September 19, 2019, 05:48:28 PM

Author Topic: Terry Fenwick Thread.  (Read 79241 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline AB.Trini

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5624
  • yuh cyar take meh ancestry from meh
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #780 on: February 02, 2017, 07:44:13 AM »
Obviously looking from the outside what appears as a " no brainer" is often clouded by what we don't know. This coach has achieved success as a player and as a coach at the local level.
In my opinion, if I was him I would offer to work with and assist with recruitment and the training of local players who show potential to develop and progress to the national team. I could see his knowledge  being use along with local coaches to develop a core group of players as part of a national team strategy for our team.

In some capacity aspiring coaches like him, and Stern John should be part of a national plan that works in conjunction with the national head coach in identifying , training and coaching players in specialized positional play and tactics. I.e defence- strikers!!




Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21765
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #781 on: February 02, 2017, 07:55:00 AM »
With the outcome of the NT selection, what is the future of Terry Fenwick in T&T football? Looks like if he wants to advance to the NT level he should consider reading a page from the Belgian's book and hit the nomad trail.

Thoughts?

Well as recently as December, he was tipped to be the coach of Belgian third tier club, Patro Eisden. This is the same club that Nathaniel Garcia and Nicholas Dillon went to for trials.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tobago28

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 507
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #782 on: February 02, 2017, 08:47:16 AM »
With the outcome of the NT selection, what is the future of Terry Fenwick in T&T football? Looks like if he wants to advance to the NT level he should consider reading a page from the Belgian's book and hit the nomad trail.

Thoughts?

I recognize the playing career of Fenwick as part of his credibility but that playing success ended in 1993, before the transformation of the league into a truly open competitive league with players and managers from all over the world. 

His management success is limited to our not so pro league as his time at Portsmouth is over 20 years ago. 

Frankly, I do not rate English managers nor English development of players. The top two leagues in the world are La Liga and EPL; neither is led by English managers. The La Liga and EPL clubs are NOT spending top dollar for English developed players.

We are so close to Brasil, Argentina and Uruguay a combined 9 World Cup championships but we looking at England for development of players and management. 

In the short term his methods will work in TnT because it increases speed of play, fitness and work rate. I have nothing against Fenwick but I do not believe that the future of our football can be placed in an Englishman's hands. Not because he is English but because of how he has been trained and developed and views football.

Offline Mose

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2231
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #783 on: February 02, 2017, 08:59:49 AM »
Interesting critique Tobago.  :beermug:
Are you a match? It's too late for Emru, but maybe you can help save someone's life: http://www.healemru.com

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21765
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #784 on: February 02, 2017, 10:00:00 AM »
With the outcome of the NT selection, what is the future of Terry Fenwick in T&T football? Looks like if he wants to advance to the NT level he should consider reading a page from the Belgian's book and hit the nomad trail.

Thoughts?

I recognize the playing career of Fenwick as part of his credibility but that playing success ended in 1993, before the transformation of the league into a truly open competitive league with players and managers from all over the world. 

His management success is limited to our not so pro league as his time at Portsmouth is over 20 years ago. 

Frankly, I do not rate English managers nor English development of players. The top two leagues in the world are La Liga and EPL; neither is led by English managers. The La Liga and EPL clubs are NOT spending top dollar for English developed players.

We are so close to Brasil, Argentina and Uruguay a combined 9 World Cup championships but we looking at England for development of players and management. 

In the short term his methods will work in TnT because it increases speed of play, fitness and work rate. I have nothing against Fenwick but I do not believe that the future of our football can be placed in an Englishman's hands. Not because he is English but because of how he has been trained and developed and views football.


Then again, the development of players is not the job of any one coach. Until we implement a sustainable development programme, our inconsistent results will remain. How do you fix players at the senior level who are technically unsound? By dat time it too late.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tobago28

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 507
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #785 on: February 02, 2017, 10:07:52 AM »
With the outcome of the NT selection, what is the future of Terry Fenwick in T&T football? Looks like if he wants to advance to the NT level he should consider reading a page from the Belgian's book and hit the nomad trail.

