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Author Topic: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money  (Read 20960 times)

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Offline mal jeux

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Re: Pirates fire on US cruise ship in hijack attempt
« Reply #30 on: December 02, 2008, 10:45:00 AM »
"The pirates fired at the passenger liner but the larger boat was faster than the pirates' vessels, Choong said."
dem pirates were rowing their boat or what? :devil:

ent! daiz the same ting I saying. dat cruise ship probably eh even getting 25 knots.
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Offline dervaig

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Re: Pirates fire on US cruise ship in hijack attempt
« Reply #31 on: December 02, 2008, 11:03:37 AM »
Put 2 drones over the coastline of Somalia, anything ventures out
into the water, shoot to kill. ANYTHING!

Let's see how brazen they will be after this.

Offline WestCoast

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Re: Pirates fire on US cruise ship in hijack attempt
« Reply #32 on: December 02, 2008, 11:42:29 AM »
Put 2 drones over the coastline of Somalia, anything ventures out
into the water, shoot to kill. ANYTHING!

Let's see how brazen they will be after this.
that's it :applause: :applause:
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Offline Bakes

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Re: Pirates fire on US cruise ship in hijack attempt
« Reply #33 on: December 05, 2008, 03:34:20 PM »
Danish Navy Rescues Suspected Pirates

December 6, 2008

By ALAN COWELL

LONDON -- A Danish warship on patrol to thwart piracy in the Gulf of Aden ended up rescuing seven of its presumed prey when its crew found suspected Somali pirates adrift this week with a broken motor on their speedboat, the Danish Navy said on Friday.

Danish sailors brought the hungry, thirsty Somalis on board their own ship, a naval official said. Then they sank the speedboat.

The incident highlighted the challenges facing a small international flotilla patrolling vast expanses of ocean where pirates have struck with increasing audacity, hijacking vessels including a Ukrainian freighter laden with armaments and a supertanker carrying an estimated $100 million of crude oil.

Earlier this week, pirates chased and shot at an American cruise ship with more than 1,000 people on board but failed to hijack the vessel as it sailed along a corridor patrolled by the international warships, officials told The Associated Press.

The Danish warship, a combat support vessel called the HDMS Absalon, picked up the seven men about 90 miles off the coast of Yemen on Wednesday after a maritime patrol aircraft spotted them signaling in distress, said Lt. Cmdr. Jesper Lynge, a Danish Navy spokesman, in a telephone interview from Copenhagen.

But when Danish special forces from the Absalon went alongside the stricken speed-boat, they found rocket-propelled grenades and AK-47 assault rifles -- familiar pirate weapons -- which they confiscated.

“Their ship had been without propulsion for several days,” he said. “They were hungry and thirsty. We had them checked out by our doctor. We gave them blankets, food and water.”

But they did not arrest them.

“We had a situation where these guys were shipwrecked persons,” Lieutenant Commander Lynge said. “But we haven’t caught them in an act of piracy, and what their main purpose was -- your guess is as good as mine.”

The Danish crew handed them over early Friday to the Yemen coast guard, he said.

The Absalon, with a crew of 100, was deployed in the Gulf of Aden last September as part of an international effort to curb piracy.

The Danish actions followed another incident last month in which an Indian Navy warship sank what officials called a pirate “mother ship,” but later described by its owner as a hijacked Thai fishing trawler.

Negotiations are under way to free the Ukrainian freighter, the Faina, captured more than two months ago.

Last Sunday, Andrew Mwangura, who as head of a Kenyan maritime association has helped mediate the situation, said the Somali pirates who seized the Ukrainian vessel had agreed on a ransom with the ship’s owners. He would not reveal the figure, but he said that the only thing left was to figure out how to get the money to the pirates and hand over the ship.

The hijacked supertanker, the Sirius Star, is anchored a few miles off the coast of Somalia, near the town of Xarardheere. Its cargo of 2 million barrels of Saudi crude is worth about $100 million; the ship itself is worth more than $100 million. There are 25 crew members aboard. The pirates who seized it have been reported by news agencies to have demanded between $15 million and $25 million for its release.


http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/06/world/europe/06pirate.html?hp

Vid... http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/africa/12/05/yemen.pirates/index.html?iref=newssearch#cnnSTCVideo

Offline fari

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Re: Pirates fire on US cruise ship in hijack attempt
« Reply #34 on: December 05, 2008, 04:28:09 PM »
my wife said on NPR there was a story this week about these piratas, supposedly youths in somalia aspiring to this when they grow up...wtf

Offline mukumsplau

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Re: Pirates fire on US cruise ship in hijack attempt
« Reply #35 on: December 05, 2008, 09:51:52 PM »
if its all they have its all they have

Offline D.H.W

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German navy foils Somali pirates
« Reply #36 on: December 25, 2008, 07:48:48 PM »
The German navy says it has foiled an attempt by pirates to hijack an Egyptian cargo vessel off Somalia.


