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Offline Flex

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Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« on: August 27, 2020, 02:48:17 PM »
Grosvenor grateful for love and prayers, iconic ex-St Anthony’s coach hospitalised for Covid-19
Wired868.com.


Iconic Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) coach and former Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) national youth team coach Nigel ‘Grovey’ Grosvenor is among 828 persons being treated for the novel coronavirus at present, within the Ministry of Health’s parallel health care system.

Grosvenor was admitted to the Couva General Hospital yesterday evening. As of this evening, the Ministry of Health has reported 1,007 positive cases in the twin island republic since the onset of the novel coronavirus.

“Thanks for all the love and prayers,” he asked Wired868 to relay to his supporters, via Whats App.

Ever the football man, Grosvenor wanted to learn more about the untimely passing of former Prisons FC attacker and St Augustine Secondary stand-out Nathan Julien who was murdered in Maloney last night. He extended his condolences to Julien’s friends and loved ones.

Grosvenor, a recovering cancer patient, announced last December that he was retiring from the role of head coach at Queen’s Royal College (QRC). He spent three seasons with the ‘Royalians’ but his name remains synonymous with St Anthony’s College where the former physical education teacher won five National Intercol and two National League titles to go with a room full of zonal trophies.

His former stand-outs include three World Cup 2006 players: Carlos Edwards, Kenwyne Jones and Evans Wise. Edwards and Jones also went on to play in the England Premier League.

The Ministry of Health reminds members of the public to adhere to the ‘new normal’ and:

Wear a mask over your nose and mouth when you go out in public;

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Clean then sanitise surfaces, such as tabletops, door knobs and cell phones;

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Persons are urged to call Covid-19 hotline numbers: 877-WELL, 87-SWRHA or 877-3742 (Trinidad) and 800-HEAL (Tobago) if they feel unwell; or they can report a possible breach of Covid-19 regulations by calling 555, or sending messages—inclusive of photographs and videos—to the Police App or via Whats App to 482-GARY.

RELATED BONUS NEWS (Dec-2019)

‘Grovy’ number: Iconic SSFL coach on Dwarika, ‘Saints’ rivalry, coaching and a life-changing tackle.
By Roneil Walcott (Wired868).


After calling a day on his 35-plus year coaching career in the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) last week, former Queen’s Royal College coach Nigel ‘Grovy’ Grosvenor took some time away from playing with his granddaughter to talk to Wired868 about his health, his storied career with St Anthony’s College, his ability to win hearts and trophies without ever doing a coaching course and the tackle that altered his life.

Wired868: Why now? Why are you walking away from the game at this time?

Grosvenor: I was in West Shore Medical for two days last week. I was getting a lot of pain in my upper back and I thought it was a muscle pain, so I took muscle relaxers and all of these things. My daughter said that I should go to the hospital. Every time I sat down the pain was unbearable, so I jumped in the car and went to West Shore Medical.

I honestly thought it was a heart attack. My pressure was so high that the doctors said I could’ve gotten a stroke. I did an ECG, a chest X-ray and I also did blood tests. While lying down there in the hospital bed, they checked my heart, and everything was good. I asked myself what was happening here. And I said, ‘Aye, Nigel Grosvenor, you need a rest. You really need to take a rest.’

I’m not getting any younger. I said that was it. It’s a hard thing to do, saying you’re going to stop doing what you love doing. But I felt like I had little choice. Up to now, I’m still getting pain in my back. The pressure has gone down but not as low as it should be. I’ve spent about $3,000 on tablets since last week.

Wired868: How many years did you spend at St Anthony’s College?

Grosvenor: I spent 33 to 34 years at St Anthony’s.

Wired868: You had quite the career at St Anthony’s. How was the experience there?

Grosvenor: That’s a whole lot of time to spend at one institution, but I’m not regretting anything at all, at all with my coaching career. I just loved it. I instilled a discipline at St Anthony’s College.

I came to school like any other teacher for eight o’clock in the morning. When school was over, the work wasn’t finished for me as that would be the start of training. So I would reach home like half-past six or seven in the evening. That was going on and on for years. When I was coaching, I gave it my all.