Thoughts?

I recognize the playing career of Fenwick as part of his credibility but that playing success ended in 1993, before the transformation of the league into a truly open competitive league with players and managers from all over the world. 

His management success is limited to our not so pro league as his time at Portsmouth is over 20 years ago. 

Frankly, I do not rate English managers nor English development of players. The top two leagues in the world are La Liga and EPL; neither is led by English managers. The La Liga and EPL clubs are NOT spending top dollar for English developed players.

We are so close to Brasil, Argentina and Uruguay a combined 9 World Cup championships but we looking at England for development of players and management. 

In the short term his methods will work in TnT because it increases speed of play, fitness and work rate. I have nothing against Fenwick but I do not believe that the future of our football can be placed in an Englishman's hands. Not because he is English but because of how he has been trained and developed and views football.


Then again, the development of players is not the job of any one coach. Until we implement a sustainable development programme, our inconsistent results will remain. How do you fix players at the senior level who are technically unsound? By dat time it too late.

Totally agree that that 1) you can not fix technically flawed players at senior level and 2) a development programme is required from ages.

My main point is that we need to look to our neighbors in South America, damn even our baseball crazy neighbors in Venezeula are following their South American neighbors to increased success.

Offline Marcos

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2055
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #786 on: February 02, 2017, 01:16:20 PM »
You say they can't fix technique when they are already at senior level, but all european pro players work on technique everyday. Maybe if a player is so far behind on something then it may be impossible to catch up, but you see even seasoned pros make incremental improvements. Just look at somebody at the highest level -  Messi - his free kick-taking ability and overall shooting technique have improved tremendously.

The thing i find we struggle with that the national coach can't improve is fitness.
Nothing pisses me off more than racism, and ppl who you know that act like they don't know you.

Offline lefty

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5406
  • would u like to buy an 'O'.........
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #787 on: February 02, 2017, 01:28:52 PM »
You say they can't fix technique when they are already at senior level, but all european pro players work on technique everyday. Maybe if a player is so far behind on something then it may be impossible to catch up, but you see even seasoned pros make incremental improvements. Just look at somebody at the highest level -  Messi - his free kick-taking ability and overall shooting technique have improved tremendously.

The thing i find we struggle with that the national coach can't improve is fitness.

dat is where qualified trainers come in and the availability of high performance fitness centers, dat cater specifically to sports and sports teams come in......do any of our clubs have gyms and fitness trainers, regional fitness centers through the country that teams could utilize at relatively small cost might be a way to go
I pity the fool....

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21765
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #788 on: February 02, 2017, 01:30:48 PM »
You say they can't fix technique when they are already at senior level, but all european pro players work on technique everyday. Maybe if a player is so far behind on something then it may be impossible to catch up, but you see even seasoned pros make incremental improvements. Just look at somebody at the highest level -  Messi - his free kick-taking ability and overall shooting technique have improved tremendously.

The thing i find we struggle with that the national coach can't improve is fitness.

Well I cyar remember de last time I've seen a senior T&T international show improved technique in a particular area (corners, free kicks, shooting, crossing, passing etc.). It usually remains the same over the years. Actually one exception comes to mind. Clayton Ince.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21765
    • View Profile
Terry Fenwick, from marking Maradona to managing in the Caribbean
« Reply #789 on: February 15, 2017, 12:04:52 PM »
Far-Flung Adventures: Terry Fenwick, from marking Maradona to managing in the Caribbean
By Santokie Nagulendran (thesetpieces.com)


Maradona. The 1986 World Cup. We all know the story; how the Argentine broke English hearts by handling the ball into the net, and then, in cruel juxtaposition, scoring one of the greatest goals of all time to win the game, sending England home and Argentina through to the semi-final.

