June 22, 2024, 12:20:59 PM

Author Topic: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?  (Read 82915 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #240 on: February 19, 2014, 04:06:44 PM »
I spoke to a pardna who visited with his fiancee from Spain.  He said he was well-received by the Argentinian people... but everybody insisted he had to be Brazilian, even before hearing him speak.


Where was he from?

Sorry, Trinidad... living in London, black fella.

Offline Pointman

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 4700
  • T&T football: win or lose, we still fetein'
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #241 on: February 19, 2014, 08:41:48 PM »
I spoke to a pardna who visited with his fiancee from Spain.  He said he was well-received by the Argentinian people... but everybody insisted he had to be Brazilian, even before hearing him speak.


Where was he from?

Sorry, Trinidad... living in London, black fella.
that's normal, when i was a teenager spending time in Mexico because i spoke spanish everybody assumed I was from Acapulco because that's where most Afro Mexicans live.
Trini to de bone; Pointman to de bone.

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #242 on: February 19, 2014, 09:45:46 PM »
that's normal, when i was a teenager spending time in Mexico because i spoke spanish everybody assumed I was from Acapulco because that's where most Afro Mexicans live.


Yuh miss de point... at no time did they even consider that he might have been from Argentina itself, because Argentina has no black people, remember?  At least Acapulco still part ah Mexico.

Offline Sanchez

  • Full Warrior
  • ***
  • Posts: 132
  • Numero Diez por siempre
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #243 on: February 24, 2014, 11:39:06 AM »
Have a brethren from Argentina, he said the first time he ever saw a black person in his life, was when he came to the US.  Take that into perspective...very tiny populace of blacks..

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18094
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #244 on: January 27, 2015, 06:33:14 AM »
Argentina Rediscovers its African Roots

The chapel in the small lakeside resort community of Chascomús is at best underwhelming. Its whitewashed brick exterior is partly obstructed by a tangle of vines and bushes, and its dim, one-room interior is no more majestic than its facade. Wooden pews and an uneven dirt floor are scarcely illuminated by sunlight from a single window. The gray, cracked, dusty walls are adorned with crosses, photos, icons — things people leave to mark their pilgrimage. A low front altar is layered with thick candle wax, flowers and a pantheon of black saints, Madonnas and African deities like the sea goddess Yemanja of the Yoruba religion.

Despite its unkempt state, this chapel, the Capilla de los Negros, attracts a little over 11,000 tourists each year who come to see a church named for the freed slaves who built it in 1861.

The chapel is “where we can locate ourselves and point out the truth that we are here,” said Soledad Luis, an Afro-Argentine from the tourism office who led me through the space. She knows it well. It sits on a plot her great-grandfather helped secure, and her family still gathers there weekly for a meal.

Capilla de los Negros feels off the beaten path, but it is part of a list of slave sites in Argentina created in 2009 by Unesco. Its inclusion signals the growing consciousness of African heritage in Argentina, seemingly the most Europeanized country in South America.

Argentina at one time had a robust African presence because of the slaves who were brought there, but its black population was decimated by myriad factors including heavy casualties on the front lines in the War of the Triple Alliance against Paraguay in the 1860s; a yellow fever epidemic that rich, white Argentines largely escaped; and interracial offspring who, after successive generations, shed their African culture along with their features. And European immigration swelled the white population — 2.27 million Italians came between 1861 and 1914.

The demographic shift has been sharp. In 1800, on the eve of revolution with Spain, blacks made up more than a third of the country, 69,000 of a total population of 187,000, according to George Reid Andrews’s 2004 book “Afro-Latin America.” In 2010, 150,000 identified themselves as Afro-Argentine, or a mere 0.365 percent of a population of 41 million people, according to the census, the first in the country’s history that counted race.

But the culture the slaves brought with them remained. And in recent years, Argentina has gone from underselling its African roots to rediscovering them, as academics, archaeologists, immigrants and a nascent civil rights movement have challenged the idea that African and Argentine are mutually exclusive terms.

