December 02, 2022, 08:34:47 AM

Author Topic: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money  (Read 17696 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Brownsugar

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 10174
  • Soca in mih veins, Soca in mih blood!!
    • View Profile
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #90 on: April 13, 2009, 08:01:32 AM »
where's Cana? You notice ah Trini was in the mix ...AGAIN!



We like sweetie paper....EVERYWHERE!!!....  ;D
"...If yuh clothes tear up
Or yuh shoes burst off,
You could still jump up when music play.
Old lady, young baby, everybody could dingolay...
Dingolay, ay, ay, ay ay,
Dingolay ay, ay, ay..."

RIP Shadow....The legend will live on in music...

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 17843
    • View Profile
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #91 on: April 13, 2009, 08:10:29 AM »
Somalis fighting back now, mortars fired at US congressman. in Somalia 

Dahis Donald Payne, a man said to be fairly supportive of CARICOM issues. He may have Caribbean roots.
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/MB2LQlWVWKU" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/MB2LQlWVWKU</a>

Think of the 2022 conversation regarding reparations as the item tabled for future discussion when initially raised for negotiation during talks in 1834. A lot of intere$t has accrued.

Offline TriniCana

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 7557
  • ah Catch ah Glad
    • View Profile
    • allyuhmuddaass@com
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #92 on: April 13, 2009, 08:41:23 AM »
where's Cana? You notice ah Trini was in the mix ...AGAIN!



It never frigging fails eh.. Everywhere it have some blasted commotion, ah TRINI in dat and always living to tell dey tale. Hopefully some Americanas influences will hit they arse one day to write ah book - make some damn money man :devil:

No Bajan, Grenadian, Lucian or even Vincey - ah TRINI....

We juss kissmehass farse :P

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18445
    • View Profile
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #93 on: April 13, 2009, 12:30:07 PM »
The Somali pirates may have legimate gripes. The fishing industry is/was "dsetroyed" by the asian fishing fleets. Also gabbage being dump in their waters. I believe that. But that being said how can we justify piracy. They theifin'. That is unlawful. It is only a matter of time before they kill somebody. Then it go be tit for tat. Well it start already. Frenchie did not negotiate. They bust them up, even at the expense of one of their own citizen.

Then their is also the elements of islamist or Al-Qaida getting involved. The issue is the failed state of Somalia. This has gone on for 20 yrs. As long as the West don,t talk with the radicals, this will continue to fester. There have to be some form of stable government  there to resolve the current situation. But law and order has to prevail or else them shipping companis and maritime insurance companies will just pass the bucks on the consumers. Security tax.


Offline zuluwarrior

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3048
  • use your tongue to count your teeth
    • View Profile
    • http://pointalive.com
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #95 on: April 14, 2009, 09:02:59 PM »
Another US ship attacked by them pirates and the us  NAVY came to the rescue destroyer bainbridge .
.
good things happening to good people: a good thing
good things happening to bad people: a bad thing
bad things happening to good people: a bad thing
bad things happening to bad people: a good thing

Offline verycute1

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 866
  • Me Smash.. You Die
    • View Profile
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #96 on: April 15, 2009, 01:04:40 PM »
where's Cana? You notice ah Trini was in the mix ...AGAIN!



It never frigging fails eh.. Everywhere it have some blasted commotion, ah TRINI in dat and always living to tell dey tale. Hopefully some Americanas influences will hit they arse one day to write ah book - make some damn money man :devil:

No Bajan, Grenadian, Lucian or even Vincey - ah TRINI....

We juss kissmehass farse :P


LOL

One ah dese days, A trini go end up on the moon
One of these days I'm going to bust out the crystalline doomhammer and go positively orc on this town. Then they'll be sorry...

Read the lore, warlocks are mages that decided not to suck.

Offline daryn

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 1783
    • View Profile
China Reports Dolphins Foiled Pirate Attack
« Reply #97 on: April 15, 2009, 06:19:15 PM »
China Reports Dolphins Foiled Pirate Attack
By Robert Mackey



According to a report from China’s official news agency Xinhua, “thousands of dolphins” recently prevented an attack on Chinese merchant ships by Somali pirates in the Gulf of Aden. Xinhua’s Web site published the photograph above, and three others, which first appeared on the Web site of China Radio International on Monday.