It would be easy for the England players to be defined by that game, their legacy cemented within 90 devastating minutes. Yet for defender Terry Fenwick, that sunny afternoon in Mexico City has become a footnote in a personal journey that has taken him to the top of Caribbean football.

In historic footage of the Argentina match, Fenwick can be seen chasing referee Ali Bin Nasser all the way back to the halfway line, desperately appealing against Maradona’s controversial handball that opened the scoring. Moments later he was one of the players valiantly trying to stop Argentina’s No.10 as he glided across the pitch for his memorable second goal.

A no-nonsense central defender – he holds the record for most yellow cards in a single World Cup – Fenwick enjoyed a lengthy playing career with Crystal Palace, QPR, Tottenham Hotspur and Swindon Town before retiring in 1995, immediately becoming manager of Portsmouth.

After three seasons at Fratton Park, and a subsequent stint as director of football at non-league Southall United, Fenwick was presented with an unusual opportunity across the globe.

‘’Sir Bobby Robson brought Newcastle United over to Trinidad and Tobago in the summer of 2000 for pre-season [and] several local club owners there approached him asking who he’d recommend as a manager. He threw my name in the hat,” Fenwick recalls.

What initially began as a short visit for Fenwick, made out of respect for Sir Bobby, eventually saw him settle in Trinidad for the next decade. 

‘’I visited T&T for one week and recognized it was essentially a developmental job, lots of potential but several inherent issues like politics hampering sport in general. However, the climate and lifestyle made it worth it,’’ Fenwick tells The Set Pieces.

Trinidad and Tobago is one of only two nations in the Caribbean that has a professional domestic league, Jamaica being the other. The aptly named TT Pro League includes ten clubs and is funded by government investment, as the league strives to become self-sufficient.

Crowds are frequently low and young players often have other distractions away from the football pitch. It is a demanding job for local managers, let alone a coach coming from England with little prior knowledge of the country or culture.

But Fenwick settled quicker than most would have predicted, leading community-focused club San Juan Jabloteh to the TT Pro League title in only his second season in charge in 2002. 

‘’My success has been due to the tremendous role models I have been fortunate to learn from,” he says.

“Terry Venables (who Fenwick played under at Palace, QPR and Spurs in the 1980s) in particular has provided me with a whole lot of skill sets necessary to ensure sustained success in a very small but competitive environment. 

“Self-belief and the ability to diversify, think over and address matters in another fashion have kept things interesting.”

During his time at San Juan Jabloteh, Fenwick was known for promoting youth prospects to the first team as well as getting the best out of the more established players.

Reflecting on the most talented player he has worked with in the region, Fenwick says: “Aurtis Whitley was an unbelievable talent. This kid had everything, I nurtured his career and sent him off to the World Cup in 2006. What a diamond.’’

As he reminisces about a player he coached over 10 years ago, it’s clear to see Fenwick has a genuine passion for developing T&T football. He has even set up a coaching school in the country with a focus on nurturing young talent.

There have been numerous exports from the TT Pro League that have enjoyed success in stronger competitions, such as former Southampton, Stoke and Sunderland striker Kenwyne Jones. It was Fenwick who first took Jones to England, landing him a 10-day trial at Manchester United in 2002.

Other players who started out in T&T domestic football, such as Jason Scotland and Carlos Edwards, have also forged successful careers in England. Indeed, the Pro League played a vital role in Trinidad and Tobago defying the odds to qualify for the 2006 World Cup.

Fenwick is the second most successful coach in the league’s history, having won the title three times with San Juan Jabloteh and guiding fellow club Central FC to the CONCACAF Champions League in 2015.

Yet there have also been off-field incidents which have marked the 57-year-old’s time in T&T, notably in 2005 when he was banned for ten games for elbowing an opposition player during a match.

