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Voting closed: January 02, 2006, 04:58:17 PM

Author Topic: Jamaica Football Thread.  (Read 344484 times)

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Offline frico

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3090 on: December 05, 2016, 04:33:56 AM »
I knew many boys in school in London who were very good footballers,they were looked at by coaches from the EPL,whenever you asked who they would play for they said England.Those who plum to play for the country of their parents birth are a small minority,secondly,when they can't make the England team,they go for the team of their parents birth,eg Jamaica,Grenada,Antigua Barbados,many foreign born Trinis don't even want to play for TT coz we are crap.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3091 on: December 05, 2016, 07:06:58 AM »
Frico, maybe they not good enough.

Offline frico

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3092 on: December 05, 2016, 09:42:34 AM »
Frico, maybe they not good enough.
I didn't think of it like that,but you could have a point.The thing is we do not give those foreigners nuff proof that we are good enough,especially when we lose to people we should beat,I take your point.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3093 on: December 05, 2016, 11:21:08 AM »
Frico, maybe they not good enough.
I didn't think of it like that,but you could have a point.The thing is we do not give those foreigners nuff proof that we are good enough,especially when we lose to people we should beat,I take your point.

So what if we lose to people we should beat. Then that means they don't want to help us. They want a ready made team. Chris Birchall did not think that way. Boucaud been thru. the team's ups and down. Bobby Zamora, Deleon and Bostock all have their chances and they prefer to wait and see if they will be called by birth country. I know TTFA has been dysfunctional for the past 20 yrs. the fans has responded to that by not going to "first class" football.  The only thing saving football is lower league football and minor league football. If these guys feel it going to be a hassle then they truly should not offer their services as you opined. TT football is not for the faint hearted. But I see what you getting at.

Offline frico

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3094 on: December 05, 2016, 04:23:37 PM »
Deeks, I was talking about losing to Martinique and the match we lost against Haiti when we failed to get into Copa, that must hurt, I can just see players turning their backs.Your last post indicates more than I had thought of, it's so sad that things have become so dysfunctional, you may not believe it, but the only time I pray is when TT play football.My father told me.sometimes people used to call us little Brazil, that is so true in many aspects, although he was talking about our football.One day man, one day...

Offline De_Professor

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REGGAE BOYZ BUSRIDE, CHATANOOGA, TN FEB 3
« Reply #3095 on: January 10, 2017, 09:53:43 AM »
Pleasant good afternoon, I've organized a bus ride leaving from Stone Mountain, GA to Chatanooga, TN for the Jamaica vs U.S. friendly on Friday Feb 3.  THe details are in the links below, blesss.  I is a Trini....supporter.  http://www.postermywall.com/index.php/posterbuilder/load/044899953cebf0fe4a5497e4fe2f87e8

Offline gawd on pitch

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3096 on: January 10, 2017, 07:08:26 PM »
Pleasant good afternoon, I've organized a bus ride leaving from Stone Mountain, GA to Chatanooga, TN for the Jamaica vs U.S. friendly on Friday Feb 3.  THe details are in the links below, blesss.  I is a Trini....supporter.  http://www.postermywall.com/index.php/posterbuilder/load/044899953cebf0fe4a5497e4fe2f87e8

No way pardna. The last thing I want to hear is meh yardie friends making joke about we current situation. Yuh see the bacchanal going on right now with we national team?

Offline Tallman

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JFF President Captain Horace Burrell Is Dead
« Reply #3097 on: June 06, 2017, 06:40:08 PM »
JFF President Captain Horace Burrell Is Dead
Jamaica Gleaner


Jamaica’s football has suffered a major blow with the passing of Captain Horace Burrell, the president of the Jamaica Football Federation.

Burrell died overseas this afternoon after a long struggle with illness.

Burrell was 67 years-old.

Known as a strong leader, Burrell a captain in the Jamaica Defence Force rose to prominence with the military team before being elected to the JFF presidency in 1994.

Burrell was instrumental in Jamaica’s qualification to the 1998 FIFA World Cup Finals in France.

He was also a prominent figure in regional football holding several positions in the Caribbean Football Union and CONCACAF.