Continue reading the main story
Some see creating tourist trails, with plaques and brochures, as a way to educate locals and tourists alike about this long-suppressed history. In my several visits the last few years and during my time living in the country, the trail led me to the other Argentina, one that is just starting to be woven into the country’s narrative about itself.

MY FIRST STOP required some dancing shoes. I dropped in on a tango lesson at the Movimiento Afrocultural on Buenos Aires’s Calle Defensa in San Telmo. The cultural institution was started in 2009 to promote African and African-Argentine heritage. As I scanned its events calendar, there were many activities that had an obvious African bent, but tango?

“There are no doubts that tango has an African origin,” the teacher, Veronica Rueco, told me. Together, we watched locals and tourists practice their dance moves in the center, a converted warehouse whose walls were lined with candombe drums carved with images of slave ship hulls filled with chained human cargo. “The only doubt is the exact story of how it came about.”

The dance form, she went on to note, was created in the late 1800s, the result of a fusion of African and European immigrant culture. (The term tango is thought to originate from a Niger-Congo term that survived the trans-Atlantic passage along with the slaves, according to Dr. Erika Edwards of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.)

The center’s director, an Afro-Uruguayan named Diego Bonga, leads a drum circle that draws a diverse crowd. The night I attended there were Porteños (from Buenos Aires), Chileans, Uruguayans and even a woman from Iran. The curious peered through the gates at us. Those onlookers are part of the party on Sundays, the neighborhood’s busiest day, when antiques vendors line Defensa, and Plaza Dorrego becomes an open-air milonga, or tango salon, with performers, locals and tourists dancing past midnight. That day, Movimiento Afrocultural holds a candombe parade. Spectators become participants, dancing on the cobblestones in the jittery shake of a murga comparsa, an Argentine dance popular during Carnival season, also rooted in African culture.

I followed the musicians down Defensa as they reached Plaza Dorrego, yellow lights casting a 1920s postcard sepia dream tone over dancers moving two by two. I watched as bystanders searched for the source of the loud, boisterous music. They began stepping in sync with the candombe, bringing to life again their abandoned African forebears.

My next visit was a little less lively. It was underground. It’s no secret that underneath Old Buenos Aires lies a latticework of tunnels, used by colonial smugglers to avoid Spanish tariffs and by priests to travel between Jesuit churches like San Francisco and San Ignacio at the Manzana de las Luces historical site.

Lesser known are the tunnels that run under residential buildings like the one at Defensa 1464 in San Telmo. The complexity of that structure, which is the subject of a 2009 documentary directed by David Rubio, was uncovered by Freda Montaño, an Afro-Ecuadorean who runs the restaurant Rincón Ecuatoriano and once lived there. The colonial-era building’s history has partly been obscured by a new belle epoque facade that it got at the turn of the last century, a period when Buenos Aires consciously mimicked Paris. Still,

Ms. Montaño said she found tunnels in the basement and a small door meant “for someone who services the house, so as not to interfere with what is being done by the white people.” She said that neighbors told her the tunnels lead to Parque Lezama, where slaves were sold and then transported underground to the households purchasing them.

Plaza San Martín, home to the statue of Argentina’s liberator, José de San Martín, was the city’s other main slave auction site. These sites, along with entire districts within Buenos Aires’s colonial core, are part of Unesco’s slave route heritage listing but remain largely unmarked by historical plaques.

Ms. Montaño opened a short-lived cultural center at Defensa 1464 but was forced to close when the landlord wanted to sell the house. She says she hopes the city buys it and creates a museum, and believes that demonstrating the tunnels’ relationship to slavery will benefit tourists and locals alike, “where the world knows nothing of this because people say in this country there are no Afro-descendants.”