When asked about the obstacles facing Trinidadian players, Fenwick says: “T&T have produced excellent footballers, although there is a drawback in the cultural aspect of Caribbean life. [There are] no role models or administrators to guide the youths, with politics and self-interest taking preference.’’

It is this frustration with the system in Trinidad and Tobago that has seen Fenwick seek pastures new at times in his career. In 2003, after winning the league, he returned to England to take the helm at Northampton Town, but lasted only seven matches on route to the Cobblers’ relegation at the end of the season.

In 2014, Fenwick took charge of Belgian third division club C.S Vise. “I really enjoyed Belgium although my club was financially strapped,” he says. “The facilities and first world lifestyle were a welcome change after so many years in Trinidad. Unfortunately Belgium are themselves restructuring and streamlining their leagues, so the timing was not the best.”

Fenwick made another quick departure following financial difficulties at C.S Vise, returning to his adopted home T&T in 2015 to begin coaching again.

His extended stay in the region has earned him the praise of local football enthusiasts, with journalist Lasana Liburd, who covers the Pro League, describing Fenwick as “a very astute man-manager and also a quite versatile coach in tactical terms”.

“His teams play at a high tempo and are always aggressive – not necessarily in terms of flying studs but their eagerness to get results,” Liburd added. “At least one former Caribbean coach I spoke to credited Fenwick for lifting the standard of the local game because other teams had to prepare better in terms of fitness and their ability to play at tempo to compete. If you couldn’t, his teams would maul yours.”

Despite his domestic success, Fenwick has never been given a shot at the top job – managing Trinidad and Tobago’s national team. Many feel his outspoken nature, which falls in line with his no-nonsense style as a player, has hindered his prospects, with the country’s football association reluctant to hire somebody who may disagree with some of their policies.

However, in an honest observation, Fenwick remains optimistic that the role will one day come his way: “I do hope I’ll eventually get a crack at the top job.’’
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21765
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #790 on: August 15, 2017, 06:00:24 PM »
WATCH: Interview with Terry Fenwick on Field of Dreams

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/VvNVvZAi3eI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/VvNVvZAi3eI</a>
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline vb

  • Board Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *
  • Posts: 8068
    • View Profile
    • http://www.caribsport01.homestead.com/caribsport.html
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #791 on: August 16, 2017, 01:28:27 AM »
Far-Flung Adventures: Terry Fenwick, from marking Maradona to managing in the Caribbean
By Santokie Nagulendran (thesetpieces.com)


Maradona. The 1986 World Cup. We all know the story; how the Argentine broke English hearts by handling the ball into the net, and then, in cruel juxtaposition, scoring one of the greatest goals of all time to win the game, sending England home and Argentina through to the semi-final.

It would be easy for the England players to be defined by that game, their legacy cemented within 90 devastating minutes. Yet for defender Terry Fenwick, that sunny afternoon in Mexico City has become a footnote in a personal journey that has taken him to the top of Caribbean football.

In historic footage of the Argentina match, Fenwick can be seen chasing referee Ali Bin Nasser all the way back to the halfway line, desperately appealing against Maradona’s controversial handball that opened the scoring. Moments later he was one of the players valiantly trying to stop Argentina’s No.10 as he glided across the pitch for his memorable second goal.

A no-nonsense central defender – he holds the record for most yellow cards in a single World Cup – Fenwick enjoyed a lengthy playing career with Crystal Palace, QPR, Tottenham Hotspur and Swindon Town before retiring in 1995, immediately becoming manager of Portsmouth.

After three seasons at Fratton Park, and a subsequent stint as director of football at non-league Southall United, Fenwick was presented with an unusual opportunity across the globe.

‘’Sir Bobby Robson brought Newcastle United over to Trinidad and Tobago in the summer of 2000 for pre-season [and] several local club owners there approached him asking who he’d recommend as a manager. He threw my name in the hat,” Fenwick recalls.

What initially began as a short visit for Fenwick, made out of respect for Sir Bobby, eventually saw him settle in Trinidad for the next decade. 