Burrel was also the founder of the restaurant chain The Captain's Bakery and Grill and Captain's Aviation Services.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3098 on: June 06, 2017, 07:01:54 PM »
Wow. Condolences to the JA family.

Offline kounty

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3099 on: June 07, 2017, 08:19:30 AM »
shocking! safe passage Captain!

Offline Big Magician

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3100 on: June 07, 2017, 03:11:16 PM »
RIP
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Offline royal

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3101 on: June 07, 2017, 05:56:32 PM »
shocking news.... RIP Sir

Offline Rastaman

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3102 on: June 11, 2017, 05:17:17 PM »
my condolences to my Jamacian brothers. May he rest in peace.

Offline Flex

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3103 on: December 21, 2017, 05:23:42 AM »
Romai in ruins: Umbro join Jamaica for $4m, Puma seal Senegal for $3m
insideworldfootball.com


UAE-based kit supplier Romai has lost deals with Jamaica and Senegal in the space of a week after what has been described as disastrous relationships with the two national federations.

The Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) has sealed a four-year, $4 million partnership with Umbro, while Puma has returned to sponsor Senegal in a $3 million a year deal just in time for the Russia 2018 World Cup.

Umbro will supply shirts and other equipment for all Jamaica’s national teams from 2018 in a four-year deal. Romai had a deal with the JFF worth about $5.4 million and signed in 2015. Umbro is playing less but there are performance based incentives for the Jamaicans.

Umbro currently provides kit for the Peruvian and Serbian national teams, and is also the official kit manufacturer for English Premier League clubs AFC Bournemouth, Everton and West Ham United.

“This is a world-renowned name and the JFF is delighted to be partnering with Umbro,” said Michael Ricketts, president of the JFF.

“We are pleased to have added the Jamaican national team to our roster of clubs around the world. The team has a unique culture that fits perfectly with Umbro’s values and combined with our unparalleled kit design and footballing insight, should make a fantastic partnership,” said Antony Little, managing director of Umbro.

Puma return to Senegal

The Senegalese Football Federation (FSF) have similarly dropped Romai, ahead of the 2018 World Cup, opting for a four-year deal with Puma.

The FSF were previously with Puma until 2016 when they signed with Romai in a last minute hook-up.

The qualification for Russia 2018 has made the Senegalese a more attractive proposition and become Puma’s third World Cup team alongside Switzerland and Uruguay.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Trini _2022

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Visions of a new, exciting schoolboy football structure
« Reply #3104 on: January 04, 2018, 01:14:28 PM »
Visions of a new, exciting schoolboy football structure
BY ANDREW EDWARDS
Jamaica Observer
Wednesday, January 03, 2018 8 Comments

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Jamaica College players and staff celebrate winning their fifth-straight Olivier Shield title, after defeating rural champions Rusea's High School 3-2 in extra time at National Stadium recently. (Photo: Observer file)

For over one hundred years, the Inter-secondary Schools Sports Association (ISSA) has been a champion of Jamaica's sporting prowess. Providing competitive platforms for the emergence, identification and nurturing of the vast majority of the nation's top talents, certainly in track and field, football, netball, basketball and cricket.

Through the years, ISSA has by and large proven itself to be dynamic, adaptable and a reliable ally to most sporting disciplines. Truthfully, the organistion is hardly recognised for the Herculean tasks it fulfills annually, keeping the conveyor belts of athletic and sporting development going, so that Jamaica may continue to increase in success, recognition and record-breaking feats on varied global sport stages.

Adapting to global trends and maintaining its core values has never been and will never be a simple process for ISSA. The merging of the annual Boys' and Girls' Athletics Championships must be acknowledged as the single most progressive adaptation made by ISSA. There can be no disputing the fact that since that merger in 1999, Jamaica has achieved unprecedented success in global track and field events.

Football is the next big sport, possibly the biggest, managed by ISSA, and for years now the debate has been brewing about how to adapt and develop the sport.

Truth be told, much of the debate has been centred around the number of games played in the 12 weeks of competition and subdividing the competition in tiers. These debates are absolutely necessary and need to be taken to another level if — as we have done in track and field — we are to become the envy of the world in football as well.

