March 05, 2024, 02:18:05 AM

Author Topic: Hummingbird haven  (Read 1752 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Touches

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Trow wine on she...
    • View Profile
Hummingbird haven
« on: November 29, 2011, 09:54:27 AM »
Trinidad Express

Hummingbird haven
By Kimberly Castillo

Story Created: Nov 16, 2011 at 11:57 PM ECT


There are no signs leading to Yerette, no imposing billboards advertising what may be the best place to experience hummingbirds up close. You know you've arrived when you see possibly the largest silk cotton tree in Trinidad at the bottom of the driveway leading to the home of Dr Theodore Ferguson and his wife, Gloria, in Valley View, Maracas, St Joseph.

Between August and September last year, the Fergusons discovered that dozens of well-maintained bird feeders placed strategically in and among their lush, green landscape just beyond their verandah, could lure some of the world's smallest flying acrobats—the hummingbirds. To say that what they created is now a hummingbird oasis will be the greatest understatement.

Rather than keep it to themselves, the Fergusons made the decision to open their home and share what they had with Trinidad and Tobago and the rest of the world.

When I first arrived at Yerette, the skies were overcast and a light rain had just begun. In the distance, low clouds formed a skirt around Trinidad's second tallest peak, El Tucuche, yet all I could notice were the scores, perhaps even hundreds of hummingbirds, like floating jewels, just an arm's length away from me. I had heard reviews about this place—all great; but seeing is believing. And the sight of these birds, in plentiful abundance, stopped me in my tracks and left me speechless.

"I never planned to go into this. It came out of my love for photography," said Ferguson, who is arguably one of Trinidad's best bird photographers. He is also a walking encyclopedia on hummingbirds and has even gone to great lengths to observe these birds in their natural habitat.

Ferguson has staked out and photographed all the species of hummingbird in Trinidad and Tobago. Thirteen species can be found at Yerette, which was named after the Amerindian word for hummingbird.

On any given day, Ferguson estimates that there are between 750 and 3,000 hummingbirds in his oasis. "Numbers are greatest during cool, overcast conditions when we experience the hummingbird shower, especially at the end of a heavy rain shower," said Ferguson.

As he and I talked, a hummingbird zipped closely by my ear; it was enough to make the hairs on my hand stand on end.

The Fergusons have dozens of bird feeders in their yard. Each day, it takes about two hours to feed the birds and another two hours to maintain the garden.

There is a science to feeding hummingbirds. It's not as simple as mixing brown sugar with water. In fact, by so doing, one can inadvertently poison the hummingbirds—this is because brown sugar contains iron, which damages their internal organs, said Ferguson. Instead, Ferguson brings to a boil granulated sugar and water. He allows it to cool before refilling half-empty feeders.

The birds, he says, must be treated well. "In reorganising our garden, we placed the emphasis on flowering plants rather than lawn and green hedges. For example, our green hibiscus hedge was transformed into more bushy, flowering shrubs. Also, we sought to have a variety of flowering plants in order to attract a wider variety of species—this worked beautifully; we now have 13 of the 16 species found in Trinidad," said Ferguson.

They may be among the smallest birds in the animal kingdom, yet their flying capabilities more than make up for any deficiency on their part. For instance, these birds have excellent memories; while their brains are tiny, they have the largest brain in relation to body size among birds, said Ferguson. The hummingbird has weak feet, yet its wings beat up to 200 times a second; they can fly in any direction, including upside-down.

With the exception of their wings, hummingbirds are naturally iridescent, which is why, depending on the angle or the way the sunlight catches their tiny bodies, hummingbirds seem to change colours before our very eyes. At first glance, the breast of the tufted coquette appears to be brilliant orange in colour; look again, and before you know it, his bright, orange-coloured breast has turned a shimmering emerald green.

In just under a year, visitors from as far away as Australia and Japan have visited Yerette, and international birders and photographers have also made trips there part of their itinerary.

Messages posted in the visitors' log indicate the wonder and amazement many have experienced at Yerette. Visits to Yerette must be booked in advance by contacting the Fergusons at 663-2623, 373-1379 or 397-3724. While there, visitors can enjoy the hummingbirds up close, be treated to an equally impressive photo slide show, enjoy a complimentary morning or afternoon tea and view the Yerette Art Gallery, where hummingbird photos and craft items by Gloria Ferguson can be bought.

The hummingbird is a national symbol, it can be found on our currency, coat of arms and is an insignia of our protective services, yet few locals know much about these spectacular birds, said Ferguson.

He insisted that our environment must be promoted in a more positive way.

"Here at Yerette, we hope that we are helping people to have a better appreciation of what exists by giving our visitors a close-up view of one beauty in our midst—hummingbirds," he said.

On leaving Yerette, I decided that it's difficult choosing just one favourite among the hummingbird species, having seen so many beautiful birds. But if I had to choose, then it would be the Tufted Coquette.

When you visit Yerette, try choosing a favourite of your own.


A for apple, B for Bat, C for yuhself!

Offline Jah Gol

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 8493
  • Ronaldinho is the best player of our era
    • View Profile
    • The Ministry of Noise
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2011, 03:24:47 PM »
Iere

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18623
    • View Profile
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2011, 04:01:37 PM »
Please allyuh don't cut down the hisbiscus hedges. When I was a kid living in St. Joseph, they used to be a dime a dozen. We had plenty hibiscus hedges about the place and they would be there sucking the flowers. I also have to admit I used to sneek up and try to grab them when they had their beaks in the flower. Never succeeded. Too quick. I always end up in the hedge with greenleaves in meh hands and the flowers in meh mouth.