I always tell people that God gave me that coaching talent. I never did a coaching course in my life. It was a gift from God. Let me tell you how I got into coaching. I went to Trinity College Moka and I got a scholarship to go West Virginia University and play football. I came back home and played for a team called Essex FC. I was pretty good.

And in 1984, I got one nasty tackle, which basically changed my life plans. And you see how I’m limping right now? That’s because of that tackle I got years ago in 1984, which mashed me up. That stopped me from playing.

When I got that tackle and laid down in the hospital and cried. I asked myself why God did that to me. I asked what I had done. You know you ask yourself those questions.

I was pretty young in the football still. When I was in the hospital bed, I found out that the national coach had liked me and wanted me to start training with the national team. I found out that just as I was waiting to go into my operation. I cried. Then I realised that this is what was supposed to happen to me. I never regretted it.

I realised it at St Anthony’s when we were winning trophies, why I broke my leg that day. If I didn’t break my leg at that time, I wouldn’t have concentrated on coaching. And I realised that God was sending me in another direction.

I used it to show people that I had a degree, and when I got injured in football, I was able to use my education to fall back on. I encourage the boys to get their education first. I say, ‘Look at me.’

Wired868: Did you assume the first coaching role at St Anthony’s straightaway?

Grosvenor: When I started at St Anthony’s, I started with the junior teams first. When I came to St Anthony’s nothing was going on. They were getting licks badly. I came into St Anthony’s in 1983 as a physical education teacher and eventually got into the coaching because they had nobody. I got injured in 1984 and then I started to get into the coaching aspect and got more interested in coaching.

Wired868: When did you win your first national title with St Anthony’s?

Grosvenor: We got our first national title in 1997. We were winning a lot of Under-14s and Under-16s. The team was coming up and things were working well and there was no turning back after that.

Wired868: How many titles did you win at St Anthony’s?

Grosvenor: I won five National Intercol and two National League titles. St Anthony’s have won six National Intercol titles in all, and three National League.

I had the support of my wife and my children. I also had the support of the fans and staff because I was a teacher as well.

Wired868: How many seasons did you spend at QRC? And how would you sum up the time there?

Grosvenor: I spent three seasons at QRC. With QRC, it was a new experience. I thought I was successful with what I wanted to do at QRC. When I came, there was no succession of players going up. They didn’t have a youth programme that would see the boys reach up to the Premier Division and continue on. And I came in and tried to implement that. And look what happened this year?

These boys should be here for the next two to three years. I was very pleased with my experience at QRC.

Wired868: When you left for QRC three years ago, were you still teaching?

Grosvenor: Yes. I was still teaching at St Anthony’s. It was my last year as I had to retire after reaching age 60. St Anthony’s got somebody, but I wasn’t ready to give up on my coaching career. I called QRC because I heard they were looking for a coach. They were interviewing and they took me in one time.

I had a nice three years with them. This team this year was a nice, young team. I was really trying to avoid relegation this year because I knew that I had them for the next two years. I really went in there to develop them. It was pretty good you know. We came eighth and there were some games we should’ve won. This would’ve put us in fourth or fifth place.

Wired868: What is your most cherished moment as a coach?

Grosvenor: I have cherished moments all the time. But obviously it would be my first national title, which I won in 1997 when we won the National Intercol final. We were nowhere near the favourites. We placed very low in the league standings and it was amazing to see the kinda crowd that turned up at the Queen’s Park Oval to see that final against St Benedict’s College.

There were 15 to 20,000 people in that Oval. It was packed. We came like the sweethearts in the SSFL’s Intercol competition at that time. Here we were playing against the mighty St Benedict’s, and everybody just came out. It was pandemonium after the game. I had very good years after that.

In 2011, we didn’t lose a single game. We won everything. We played 19 games and won all 19. And that was a good team too. But in 1997, when we won our first Intercol title, it was heaven.

Wired868: Who were some of the players on that team in 1997?

Grosvenor: Carlos Edwards was a member of that team. We also had Sean Cooper. That’s when Carlos made his name—and Shawn also. We also had Marcus Rodriguez.

It was nice knowing that most of these guys went on to get scholarships and so on. A lot of them have their degrees now. Well, we know that Carlos went pro and made a good career for himself in the English Premier League. But that team was very nice.