German forces with the frigate Karlsruhe

Six Somali pirates were captured by sailors of the frigate Karlsruhe in the Gulf of Aden.

However, the pirates were immediately released on the orders of the German government, officials told the BBC.

Separately, three Chinese naval ships were due to leave their home port of Sanya on Thursday to protect Chinese ships off Somalia.

There have been more than 100 pirate attacks this year in the Gulf of Aden and several countries have deployed warships there.

Confiscated

The Karlsruhe sent a helicopter to protect the Egyptian cargo ship Wadi al-Arab from the pirates, who shot and injured a member of its crew as they tried to board the vessel.

A German navy spokesperson based in Djibouti told the BBC's Greg Morsbach the Somali attackers were disarmed by German sailors and their weapons confiscated.

"We had forces on board the frigate, and they used fast small boats, and together with the helicopter we were able to surround the pirates and disarm them," he said.

He said the decision not to detain or arrest them was taken by the German government in Berlin.

A spokesman for the EU's mission off Somalia, Cdr Achim Winkler, told the BBC's Europe Today programme that Germany would only bring pirates to justice where German interests were hurt.

This would be the case if a German ship was attacked or German citizens were killed or injured, he said.

The injured crewman is being treated on the Karlsruhe.

The UN Security Council recently passed a resolution giving members states extra powers to deal with pirates on the High Seas, including the power of detention and arrest.

The Chinese ships - two destroyers and a supply ship - aim to defend Chinese shipping from pirates, the ministry of defence said.

The BBC's Chris Hogg in Beijing says China has followed a doctrine of non-interference in other nations' affairs and despite this new type of deployment the ministry insists this has not changed.
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Offline Bakes

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #37 on: January 09, 2009, 08:30:16 PM »
Pirates Free Tanker After Ransom


A U.S. Navy photo shows a parachute, possibly containing a ransom payment, dropped by a small aircraft on Friday
onto the Sirius Star, a Saudi-owned supertanker.


January 10, 2009

By MOHAMMED IBRAHIM and GRAHAM BOWLEY

MOGADISHU, Somalia — A Saudi-owned supertanker held by pirates off the coast of Somalia for two months has been released for a ransom of $3 million, according to one of the pirates and residents of Xarardheere, a pirate town on the Somali coast near where the tanker was being held.

The tanker, about the length of an American Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, is the largest ship known to have been seized by pirates, and it was fully loaded with two million barrels of oil.

The pirates were due to leave the ship after they received the money, paid by the ship’s owners, on Friday, according to the pirates and residents, who later said the ship had moved away from the coast where it had been anchored since November.

News agencies had reported that the pirates originally asked for $25 million for the oil tanker, the Sirius Star, but a pirate in Xarardheere who gave his name as Jama said, “They have agreed on $3 million.” He said he had spoken to pirates who had gone to the ship for the payment.

The International Maritime Bureau in London, a clearinghouse for piracy information and maritime safety issues, said it could not yet confirm that the pirates had freed the tanker.

“The information that we have from the owner is that the vessel is not yet released,” said Cyrus Mody, a spokesman for the organization. The owner, Vela International Ltd., could not be immediately reached for comment.

But a maritime group based in Kenya confirmed the release. Andrew Mwangura of the East African Seafarers Assistance program was quoted by Reuters as saying: “The last batch of gunmen have disembarked from the Sirius Star. She is now steaming out to safe waters.”

The Sirius Star was seized in November off the coast of Somalia, in seas where pirates have struck with increasing audacity in recent months, hijacking vessels including a Ukrainian freighter laden with armaments that is still being held.

China said last month that it would send naval ships to the Gulf of Aden. And on Thursday, the United States Navy said a new international force under American command would begin patrols to confront pirates off the Horn of Africa.

As for the supertanker, Abdi Ahmed of Xarardheere said, “The big fishes left Xarardheere on Thursday afternoon to the Sirius Star ship to get the ransom money and to set free the ship.”

The pirate named Jama said he was waiting for his share of the ransom. “When the pirates receive the money, they will divide in shares on the spot, so that they will disembark tonight from the ship with everyone’s share in pocket,” he said.