Below is an articulation of some proposals that are believed will allow for better, sustained development of football players without compromising the academic pursuits of the students who play the sport. Before the proposals are opined, let it be clearly stated that as a former student athlete, a teacher of more than 20 years and a coach of almost as many years, I do not subscribe to the myopic and biased view that student athletes are less successful academically because of their participation in sports.

In a previous article it was posited that ISSA considers a technical department for each sport it manages. This is essential for progressive, sustainable development of individual sports in conjunction with the respective sport association.


While I am not aware of the extent of relations between ISSA and respective sport associations, I do know that there is cooperation. In fact, it is common knowledge that the annual boys' and girls' championships does have a technical committee comprised of some of the most astute and accomplished minds of the sport. This should also be the case in football and all other sports.

The unique history and culture of our sports infrastructure, football in particular, obliges ISSA, in tandem with the JFF, to pursue a cooperative path for the development of our youth football. FIFA, through its technical study group (TSG), has found and embraced that youth football in some countries is best developed through the school system. Jamaica is one such country.

According to the FIFA manual on youth football, the recommended minimum number of competitive games essential for the development of youth players is 30 games, ideally spread over a minimum seven months. The development occurs best when players are matched up against others of similar age and level of play. This is very instructive for the proposals that follow here.

A total revamp of the existing football structure is necessary to achieve the sustainable developments that will improve our international football possibilities. The Manning and DaCosta Cups should be replaced with a three-tier national competition (Divisions One, Two and Three). Ideally, using the 2017 performance rankings, schools will be placed accordingly. The top-ranked forty-eight schools, across the Manning and daCosta Cup, will be placed in Division One, with the next 48 in Division Two and the rest in Division Three. Schools which did not participate in the previous campaign automatically enter in Division Three.

Each tier will comprise a maximum 48 teams divided into four groups of 12. The top four teams in each group progress to the quarter-finals (four groups of four played home and away), with the winners progressing to the semi-finals.

The lowest-ranked four teams (across all zones) in Divisions One and Two will be demoted, and the four semi-finalists from Divisions Two and Three will be promoted to the next level.

In the preliminary round each team will play all teams in their group home and away (22 games) — September to December. Games will be played, on average, every four days. This will reduce burnout and students missing the same school day each week. The post-preliminary rounds of the competition will be played in January and February, with the finals slated for mid-February.

A single knockout competition should be contested between the top-ranked 128 teams, across all tiers, at the end of the first round of the preliminary stage. This equals seven rounds of competition, starting in November. The first three or four rounds should be contested in November and December, with the last three or four in January and February. The final should be the last game of the season at the end of February. Match-ups will be determined using a draw from a single pot and also to determine who plays at home.

Under this structure, all teams will play a minimum of 22 games. The top two from each tier will play a total of 31 games, and if said teams make it to the knockout finals, they will play a maximum of 38 games.

These proposals further posit that the age structure be changed to Under-17, Under-15 and Under-13, respectively. After age 17 players should be decided on their futures and at that age, high school football is definitely not the best platform for the next stage of their development. This age structure is also best aligned to the age structure of FIFA and consequently the national teams. Remember, the context is future global dominance.

In year one, Under-15 and Under-13 teams of each school will compete in the same division as the Under-17s. Thereafter, each age level team of the said school determines their own level annually.

One of the key concerns of the 'small schools' is the poaching of the 'bigger schools' of their players. This can be controlled by a combination of rule changes as follows. The student player should meet certain transfer criteria to be determined. The receiving school should be required to compensate the sending school for their investment in the player being transferred, as per FIFA rules. Restrict the number of transferred players who can be rostered by schools per season and for each game. Schools recruiting players from beyond their Ministry of Education geographic demarcation should bear the burden of proof for minimum standards of accommodation and supervision for each student recruited. Impose transfer bans on schools which recruit players who do not play a set number of games, especially in instances when said player was a regular at his previous school.

This proposal will necessarily mean increased travel for some schools, particularly those from the urban areas. Note, however, that among rural schools it is not unusual in football for schools in St Thomas to be paired with schools in St James or Westmoreland. In cricket it is quite common to have zones spreading across three or four parishes. The travelling is a part of the development and may very well prove a great equaliser.

The argument that football cannot straddle two terms is founded in bias. Basketball and track and field already straddle the same two terms as football and cricket is played from January to May sometimes June, also straddling two-terms.