Slavery’s connection to the tunnels under this building is unclear, though academics like Pablo Cirio, director of Afro-Argentine studies at the National University, said they were used “to transport goods and live workers — read human slaves — but no serious studies prove it.”

Another network of tunnels lies underneath El Zanjón de Granados museum in San Telmo. They lead through a dried-out, brick-covered creek used as a sewer system. The city’s smallest house, Casa Mínima, is part of the museum complex, and tours explain that it was owned by a freed slave, among Buenos Aires’s few open recognitions of its slave past.

There have been other attempts to examine Argentina’s African roots in Buenos Aires, including a now-closed maritime museum discussing the slave trade in the La Boca neighborhood. And during Argentina’s 2010 bicentennial, cultural institutions sought to mark the country’s diverse past. The National Historical Museum grouped paintings from the museum’s permanent collection of the five-decade-long Emancipation era. The exhibition center Casa Nacional del Bicentenario occasionally surveys African influences in Argentine music. Outside the capital, in San Antonio de Areco, there are exhibits on Argentina’s black gauchos, or cowboys, in the Museo Ricardo Güiraldes and Museo Las Lilas de Areco. Near Cordoba, the Museo de la Estancia Jesuítica de Alta Gracia, part of Unesco’s slave trail list, also contains exhibitions on the relationship among Jesuits, natives and African slaves.

But those attractions all look backward. As part of the shift toward embracing Afro-Argentine culture, the country is beginning to welcome contemporary African influence. El Buen Sabor restaurant in the Villa Crespo neighborhood, for example, was started by a Cameroonian in 2008. The small, yellow space seats perhaps two dozen, but its reputation is outsize. I caught up with its owner, Maxime Tankouo, during one of my visits. “I was seen as a little weird here when I arrived” in 2001, he said. “It was eight days before I saw someone of my race.” He said, “I mix many things, Moroccan, African, Cameroon, all in the same plate.” At first Mr. Tankouo was supported largely by French and other tourists. Now locals are the majority of clients.

These new immigrant arrivals are unintentionally bridging a gap that has already been partly overcome. Even traditional restaurants have an Afro-Argentine touch, albeit unintentional. “Our gastronomic symbol has an African character,” Nicolás Fernández Bravo, a University of Buenos Aires social anthropologist, said of the asado, the Argentine grill consumed by nearly all visiting tourists. He told me of the 19th-century Argentine literary classic “El Matadero” by Esteban Echeverría, with descriptions of cows being butchered and the dividing out of the mollejas, or glands. “Sweetbread parts were given to the slaves,” he said. “This is now part of the general meal, and thought of as a special delicacy, but at one time this would never have been eaten among the elites.”

Argentina still wrestles with its complicated identity. Back at the chapel, Ms. Luis told me she is often the first Afro-Argentine local tourists have met, some arguing she is from elsewhere. Because of this, she said, “the history of blacks must be told to you by blacks.”

Her boss, José Fares, head of Chascomús tourism, explained that the chapel is one way Argentina can overcome its own myths, recounting the Argentine axiom, “ ‘the Mexicans descended from the Mayans, the Peruvians from the Incas, and us, from the boats.’ We Argentines think we are the Europeans of South America.”

Ms. Luis reminds us that her ancestors came by boat, too, saying: “They immigrated. We were brought here.”

Source: The New York Times, September 9, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/14/travel/argentina-rediscovers-its-african-roots.html

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18094
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #245 on: January 27, 2015, 07:21:53 AM »
Yesterday ah was standing at a magazine kiosk buying a newspaper when a woman walked by, gently put her hand on my back, and said “quilombo“, then off she continued down the street.

Offline Mose

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2231
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #246 on: January 27, 2015, 09:01:23 AM »
Yesterday ah was standing at a magazine kiosk buying a newspaper when a woman walked by, gently put her hand on my back, and said “quilombo“, then off she continued down the street.

