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Author Topic: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money  (Read 17849 times)

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truetrini

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #60 on: April 10, 2009, 08:09:18 PM »
yuh feel if dat crew was Canadain dem was ever fighting and taking back control ah dat ship>  steups...dais wah yuh get when yuh mess with yankee resolve!

Yankee resolve need to line up some snipers and cut the f**kkery.
  it coming...wait

Offline D.H.W

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #61 on: April 10, 2009, 08:30:53 PM »


how they shoot them in that
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Offline Bakes

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #62 on: April 10, 2009, 08:43:52 PM »


how they shoot them in that

How hard yuh think it go be to get two frog men to go put some hole in de bottom ah dat?

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #63 on: April 10, 2009, 09:21:53 PM »


how they shoot them in that

How hard yuh think it go be to get two frog men to go put some hole in de bottom ah dat?

How the hell you know what I thinking....I done say that long time. That should be sinking right now.
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Offline zuluwarrior

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #64 on: April 11, 2009, 08:40:36 AM »
He said that so far, in the eyes of the world, the pirates had been misunderstood. “We don’t consider ourselves sea bandits,” he said. “We consider sea bandits those who illegally fish in our seas and dump waste in our seas and carry weapons in our seas. We are simply patrolling our seas. Think of us like a coast guard.”


Ah find it funny non ah alyuh adressing the reason why these fiehermen became pirates ,is it ok for the western big ships to dump they shit in the people waters ,fish in the people waters with they big ships and no body cares about them is only natural at some point they would fight back and this is their way of fighting back it might not be right but what the weastern world is doing to the people is not right either and is time for this problem to be address . As the man say we have know coast guard so think of them like the somalia coast guard .as i see it a coin have two sides not one .
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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #65 on: April 11, 2009, 09:04:38 AM »
Breaking --

Pirates seize a US-owned, Italian-flagged, tugboat in the Gulf of Aden with 16 crew aboard, amid a standoff over a US captain held hostage.
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Offline Bakes

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #66 on: April 11, 2009, 10:14:28 AM »
He said that so far, in the eyes of the world, the pirates had been misunderstood. “We don’t consider ourselves sea bandits,” he said. “We consider sea bandits those who illegally fish in our seas and dump waste in our seas and carry weapons in our seas. We are simply patrolling our seas. Think of us like a coast guard.”


Ah find it funny non ah alyuh adressing the reason why these fiehermen became pirates ,is it ok for the western big ships to dump they shit in the people waters ,fish in the people waters with they big ships and no body cares about them is only natural at some point they would fight back and this is their way of fighting back it might not be right but what the weastern world is doing to the people is not right either and is time for this problem to be address . As the man say we have know coast guard so think of them like the somalia coast guard .as i see it a coin have two sides not one .

Ah find it funny that you would post this nonsense... all of these incidents are occurring in international waters... that jackass trying hard to justify the bullshit that they doing and you steady eating de chain up.

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #67 on: April 11, 2009, 11:20:57 AM »
Yes bakes  i understand that it happening in international waters now  because they see the kind ah money they could make but what i am asking what cause these fishermen to reach to that point there must be a cause they did not juss getup one day and say let us be pirates what have these people been dealing with before they got to this point ? Doh get me wrong i am not sayin that they are right, did anybody listen when the fishermen complain .
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Offline Dutty

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #68 on: April 11, 2009, 12:15:28 PM »
yuh feel if dat crew was Canadain dem was ever fighting and taking back control ah dat ship>  steups...dais wah yuh get when yuh mess with yankee resolve!

*steeuuupps**

last time allyuh went in somalia...dem fellahs take some bow and arrow and sling shot an blow out de black hawk, some humvees and run allyuh out de place...now yuh wuh sen tadpole and frog to get another round of sampat?

heh..tell yuh people spray dat in de pirate eye patch it might wukk dis time
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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #69 on: April 11, 2009, 12:25:19 PM »
Yes bakes  i understand that it happening in international waters now  because they see the kind ah money they could make but what i am asking what cause these fishermen to reach to that point there must be a cause they did not juss getup one day and say let us be pirates what have these people been dealing with before they got to this point ? Doh get me wrong i am not sayin that they are right, did anybody listen when the fishermen complain .

What caused it may very well be the internal strife that's taking place in Somalia... but what does the international community have to do with that?  Somalia has been under the vise of warlord politics for the past twenty years and that has stifled an already troubled economy.  Why these pirates don't band together and topple the government if they that dissatisfied?  If is oppression and injustice they oppose then what they doing about the refugees in Darfur, right in their own backyard?  Somalia is a blight on the facking map of the world, plain talk.  Let it not be lost in all of this that the ship whose captain is being held, was actually delivering food and relief supplies to Kenya... this isn't a case of rich merchants explointing the poor Somalis.  The international community needs to get together and make an example of these so-called pirates.

Offline capodetutticapi

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #70 on: April 11, 2009, 01:03:07 PM »
them fukkers seize another ship in de presence of de US warships.
soon ah go b ah lean mean bulling machine.