It has to be said that none of the photographs actually shows the boats said to contain Somali pirates being blocked by the dolphins, but Xinhua reported news of the dolphin intervention as fact. Xinhua’s English-language report, about a group of merchant ships escorted through the dangerous waters by vessels from the Chinese navy, contains some translation errors, but describes the efforts of the newest members of the anti-piracy coalition in glowing, even poetic, detail:

    The Chinese merchant ships escorted by a China’s fleet sailed on the Gulf of Aden when they met some   suspected pirate ships. Thousands of dolphins suddenly leaped out of water between pirates and merchants when the pirate ships headed for the China’s.

    The suspected pirates ships stopped and then turned away. The pirates could only lament their littleness befor the vast number of dolphins. The spectacular scene continued for a while.


Xinhua does not suggest that the cetacean force may have been part of a classified military program, but given that we know that the United States military has at least tried to train dolphins to work for the government, The Lede is not yet willing to rule out the possibility.

In 1989 Timothy Egan, who now blogs for The Times, reported in the newspaper that the United States Navy was working on a plan to use dolphins to guard a nuclear submarine base and had already spent millions of dollars on training, though there had been some problems:

    As part of a top-secret program expanded in the Reagan administration, the Navy has spent nearly $30 million in the last four years trying to put the highly intelligent marine mammals to military use. [...]

    Critics question the ethics of using what is seen as a benign creature for military tasks and charge that dolphins, known to be independent and unpredictable, are not reliable guardians. [...]

    Navy officials admit that dolphins and sea lions, which are also being trained for military use, have occasionally been absent without leave or have refused to obey orders.


While that Dr. Evil-like plan was officially abandoned in 1991 because of budget cuts after the fall of the Berlin Wall, and former dolphin members of the Soviet Navy were reportedly finding new lines of work in 1997, there were reports in the wake of Hurricane Katrina that, as the Guardian suggested in 2005: “Armed dolphins, trained by the U.S. military to shoot terrorists and pinpoint spies underwater, may be missing in the Gulf of Mexico.” The Guardian report cited concerns that the dolphins may have been trained “to shoot at divers in wetsuits who have simulated terrorists in exercises,” and added, not so reassuringly, that “the U.S. navy admits it has been training dolphins for military purposes, but has refused to confirm that any are missing.”

from: NYTimes news blog

Offline Dutty

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 9578
    • View Profile
Re: China Reports Dolphins Foiled Pirate Attack
« Reply #98 on: April 15, 2009, 08:26:13 PM »
wayzzz  :o...even the dolphins have resolve
Little known fact: The online transportation medium called Uber was pioneered in Trinidad & Tobago in the 1960's. It was originally called pullin bull.

truetrini

  • Guest
Re: China Reports Dolphins Foiled Pirate Attack
« Reply #99 on: April 15, 2009, 09:26:27 PM »
wayzzz  :o...even the dolphins have resolve

Yep..they are Miami Dolphins...wha yuh expect?

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: China Reports Dolphins Foiled Pirate Attack
« Reply #100 on: April 15, 2009, 09:30:13 PM »
^^^^ bllttttt


 :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

Offline legal alien

  • Sr. Warrior
  • ****
  • Posts: 433
    • View Profile
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #101 on: April 16, 2009, 12:39:15 AM »
   Look, this is one issue I can't bring myself to side with the U.S (and ,as it seems , everyone else here).The Somalis are the victims. One can say that they are engaging in illegal activity, but what the hell do you want these Somalis to do ? Foreigners taking all their fish and dumping nuclear waste in Somali waters-pure advantage. The Somalis simply trying to make money for their impoverished country.They didn't want to kill the hostages. But with the U.S killing these pirates, they really messed up . Any American sailor caught henceforth will be dead.
    I am happy the guy got home safe, but I am sure they didn't have to kill those pirates.