I don't understand the reference.
Are you a match? It's too late for Emru, but maybe you can help save someone's life: http://www.healemru.com

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #247 on: January 27, 2015, 09:16:32 AM »
Yesterday ah was standing at a magazine kiosk buying a newspaper when a woman walked by, gently put her hand on my back, and said “quilombo“, then off she continued down the street.

I don't understand the reference.

African slave reference... well Brazilian. She probably took him for a Brazilian tourist.

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18094
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #248 on: January 27, 2015, 09:39:59 AM »
Yesterday ah was standing at a magazine kiosk buying a newspaper when a woman walked by, gently put her hand on my back, and said “quilombo“, then off she continued down the street.

I don't understand the reference.

African slave reference... well Brazilian. She probably took him for a Brazilian tourist.

This was one of my inferences. As the vendor sourced the paper (I wanted the Sunday paper, and it was Monday at about 7pm ah was asking for it), I was scanning the postcard rack when she walked by. In context, most passers-by would have concluded I wasn't from there. However, a few minutes later, an Argentine woman stopped to peruse the cards as well. Theoretically, anyone could be buying a postcard.

It all happened so quickly that as I turned to look at the woman making the quilombo comment, I just smiled, and returned to what I was doing. It reminded me of being in Colombia and a fella in a passing car shouted out "Nariño". (Nariño is a figure in Colombian history who "granted" slaves their freedom predicated on their service in his army that fought against the Spanish Crown. It is also the name of a region in Colombia in which there is a sizeable representation of Afro-Colombians).

A lil football anecdote: When she made her purchase, she was sure to tell the vendor that the Boca cards were in better condition than the River cards and that he needed to fix that.  :) Football permeates everything.

In Uruguay, in Punta del Este, where tourism booms at this time of the year, even the Brazilians thought I was Brazilian. An Afro-Brazilian told me, “you look Brazilian“. When I went to pay for an item in a small souvenir shop, the cashier immediately started in Portuguese. However, the workers on the floor addressed me in Spanish and/or English ... but always Spanish first. This strikes me as no different to Quebec, where people start with French first and then venture into English, if French not doing the trick.

Sitting in a cafe in Punta del Este, a boy of probably 5 or 6 years of age walked up to me and asked: are you from Colombia or from Uruguay? That was his introduction. As I was processing it, I realized that his parents were just as curious. I said: Neither! Trinidad & Tobago. They were not expecting that ... so they nodded and kinda made the point to him that there was a benefit to asking questions ... de youth made for the door ... which was only a few paces away. As he was exiting, he said to them, ah wonder what team he plays for ... which confirmed one of the items I had been procesing within the dilemma of his laden question.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2015, 10:25:09 AM by asylumseeker »

Offline Mose

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2231
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #249 on: January 27, 2015, 10:43:35 AM »
Yesterday ah was standing at a magazine kiosk buying a newspaper when a woman walked by, gently put her hand on my back, and said “quilombo“, then off she continued down the street.

I don't understand the reference.

African slave reference... well Brazilian. She probably took him for a Brazilian tourist.

This was one of my inferences. As the vendor sourced the paper (I wanted the Sunday paper, and it was Monday at about 7pm ah was asking for it), I was scanning the postcard rack when she walked by. In context, most passers-by would have concluded I wasn't from there. However, a few minutes later, an Argentine woman stopped to peruse the cards as well. Theoretically, anyone could be buying a postcard.

It all happened so quickly that as I turned to look at the woman making the quilombo comment, I just smiled, and returned to what I was doing. It reminded me of being in Colombia and a fella in a passing car shouted out "Nariño". (Nariño is a figure in Colombian history who "granted" slaves their freedom predicated on their service in his army that fought against the Spanish Crown. It is also the name of a region in Colombia in which there is a sizeable representation of Afro-Colombians).

A lil football anecdote: When she made her purchase, she was sure to tell the vendor that the Boca cards were in better condition than the River cards and that he needed to fix that.  :) Football permeates everything.