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #71 on: April 11, 2009, 01:05:06 PM »
Pirates seize Italians on tug as US ships converge
NAIROBI, Kenya – Somali pirates hijacked an Italian-flagged tugboat with 16 crew Saturday, a NATO spokeswoman said, as U.S. warships closely watched a lifeboat where an American captain was being held hostage for a fourth day.

The tugboat was hijacked in the Gulf of Aden off Somalia's northern coast as it was pulling barges, said Shona Lowe, a spokeswoman at NATO's Northwood maritime command center.

The Foreign Ministry in Rome confirmed 10 of the 16 crew members are Italian. The crew members also include five Romanians and one Croatian, according to Micoperi, the Italian maritime services company that owns the ship.

"We received an e-mail from the ship saying 'We are being attacked by pirates,' and after that, nothing," Silvio Bartolotti, the owner of the company, told The Associated Press.

The attack on the Italian boat took place as the American captain of the U.S.-flagged Maersk Alabama was held on a lifeboat watched by two U.S. warships, hundreds of miles from land. The two hijackings did not take place near each other and it was unclear whether they were related.

The Alabama was heading toward the Kenyan port of Mombasa — its original destination — with 20 American crew members aboard. It was expected to arrive Saturday night, said Joseph Murphy, whose son is second-in-command of the vessel.

Port officials moved shipping containers Saturday afternoon to block reporters' and photographers' views of the ship when it docks.

A Nairobi-based diplomat, who receives regular briefings on the situation, said the four pirates holding Capt. Richard Phillips some 380 miles off shore had tried to summon other pirates from the Somali mainland.

The diplomat, who spoke on condition on anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to reporters, said that pirates had been trying to reach the lifeboat.

He said that at least two American ships and U.S. Navy surveillance aircraft had been attempting to deter pirate ships and skiffs from contact with the lifeboat but he did not know if the pirates and Navy ships had come into contact.

A Somali who described himself as having close ties to pirate networks told The Associated Press that pirates had set out in four commandeered ships with hostages from a variety of nations including the Philippines, Russia and Germany. The diplomat told the AP that large pirate "motherships" and skiffs were heading in the direction of the lifeboat.

A second Somali man who said he had spoken by satellite phone to a pirate piloting a seized German freighter told the AP by phone Saturday that the pirate captain had reported being blocked by U.S. forces and was returning Saturday to the pirate stronghold of Harardhere.

Speaking on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals, the Somali man said the pirate captain told him the ship was in sight of a U.S. Navy destroyer Saturday morning local time, received a U.S. warning not to come any closer and, fearing attack, left the scene without ever seeing the lifeboat.

A Pentagon official who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the negotiations said in Washington Saturday morning that there had been no developments overnight. He declined to comment on the report that the U.S. Navy had turned back the pirates.

However, two U.S. officials said Saturday that FBI agents are investigating the Somali pirates who are holding Phillips hostage, raising the possibility of federal charges against the men if they are captured. The officials who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the case.

The Somali man said the pirate also told him that two other commandeered ships from Taiwan and Greece that were trying to reach the lifeboat feared a showdown with the U.S. Navy and returned to Eyl, a port that serves as a pirate hub, on Friday night. It was not immediately possible to contact people in Eyl Saturday.

The Somali man said the fourth ship that had tried to reach the lifeboat was a Norwegian tanker that was released Friday after a $2 million ransom was paid. The owner of the Norwegian tanker Bow Asir confirmed Friday that it had been released two weeks after it was seized by armed pirates off the Somali coast, and all 27 of its crew members were unhurt.

Phillips, 53, of Underhill, Vermont, was seized Wednesday when he thwarted the takeover of the 17,000-ton U.S.-flagged Maersk Alabama, which was carrying food aid for hungry people in Somalia, Rwanda and Uganda. He told his crew of 20 to lock themselves in a cabin, crew members told stateside relatives.

Phillips surrendered himself to safeguard his men. The crew later overpowered some of the pirates but the Somalis fled with the captain to an enclosed lifeboat, the relatives said.

On Friday, Phillips jumped out of the lifeboat and tried to swim for his freedom but was recaptured when a pirate fired an automatic weapon at or near him, according to U.S. Defense Department officials speaking on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to talk about the sensitive, unfolding operations.

Negotiations had been taking place between the pirates and the captain of the Bainbridge, who was getting direction from FBI hostage negotiators, the officials said.

Sailors on the USS Bainbridge, which has rescue helicopters and lifeboats, were able to see Phillips but at several hundred yards away were too far to help him. The U.S. destroyer is keeping its distance, in part to stay out of the pirates' range of fire.

The lifeboat has some gas and the ability to move, according to U.S. defense officials who spoke on condition of anonymity in order to discuss sensitive details.

U.S. sailors saw Phillips moving around and talking after his return to the lifeboat, and the Defense Department officials said they think he is unharmed.

The Bainbridge was joined Friday by the USS Halyburton, which has helicopters, and the huge, amphibious USS Boxer was expected soon after, the defense officials said. The Boxer, the flagship of a multination anti-piracy task force, resembles a small aircraft carrier. It has a crew of more than 1,000, a mobile hospital, missile launchers and about two dozen helicopters and attack planes.

The vice president of the Philippines, the nation with the largest number of sailors held captive by Somali pirates, appealed for the safety of hostages to be ensured in the standoff.