Mohammed Ibrahim reported from Mogadishu, and Graham Bowley from New York.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/10/world/africa/10somalia.html?hp
« Last Edit: January 09, 2009, 08:32:32 PM by Bake n Shark »

Offline ZANDOLIE

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #38 on: January 09, 2009, 08:35:54 PM »
Pirates Free Tanker After Ransom


A U.S. Navy photo shows a parachute, possibly containing a ransom payment, dropped by a small aircraft on Friday
onto the Sirius Star, a Saudi-owned supertanker.



The pirate named Jama said he was waiting for his share of the ransom. “When the pirates receive the money, they will divide in shares on the spot, so that they will disembark tonight from the ship with everyone’s share in pocket,” he said.


Wey sah, I in the wrong profession!
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Offline Dutty

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #39 on: January 09, 2009, 08:57:30 PM »
color=navy]A U.S. Navy photo shows a parachute, possibly containing a ransom payment, dropped by a small aircraft on Friday
onto the Sirius Star, a Saudi-owned supertanker.
[/color]


The pirate named Jama said he was waiting for his share of the ransom. “When the pirates receive the money, they will divide in shares on the spot, so that they will disembark tonight from the ship with everyone’s share in pocket,” he said.



Wey sah, I in the wrong profession!

Check de heights as to why dat ransom get pay normal....dem global oil broker HAPPY de tanker get hijack

The longer de tankers stay outside...de more money dey go make speculating on the rise on the price of crude
dem fellahs currently fillin up all de worlds supertankers and parkin dem offshore....just waitin

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=ahkU9Lg5fzoA&refer=home

ah think ah glad de somali robbin dem outside...cause dem oil barons robbin we inside
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Offline grimm01

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #40 on: January 10, 2009, 09:32:09 AM »
So how bout some of the pirates from the Saudi tanker incident take their money on a boat and it sink and dey drown. The irony is strong here.

BTW how yuh go be a pirate and can't swim?


http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090110/ap_on_bi_ge/piracy

5 Somali pirates drown with ransom share
By MOHAMED OLAD HASSAN, Associated Press Writer Mohamed Olad Hassan, Associated Press Writer 19 mins ago

MOGADISHU, Somalia – Five of the Somali pirates who released a hijacked oil-laden Saudi supertanker drowned with their share of a reported $3 million ransom after their small boat capsized, a pirate and a relative of one of the dead men said Saturday.

Pirate Daud Nure said the boat with eight people on board overturned in a storm after dozens of pirates left the Sirius Star following a two-month standoff in the Gulf of Aden that ended Friday.

He said five people died and three people reached shore after swimming for several hours. Daud Nure was not part of the pirate operation but knew those involved.

Abukar Haji, the uncle of one of the dead men, said the deaths were an accident.

"The boat the pirates were traveling in capsized because it was running at high speed because the pirates were afraid of an attack from the warships patrolling around," he said.

"There has been human and monetary loss but what makes us feel sad is that we don't still have the dead bodies of our relatives. Four are still missing and one washed up on the shore."

Saudi Arabian oil minister Ali Naimi said Saturday that the crew of the Sirius Star was safe and that the tanker had left Somali territorial waters and was on its way home.

A Saudi Oil Ministry official said the ship was headed for Dammam, on Saudi Arabia's Gulf coast, but gave no estimated time of arrival. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the press.

The Liberian-flagged ship is owned by Vela International Marine Ltd., a subsidiary of Saudi oil company Aramco. A spokesman for the Dubai-based Vela, Mihir Sapru, would not provide details of the ship's destination or plans once in port.

"We are very relieved to know that all the crew members are safe and I am glad to say that they are all in good health and high spirits," said a statement by Saleh K'aki, president and CEO of Vela. "Throughout this ordeal, our sole objective was the safe and timely release of the crew. That has been achieved today."

U.S. Navy photos released Friday showed a parachute, carrying what was described as "an apparent payment," floating toward the tanker. The Sirius Star and its 25-member crew had been held since Nov. 15. Its cargo of crude oil was valued at US$100 million at the time.

The capture was seen as a dramatic demonstration of the pirates' ability to strike high-value targets hundreds of miles offshore.

On the same day the Saudi ship was freed, pirates released a captured Iranian-chartered cargo ship, Iran's state television reported Saturday. The ship Delight was carrying 36 tons of wheat when it was attacked in the Gulf of Aden Nov. 18 and seized by pirates. All 25 crew are in good health and the vessel is sailing toward Iran, the TV report said.

The pirate-infested Gulf of Aden is one of the world's busiest shipping routes.

The U.S. Navy announced this week it will head a new anti-piracy task force after more than 100 ships were attacked last year. NATO and the European Union already have warships patrolling the Gulf of Aden and have intervened to prevent several ships from being captured.

More than a dozen ships with about 300 crew members are still being held by pirates off the coast of Somalia, including the weapons-laden Ukrainian cargo ship MV Faina, which was seized in September.