‘’I visited T&T for one week and recognized it was essentially a developmental job, lots of potential but several inherent issues like politics hampering sport in general. However, the climate and lifestyle made it worth it,’’ Fenwick tells The Set Pieces.

Trinidad and Tobago is one of only two nations in the Caribbean that has a professional domestic league, Jamaica being the other. The aptly named TT Pro League includes ten clubs and is funded by government investment, as the league strives to become self-sufficient.

Crowds are frequently low and young players often have other distractions away from the football pitch. It is a demanding job for local managers, let alone a coach coming from England with little prior knowledge of the country or culture.

But Fenwick settled quicker than most would have predicted, leading community-focused club San Juan Jabloteh to the TT Pro League title in only his second season in charge in 2002. 

‘’My success has been due to the tremendous role models I have been fortunate to learn from,” he says.

“Terry Venables (who Fenwick played under at Palace, QPR and Spurs in the 1980s) in particular has provided me with a whole lot of skill sets necessary to ensure sustained success in a very small but competitive environment. 

“Self-belief and the ability to diversify, think over and address matters in another fashion have kept things interesting.”

During his time at San Juan Jabloteh, Fenwick was known for promoting youth prospects to the first team as well as getting the best out of the more established players.

Reflecting on the most talented player he has worked with in the region, Fenwick says: “Aurtis Whitley was an unbelievable talent. This kid had everything, I nurtured his career and sent him off to the World Cup in 2006. What a diamond.’’

As he reminisces about a player he coached over 10 years ago, it’s clear to see Fenwick has a genuine passion for developing T&T football. He has even set up a coaching school in the country with a focus on nurturing young talent.

There have been numerous exports from the TT Pro League that have enjoyed success in stronger competitions, such as former Southampton, Stoke and Sunderland striker Kenwyne Jones. It was Fenwick who first took Jones to England, landing him a 10-day trial at Manchester United in 2002.

Other players who started out in T&T domestic football, such as Jason Scotland and Carlos Edwards, have also forged successful careers in England. Indeed, the Pro League played a vital role in Trinidad and Tobago defying the odds to qualify for the 2006 World Cup.

Fenwick is the second most successful coach in the league’s history, having won the title three times with San Juan Jabloteh and guiding fellow club Central FC to the CONCACAF Champions League in 2015.

[/quote


Perhaps he meant Caribbean not Concacaf.
VITAMIN V...KEEPS THE LADIES HEALTHY...:-)

Offline maxg

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5824
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #792 on: August 16, 2017, 04:38:17 PM »
Terry "D Trute" Fenwick  (The Truth already left the building)

'Dem can't Handle D Trute ', not even as ah Assist. As usual doh, he score some good goals points for me.  :beermug:

Offline palos

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 11489
  • Test
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #793 on: August 16, 2017, 05:13:08 PM »
Terry "D Trute" Fenwick  (The Truth already left the building)

'Dem can't Handle D Trute ', not even as ah Assist. As usual doh, he score some good goals points for me.  :beermug:

Allyuh does still get tie up with de accent
Carlos "The Rolls Royce" Edwards

Offline maxg

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5824
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #794 on: August 17, 2017, 02:51:07 PM »
Terry "D Trute" Fenwick  (The Truth already left the building)

'Dem can't Handle D Trute ', not even as ah Assist. As usual doh, he score some good goals points for me.  :beermug:

Allyuh does still get tie up with de accent
Right & wrong, Discipline & Detraction, Technique, Knowledge, Experience and development, Good or bad have no accent . We aim to achieve or we don't. Not dependent on the one, except God. Fenwick is no God. No man is. That being said, God might say "Lehwe doh go dong dey"  :devil:

Offline Thomo

  • Sr. Warrior
  • ****
  • Posts: 431
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #795 on: August 18, 2017, 04:23:38 AM »
Terry should without a doubt be a coach on the national set up. This man has been able to carve out a winning mentality with all the teams he's been involved with in TnT. An attribute that is sadly lacking around. Sometimes we see bits of it pop up but it's not innate in our football culture and needs to nurtured. Bertille St Clair nurtures that mentality and did it with Signal Hill team in the 80s, the 1990 U20 team. In fact I remember when he was in charge of the U23 which featured Kelvin Jack, Sancho, John and Co, years later in an interview Jack said when the played Brazil which included a one Ronaldinho, he was pissed off because Bertille was telling them they could still beat them even though being a few goals down. Skill,technical and tactical awareness along with a winning mentality from the right administrators and coaches can go a damn long way.

Offline Cocorite

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2245
  • John 5:24
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #796 on: August 18, 2017, 02:39:07 PM »
 Exactly! :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Socawarriors Need A Winning Mentality

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21765
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #797 on: April 04, 2019, 01:11:57 PM »
England legend Terry Fenwick quit London for Trinidad and Tobago and has become one of the most successful coaches in the Caribbean
By Russell Lanning (The Sun)


FORMER defender Terry Fenwick spent 17 years of his 20-year playing career in London.

Today, the 59-year old lives nearly 4,500 miles away in Trinidad in the warmer climes of the Caribbean and is Technical Director of the Football Factory Foundation as well as a TV analyst.

Since he was first recommended by Sir Bobby Robson to travel to the Caribbean at the start of the century, he has established himself as one of the most successful coaches in Trinidad and Tobago’s professional era having won regional and domestic titles with Central FC and San Juan Jabloteh.

Last week he was part of the Launch of the Commissioner’s Cup Football Tournament - along with former Stoke striker Kenwyne Jones - linking the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service with the Football Association in an initiative aimed at fighting crime.

Fenwick admitted: “It’s a world away from when I left home 15 and a half and left my north-east home to move to Crystal Palace.

“But the one thing that’s remained consistent is I feel as passionate about football now as I did 44 years ago when I was on the train to Sehurst Park - via Durham to King’s Cross - as a teenager.”

“The other huge plus for me being in Trinidad is the fact I have suffered from asthma throughout my life and the environment and air here compared with Britain makes it so much easier for me.”

'TEAM OF THE EIGHTIES'

Fenwick - who won 20 England caps and played in the infamous ‘Hand of God’ game when Diego Maradona and Argentina KO’d Three Lions in the 1986 World Cup quarter-final - says he would never have made it so far in his playing career without the help of three brilliant coaches.

“Malcolm Allison was the first guy who spotted me and said I had a talent. Forget the flash hat and the cigar, Malcolm was a brilliant football man.

“He then put me under the wing of John Cartwright who I will always be grateful to.

“Palace were down in the third tier at the time, but John coached myself along with youngsters like Vince Hilaire, Kenny Sansom and Billy Gilbert along with so many others.

“Then Malcolm left and his assistant Terry Venables stepped up and we soon became labelled ‘The Team of the Eighties’.

“Unfortunately, a few of the boys moved on - Kenny to Arsenal - then Terry left for QPR and I soon joined him at Loftus Road.

“Without doubt, my seven years with Rangers (1980-87) were my most enjoyable and I genuinely thought I’d retire at Loftus Road and never leave.

“We reached the FA Cup final in 1982 and at one stage were leading Liverpool at the top of the table in old old Division One - when they were picking up league titles like confetti.

“But when Terry left for Barcelona, new managers came in and it was a completely different atmosphere.

“I had my most difficult decision when QPR told me George Graham wanted to talk to me at Arsenal in 1987. George was an old friend from my Palace days.

“I met George and during our conversation I had a call - on one of the original old brick mobiles back in the day - and it was Terry Venables on his way to Tottenham from Barca who wanted me at White Hart Lane.

“In the end I joined Tottenham, but it was one of my big regrets - but it had nothing to do with the fans at Spurs who were brilliant.