"We hope that before launching any tactical action against the pirates, the welfare of every hostage is guaranteed and ensured," said Vice President Noli de Castro. "Moreover, any military action is best done in consultation with the United Nations to gain the support and cooperation of other countries."

On Friday, the French navy freed a sailboat seized off Somalia last week by other pirates, but one of the hostages was killed.

France's defense minister promised an autopsy and investigation into the death of the hostage killed during the commando operation, which freed four other captives and was prompted by threats the passengers would be executed.

The pirates had seized the sailboat carrying Florent Lemacon, his wife, 3-year-old son and two friends off the Somali coast a week ago.

Two pirates were killed, and Lemacon died in an exchange of fire as he tried to duck down the hatch. Three pirates were taken prisoner in the operation, and are to be brought to France for criminal proceedings.

Piracy along the anarchic and impoverished Somali coast, the longest in Africa, has risen in recent years.

Somali pirates have been seizing ships with many hostages and anchoring it near shore, where they have quickly escaped to land and begun negotiations for multimillion-dollar ransoms.

They hold about a dozen ships with more than 200 crew members, according to the International Maritime Bureau, a piracy watchdog group based in Malaysia. The bureau lists 66 attacks since January, not including the Alabama.

soon ah go b ah lean mean bulling machine.

Offline Brownsugar

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #72 on: April 12, 2009, 06:09:53 AM »
I find dis shit going on too long now.....steups

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #73 on: April 12, 2009, 06:16:12 AM »
so....................
what is THEIR government doing for them?


here read this

HMCS Winnipeg thwarts Arabian Sea pirate attack

CTV.ca News Staff
 
Updated: Sun. Apr. 5 2009 8:00 PM ET

A Canadian warship has had a busy weekend on the Arabian Sea, thwarting a pirate attack and delivering supplies to a boatload of Somali refugees all in the same 24-hour period.

On Saturday, HMCS Winnipeg, currently involved in an anti-pirate NATO mission called Operation Allied Protector, saw three skiffs approaching an Indian merchant vessel.

The Pacific Opal radioed for help and Cmdr. Craig Baines, the commanding officer of the Canadian warship, sent out a Sea King helicopter to investigate.

Baines told CTV Newsnet that HMCS Winnipeg got the call for help while it was busy escorting another ship.

"We were actually escorting another vessel at the time when we noticed that another ship launched three smaller vessels that rapidly closed in on a merchant vessel that was nearby in the area," he said Sunday.

Pilot Maj. James Hawthorne said the pirates complied with Canadian instructions, which came in the form of a sign hanging from the side of the helicopter with the word "Stop" written in Somali.

"Whatever their intentions were, they complied without instructions and allowed the merchant vessel to proceed," Hawthorne said, when quoted in a military statement that was released Saturday.

Baines said the helicopter shadowed the suspected pirate skiffs for about 15 minutes in total.

"After we've deterred something, if they haven't actually done an act of piracy, which in this case they hadn't because we intervened beforehand, we usually just let them carry on and try to monitor their position," Baines said.

Few pirates would engage a military ship or helicopter, he said, because the risks are too high.

"The fortunate thing is that the pirates want nothing to do with warships or helicopters," Baines said.

"They are in this for economic gain only and so they know that if they ever tried to engage a ship or a helicopter, it would end badly for them."

Afterward, the HMCS Winnipeg crew got a thank you message from the crew on board the Pacific Opal, Baines said.

Lieut. Gen. Michel Gauthier said the incident "highlights the importance of our mission and the efforts to make a difference with our coalition partners in the fight against piracy and international terrorism."

HMCS Winnipeg saw further action on Sunday when it brought supplies to a boatload of Somali refugees who were hungry and thirsty after being at sea for two days.

The warship has a crew of some 240 officers and non-commissioned members and is based out of Esquimalt, B.C.

It has been at sea since February and is scheduled to return to B.C. in August.

With files from The Canadian Press

© 2009  All Rights Reserved.
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20090405/pirate_attack_090405/20090405
« Last Edit: April 12, 2009, 06:28:00 AM by Kernberg »
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Offline Deeks

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #74 on: April 12, 2009, 08:47:44 AM »
Happy Easter Warriors!!!
                                   Unfortunately, the area that the US navy has to cover is about the size of the east coast. Them ship can't just speed up to each highjacking incident  just like that. The pirates decides when to attack. They making sure them warships are about 300 mls or more from them. The issues as everybody rightly agree on is resolving the entire Somali mess. That country has to be fixed. I don't know how? Maybe they should split it in 3. They had over 20 yrs to figure out what they want. They can't agree.

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #75 on: April 12, 2009, 11:38:00 AM »
The Captain was freed and 3pirates geh ded
.
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truetrini

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #76 on: April 12, 2009, 11:56:36 AM »
yuh feel if dat crew was Canadain dem was ever fighting and taking back control ah dat ship>  steups...dais wah yuh get when yuh mess with yankee resolve!

*steeuuupps**

last time allyuh went in somalia...dem fellahs take some bow and arrow and sling shot an blow out de black hawk, some humvees and run allyuh out de place...now yuh wuh sen tadpole and frog to get another round of sampat?

heh..tell yuh people spray dat in de pirate eye patch it might wukk dis time


Maybe we need to start shipping some ah dem cans ah resolve into PANSY ass Canada!