The multimillion dollar ransoms are one of the few ways to earn a living in the impoverished, war-ravaged country. Somalia has not had a functioning government since 1991 and nearly half of its population depends on aid.


Offline Bakes

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #41 on: January 10, 2009, 10:08:48 AM »
God doh like ugly.

Offline capodetutticapi

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #42 on: January 10, 2009, 12:40:52 PM »
they really sleep with de fishs.
soon ah go b ah lean mean bulling machine.

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #43 on: January 11, 2009, 05:34:19 PM »
Pirate's body washes ashore with $153,000
The Somali man drowned Friday just after receiving a huge ransom



Image: Ransom payment
Aw2 David B. Hudson / AP
An apparent ransom payment fall via parachute to pirates holding the Sirius Star.
 View related photos

MOGADISHU, Somalia - The body of a Somali pirate who drowned just after receiving a huge ransom washed onshore with $153,000 in cash, a resident said Sunday, as the spokesman for another group of pirates promised to soon free a Ukrainian arms ship.

Five pirates drowned Friday when their small boat capsized after they received a reported $3 million ransom for releasing a Saudi oil tanker. Local resident Omar Abdi Hassan said one of the bodies had been found on a beach near the coastal town of Haradhere and relatives were searching for the other four.

"One of them was discovered and they are still looking for the other ones. He had $153,000 in a plastic bag in his pocket," he said Sunday.
Story continues below ↓advertisement | your ad here

Ransom delivery
The U.S. navy released photos of a parachute dropping a package onto the deck of the Sirius Star, and said the package was likely to be the ransom delivery.

But five of the dozens of pirates who had hijacked the tanker drowned when their small boat capsized as they returned to shore in rough weather. Three other pirates survived but also lost their share of the ransom.

Graeme Gibbon Brooks, managing director of the British company Dryad Maritime Intelligence Service Ltd, said the incident was unlikely to deter attacks.

"The loss or potential loss of the ransom means the pirates will be all the more keen to get the next ransom in," he said. "There are people lining up to be pirates."

The Sirius Star had been held near the Ukrainian cargo ship MV Faina, which was loaded with 33 Soviet-designed battle tanks and crates of small arms. The same day the Sirius Star was released, the family members of the Faina crew appealed for help, saying they were not being kept informed about the negotiations or the state of their loved ones' health.

But a pirate spokesman assured The Associated Press on Sunday that the 20 crew members on the MV Faina were doing well.

"The cargo is still there unharmed and the crew is healthy," Sugule Ali said. "Once the negotiations end in mutual understanding, the ship, its crew and the cargo as well will be released."

False alarms
There have been several false alarms about the release of the MV Faina since it was seized last September. Ali said the pirates were still negotiating with the ship's owners.

"Nothing has changed from our previous demand of $20 million ransom for the release of the ship, but as negotiations continue we are likely to reduce the amount," he said. He declined to give further details.

American warships have been closely monitoring the Faina amid fears that some of the weapons onboard could be taken onshore and fall into the hands of Islamic insurgents.

The shaky Somali government is battling insurgents the U.S. State Department says are linked to al-Qaida. But the situation is complicated by clan militias and rivalries within the Islamist movement.

  Click for related content
5 Somali pirates drown with ransom money

The latest clashes among Islamist militias have killed at least 29 people and wounded more than 50 others in central Somalia, witnesses said Sunday. The government now only controls the parliamentary seat of Baidoa and pockets of Mogadishu, the capital.

Somalia has not had a functioning government since 1991 and its lawless coastline is a perfect haven for pirates, who attacked 111 ships in the Gulf of Aden and kidnapped 42 of them last year alone. The multimillion dollar ransoms are one of the only ways to make money in the impoverished Horn of Africa nation.

An international flotilla including U.S. warships has been patrolling the area. The flotilla has stopped many attacks, but the area is too vast to keep all ships safe.

 

Offline capodetutticapi

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #44 on: January 11, 2009, 11:49:45 PM »
them boy really naive to tink they could just sail away.
soon ah go b ah lean mean bulling machine.

Offline capodetutticapi

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Somali pirates hijack German gas tanker
« Reply #45 on: January 29, 2009, 12:36:49 PM »
Crew of 12 Filippinos and an Indonesian taken hostage in the Gulf of Aden

NAIROBI, Kenya - Somali pirates hijacked a German gas tanker and its 13-man crew Thursday in the Gulf of Aden, the third ship captured off the Horn of Africa this month.

The MV Longchamp, registered in the Bahamas, is managed by the German firm Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement, which said in a statement that seven pirates boarded the tanker early Thursday.