Offline mukumsplau

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2035
    • View Profile
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #102 on: April 16, 2009, 06:23:27 AM »
the pirates were never going to kill him. now d US make it bad fuh everybody

Offline fari

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3060
    • View Profile
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #103 on: April 16, 2009, 10:19:14 AM »
check your facts LA...these somalis are not as altruistic as you claim.  i would venture that most if not all of these fellas just want to buy a big house, bling and have all the women and best parties.   little boys in somalia now aspire to be pirates when they grow up.  you think these lil boys thinking about the welfare of somalia?   i agree that other nations have taken advantage of the somalis but at some point somalians have to stand up for their country and try to pull together.   

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18445
    • View Profile
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #104 on: April 16, 2009, 10:29:38 AM »
LA and all those who think that the highjacking of ships is ok, I beg to differ. You are correct that all the other nations are stealing the fishes and not paying any taxes. But bandit is bandit. Them fellas ain't altruistic. They seize the opportunity to make money. It was only a matter of time before somebody dead.  But the Somali political situation has to be resolve first before that banditry stop. If they don't stop the Somalis will be the loosers. As a matter of fact I think the poliicians and klans are encouraging them to do it. They may be getting a cut in the ransom money.

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #105 on: April 16, 2009, 11:08:03 AM »
LA and all those who think that the highjacking of ships is ok, I beg to differ. You are correct that all the other nations are stealing the fishes and not paying any taxes. But bandit is bandit. Them fellas ain't altruistic. They seize the opportunity to make money. It was only a matter of time before somebody dead.  But the Somali political situation has to be resolve first before that banditry stop. If they don't stop the Somalis will be the loosers. As a matter of fact I think the poliicians and klans are encouraging them to do it. They may be getting a cut in the ransom money.

Not only that... but even if yuh accept the argument that they just doing this to compensate for people thiefing dey fish and dumping in dey waters then how does that justify them robbing Peter to pay for Paul?  Yuh think them Somalis checking ID to see who guilty from who innocent?  The Maersk was carrying food and humanitarian relief to Kenya, dem wasn't dumping or fishing.  Even if yuh still try and say it justified to snatch each and every ship they find they snatching these ships in INTERNATIONAL waters, not Somali waters.  Even still, yuh think the Somali people seeing any of this money?  Please.  Dem pirates driving Range Rover and building big house and thing...

Quote
On the ground in Somalia, some pirates are seen as "flamboyant middle aged men," said Mahad Shiekh Madar, a car salesman living in the northeastern port town of Bossaso on the tip of Africa's horn. "They always travel in beautiful four-wheel-drive luxury cars and look like people who are working for a big business company."

Abdulahi Salad, a 43-year-old former pirate in the central coastal village of Gaan, said pirates were "different from the ordinary gunmen in Somalia. They are not thin, and they have bright faces and are always happy."

Indeed, they are often regaled for bringing wads of cash into impoverished communities.

Related Stories
It's World Health Day 
A local elder in Gaan, Haji Muqtar Ahmed, said "being a pirate is not shame ... it is believed to be a noble profession."

Ahmed said people there used to make a living fishing, "but now the only livelihood they have is the income from the piracy."


http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/us_world/Somali-Pirates-All-About-Huge-Ransoms.html

Quote
Somalia's increasingly brazen pirates are building sprawling stone houses, cruising in luxury cars, marrying beautiful women — even hiring caterers to prepare Western-style food for their hostages.

And in an impoverished country where every public institution has crumbled, they have become heroes in the steamy coastal dens they operate from because they are the only real business in town.