Wired868: On the flip side, what was the least favourite moment in your coaching career?

Grosvenor: Looking back, I’d say the moment that left a bitter taste in my mouth was the death of one of my players, Martin Anatol. He was a former captain also. He was on a scholarship in England and he died from drowning.

That one really hit me. The death of former national team goalkeeper Michael McComie also hit me hard. But Anatol died shortly after featuring in my team and skippering that team. It really threw me off. I’m talking to you right now and I’m seeing Martin’s face in front of me… He was disciplined; a very good player.

Wired868: From all the players you have coached over the years, which player would you say stood out the most?

Grosvenor: Brother, and I’m being very honest with you, people have always asked me this question and I’ve never answered. Because when I call one name somebody would say, ‘so what about so and so?’

In my time at St Anthony’s College, we have had so many outstanding players. There’s no way on this earth I’d be able to single out one. I wouldn’t even give out examples. But we’ve had so many outstanding players that to call out one would be madness. And that’s the honest truth.

Wired868: What is your coaching philosophy?

Grosvenor: When I finish coach, I want my players to be able to look forward to the next day of coaching; that’s important. They must enjoy it. As soon as a session is finished and these players come off the field, we are talking and liming. I will stay with them and we will be talking about life and everything else.

When they go on the field, they understand that this is work. But off the field, they must be able to feel comfortable and build a genuine relationship.

The thing is, coaches would read a book and go through many different courses and not know how to deal with the kids. It’s more than just putting cones on the field. It’s about personality. You must have the personality to coach. You can get an ‘A’ in your coaching course, but if the players aren’t comfortable with you, then that would’ve been a waste of time.

I think my personality helped me a lot in my coaching career. I’m not boasting eh. People told me that. When I go out there, I coach from the heart. I use my experience as a player and a teacher, and I put those two together. You must remain humble and ask a lot of questions. When I played, I looked to see what other coaches did and that’s how it is. I never did a coaching course.

Wired868: Who was the toughest coach you went up against?

Grosvenor: The toughest coaches would’ve had some really good players eh [chuckles]. But the coaches I really looked up to and learned from would’ve been Hayden Martin, who was at St Mary’s College, Selris Figaro from Mucurapo, Ken Franco from Malick and Michael Grayson from St Augustine. These were some of the top coaches. These days we were playing in the zone so notice that there are quite a few north coaches there.

Wired868: What was something specific that you learned from these coaches that you perhaps then adapted to your own style?

Grosvenor: From Hayden, it was a lot of discipline. And that was something St Mary’s always had. How he carried himself and how the players carried themselves was admirable. When we went there, the players all had on the same outfits and they all looked in unison. I learned a lot of that from him. From Figaro, it was a lot of one-touch and two-touch football; a lot of skills football.

I got it into that with St Anthony’s. I let them know that we had to knock the ball around and be patient. The discipline kept us on top with all of that because the boys were enjoying it. When we combined that discipline with the style of play then it really put everything together for us.

The major thing was the love I had for them and the love they gave to each other. It starts from on top. […] Off-the-ball work made us victorious. It’s not just about going on the field and putting down cones and yelling out tactics. That alone isn’t going to make you victorious. Getting that team together as one, that’s what St Anthony’s did.

Wired868: Who was the toughest opposing player for you to contain?

Grosvenor: The best player I faced in my coaching career in the SSFL was Arnold Dwarika. He was totally unbelievable. He was the most dangerous player I coached against.

Wired868: What made Dwarika so dangerous?

Grosvenor: The skill, the speed, the knowledge, the shot. He singlehandedly brought Malick to a level of prominence in his era. I’m not saying that there weren’t other good players, but he was unmarkable [sic].

I remember in a North Intercol final, I put a player on Dwarika called Maurice Loregnard, who was my skipper at the time. He held down Dwarika for long periods of that game until he came off the field with cramp in the 89th minute. To mark Dwarika was a chore and that little boy was so disciplined and stubborn that he put out everything, to the point where he cramped up and couldn’t go anymore. As he came off and another man came on, Dwarika scored the winning goal.

Wired868: Was there any player who superseded your expectations with his progress during his career?