Spokesman Andre Delau said the ship's master had been briefly allowed to communicate with the firm and had said the crew of 12 Filipinos and one Indonesian were safe.

"We think that everything is in order, nobody is injured," he told The Associated Press.

No ransom demands have been made yet, the company said.

Lt. Nathan Christensen, a Bahrain-based spokesman for the U.S. 5th Fleet, said the ship was seized off the southern coast of Yemen, 60 miles from the town of al-Mukalla, the capital of Yemen's Hadramaut region. Yemen is on the north side of the Gulf of Aden, while Somalia is on the south.

Robin Phillips, deputy director of the Bahamas maritime authority in London, said the Longchamp had been traveling in a corridor secured by EU military forces when it sent a distress signal before dawn.

"Ships and helicopters were dispatched, but they arrived too late," said Phillips, who added that gun shots could be heard over the radio.

He said the ship later set a course south for Somalia.

The tanker is designed to carry pressurized liquefied gas, but Phillips said he did not know whether it was full. Liquefied petroleum gas is a mixture of gases used to fuel heating appliances and vehicles. The mixture can be mostly propane, or mostly butane, or a combination of both.

Increasing toll
Piracy has taken an increasing toll on international shipping, especially in the Gulf of Aden, one of the world's busiest shipping lanes, which links the Mediterranean Sea and the Suez Canal with the Indian Ocean. Pirates made an estimated $30 million hijacking ships for ransom last year, seizing more than 40 vessels off Somalia's 1,900-mile coastline.

Somali waters are now patrolled by more than a dozen warships from countries including Britain, France, Germany, Iran and the United States. China and South Korea have also ordered warships sent to the region to protect their vessels and crews from pirates.

Somalia, a nation of about 8 million people, has not had a functioning government since warlords overthrew a dictator in 1991 and then turned on each other. Its lawless coastline is a haven for pirates.

The Longchamp is the third ship to be hijacked in the Gulf of Aden this year. Six have been released. Cyrus Mody of the International Maritime Bureau said 166 crew on nine ships were still being held off the coast of Somalia, not including the Longchamp.

soon ah go b ah lean mean bulling machine.

Offline capodetutticapi

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Re: Somali pirates hijack German gas tanker
« Reply #46 on: January 29, 2009, 12:40:50 PM »
i really doh understand how these men could pull up in ah row boat,fuh argument sake,leh we say they have ah speed boat,and just board ah friggin oil tanker.these big tankers doh have radar to see approachin vessels and if so cyar take precaution.
soon ah go b ah lean mean bulling machine.

truetrini

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Re: Somali pirates hijack German gas tanker
« Reply #47 on: January 29, 2009, 01:00:52 PM »
i really doh understand how these men could pull up in ah row boat,fuh argument sake,leh we say they have ah speed boat,and just board ah friggin oil tanker.these big tankers doh have radar to see approachin vessels and if so cyar take precaution.

Dem little boats real hard t pick up on radar, sometimes dey look jes like a wave or swell.

Take dem huge tankers, yuh know how tll dem really are?

An Aircraft carries does be able to alunch a plane very 25 seconds and does be around 20 stories tall and about 1100 feet long...dat longer than most buildings are tall.

truetrini

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Re: Somali pirates hijack German gas tanker
« Reply #48 on: January 29, 2009, 01:04:35 PM »
another thing, dem small boats so manouverable it hard to pick dem up, add the fact dat most radars designe to pick up enemy ships and missiles and planes dan small boats.

I feel the solution might be to equip them tankers with infrared and thermal imaging cameras....dem doh miss!

Offline capodetutticapi

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Re: Somali pirates hijack German gas tanker
« Reply #49 on: January 29, 2009, 01:12:40 PM »
another thing, dem small boats so manouverable it hard to pick dem up, add the fact dat most radars designe to pick up enemy ships and missiles and planes dan small boats.

I feel the solution might be to equip them tankers with infrared and thermal imaging cameras....dem doh miss!
and one or two sharpshooters
soon ah go b ah lean mean bulling machine.

Offline WestCoast

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Re: Somali pirates hijack German gas tanker
« Reply #50 on: January 29, 2009, 01:19:31 PM »
another thing, dem small boats so manouverable it hard to pick dem up, add the fact dat most radars designe to pick up enemy ships and missiles and planes dan small boats.