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory?id=6288745

Offline zuluwarrior

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3048
  • use your tongue to count your teeth
    • View Profile
    • http://pointalive.com
How Somalia's Fishermen Became Pirates
« Reply #106 on: April 22, 2009, 06:40:11 PM »
How Somalia's Fishermen Became Pirates
By Ishaan Tharoor Saturday, Apr. 18, 2009A fisherman carries a sword fish on his head from the Indian Ocean in the port city of Kismayu

 

Ever since a civil war brought down Somalia's last functional government in 1991, the country's 3,330 km (2,000 miles) of coastline — the longest in continental Africa — has been pillaged by foreign vessels. A United Nations report in 2006 said that, in the absence of the country's at one time serviceable coastguard, Somali waters have become the site of an international "free for all," with fishing fleets from around the world illegally plundering Somali stocks and freezing out the country's own rudimentarily-equipped fishermen. According to another U.N. report, an estimated $300 million worth of seafood is stolen from the country's coastline each year. "In any context," says Gustavo Carvalho, a London-based researcher with Global Witness, an environmental NGO, "that is a staggering sum."

In the face of this, impoverished Somalis living by the sea have been forced over the years to defend their own fishing expeditions out of ports such as Eyl, Kismayo and Harardhere — all now considered to be pirate dens. Somali fishermen, whose industry was always small-scale, lacked the advanced boats and technologies of their interloping competitors, and also complained of being shot at by foreign fishermen with water cannons and firearms. "The first pirate gangs emerged in the '90s to protect against foreign trawlers," says Peter Lehr, lecturer in terrorism studies at Scotland's University of St. Andrews and editor of Violence at Sea: Piracy in the Age of Global Terrorism. The names of existing pirate fleets, such as the National Volunteer Coastguard of Somalia or Somali Marines, are testament to the pirates' initial motivations.

The waters they sought to protect, says Lehr, were "an El Dorado for fishing fleets of many nations." A 2006 study published in the journal Science predicted that the current rate of commercial fishing would virtually empty the world's oceanic stocks by 2050. Yet, Somalia's seas still offer a particularly fertile patch for tuna, sardines and mackerel, and other lucrative species of seafood, including lobsters and sharks. In other parts of the Indian Ocean region, such as the Persian Gulf, fishermen resort to dynamite and other extreme measures to pull in the kinds of catches that are still in abundance off the Horn of Africa. (Read about illegal wildlife trade.)

High-seas trawlers from countries as far flung as South Korea, Japan and Spain have operated down the Somali coast, often illegally and without licenses, for the better part of two decades, the U.N. says. They often fly flags of convenience from sea-faring friendly nations like Belize and Bahrain, which further helps the ships skirt international regulations and evade censure from their home countries. Tsuma Charo of the Nairobi-based East African Seafarers Assistance Programme, which monitors Somali pirate attacks and liaises with the hostage takers and the captured crews, says "illegal trawling has fed the piracy problem." In the early days of Somali piracy, those who seized trawlers without licenses could count on a quick ransom payment, since the boat owners and companies backing those vessels didn't want to draw attention to their violation of international maritime law. This, Charo reckons, allowed the pirates to build up their tactical networks and whetted their appetite for bigger spoils.

Beyond illegal fishing, foreign ships have also long been accused by local fishermen of dumping toxic and nuclear waste off Somalia's shores. A 2005 United Nations Environmental Program report cited uranium radioactive and other hazardous deposits leading to a rash of respiratory ailments and skin diseases breaking out in villages along the Somali coast. According to the U.N., at the time of the report, it cost $2.50 per ton for a European company to dump these types of materials off the Horn of Africa, as opposed to $250 per ton to dispose of them cleanly in Europe.

Monitoring and combating any of these misdeeds is next to impossible — Somalia's current government can barely find its feet in the wake of the 2006 U.S.-backed Ethiopian invasion. And many Somalis, along with outside observers, suspect local officials in Mogadishu and in ports in semi-autonomous Puntland further north of accepting bribes from foreign fishermen as well as from pirate elders. U.N. monitors in 2005 and 2006 suggested an embargo on fish taken from Somali waters, but their proposals were shot down by members of the Security Council. (See photos of dramatic pirate rescues.)

In the meantime, Somali piracy has metastasized into the country's only boom industry. Most of the pirates, observers say, are not former fishermen, but just poor folk seeking their fortune. Right now, they hold 18 cargo ships and some 300 sailors hostage — the work of a sophisticated and well-funded operation. A few pirates have offered testimony to the international press — a headline in Thursday's Times of London read, "They stole our lobsters: A Somali pirate tells his side of the story" — but Lehr and other Somali experts express their doubts. "Nowadays," Lehr says, "this sort of thing is just a cheap excuse." The legacy of nearly twenty years of inaction and abuse, though, is far more costly.