In Uruguay, in Punta del Este, where tourism booms at this time of the year, even the Brazilians thought I was Brazilian. An Afro-Brazilian told me, “you look Brazilian“. When I went to pay for an item in a small souvenir shop, the cashier immediately started in Portuguese. However, the workers on the floor addressed me in Spanish and/or English ... but always Spanish first. This strikes me as no different to Quebec, where people start with French first and then venture into English, if French not doing the trick.

Sitting in a cafe in Punta del Este, a boy of probably 5 or 6 years of age walked up to me and asked: are you from Colombia or from Uruguay? That was his introduction. As I was processing it, I realized that his parents were just as curious. I said: Neither! Trinidad & Tobago. They were not expecting that ... so they nodded and kinda made the point to him that there was a benefit to asking questions ... de youth made for the door ... which was only a few paces away. As he was exiting, he said to them, ah wonder what team he plays for ... which confirmed one of the items I had been procesing within the dilemma of his laden question.

Living in Quebec, I'm quite familiar with this. But also, being black, if I speak English, it is assumed I'm from Jamaica but if I speak in French it is assumed I'm from Haiti.

re: the youth's exiting comment. Football really does permeate all aspects of life in that society.

re: quilombo. After my initial question, I did a google search and found a reference that suggested it is also sometimes used to refer to a brothel. Had me wondering given the manner, and intimacy, of the interaction.
Are you a match? It's too late for Emru, but maybe you can help save someone's life: http://www.healemru.com

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18094
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #250 on: January 27, 2015, 11:23:54 AM »
...

Living in Quebec, I'm quite familiar with this. But also, being black, if I speak English, it is assumed I'm from Jamaica but if I speak in French it is assumed I'm from Haiti.

re: the youth's exiting comment. Football really does permeate all aspects of life in that society.

re: quilombo. After my initial question, I did a google search and found a reference that suggested it is also sometimes used to refer to a brothel. Had me wondering given the manner, and intimacy, of the interaction.

The thing is that his global view was constructed on stereotype. I was not wearing anything athletic or football-related. There was no basis on which to presume I played. It was an opportunity to shift a fence ... however, I did not. One of those situations where one weighs all the interests and moves on.

« Last Edit: January 27, 2015, 11:37:26 AM by asylumseeker »

Offline Mose

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2231
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #251 on: January 27, 2015, 01:11:29 PM »
...

Living in Quebec, I'm quite familiar with this. But also, being black, if I speak English, it is assumed I'm from Jamaica but if I speak in French it is assumed I'm from Haiti.

re: the youth's exiting comment. Football really does permeate all aspects of life in that society.

re: quilombo. After my initial question, I did a google search and found a reference that suggested it is also sometimes used to refer to a brothel. Had me wondering given the manner, and intimacy, of the interaction.

The thing is that his global view was constructed on stereotype. I was not wearing anything athletic or football-related. There was no basis on which to presume I played. It was an opportunity to shift a fence ... however, I did not. One of those situations where one weighs all the interests and moves on.


Not surprising given his age and the society. The issue now is whether or not he remains that way as he grows up or does he manage to 'shift his fences'.
Are you a match? It's too late for Emru, but maybe you can help save someone's life: http://www.healemru.com

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18094
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #252 on: January 31, 2015, 05:19:56 AM »
Given the nature of this thread, it seems appropriate to point out that Correo Argentino (the postal service) only some weeks ago issued this stamp ...


Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18094
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #253 on: February 18, 2015, 01:25:17 PM »
Uruguay has a "walk of fame" ... similar to the Hollywood stars thing ... that honours Uruguayans who have made an inordinate contribution to the nation. This past weekend I decided to take a guided tour of the Ciudad Vieja (the area of Montevideo that is the heart of the old colonial centre), and I was surprised to learn that Nelson Mandela is the ONLY foreigner there honoured. Truth be told, I had walked right by and over his "star" (in the shape of the sun on the Uruguayan flag) tens of times and had no idea that it (or the others) was/were there. Mandela's legacy across the world is boundless. In fact, the "star" is a few feet away from where I stopped to speak with a Senegalese businessman (married to an Argentine) about 2 weeks ago.