U.S. Navy rescues captain held by pirates
Three of the Somali captors were killed and one was in custody
Image: Maersk Alabama crew
Sayyid Azim / AP
A crew member waves from the Maersk Alabama at the Mombasa port in Kenya, on Sunday.
 View related photos
   
  Pirates reportedly fire upon U.S. sailors
April 11: U.S. sources tell NBC News that well after sunset, the pirates holding Capt. Richard Phillips fired several shots at a small Navy patrol boat circling their location. NBC’s Jim Miklaszewski reports.

Nightly News
   
Video
   
  Crew remains aboard Maersk Alabama
April 11: A Maersk spokesperson says the crew will remain on the docked ship until the FBI finishes its investigation into the pirate attack.
 

MOMBASA, Kenya - The U.S. Navy has rescued the American sea captain held by Somali pirates.

A senior U.S. intelligence official said hostage Richard Phillips was not hurt in what appeared to be a swift firefight off the Somali coast on Sunday. Phillips was safely transported to a Navy warship nearby.

The official said three pirates were killed and one was injured.
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The official was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

U.S. warships and helicopters had been stalking the lifeboat holding the captain and his  captors as a Somali official and others reported earlier that negotiations for his release had broken down.

The district commissioner of the central Mudug region said talks went on all day Saturday, with clan elders from his area talking by satellite telephone and through a translator with Americans, but collapsed late Saturday night.

"The negotiations between the elders and American officials have broken down. The reason is American officials wanted to arrest the pirates in Puntland and elders refused the arrest of the pirates," said the commissioner, Abdi Aziz Aw Yusuf. He said he organized initial contacts between the elders and the Americans.

Two other Somalis, one involved in the negotiations and another in contact with the pirates, also said the talks collapsed because of the U.S. insistence that the pirates be arrested and brought to justice.

Nineteen American sailors guarded by U.S. Navy Seals reached safe harbor in Kenya's northeast port of Mombasa on Saturday night, exhilarated by freedom but mourning the absence of Capt. Richard Phillips, who sacrificed himself as a hostage to save them.

"He saved our lives!" second mate Ken Quinn, of Bradenton, Florida, declared from the ship deck. "He's a hero."

‘Hooks and ropes’
ATM Reza, a crew member who said he was first to see the pirates board the U.S.-flagged Maersk Alabama on Wednesday described how the bandits "came on with hooks and ropes and were firing in the air."

He was responding to a throng of reporters shouting questions from shore about the ordeal that began with Somali pirates hauling themselves up from a small boat bobbing on the surface of the Indian Ocean far below.

As the pirates shot in the air, Phillips, 53, of Underhill, Vermont, told his crew to lock themselves in a cabin and surrendered himself to safeguard his men, crew members said.

Phillips was still held hostage in an enclosed lifeboat Sunday by four pirates being closely watched by U.S. warships and a helicopter in an increasingly tense standoff. The lifeboat is out of fuel and drifting.

A Pentagon spokesman said Saturday night that negotiations to free Phillips were continuing.

But Abdiwali Ali Tar said they were deadlocked. "Some local elders as well as our company have been involved in the negotiations but things seem to be deadlocked because the pirates want to make sure to be in a safe location first with the captain — either on one of the ships their colleagues hold or Somali coastal villages — but the Americans will not allow that," said Tar, the head of a private security firm acting as the coast guard in northeast Puntland region, a haven for pirates.

Talks had begun Thursday with the captain of the USS Bainbridge talking to the pirates under instruction from FBI hostage negotiators on board the U.S. destroyer.

It was not clear where the lifeboat was on Sunday. But a statement from Maersk Line, owner of the Maersk Alabama, which Phillips captains, said "the U.S. Navy had sight contact" of Phillips earlier Sunday — apparently when the pirates opened the hatches.

A pirate who says he is associated with the gang holding Phillips, Ahmed Mohamed Nur, told The Associated Press that the pirates say "helicopters continue to fly over their heads in the daylight and in the night they are under the focus of a spotlight from a warship."

He spoke by satellite phone from Harardhere, a port and pirate stronghold where a fisherman said helicopters flew over the town Sunday morning and a warship was looming on the horizon. The fisherman, Abdi Sheikh Muse, said that could be an indication the lifeboat may be near to shore.

The U.S. Navy has assumed the pirates would try to get their hostage to shore, where they can hide him on Somalia's lawless soil and be in a stronger position to negotiate a ransom.

Three U.S. warships were within easy reach of the lifeboat on Saturday, but fears of endangering Phillips' life limit their ability to use their overwhelming firepower. The pirates have threatened to kill Phillips if attacked.

On Friday, the French navy freed a sailboat seized off Somalia last week by other pirates, but one of the five hostages was killed.

Early Saturday, the pirates holding Phillips in the lifeboat fired a few shots at a small U.S. Navy vessel that had approached, a U.S. military official said on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly.

The official said the U.S. sailors did not return fire, the Navy vessel turned away and no one was hurt. He said the vessel had not been attempting a rescue. The pirates are believed armed with pistols and AK-47 assault rifles.
Phillips jumped out of the lifeboat Friday and tried to swim for his freedom but was recaptured when a pirate fired an automatic weapon at or near him, according to U.S. Defense Department officials speaking on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to talk about the unfolding operations.