.
good things happening to good people: a good thing
good things happening to bad people: a bad thing
bad things happening to good people: a bad thing
bad things happening to bad people: a good thing

Offline ribbit

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 4294
  • T & T We Want A Goal !
    • View Profile
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #107 on: April 24, 2009, 11:31:28 AM »
they did an audit of the european fish market last year, near the mediterranean, and a huge proportion (40 - 50%) of the fish they found were illegally caught. big big market, especially for somalia.

Offline Dutty

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 9578
    • View Profile
Re: Somali Pirates Tell All: They’re in It for the Money
« Reply #108 on: April 24, 2009, 03:22:52 PM »
why bother wit red snapper when yuh could reel in ah oil tanker
Little known fact: The online transportation medium called Uber was pioneered in Trinidad & Tobago in the 1960's. It was originally called pullin bull.

Offline Dutty

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 9578
    • View Profile
Pirates kill hostages
« Reply #109 on: February 22, 2011, 11:46:35 AM »
http://www.navytimes.com/news/2011/02/navy-pirates-shot-hostages-022211w/

Navy retakes vessel; pirates kill 4 hostages

By Sam Fellman - Staff writer
Posted : Tuesday Feb 22, 2011 9:46:52 EST
   
U.S. forces discovered Tuesday that pirates had killed four American hostages as a U.S.-led team was attempting to negotiate for their release in the waters off Somalia.

Pirates onboard a hijacked yacht fired a rocket-propelled grenade at the destroyer Sterett, 600 yards away. It missed. The sound of gunfire onboard the sailboat followed. A special forces boarding team, in two high-speed assault craft, rushed alongside and boarded. They killed two pirates, one with a knife, and captured 13. But they found the four Americans had been mortally shot and rendered aid, according to a statement released by U.S. Central Command.

The actions occurred around 8 a.m. local time, 50 miles off the Somali coastline, said Lt. Col. Mike Lawhorn, a Central Command spokesman.

“We express our deepest condolences for the innocent lives callously lost aboard the Quest,” Marine Gen. James Mattis, head of Central Command, said in a statement.

The dead were yacht owners Jean and Adam Scott and crewmembers Phyllis Macay and Bob Riggle, Vice Adm. Mark Fox, 5th Fleet commander, told reporters Tuesday. He said that their families and kin had been notified.

They had been participating in an ocean sailing cruise, the Blue Water Rally, which they joined just before Christmas, race organizers said in a Feb. 19 news release. “Quest chose to take an independent course from Mumbai to Salalah, [Oman,] leaving the rally on 15 February,” they said. Quest was hijacked Feb. 18.

“We feel desperately sorry for our four friends onboard,” the released said.

Fox said the pirates commandeered the 58-foot sailboat and were steering a course southwest, back towards Somalia. Four warships had been tracking Quest for three days: the aircraft carrier Enterprise, cruiser Leyte Gulf, and destroyers Sterett and Bulkeley.

On Monday, two pirates were brought aboard Sterett to negotiate for the hostages’ release. They were still onboard on Tuesday, when the gunfire broke out. The boat was midway between the northeastern horn of Somalia and the island of Socotra. “It was very clear that they wanted to bring the hostages to Somali territorial waters, if nothing else,” Fox said.

All 15 pirates, included the two sent to negotiate, are now in custody on a U.S. warship, Fox said.



.... first time I ever heard of them fellahs killin dey meal ticket,,,,either way dey fried

Little known fact: The online transportation medium called Uber was pioneered in Trinidad & Tobago in the 1960's. It was originally called pullin bull.

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18445
    • View Profile
Re: Pirates kill hostages
« Reply #110 on: February 22, 2011, 04:21:01 PM »
Sad. RIP!!!!!!!!