More pertinent to the topic ...  players have to be selected on merit to come through the ranks. Will say more on this in due course.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2015, 01:29:42 PM by asylumseeker »

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18094
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #254 on: April 12, 2016, 06:08:36 PM »
Just found out this week that Roberto Nurse, who plays for Panama, would have been eligible to play for Mexico. Mexican citizen by birth.

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18094
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #255 on: April 12, 2016, 06:25:26 PM »
The black people 'erased from history'
By Arlene Gregorius, BBC News


More than a million people in Mexico are descended from African slaves and identify as "black", "dark" or "Afro-Mexican" even if they don't look black. But beyond the southern state of Oaxaca they are little-known and the community's leaders are now warning of possible radical steps to achieve official recognition.

"The police made me sing the national anthem three times, because they wouldn't believe I was Mexican," says Chogo el Bandeno, a black Mexican singer-songwriter.

"I had to list the governors of five states too."


He was visiting the capital, Mexico City, hundreds of miles from his home in southern Mexico, when the police stopped him on suspicion of being an illegal immigrant.

Fortunately his rendition of the anthem and his knowledge of political leaders convinced the police to leave him alone, but other Afro-Mexicans have not been so fortunate.

Clemente Jesus Lopez, who runs the government office in charge of Afro-Mexicans in Oaxaca state, recalls two separate cases, both involving women.

"One was deported to Honduras and the other to Haiti because the police insisted that in Mexico there are no black people. Despite having Mexican ID, they were deported."

With the help of the Mexican consulates they were able to return but were offered no apology or compensation, Lopez says.

Black Mexicans have been living in the Costa Chica area, on the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, since their ancestors were brought from Africa as slaves in the 16th Century.

Colonial Spanish cattle ranchers often used them as foremen, in charge of indigenous Mexican workers who were not used to animals the size of cows or horses.

But outside the Costa Chica area there is little awareness of their existence.

An interim census in 2015 indicated a black population of 1.4 million, or 1.2% of the Mexican population. Even in Oaxaca state they only account for 5% of the total.

By comparison, indigenous peoples made up nearly 10% of Mexico's population, as measured in the 2010 census.

The appearance of those who identify as black Mexicans varies considerably. Some are hard to distinguish from indigenous Mexicans.

"It's not only about skin colour, it's also about how you feel," says Tulia Serrano Arellanes, a council worker. "You may have had a grandmother who was black and feel black, even if you don't look it."

Much of their identity is based on where they live - if you live in a black town such as Santiago Llano Grande, as Chogo el Bandeno does, you are likely to think of yourself as black.

But there is also a common culture.

For example, there's a distinctive style of music called the chilena, which was brought to the Costa Chica in the 19th Century by Chilean sailors on their way to the gold rush in California, which black musicians have adapted.

They have added Afro-Mexican instruments such as the quijada, a dried out donkey's jawbone with rattling molar teeth. There's also the bote, a friction drum - you rub a stick attached to the drum skin and it makes a kind of growling percussive noise. These sounds are a central part of Afro-Mexican musical life.

There are also dances that hark back to the colonial ranching days, including the Dance of the Devils, performed around the Day of the Dead at the end of October and in early November.

The dancers wear "devil" masks, and are led by the brash character "Pancho", who plays the colonial ranch foreman.

He struts around with a whip while his buxom "white" wife - played by a black man - flirts outrageously with the "devils" and even with the audience.

In the towns of the Costa Chica, even nursery-age children learn steps of the dance and are taught to take pride in their black heritage.

But there is frustration here that the Afro-Mexicans are not more widely known in Mexico and are not officially recognised as a minority by the Mexican government.