Breaking tradition is never easy, especially ones such as the Manning Cup and Olivier Shields contested since 1910 and the daCosta Cup since 1950. However, when considered, one must agree that the current structure has waned in effectiveness in -sofar as preparing the next generation of Reggae Boyz.

These changes will, without doubt, give rise to numerous challenges and criticisms. However, in the broad scheme of things, when the big picture is observed, change is necessary. These proposals clearly increase the possibilities for significant developments over the short, medium and long term. Increased numbers of competitive games over a longer period of time will accrue unimaginable growth for our youth players.

Subdividing the schools in tiers will allow for teams to compete closer to their levels of development, which is critical at the respective age. Many 'small schools' will now have a better chance of winning an increased number of matches and possibly titles.

This structure will, over time, improve the quality, readiness and maturity of players invited to the youth national teams. Our natural assets of athleticism will gradually be supplemented with deeper tactical nous, tactical appreciation and understanding.

There's no panacea for success, and whatever changes are determined by the ISSA will need time to be fully appreciated and accepted. The rewards at the national and international levels will also take time.

As we have already started a new year, I call on all readers to raise the level of your expectations, increase your commitment to the realisation of those expectations, increase your desires, and back them up with the requisite attitudes and work. Remember, dreams only work if you do; so, get on up and create the kind of year you truly and deeply desire. I give thanks for this opportunity to share, for the talents and numerous gifts with which I have been blessed, and I am thankful for all that awaits in 2018.
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Offline elan

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3105 on: March 08, 2018, 06:22:03 PM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/blUSVALW_Z4" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/blUSVALW_Z4</a>

Offline Tallman

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3106 on: March 08, 2018, 06:45:05 PM »
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3107 on: March 08, 2018, 08:58:48 PM »
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

Offline elan

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3108 on: March 09, 2018, 02:42:45 PM »
His Dad is in talks with the EFA if the Mirror is to be believed.

https://twitter.com/PremLeaguePanel/status/972132364708171776
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Offline Deeks

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3109 on: March 09, 2018, 04:29:14 PM »
Bostock redux.

Offline Tallman

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3110 on: March 09, 2018, 04:55:26 PM »
Bostock redux.

Except dat he born and grow in Jamaica.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3111 on: March 09, 2018, 09:13:30 PM »
Reading another  article on this situation. It appears he can't play for England. In addition his dad has issues with the JFF. We will see what happens.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3112 on: March 22, 2018, 07:36:11 PM »
Look trouble! Ravel Morrison to join Jamaica setup.
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

Offline gawd on pitch

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3113 on: March 23, 2018, 06:04:52 AM »
JA has the potential to be a powerhouse in Concacaf. Throw Leon Bailey into the mix, and is fire.

I not surprised at the depth JA has overseas. I find that even some of the smaller Islands have more depth than TT. Grenada has 2 premier league players and a handful in the lower divisions that they haven't tapped into as yet. . Just something to think about.

Offline Tallman

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3114 on: March 23, 2018, 06:32:12 AM »
JA has the potential to be a powerhouse in Concacaf. Throw Leon Bailey into the mix, and is fire.

I not surprised at the depth JA has overseas. I find that even some of the smaller Islands have more depth than TT. Grenada has 2 premier league players and a handful in the lower divisions that they haven't tapped into as yet. . Just something to think about.

Jamaica by far has the most depth overseas because of their travel and migration history. T&T has depth, but we don't scout well and our federation is a mess. Jamaica tends to play higher quality friendlies.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Storeboy

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3115 on: March 23, 2018, 07:05:15 AM »
JA has the potential to be a powerhouse in Concacaf. Throw Leon Bailey into the mix, and is fire.

I not surprised at the depth JA has overseas. I find that even some of the smaller Islands have more depth than TT. Grenada has 2 premier league players and a handful in the lower divisions that they haven't tapped into as yet. . Just something to think about.

Jamaica by far has the most depth overseas because of their travel and migration history. T&T has depth, but we don't scout well and our federation is a mess. Jamaica tends to play higher quality friendlies.