Emphasizing the U.S. stand on bringing pirates to justice, U.S. Coast Guard chief Adm. Thad Allen said Sunday that "an international legal framework" is needed. Speaking on ABC's "This Week" program, Allen said "What you really have to have is a coordinating mechanism that ultimately brings these pirates to court where they can be held accountable."

The United States has signed, but not ratified, the U.N.-sponsored Law of the Sea, which allows signatories to bring pirates arrested in any part of the world to trial in their countries. France, for example, is holding alleged pirates arrested off Somali waters for trial.
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U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has promised to work to get the treaty ratified. The United States originally objected, during the Cold War, that the treaty provisions militated against a free market. More recently it objected to the treaty's regime governing exploitation of minerals of the deep seabed. Lately, treaty critics claim it would impinge on U.S. sovereignty.

Stabbed with an ice pick
In Mombasa, meanwhile, the Alabama crew described how they overpowered the pirates.

Reza, a father of one from Hartford, Connecticut, said that after the pirates boarded, he had led one to the engine room where he stabbed him in the hand with an ice pick and tied him up.

The crew have told family members by phone that they took one pirate hostage before giving him up in the hope their captain would be released. Instead, the Somalis fled with Phillips to the lifeboat.

Maersk President John Reinhart said from Norfolk, Virginia, that the ship was still a crime scene and the crewmen could not leave until the FBI investigates the attack.

"When I spoke to the crew, they won't consider it done when they board a plane and come home," Reinhart said. "They won't consider it done until the captain is back, nor will we."

Other bandits, among hundreds who have made the Gulf of Aden the world's most dangerous waterway, seized an Italian tugboat off Somalia's north coast Saturday as it was pulling barges, said Shona Lowe, a spokeswoman at NATO's Northwood maritime command center outside London.

The Foreign Ministry in Rome confirmed 10 of the 16 crew members are Italian. The others are five Romanians and a Croatian, according to Micoperi, the Italian company that owns the ship.

A piracy expert said the two hijackings did not appear related.

"This is just the Somali pirate machine in full flow," said Graeme Gibbon-Brooks, founder of Dryad Maritime Intelligence Ltd.

In Phillips' hometown, the Rev. Charles Danielson of the St. Thomas Church said the congregation would continue to pray for Phillips and his family, who are members, and he would encourage "people to find hope in the triumph of good over evil."

Reinhart said he spoke with Phillips' wife, Andrea, who is surrounded by family and two company employees who were sent to support her.

"She's a brave woman," Reinhart said. "And she has one favor to ask: 'Do what you have to do to bring Richard home safely.' That means don't make a mistake, folks. We have to be perfect in our execution."

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truetrini

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #77 on: April 12, 2009, 11:58:04 AM »
dais wha yuh get when yuh try to f**k with de greatest NAVY this world has ever seen...biatches!

like yuh was hoping for disaster...well dere was one!  At least from the so-called pirates view point.

Word to the pirates:  "Go after Canadian, Saudi, French ships....leave de US registered vessels alone....or DIE!"

Ah wonder if Canada have any ah de pirogues floating around out dere?
« Last Edit: April 12, 2009, 12:02:39 PM by Trinity Cross »

Offline Dr. Rat

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #78 on: April 12, 2009, 12:09:12 PM »
Cheers to the US Navy and to a resilient captain. :beermug:
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Offline D.H.W

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #79 on: April 12, 2009, 12:54:17 PM »
Navy Seal Commandos did the Job, big up to them brave men  :beermug:
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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #80 on: April 12, 2009, 01:27:31 PM »
dais wha yuh get when yuh try to f**k with de greatest NAVY this world has ever seen...biatches!

l
:violin:
The brits will beg to differ


So lemme get this straight.. 3 fully staffed warships vs 4 nashy somali with 2 pistol, ah AK and a slingshot

what next? an army ranger platoon to stop de bullying in virginia elementary schools?



I feel de hostage captain mus be did take out at least 2 ah dem fellahs first
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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #81 on: April 12, 2009, 01:42:24 PM »
Ah bet dai's de last time they take an American hostage... f**kers.  .50 cal in dey c**t.

What the global community needs to do now is band together and set up patrols.  Set a perimeter off the coast of Somalia and any Somali vessel wanting to cross must show cause as to why they should be allowed inot international waters.  If yuh doh want to be that drastic then allow them to cross the perimeter and just watch dem like a f**king hawk.

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #82 on: April 12, 2009, 01:52:34 PM »
dais wha yuh get when yuh try to f**k with de greatest NAVY this world has ever seen...biatches!

l
:violin:
The brits will beg to differ


So lemme get this straight.. 3 fully staffed warships vs 4 nashy somali with 2 pistol, ah AK and a slingshot

what next? an army ranger platoon to stop de bullying in virginia elementary schools?



I feel de hostage captain mus be did take out at least 2 ah dem fellahs first

The Brits could beg to differ, or beg for mercy...DE GREATEST NAVY EVER-US NAVY!