I feel the solution might be to equip them tankers with infrared and thermal imaging cameras....dem doh miss!
and one or two sharpshooters
yeah dais it right there
a couple sharp shooters

I was reading this and it says that radar should be able to pick up small craft.
Could it be the location of the radar on the tanker?
Whatever you do, do it to the purpose; do it thoroughly, not superficially. Go to the bottom of things. Any thing half done, or half known, is in my mind, neither done nor known at all. Nay, worse, for it often misleads.
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Offline Dr. Rat

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Re: Somali pirates hijack German gas tanker
« Reply #51 on: January 29, 2009, 03:02:58 PM »
Try transporting millions of gallons of fuel/oil and try running away from a man that can potentially destroy with rocket launcher.  These ships have no choice but to stop.
PNM in yuh mudda-in-law

Offline Bitter

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #52 on: April 08, 2009, 10:04:31 AM »
They have to break out the Kraken for these people.

Somali Pirates Seize U.S. Ship in Latest Attack
20 Americans Held by Pirates on Container Ship Carrying Food Aid
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/04/08/AR2009040800940.html?hpid=topnews

By Stephanie McCrummen
Washington Post Foreign Service
Wednesday, April 8, 2009; 11:31 AM

NAIROBI, April 8 -- Somali pirates seized a U.S.-operated container ship Wednesday with 20 American crew on board, the latest in a spate of pirate attacks that have drawn an international flotilla of naval vessels to the waters off Somalia's coast.

A U.S. Navy spokeswoman, Cmdr. Jane Campbell, confirmed the attack on the 17,000-ton Maersk Alabama, which was carrying food aid. She said it was the first seizure in recent memory of a U.S.-operated ship.

Campbell also noted that the pirates, who have been operating a multimillion-dollar shakedown business mostly in the crowded shipping lanes in the Gulf of Aden, seem to be moving south to the less-controlled, open sea off Somalia's vast coast -- a shoreline roughly the length of the East Coast of the United States.

The Maersk Alabama was seized 500 miles south of the Gulf of Aden transit routes where most of the 20 or so naval vessels are patrolling, Campbell said. The nearest navy ship was about 300 miles away.

"It's an incredibly vast area, and basically we're seeing pirates in more than a million-square-mile operating area," said Campbell, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet, based in Bahrain. "So while the presence of naval vessels has had an effect, we continue to say that naval presence alone will never be a total solution. It starts ashore."

That shore belongs to Somalia, where a newly-elected transitional government is struggling to contain an Islamist insurgency with ties to al-Qaeda. The pirate networks are controlled by clan-based militias, which so far have remained separate from the Islamist insurgent group known as al-Shabab.

The Maersk Alabama is owned and operated by Maersk Line Ltd. in the United States, part of the Copenhagen-headquartered A.P. Moller Maersk Group, according to a statement on the company's Web site.

It is the sixth ship to be seized in the past week, said Andrew Mwangura, coordinator for the East African Seafarer's Assistance Program based in Mombassa, Kenya, where the Maersk Alabama was headed.

Mwangura said the attack marks a rise in a piracy problem that cost companies $150 million in ransom last year. The attacks had been stemmed in recent months by patrolling navy ships sent from the United States, Russia, China, Turkey and Pakistan, among other nations.

There are now 18 ships being held by Somali pirates, a wily bunch who deploy a high- and low-tech arsenal of satellite phones, rocket-propelled grenades and wooden ladders to take over the massive container ships. Although there is no word yet on the fate of the Maersk Alabama crew, the pirates usually take sailors onto shore and begin negotiating hefty ransoms that fund lavish lifestyles centered in Somalia's pirate capital of Eyl, along the coast.

Campbell said that despite the deployment of heavily armed ships to combat piracy, at least three shipping companies have managed to fend off pirates recently using relatively low-tech methods.

One simply zigzagged, outmaneuvering the pirates, who typically attack in 15-foot skiffs. Another used flares and a water hose. The third one: old-fashioned barbed wire.

"These boats are usually armed to the teeth with RPGs and automatic weapons, but the method of boarding is literally tilting a ladder and climbing," she said. "In this case, when they got to the top of the ladder, the barbed wire was there."

Maritime officials reported that the pirate attack on the Maersk Alabama began late at night and lasted about five hours. Up to three pirate skiffs were said to be involved. The container ship's crew tried to take evasive action before the pirates eventually were able to board it.

Piracy experts attribute the recent surge in successful hijackings largely to an improvement in the weather in recent weeks.
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Offline E-man

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #53 on: April 08, 2009, 10:32:22 AM »
self-reliant American crew takes ship back.


US crew reportedly takes over ship from pirates
AP

By KATHARINE HOURELD, Associated Press Writer Katharine Houreld, Associated Press Writer – 1 min ago

NAIROBI, Kenya – Pentagon officials said Wednesday that the American crew of a U.S.-flagged cargo ship had retaken control from Somali pirates who hijacked the vessel far off the Horn of Africa.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because information was still preliminary. But they said the hijacked crew had apparently contacted the private company that operates the ship.