Ditto! We've been saying it for years. You cannot play lower ranked countries, small club teams and improve. We must attempt to schedule teams that will beat us, test us, and strengthen us. And we cannot put a team together a few weeks before tournament time and expect to be successful. But with the TTFA administration in such a mess, hope is dimmer than ever.
Never, never, ever give up! Go T&T Warriors!

Offline Big Magician

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3116 on: March 23, 2018, 07:38:52 AM »
Leon Bailey courted by England...hope he plays for England...hahha..what a slap in the face that would be...
Little Magician is King.......ask Jorge Campos


Offline Deeks

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3117 on: April 09, 2018, 05:23:57 PM »
Heard Theodore Whitmore resigned. True, false?

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3118 on: April 09, 2018, 05:33:22 PM »
Whitmore's frustration
Oral Tracey, Jamaica Gleaner.


The sudden resignation of interim national senior football coach Theodore 'Tappa' Whitmore, in and of itself, is shocking, but the circumstances surrounding Whitmore's bombshell decision are sad and depressing indices of the crippling lack of leadership coming from the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF).

On the face of it, Whitmore's decision seems rushed, but no one knows his pain. The underlying issues that were frustrating Whitmore and culminated in the 1998 World Cup hero throwing in the towel via that long and emotional letter of resignation are quite instructive. The uncertainty about his status and his remuneration package is obviously one significant factor, but there were others. From my impeccable information, Whitmore felt totally disrespected and at times alienated by the current leadership of the JFF. Himself and President Michael Ricketts have had, and continue to have, a frosty relationship. However, despite Ricketts giving the impression publicly that he and Whitmore enjoy a good professional relationship, nothing is further from the truth.

Whitmore, as national coach, learnt about the return fixture against Antigua and Barbuda and the friendly against St Kitts and Nevis, believe it or not, via a media release sent out by the federation. On the recent trip to Turkey, where the national team spent 10 days on the road and played two friendly games, Ricketts and Whitmore were both in attendance and hardly exchanged words.

The broken lines of communication between the national coach and the federation president had begun to cripple the progress of the football. Outside of the uncertainty about his future and his remuneration, again reliable information is that the coach made representations to the federation leadership about the technical vision and long- to medium-term direction of the programme, and about specific areas such as player selection and development protocols. These were concerns that were either treated with scant regard or totally ignored by the JFF leadership. That resignation letter was written out of sheer frustration and a feeling of being repeatedly and inexplicably disrespected.

POLITICAL SMOKESCREEN
 
President Ricketts' publicly expressing that all is well between himself and Whitmore is tantamount to a political smokescreen and is completely farcical to those of us in the know. The exact nature of the problems that the current JFF leadership has with Whitmore remains unclear. By any stretch of the objective imagination, under the circumstances, Whitmore has done a good job as national coach in this his most recent stint. One is forced to wonder, is it is all petty and personal? If that is so, what would that be saying about the highest level of leadership of the nation's football?

I remember vividly during last year's campaign for the then vacant JFF presidency, expressing the view that Ricketts and his team never seemed to have a vision or a plan for Jamaica's football, and that his team was basically a clique of the late Captain Burrell's yes-men, who themselves had very little leadership qualities. The chickens are now coming home to roost.

That harsh reality is now unfolding in front of our eyes. The poor handling of major issues such as the Craig Butler/Leon Bailey controversy, and the now the Theodore Whitmore saga, have both exposed the pathetic leadership of the federation.

If the current situation with Whitmore stands and his resignation is accepted by the JFF, it will be very interesting to see the direction in which the body goes, and importantly, how quickly they would be able to source the funding to pay Whitmore's replacement. It will be impossible for Ricketts and company to acquire a credible coach for the US$3,000 (roughly J$373,000) per month they were paying Whitmore. And if they do get a foreigner, the Jamaican football public will be very keen on how much money they will pay that foreign replacement. The pressure to produce at least the equivalent results as Whitmore would be as immense on that new coach as it would be on the JFF leadership. All things considered, I doubt this resignation will be accepted by the JFF, as it ought not to be. But then again, we can never tell with the thoughtless and inept management we have seen so far from the current JFF leadership.
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Jamaica Football Thread.
« Reply #3119 on: April 09, 2018, 05:37:08 PM »
Another day in the Caribbean football experiment ...

For more background read this and this.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2018, 05:48:08 PM by asylumseeker »
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.