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: Pirates kill hostages
« Reply #111 on: February 22, 2011, 06:25:26 PM »
They really need to do something yes... dem pirates operating with impunity in international waters, I find the navy and other naval forces in that area need to set up a drag net and shoot them out the water on sight.  Once you have high powered arms on board in international waters and no legitimate explanation for why or how... and you Somalian yuh getting rope een.  It eh nice... but what they doing eh nice either.

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18445
    • View Profile
Re: Pirates kill hostages
« Reply #112 on: February 22, 2011, 07:30:49 PM »
Bakes, the only countries to assist the US in that area are Kenya and Tanzania, but they do not want to do anything unless the pirates operate in their waters. That goes for Kenya especially seeing that they are next door neighbors and has a lot of ethnic Somali Kenyan-born citizens. Where is the African Union in all of this? They are so tied up in other conflicts, I don't see them doing anything without considerable Euro-American help.

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: Pirates kill hostages
« Reply #113 on: February 22, 2011, 08:08:52 PM »
Nah Deeks the French and British patrolling the international waters... Tanzania and Kenya are providing the logistical land-based support, but a stronger naval presence is necessary.

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18445
    • View Profile
Re: Pirates kill hostages
« Reply #114 on: February 22, 2011, 09:05:40 PM »
Nah Deeks the French and British patrolling the international waters... Tanzania and Kenya are providing the logistical land-based support, but a stronger naval presence is necessary.

I agree a stronger naval prescence is needed. Do Ken-Tan have the naval resources to compliment the french and Brits?

Offline PantherX

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 1190
    • View Profile
Re: Pirates kill hostages
« Reply #115 on: February 23, 2011, 09:47:25 AM »
This problem cannot be solved by naval power alone.  The area that needs to be covered is vast and the Somali pirates have shown that they're not afraid to travel far out to sea to capture vessels.  They also know that they can operate with impunity from Somali soil.

The only way to make an impact is to strike the bases the pirates operate from, destroy their boats and weapons and kill the pirate warlords if possible.  Once that feeling of impunity disappears the number of attacks will lessen.

truetrini

  • Guest
Re: Pirates kill hostages
« Reply #116 on: February 23, 2011, 07:03:43 PM »
This problem cannot be solved by naval power alone.  The area that needs to be covered is vast and the Somali pirates have shown that they're not afraid to travel far out to sea to capture vessels.  They also know that they can operate with impunity from Somali soil.

The only way to make an impact is to strike the bases the pirates operate from, destroy their boats and weapons and kill the pirate warlords if possible.  Once that feeling of impunity disappears the number of attacks will lessen.

soon.

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: Pirates kill hostages
« Reply #117 on: February 23, 2011, 07:43:19 PM »
This problem cannot be solved by naval power alone.  The area that needs to be covered is vast and the Somali pirates have shown that they're not afraid to travel far out to sea to capture vessels.  They also know that they can operate with impunity from Somali soil.

The only way to make an impact is to strike the bases the pirates operate from, destroy their boats and weapons and kill the pirate warlords if possible.  Once that feeling of impunity disappears the number of attacks will lessen.

Panther... yuh really can't do that though, you talking about "striking" at another sovereign state, even a lawless sovereign state as the Sudan currently is.  The international community cannot or should not let that happen.  Blasting them in international waters is much easier because there are no jurisdictional issues.  And yes, it can be done with just naval power, the pirates cannot venture that far from land in the vessels that they do, there are limitations (fuel, seaworthiness) on how far they can range.  Not only that, with the collective radar capabilities of the are it shouldn't be very difficult to blanket the area or to monitor traffic.

------------------------------


Deeks, I don't know... but somehow I doubt it.

truetrini

  • Guest
Re: Pirates kill hostages
« Reply #118 on: February 23, 2011, 11:06:01 PM »
so hw come they striking Taliban in Pakistan?

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: Pirates kill hostages
« Reply #119 on: February 24, 2011, 12:20:03 AM »
so hw come they striking Taliban in Pakistan?

Uhmm because they're fighting a war in neighboring Afghanistan... and they're striking at Taliban forces in Pakistan with Pakistani assistance/authority...