According to Humberto Hebert Silva Silva, head of the Bureau for Afro-Mexican Affairs in Oaxaca, this is because Afro-Mexicans speak Spanish, like most other Mexicans - they do not have their own language.

"When we go and ask [for recognition as a minority], they come up with excuses, or say that we don't have an indigenous mother tongue. Language is the real criterion," he says. "We are being discriminated against."

If Afro-Mexicans were classified as a minority they would receive extra funding for promotion of their culture and public health programmes.

But activists including Israel Reyes, a teacher, want more than money, it's also important to them that the existence of Afro-Mexicans is recognised at the level of the Mexican state.

"The story of the black population has been ignored and erased from history," he says.

The activists' efforts have born some fruit.

The 2015 interim census for the first time gave respondents the option to identify themselves as black - negro in Spanish - though this is not a term used by all Afro-Mexicans, many of whom call themselves "dark" (moreno) or use other, local terms to describe themselves.

But some Afro-Mexicans are impatient for more recognition.

Humberto Hebert Silva Silva warns that the black community may end up emulating the indigenous uprising in Chiapas in the 1990s, known as the Zapatistas.

"So far the black communities have endured discrimination and they have stuck to legal avenues, which they have now exhausted," he says.

"With the Zapatistas, the indigenous rose up, and it was an armed uprising, to claim their rights. And well, our community is thinking the same. It's thinking, in the distant future, to rise up too," he says.

"It may be the only way to get the rights we're entitled to. It can't be right that the constitution of our country doesn't recognise us. There's a big gap between what the politicians say and what they do. We'll have to take action to give them a warning."

Related audio available here.

« Last Edit: April 12, 2016, 07:04:35 PM by asylumseeker »

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18673
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #256 on: April 12, 2016, 07:07:25 PM »
Good read. The Mexican anthem too damn long, though!.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2016, 07:09:04 PM by Deeks »

Offline Tiresais

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2819
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #257 on: April 13, 2016, 01:54:45 AM »
Listened to the podcast last weekend - definitely worth a listen

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18673
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #258 on: April 13, 2016, 06:30:52 AM »
It was on npr around 1am this morning. It was worth listening. It is a struggle for them in Mex. some Mex. are unable to believe that there are Blacks who are born and raised in the country since inception. At least the inception of the republic. The Afro-Mex. are between a rock and a hard place, as the saying goes.

Offline sjahrain

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 1053
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #259 on: April 13, 2016, 06:46:03 AM »
Henry Louis Gates ...did a documentary on this issue a couple years ago..what was remarkable about that situation was the fact that Mexico second president was an African...go figure

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18094
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #260 on: May 31, 2016, 08:46:15 AM »
Gradin, the champion who conquered racism
FIFA


The oldest national team competition in the world, the Copa America is celebrating its 100th anniversary. Since it was first contested, this grand old competition has yielded many tales and stories, though few of them as resonant as that of Uruguayan pioneer Isabelino Gradin.

The first black player to play international football in South America, Gradin was the leading goalscorer and best player at that inaugural Copa in 1916, inspiring Uruguay to the title. Overcoming prejudice and discrimination, the proud striker showed the way for other black players and went down in history as one of the greats of those early days.

Born in Montevideo in 1897, a descendant of slaves from Lesotho and the son of immigrants, Gradin grew up in the working-class neighbourhood of Barrio Sur, the home of the drums that have forged the sound of candombe, the popular Uruguayan musical genre. It was there, on the stone pavements of the country’s capital, that Isabelino began to hone his technique in the rough and tumble of street football.

The young Gradin was blessed with both power and speed, and had so much of both that even though he went on to play football for his country and win trophies, he also devoted his considerable energies to athletics.