Offline just cool

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 8065
    • View Profile
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2011, 04:29:52 AM »
i saw that on sunday on CTNT world where this doctor was feeding all these humming bird on about ah dozen feeders hung up in his yard got me pissed off right away! the fact that he was giving these wild birds raw granulated sugar mixed with water was enough to make me livid!

sugar is ah deadly poison and one of the reasons animals who live in the wild rarely suffer from some of the diseases that plague us humans is ah clear indication that the things we consume on ah daily is absolute poison! now these wild bird are now subjected to cancer diabetes and god knows what by consuming this poison known as sugar.   :pissedoff:
The pen is mightier than the sword, Africa for Africans home and abroad.Trinidad is not my home just a pit stop, Africa is my destination,final destination the MOST HIGH.

truetrini

  • Guest
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2011, 10:25:56 AM »
sugar doh do humming birds anything negative.  Sugar is sugar is sugar anyway

Offline Quags

  • use to b compre . Founder of the militant wing of the Soca Warriors
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 8309
    • View Profile
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2011, 10:43:27 AM »
it will make them fly faster

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2011, 02:42:49 PM »
i saw that on sunday on CTNT world where this doctor was feeding all these humming bird on about ah dozen feeders hung up in his yard got me pissed off right away! the fact that he was giving these wild birds raw granulated sugar mixed with water was enough to make me livid!

sugar is ah deadly poison and one of the reasons animals who live in the wild rarely suffer from some of the diseases that plague us humans is ah clear indication that the things we consume on ah daily is absolute poison! now these wild bird are now subjected to cancer diabetes and god knows what by consuming this poison known as sugar.   :pissedoff:

Do you have a source that says that sucrose is poisonous... to any living thing?  Hummingbirds live off fructose (sugars derived from fruits), and he's giving them sucrose (sugar derived from sugar cane or beet, in some cases).  Chemically they are near identical, and likely has no negative effect on the birds, as you suggest.

Offline Quags

  • use to b compre . Founder of the militant wing of the Soca Warriors
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 8309
    • View Profile
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2011, 02:45:57 PM »
white sugar is kill yah b ,yah ent know that .iodize  salt to .white flour to .

Offline Bitter

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 9689
    • View Profile
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2011, 02:51:38 PM »
white sugar is kill yah b ,yah ent know that .iodize  salt to .white flour to .

Everybody dying from the day they born.
Some faster than others
Bitter is a supercalifragilistic tic-tac-pro

Offline Daft Trini

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3822
    • View Profile
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2011, 02:52:49 PM »
same molecular formular... sucrose-fructose


Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18623
    • View Profile
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2011, 03:34:44 PM »
what!!! we have scientist in our midst. we love it.

Offline just cool

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 8065
    • View Profile
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #11 on: November 30, 2011, 08:13:13 PM »
i saw that on sunday on CTNT world where this doctor was feeding all these humming bird on about ah dozen feeders hung up in his yard got me pissed off right away! the fact that he was giving these wild birds raw granulated sugar mixed with water was enough to make me livid!

sugar is ah deadly poison and one of the reasons animals who live in the wild rarely suffer from some of the diseases that plague us humans is ah clear indication that the things we consume on ah daily is absolute poison! now these wild bird are now subjected to cancer diabetes and god knows what by consuming this poison known as sugar.   :pissedoff:

Do you have a source that says that sucrose is poisonous... to any living thing?  Hummingbirds live off fructose (sugars derived from fruits), and he's giving them sucrose (sugar derived from sugar cane or beet, in some cases).  Chemically they are near identical, and likely has no negative effect on the birds, as you suggest.
Breds, sugar from fruits and raw extract is two different things. when you consume pure sugar, and you eat ah fruit that contains sugar it's ah huge difference.

i'm coming from an holistic approach bro, i don't believe that it's the same, but i do believe that in the future with more research there would be substantial evidence to prove that extracted sugar as opposed to sugar from consuming fruits would be proven dangerous to life on the whole. 

heres some articles on refined sugar.
http://www.garynull.com/home/beware-of-the-sugar-conspiracy-opinion.html
http://www.garynull.com/home/letter-to-the-sugar-industry.html
http://www.wholife.com/issues/10_1/02_article.html
http://www.audreymarlene-lifecoach.com/sugars.html
« Last Edit: November 30, 2011, 08:38:29 PM by just cool »
The pen is mightier than the sword, Africa for Africans home and abroad.Trinidad is not my home just a pit stop, Africa is my destination,final destination the MOST HIGH.

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: Hummingbird haven
« Reply #12 on: November 30, 2011, 09:23:09 PM »
Breds, sugar from fruits and raw extract is two different things. when you consume pure sugar, and you eat ah fruit that contains sugar it's ah huge difference.

i'm coming from an holistic approach bro, i don't believe that it's the same, but i do believe that in the future with more research there would be substantial evidence to prove that extracted sugar as opposed to sugar from consuming fruits would be proven dangerous to life on the whole. 

heres some articles on refined sugar.
http://www.garynull.com/home/beware-of-the-sugar-conspiracy-opinion.html
http://www.garynull.com/home/letter-to-the-sugar-industry.html
http://www.wholife.com/issues/10_1/02_article.html
http://www.audreymarlene-lifecoach.com/sugars.html

Really... how?  Do you personally know anyone who has diabetes?  If so, ask them what effect eating, say.... a mango has on their blood sugar levels.

As for the links.... they don't really say anything we don't already know... the food industry conspires to have us consume way more sugar than is healthy... *shrug*

Hardly the "poison" you claim it to be, or the smoking gun you presume the assertions to be.

 

1]; } ?>