At a noon news conference, Maersk Line Ltd. CEO John Reinhart said that the company was working to contact families of the crew.

"Speculation is a dangerous thing when you're in a fluid environment. I will not confirm that the crew has overtaken this ship," he said.

A U.S. official said the crew had retaken control and had one pirate in custody.

"The crew is back in control of the ship," a U.S. official said at midday, speaking on condition of anonymity because she was not authorized to speak on the record. "It's reported that one pirate is on board under crew control — the other three were trying to flee," the official said. The status of the other pirates was unknown, the official said, but they were reported to "be in the water."

The official said the status of the other pirates was unknown but they were reported to "be in the water." The official spoke on condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the matter.

Another U.S. official, citing a readout from an interagency conference call, said: "Multiple reliable sources are now reporting that the Maersk Alabama is now under control of the U.S. crew. The crew reportedly has one pirate in custody. The status of others is unclear, they are believed to be in the water."

The ship was carrying emergency relief to Mombasa, Kenya, when it was hijacked, said Peter Beck-Bang, spokesman for the Copenhagen-based container shipping group A.P. Moller-Maersk.

It was the sixth vessel seized within a week, a rise that analysts attribute to a new strategy by Somali pirates who are operating far from the warships patrolling the Gulf of Aden.

Cmdr. Jane Campbell, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Navy's Bahrain-based 5th Fleet, said that it was the first pirate attack "involving U.S. nationals and a U.S.-flagged vessel in recent memory." She did not give an exact timeframe.

The top two commanders of the ship graduated from the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, the Cape Cod Times reported Wednesday.

Andrea Phillips, the wife of Capt. Richard Phillips of Underhill, Vermont., said her husband has sailed in those waters "for quite some time" and a hijacking was perhaps "inevitable."

The Cape Cod Times reported his second in command, Capt. Shane Murphy, was also among the 20 Americans aboard the Maersk Alabama.

Capt. Joseph Murphy, a professor at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, says his son is a 2001 graduate who recently talked to a class about the dangers of pirates.

Somali pirates are trained fighters who frequently dress in military fatigues and use speedboats equipped with satellite phones and GPS equipment. They are typically armed with automatic weapons, anti-tank rocket launchers and various types of grenades. Far out to sea, their speedboats operate from larger mother ships.

The U.S. Navy said that the ship was hijacked early Wednesday about 280 miles (450 kilometers) southeast of Eyl, a town in the northern Puntland region of Somalia.

U.S. Navy spokesman Lt. Nathan Christensen said the closest U.S. ship at the time of the hijacking was 345 miles (555 kilometers)away.

The International Maritime Bureau says 260 crew on 14 hijacked ships are being held off the coast of Somalia, including the U.S.-flagged ship seized Wednesday, the Maersk Alabama and its crew of 20 U.S. nationals.

The Combined Maritime Forces issued an advisory Wednesday highlighting several recent attacks that occurred hundreds of miles off the Somali coast and stating that merchant mariners should be increasingly vigilant when operating in those waters.

The advisory said the "scope and magnitude of problem cannot be understated."

Douglas J. Mavrinac, the head of maritime research at investment firm Jefferies & Co., noted that it is very unusual for an international ship to be U.S.-flagged and carry a U.S. crew. Although about 95 percent of international ships carry foriegn flags because of the lower cost and other factors, he said, ships that are operated by or for the U.S. government — such a food aid ships like Maersk Alabama — have to carry U.S. flags, and therefore, employ a crew of U.S. citizens.

There are fewer than 200 U.S.-flagged vessels in international waters, said Larry Howard, chair of the Global Business and Transportation Department at SUNY Maritime College in New York.

Offline Babalawo

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #54 on: April 08, 2009, 10:39:54 AM »
the Somalians so law bitting. I think they should just organize and tax who ever ships want to pass on their waters. Do robbery the legal way  ;)

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #55 on: April 10, 2009, 01:09:01 PM »
Have no idea how to embed this video, but here is a little background from a Somalians perspective.

http://www.afrovideo.org/play.php?vid=3920
Psalm 14:1
The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.

Offline Dutty

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #56 on: April 10, 2009, 02:58:28 PM »
Have no idea how to embed this video, but here is a little background from a Somalians perspective.

http://www.afrovideo.org/play.php?vid=3920


well, he might have point for initial reasoning...but he self say..is pure greed dem on now

this ting turning into a saga...I feel dem somali should start buying eye patch and parrots oui

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090410/us_nm/us_somalia_piracy

  By Abdi Guled Abdi Guled   – Fri Apr 10, 8:39 am ET

MOGADISHU (Reuters) – Somali pirates holding an American on a drifting lifeboat vowed on Friday to fight any attack by U.S. naval forces and reportedly recaptured their hostage when he jumped overboard to escape.