Now let me put yuh sour grapes ass stright....any NAvy we take on...is advantage USA!

Put dat in yuh dutty pipe and ...welll...smoke it!

Eeven if the American Captain took dem all out..dais what yuh get for messing with american shipping interests!

BTW...yuh never tell me about de Maple Leaf pirogues and dem.

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #83 on: April 12, 2009, 05:53:14 PM »

US captain rescued from pirates

Capt Phillips family was informed of his release hours before it became official

The captain of a US cargo ship taken hostage by Somali pirates has been released and is safe, the US Navy says.

Three pirates were killed in the operation to free Captain Richard Phillips after being held in a lifeboat for several days.

Captain Phillips was "resting comfortably" aboard a US warship after a medical check-up, a spokesman for the Navy's 5th Fleet said.

He was seized when pirates attacked his ship, the Maersk Alabama, on Wednesday.

On Friday he failed in an attempt to swim free.

On Sunday he jumped overboard for a second time, and the pirates were shot and killed before they could take action to get him back.

The order for US snipers to kill the pirates came when "the on-scene [US navy] commander determined that the captain was in imminent danger," Vice Admiral William Gortney, head of the US Naval Central Command, said in a Pentagon briefing from Bahrain.

"He had a weapon aimed at him - that would be my interpretation of imminent danger," said Admiral Gortney.

US forces apparently took advantage of the fact that one of the pirates was negotiating on a US Navy vessel when the incident happened.

The surviving pirate is now in US military custody and "being cooperative" according to the navy.

Spokeswoman: Family 'relieved' at release

Capt Phillips was initially taken on board the USS Bainbridge, a warship sent to track the pirates holding him, before being flown to the USS Boxer for a medical examination, navy spokesman Lt Nathan Christensen told AP.

Somali elders had been trying to resolve the standoff but most recent reports had suggested the talks had stalled, apparently because US officials were insisting that the pirates be arrested and brought to justice.

'Model for Americans'

"At approximately 7.19 pm (1619 GMT) US naval forces rescued Capt Richard Phillips, the master of Motor Vessel Maersk-Alabama," a statement from US Naval Forces Central Command said.

"US military forces have one pirate in custody, three were killed in the rescue," it said.

How Captain Phillips was rescued

Central Commander Vice Admiral Bill Gortney paid tribute to "an incredible team effort" and said he was "extremely proud of the tireless efforts of all the men and women who made this rescue possible."

US President Barack Obama said he was very pleased that Capt Phillips had been rescued and that his courage was a "model for all Americans".

He said he was resolved to deal with the threat of piracy in the region.

Admiral Gortney acknowledged that the military end to this hostage incident may raise the stakes for pirates in the region.

"This could escalate violence in this part of the world, no question about it."

Reading a statement on behalf of Capt Phillips' wife Andrea, a spokeswoman for ship owner Maersk Line Ltd said the family was "happy and relieved".

"This is truly a very happy Easter for the family," the statement said.

The head of Maersk praised the captain's behaviour.

"He's a leader of men... he exhibited the true spirit of an American," John Reinhart told reporters.

He said Capt Phillips had told him: "I'm just the byline, the heroes are the Navy seals who brought me home."

Mr Reinhart added that it was time to bring both captain and crew home, and that this would be done "in the next couple of days".

The ship's crew are currently in the Kenyan port of Mombasa, being questioned by US federal agents.

Crew members put a US flag over the side of the ship, whistled, pumped their fists in the air and fired off a red flare, AP said.

'Indebted'

They have hailed Capt Phillips as a hero, saying he offered himself as a hostage in order to save them when the Maersk Alabama was attacked.

Joseph Murphy, the father of the ship's chief officer, Shane Murphy, said in a statement: "Our prayers have been answered on this Easter Sunday.

"My son and our family will forever be indebted to Capt Phillips for his bravery. If not for his incredible personal sacrifice, this kidnapping - an act of terror - could have turned out much worse."

News of the captain's release came shortly after four French citizens, including a three-year-old boy, whose yacht was seized by pirates returned to Paris.

They were freed by French troops on Friday. The yacht's owner, Florent Lemacon, was killed during the operation along with two pirates.

On Saturday, pirates hijacked a tugboat in the Gulf of Aden. The Buccaneer has 16 crew members on board, 10 of them Italians.

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #84 on: April 12, 2009, 07:53:12 PM »
i read an article in this month's GQ magazine and it shed a lot of light on the pirate scene.   my take is that  is one thing to shoot the lil skinny man and dem in the boats, but them fellas getting resources, food, arms, boats from higher placed sources (in the government and in society). shooting them pirates ent go make a difference, they like medusa, when u shoot one, 7 does jump up.   to stop this pirate scourge govts need to help these ppl out (infrastructure, education, u know the deal), is real misery ppl in somalia suffer for years now, and while i ent condoning they actions i dont blame them either, cause the word is that pirates does live large.

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #85 on: April 12, 2009, 11:39:24 PM »
April 13, 2009

In Rescue of Captain, Navy Kills 3 Pirates

By ROBERT D. MCFADDEN and SCOTT SHANE

Navy Seal snipers rescued an American cargo ship captain unharmed and killed three Somali pirates in a daring operation in the Indian Ocean on Sunday, ending a five-day standoff between United States naval forces and a small band of brigands in a covered orange lifeboat off the Horn of Africa.

