
ATO,
           You have no need to apologize to anyone. Just let the donkeys bray!!!!

Offline freakazoid

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2008, 05:00:55 PM »
i  look at yuh words carefully Ato and i agree with what you said re. sportmanship issue. i cannot however agree with ppl who telling you to ignore  the "fools" who have twisted your stament and have taken it as sour grapes and jealousy. Fact is "fools" are the ones that determine which party goes into power, in short, there are plenty "fools" around. But as a tnt role model and as someone who proudly carries the red white and black flag you cannot sit back and allow this to mushroom. i am very glad that u have said what u have said in this thread and sincerly hope that it is circulated far and wide as your previous comments where.

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Offline Dutty

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2008, 05:23:51 PM »
iz ah island ting

shaka score in ah semi-final in de church league on angostura grounds and pull down he pants and wine in front ah Daybreake pastor and he wife.

 :D ;D
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Offline fLaSh

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #13 on: August 20, 2008, 05:25:52 PM »
Ato....PLEASE send this to all Jamaican and Trinidadian newspapers. I trust "my people" would learn some sense after they read this.

Offline Bakes

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Re: Bolt "situation" response
« Reply #14 on: August 20, 2008, 07:38:06 PM »
i  look at yuh words carefully Ato and i agree with what you said re. sportmanship issue. i cannot however agree with ppl who telling you to ignore  the "fools" who have twisted your stament and have taken it as sour grapes and jealousy. Fact is "fools" are the ones that determine which party goes into power, in short, there are plenty "fools" around. But as a tnt role model and as someone who proudly carries the red white and black flag you cannot sit back and allow this to mushroom. i am very glad that u have said what u have said in this thread and sincerly hope that it is circulated far and wide as your previous comments where.



Well said... and agreed.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2008, 07:41:10 PM by Bake n Shark »

 

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