“It’s just the turmoil behind the scenes with Terry and Alan Sugar made it very difficult. I was aware people talked about me being a ‘Venables boy’ so if Terry wasn’t going to be there I would be in trouble. It was very unsettling.”

He spent six years at White Hart Lane, had a loan spell at Leicester, before ending his career at Swindon in 1995.

“I didn’t enjoy it at Swindon. The whole structure wasn’t right for me.”

Having passed all his coaching badges at Lilleshall before the end of his career, it was no surprise when Fenwick was appointed in his first managerial role at Portsmouth in 1995.

“I had three great years at Pompey and the supporters were incredible. The mistake I made is did too many things towards the end to make sure the board were happy rather than do what I thought was right.

“I remember signing Lee Bradbury from the army for £500 and sold him for £3m to Man City three years later.”

Fenwick’s sons, George and Nicholas, both have hugely successful careers in the banking and money world - George currently in Hong Kong and Nicholas, who has just been headhunted back from Dubai.

He added: “I am very grateful to Skype so I can keep in touch with the boys. I am so proud of them. We are planning a get together later in the year for my 60th, so it will be lovely to have us all together.”
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Flex

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 15411
  • A Trini 4 Real.
    • View Profile
    • Soca Warriors Online
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #798 on: July 02, 2019, 01:26:57 AM »
Fenwick: Youths key to football success.
By Clint Chan Tack (Newsday).


FOOTBALL Factory technical director Terry Fenwick yesterday said emphasis must be placed on youth development if T&T is going to compete successfully at international football tournaments such as the Concacaf Gold Cup.

Fenwick, a former England defender who played for clubs such as Tottenham Hotspur and Crystal Palace, underscored this point at the launch of the Commissioner’s Cup at the Mickey Trotman Ground, Pinto Road, Arima.

Fenwick told reporters the Football Factory is hoping to unearth some of the great football talent in T&T. “T&T has got some fabulous talent on the ground. Some never get to the forefront because they are missed.” As the tournament takes place from July to August, Fenwick said the Football Factory will be out there “eyes peeled.” He added “ Already we are seeing some great talent out there.” On T&T’s exit from this year’s Concacaf Gold Cup in the United States, Fenwick said the development of local football has “got to start at the grassroots”. He explained, “ We got to have structure and we’ve got to have top coaches at every position so when the kids come to these competitions, we compete.”

Fenwick added, “At the moment what we’re seeing is national sides which are not competing. They’re just turning up. That’s got to change.”

He did not comment on the debate about whether national coach Dennis Lawrence or TT Football Association (TTFA) president David John-Williams were to blame for what happened at the Gold Cup..

He reiterated, “More importantly, what we’re looking at is the kids of T&T.” After saying football’s worldwide impact cannot be ignored, Fenwick said, “We can’t allow our administration and coaches to negatively impact the possibilities for these kids.” Fenwick previously said the TTFA should be held to account for what happened at the Gold Cup. He also said Lawrence has had a difficult time as coach and the team seemed to be under pressure all the time.

Fenwick was optimistic the Cup would become an annual event and an opportunity for young people to get football scholarships or play for T&T. He agreed with Commissioner of Police Gary Griffith that the Cup was a game changer in communities in T&T.

Griffith observed that countries such as Panama and Venezuela have invested in the development of football at youth level. He said T&T needed to follow that model if it is to compete successfully at the international level. Griffith said the Cup has been sanctioned by the TTFA and former national player Kenwyne Jones is among the people involved in promoting it.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 17040
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #799 on: July 02, 2019, 08:24:40 AM »
Let the current U-20 enter the Olympic qualification, NOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

Offline ZANDOLIE

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 4227
    • View Profile
Re: Terry Fenwick Thread.
« Reply #800 on: July 03, 2019, 12:05:51 AM »
It's too bad this guy was never allowed to coach a national youth team. 









Sacred cows make the best hamburger