Acting with President Obama’s authorization and in the belief that the hostage, Capt. Richard Phillips, was in imminent danger of being killed by captors armed with pistols and AK-47s, snipers on the fantail of the destroyer Bainbridge, which was towing the lifeboat on a 100-foot line, opened fire and picked off the three captors.

Two of the captors had poked their heads out of a rear hatch of the lifeboat, exposing themselves to clear shots, and the third could be seen through a window in the bow, pointing an automatic rifle at the captain, who was tied up inside the 18-foot lifeboat, senior Navy officials said.

It took only three remarkable shots — one each by snipers firing from a distance at dusk, using night-vision scopes, the officials said. Within minutes, rescuers slid down ropes from the Bainbridge, climbed aboard the lifeboat and found the three pirates dead. They then untied Captain Phillips, ending the contretemps at sea that had riveted much of the world’s attention. A fourth pirate had surrendered earlier.

Shortly after his rescue, Captain Phillips was taken aboard the Bainbridge, underwent a medical exam and was found to be in relatively good condition for a 53-year-old seafarer who had been held since Wednesday by pirates who had demanded $2 million for his life. He called home and was flown to the Boxer, an amphibious assault ship also off the Somali coast. Arrangements were being made Sunday night for his return home to Vermont.

“I share the country’s admiration for the bravery of Captain Phillips and his selfless concern for his crew,” Mr. Obama said in a statement. “His courage is a model for all Americans.”

Jubilation over the dramatic rescue reached from the White House to Underhill, Vt., Captain Phillips’s hometown, and from personnel aboard the Bainbridge to the cheering, fist-pumping 19-member crew of the captain’s cargo ship, the Maersk Alabama, docked in Mombasa, Kenya.

Captain Phillips, who was said to be resting comfortably, spoke to officials of the Maersk Line, who quoted him as saying: “The real heroes are the Navy, the Seals, those who have brought me home.” He also spoke to his wife, Andrea, and two college-aged children in Underhill, where dozens of yellow ribbons fluttered on the white picket fence of his home and two small American flags jutted up from the lawn.

“This is truly a very happy Easter for the Phillips family,” said Alison McColl, a Maersk representative assigned to speak for the family. “They are all just so happy and relieved,” she said. “I think you can all imagine their joy and what a happy moment it was for them.”

On the family’s behalf, Ms. McColl thanked the nation and the people of Vermont for their prayers and support. . “Obviously, this has been a long journey for the family,” she said. John Reinhart, president and chief executive of Maersk Line Ltd., praised the Navy and federal officials for their performance. “Everyone’s worked around the clock,” he said. “It’s magnificent to see the outcome.”

While the outcome was a triumph for America, officials in many countries plagued by pirates said it was not likely to discourage them. Pirates are holding a dozen ships with more than 200 crew members, according to the Malaysia-based International Maritime Bureau.

In Somalia itself, other pirates reacted angrily to the news that Captain Phillips had been rescued, and some said they would avenge the deaths of their colleagues by killing Americans in sea hijackings to come.

“Every country will be treated the way it treats us,” Abdullahi Lami, one of the pirates holding a Greek ship anchored in the pirate den of Gaan, a central Somali town, was quoted by The Associated Press as saying in a telephone interview. “In the future, America will be the one mourning and crying.”

Aboard the Maersk Alabama, a 17,000-ton cargo ship, Captain Phillips’s crew erupted in cheers, waved American flags and fired off flares. When four pirates attacked the ship on Wednesday, the crew escaped harm after the captain offered himself as a hostage. He told his crewmen to lock themselves in cabins, and allowed himself to be taken at gunpoint into the lifeboat in which the pirates fled.

Over the ensuing days, according to official accounts of the episode, the pirates made repeated threats to kill the captain as their motorized lifeboat moved about 30 miles off the Somali coast. It was closely watched by United States warships and helicopters in an increasingly tense standoff.

Talks to free the captain began Thursday, with the commander of the Bainbridge communicating with the pirates under instructions from F.B.I. hostage negotiators flown to the scene. The pirates threatened to kill Captain Phillips if attacked, and the result was tragicomic: the world’s most powerful navy vs. a lifeboat.

Vice Adm. William E. Gortney, commander of the United States naval forces in the region, said in a briefing in Bahrain that despite ransom demands from the pirates the United States had not discussed any ransom and had talked to the pirates only about the release of Captain Phillips and the pirates’ surrender.

The Defense Department twice sought Mr. Obama’s permission to use force to rescue Captain Phillips, most recently on Friday night, senior defense officials said. On Saturday morning, the president agreed, they said, if it appeared that the captain’s life was in imminent danger.

By Friday, with several warships within easy reach of the lifeboat, the negotiations had gone nowhere. Captain Phillips jumped into the sea, but was quickly recaptured. On Saturday, the pirates fired several shots at a small boat that had approached from the Bainbridge.

By the weekend, however, the pirates had begun to run out of food, water and fuel. That apparently provided the opening officials were hoping for. In briefings, senior officers who spoke anonymously because they had not been authorized to disclose information said that the pirates agreed to accept food and water. A small craft was used to deliver them and it apparently made several trips between the Bainbridge and the lifeboat.