He began his playing career as an 18-year-old with Penarol, and travelled one year later to Buenos Aires for the first South American Championships. Much was happening on the fast-growing continental football scene, with the increasing number of international friendlies and the need to organise competitive matches to continue expanding the game resulting in the creation of the South American Football Confederation (CSF) in the Argentinian capital.

The continental tournament, which was held to mark the 100th anniversary of Argentinian independence, was contested by the host nation, Uruguay, Chile and Brazil. The four teams played each other once, with the trophy going to the side amassing most points.

A much-remembered matchwinner

The opening match was played out by Uruguay and Chile on 2 July at the home ground of Gimnasia y Esgrima in Buenos Aires, before a crowd of 3,000. La Celeste won 4-0, with Gradin scoring twice, though what made the game truly notable was the fact that it was the first time two black players (Gradin and his team-mate Juan Delgado) featured for a national team in an official competition.

The Chilean delegation later appealed to the newly formed CSF, demanding that they should be awarded the points on account of the fact that Uruguay had fielded two "Africans” in their team. The appeal was rejected. Los Charrúas went on to beat Brazil, a game in which Gradin was again on the scoresheet, and draw with the hosts to win the first of their 15 Copa America crowns.

Gradin made an indelible mark on the competition. The leading marksman with three goals, he was also named the player of the tournament. Uruguay retained their title the following year, though Gradin did not feature in any of the games.

He also wrote his name in the history books at Penarol, helping the club win league titles in 1918 and 1921, and scoring 101 goals in 212 matches for them. One of the greatest all-time heroes of El Mirasol, he was described thus in the club’s Libro de Oro del Centenario ('Golden Centenary Book'): “A shooting star, Isabelino Gradin was granted his three wishes: that he would excel on pitch and track, have the poets sing about him and be remembered forever.”

Gradin the speed merchant

A fast and gifted athlete, Gradin divided his time between football and track and field, and joined the athletics club Olimpia in 1922, going on to win three South American 400m titles and two continental 200m and 4x400m relay titles.

So talented was he that the writers and poets of that pre-television age were moved to immortalise him, while in later years, the award-winning Eduardo Galeano recalled his feats at the 1916 Copa America in his book Fútbol a Sol y Sombra (Football in Sun and Shadow): “People rose to their feet whenever he set off on one of his amazingly fast runs, controlling the ball as someone else could only manage at walking pace, weaving his way past opponents at top speed and shooting on the gallop. He had the most wholesome of faces, and was one of those people that no one could ever believe would step out of line.”

After watching him play, the Peruvian poet Juan Parra del Riego penned this glowing tribute to Gradin: “An arrow! A viper! A bell! A banner! Gradin: a blue and green bullet! Gradin: an elusive balloon! A billiard player right behind the ball as it rebounds from head to head and flies off... and a soaring Discobolus... you leave one, two, three, seven players trailing in your wake.”

One hundred years on from the first Copa America, the great Isabelino Gradin remains a key figure in South American football, a player who defined an age and who, albeit unwittingly, changed the face of the game forever.


Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18094
    • View Profile
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #261 on: May 31, 2016, 08:47:00 AM »

One benefit of this forum is educational exchange. One downside to the history of transhipment of human cargo is that the acquisition of European names does not readily allow us to distinguish people of African descent by name.

Investigate the names Isabelino Gradin and Juan Delgado. There would be no Pele without them. And these fellas date back decades before the 50s and 60s. Even in the interval there are other black ballers that light up de place in South America. It's a history that's out there partner. Serious thing.

Well done to FIFA.

Offline vb

  • Board Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *
  • Posts: 8283
    • View Profile
    • http://www.caribsport01.homestead.com/caribsport.html
Re: Ever wonder why they eh have any black or Afro-Argentine ballers?
« Reply #262 on: June 02, 2016, 01:04:57 PM »
Just read up on Gradin. Wow!!

he was a big deal. Surprised, he didn't go to the Olympics.

VB
VITAMIN V...KEEPS THE LADIES HEALTHY...:-)

 

1]; } ?>