Ship captain Richard Phillips leapt into the sea, but was quickly brought back, U.S. media said, citing defense sources.

"We are not afraid of the Americans," one of the pirates told Reuters by satellite phone on behalf of the gang holding Phillips far off the Somali coast in the Indian Ocean.

"We will defend ourselves if attacked."

Despite their defiant talk, maritime groups tracking the saga -- the first time Somali pirates have captured an American -- say a more likely outcome is a negotiated solution, possibly involving safe passage in exchange for their captive.

The gang is also seeking a ransom, friends say.

Four pirates have been holding Phillips, a former Boston taxi driver, since Wednesday after a foiled bid to hijack the 17,000-tonne Maersk Alabama several hundred miles off Somalia.

The ship's lifeboat has run out of fuel.

Two boats full of heavily-armed fellow pirates have taken to sea in solidarity with the four on the lifeboat, but are too nervous to come near due to the presence of foreign naval ships including the USS Bainbridge destroyer which is up close.

"Other pirates want to come and help their friends, but that would be like sentencing themselves to death," said Andrew Mwangura, coordinator of the East African Seafarers' Assistance Program that monitors the region's seas.

"They will release the captain, I think, maybe today or tomorrow, but in exchange for something. Maybe some payment or compensation, and definitely free passage back home."

Phillips is one of about 270 hostages being held at the moment by Somali pirates, who have been plying the busy sea-lanes of the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean for years.

They are keeping 18 captured vessels at or near lairs on the Somali coast -- five of them taken since the weekend alone.

Yet the fact Phillips is the first U.S. citizen seized, and the drama of his 20-man American crew stopping the Alabama being hijacked on Wednesday, has galvanized world attention.

It has also given President Barack Obama another foreign policy problem in a place most Americans would rather forget.

Perched on the Horn of Africa across from the Middle East, Somalia has suffered 18 years of civil conflict since warlords toppled former dictator Mohamed Siad Barre in 1991.

Americans remember with a shudder the disastrous U.S.-U.N. intervention there soon after, including the infamous "Black Hawk Down" battle in 1993 when 18 U.S. troops were killed in a 17-hour firefight that later inspired a book and a movie.

U.S. SENDS MORE SHIPS

In another Somali-American saga, Captain Phillips apparently volunteered to get in the lifeboat with the pirates on Wednesday to act as a hostage for the sake of the Alabama's 20 American crew members, who somehow retook control of their ship.

The freighter, which is carrying food aid for Uganda and Somalia, is now on its way to its original destination, Mombasa port in Kenya. It is expected to arrive by Sunday night.

Friends of the pirates on the lifeboat said the situation was becoming desperate.

"The captain might be harmed and so might my friends," said a pirate on one of the two boats that left the Somali coast. "We see more warships coming to the scene. We cannot go further."

The USS Bainbridge has called on the FBI and other U.S. officials to help negotiate with the pirates.

U.S. military officials said more forces were on the way and that all options were on the table to save the captain.

Last year saw an unprecedented number of hijackings off Somalia -- 42 in total. That disrupted shipping, delayed food aid to east Africa, increased insurance costs, and persuaded some firms to send cargoes round South Africa instead of through the Suez Canal, a critical route for oil.

It also brought a massive international response, with ships from the United States, Europe, China, Japan and others flocking to the region to protect the sea-routes.

As the patrols mainly focused on the Gulf of Aden, the gateway to the Suez, the pirates began moving further afield and have been striking as far south as Indian Ocean waters near the Seychelles and Madagascar.

Analysts say the attack on the Alabama could lead to a new phase in international efforts to stop piracy.

"Piracy may be a centuries-old crime, but we are working to bring an appropriate, 21st-century response," U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said.

With a vast area for the pirates to roam in, however, analysts say the only real solution is peace and stable government in Somalia itself.
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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #57 on: April 10, 2009, 03:35:35 PM »
Time to send in the SEALS.

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #58 on: April 10, 2009, 04:13:56 PM »
yuh feel if dat crew was Canadain dem was ever fighting and taking back control ah dat ship>  steups...dais wah yuh get when yuh mess with yankee resolve!

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #59 on: April 10, 2009, 05:03:51 PM »
yuh feel if dat crew was Canadain dem was ever fighting and taking back control ah dat ship>  steups...dais wah yuh get when yuh mess with yankee resolve!

Yankee resolve need to line up some snipers and cut the fukkery.

 

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