On one trip, one of the four pirates — whose hand had been gashed during the capture of Captain Phillips — asked for medical treatment and, in effect surrendering, was taken in the small boat to the Bainbridge. Justice Department officials were studying options for his case, including criminal charges in the United States or turning him over to Kenya, where dozens of pirates have faced prosecution. Three pirates were left on board with Captain Phillips.

Meanwhile, members of the Navy Seals were flown in by fixed-wing aircraft. They parachuted into the sea with inflatable boats and were picked up by the Bainbridge. On Sunday, the pirates, their fuel gone, were drifting toward the Somali coast. They agreed to accept a tow from the Bainbridge, the senior officials said. At first, the towline was 200 feet long, but as darkness gathered and seas became rough, the towline was shortened to 100 feet, the officials said. It was unclear if this was done with the pirates’ knowledge.

At dusk, a single tracer bullet was seen fired from the lifeboat. The intent was unclear, but it ratcheted up the tension and Seal snipers at the stern rail of the Bainbridge fixed night-vision scopes to their high-powered rifles, getting ready for action.

What they saw was the head and shoulders of two of the pirates emerging from the rear hatch of the lifeboat. Through the window of the front hatch they saw the third pirate, pointing his AK-47 at the back of Captain Phillips, who was seen to be tied up
.

That was it: the provocation that fulfilled the president’s order to act only if the captain’s life was in imminent danger, and the opportunity of having clear shots at each captor. The order was given. Senior defense officials, themselves marveling at the skill of the snipers, said each took a target and fired one shot.

“This was an incredible team effort,” Admiral Gortney said when it was over. “And I am extremely proud of the tireless efforts of all the men and women who made this rescue possible.”

Robert D. McFadden reported from New York, and Scott Shane from Washington. Mark Mazzetti contributed reporting from Washington, Serge F. Kovaleski from Underhill, Vt.; and employees of The New York Times from Somalia.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/13/world/africa/13pirates.html?_r=1&hp


^^^^This is some ole Sam Fisher, Splinter Cell shit right here... ah love it © Andre Samuel

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #86 on: April 13, 2009, 06:10:31 AM »
Trinidad-born sailor Jamille Sabga hid with almost 20 crewmates in a cramped metal room next to his ship's engine in 120-degree Fahrenheit heat for hours as pirates seized control of a United States cargo ship in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Somalia.

Sabga, 65, was on board the Maersk Alabama, a container ship carrying food aid for Somalians, when it was attacked by heavily armed Somali pirates on Wednesday.

Sabga grew up in Trinidad and Tobago and moved to New York, then emigrated to Canada about 25 years ago after marrying a citizen of that country.

He has worked on ships in a career at sea spanning more than 30 years, a relative in Trinidad said yesterday.

John Hadad, whose mother is Sabga's cousin, told the Express yesterday that Sabga and his crewmates locked themselves in a small, sweltering room next to the ship's engine room for nine hours as armed pirates held the vessel hostage.

He and more than a dozen American crewmates had locked themselves in the tight quarters when their captain, Richard Phillips, signalled that they were under attack by pirates.

"They locked themselves in the room, next to the engine, in 120-degree heat," Hadad told the Express in a phone interview yesterday. "Even though the pirates tried to force them to open the door, they did not as they had a code with the captain that told them if it was safe to come out."

As Sabga's captain continued to be held hostage, Sabga and his shipmates understood it was time to make their escape.

As a standoff for their captain began, Sabga and the crew apparently fought off the Somali pirates and regained control of the vessel on Thursday, even though their captain remained in the hand of the pirates who demanded a US$2 million ransom.

Hadad said Sabga disembarked from the vessel and was medically examined by doctors who said he was in good health.

United States FBI agents have also debriefed Sabga and his crewmates and he is expected to return to his wife in Canada tomorrow, Hadad said.

"His family and friends are relieved that he has come out of it as my mother has been praying for days," Hadad said, adding that in a brief telephone conversation from Mombasa to his family, Sabga said that he was in good spirits and joked that this experience signalled the end of his career at sea.

Hadad said Sabga returns to Trinidad about once a year to spend time with his sister, other relatives and friends living here.

Captain Phillips was freed from captivity at the hands of Somali pirates in a dramatic ending to the five-day standoff with American naval forces, the US Navy said yesterday.

Phillips was freed unharmed and the US military killed three of four pirates who had held him hostage on a lifeboat after trying to seize his vessel. It said a fourth pirate was in custody.
   

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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #87 on: April 13, 2009, 06:23:52 AM »
Very happy that Obama made the right call. Even happier in the fact that he has not chosen to capitalize on the success and use it as proof of his much doubted ability to be Commander in Chief.

He take a very reserved line giving credit where it is due, while showing concern for other countries affected by this scourge who are less fortunate than the US, business as usual.

Kudos.
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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #88 on: April 13, 2009, 07:09:16 AM »
where's Cana? You notice ah Trini was in the mix ...AGAIN!


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Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #89 on: April 13, 2009, 07:49:09 AM »
Somalis fighting back now, mortars fired at US congressman. in Somalia 
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