Grosvenor: There was a little boy by the name of Damien Westfield. There were two Westfield brothers who attended Malick and they were two of the best SSFL players at the time. After one particular season with St Anthony’s, we played in a Caribbean tournament and we played teams from Jamaica and other islands and we won.

And we could have chosen three outside players for the tournament. Two of those players were the Westfield brothers from Malick. At the end of the season, Damien approached me and said he wanted to come to St Anthony’s. At that time Malick were only on football. He was telling me about guys who didn’t go to class and this and that. And then I transferred him to St Anthony’s. But he was struggling with his studies, so I got lessons for him.

There was a time I went home by him for his birthday, and I took the team there. We bought some buckets of chicken and we went by him. It was just he and his brother living there by themselves. Both of them were students at the time. The mother went away to New York to work and she would send down money and other necessities for them. Two of them lived there by themselves and the house was dilapidated.

That kid got a scholarship to attend Young Harris College for two years. From there, he went to Creighton University to play football. Now, he has a doctorate. He is a lecturer in a university. This is the same little boy. He worked hard and persevered. Now I have to call him Dr Damien Westfield.

That’s one of the players whose growth was really touching. And they don’t ever forget you. They call and ask, ‘Grovy, how yuh going?’ That’s the whole love in it. With all the years we won and getting the trophies and the attention; that was nice. But when I hear what these boys have done with themselves, that’s my trophy. When you look at Brent Rahim and Evans Wise and these guys, who have gotten their degrees and are doing well for themselves; that’s my trophy.

People feel as though we don’t do anything constructive for the boys at St Anthony’s. They just win and they don’t care about football. But it wasn’t like that at all. We’ve had so many boys who got football scholarships and have done so well, but I wouldn’t put it in the press because it’s nothing to boast about. And they keep in contact with me. And that’s what I love.

Wired868: How would you compare the players back then to the players now, in terms of the mentality and the drive to succeed?

Grosvenor: It’s harder now. In those years it wasn’t about going down to Movietowne or using PlayStation or whatever those new games are. It didn’t have those things. They didn’t even have cellular phones. Now, you have so much distractions. It’s a boat ride here and a boat ride there. As a coach, you are competing against so many things. In those days you had more time to concentrate on your schoolwork and football. Now it’s Instagram and Facebook.

Wired868: If you were to give the SSFL’s Premier Division format a grade, what grade would you give it at this time?

Grosvenor: I was the one who originally brought up this idea of having the Premier Division. I stood up and said we need to move on, and we need to make changes. We were very monotonous. I said we need to have a national league where all the top players are in that league and we’d call it the Premier Division. I stood up there and I told them that.

I think it has been a success. You have the best teams in the country playing against each other, and the standard is high. And it is getting better and better.

I’m the one who orchestrated, but obviously it’s better than playing in the zones. In the zones, you’d have one or two good teams, but you are going to have some poor teams too. You’re going to have teams collecting nine and 10, and it’s not working out.

But now in this Premier Division, you have to work hard, and the players are going to play better because the competition is tougher. It’s going to have the same distractions and so on, but the standard is higher. You are going to have problems in the Premier Division, but we’re going to work through them.

Look at the number of sponsors that the SSFL has. The sponsors are seeing a good project and they have jumped on it. If we were not successful, we would not have had all these sponsors. I don’t think the Super League and the Pro League have all the sponsors like the SSFL has. Therefore, it has been successful.

People will say all kinda things, but we have SportsMax, Shell, Digicel, First Citizens, Coca-Cola and Fruta. What else can you ask for? They are investing because they are seeing something going on.

Wired868: Do you regret not winning any National titles during the Premier Division era?

Grosvenor: It would have been nice, yeah. But I’d tell you something. When I left St Anthony’s in 2016, I’m pretty sure that we would have won that year. I built up that team and I was ready to win it that year. And I told the principal, Mr Maurice Inniss, that. I had retired from teaching, but I could’ve continued coaching. That team came up and it was a good team. The principal decided that he wanted to make changes and he had plans, so I had to leave.

That’s how I went to QRC and they were looking to rebuild. I didn’t leave St Anthony’s. I was told that they have plans and I wasn’t part of the plans. I would never do something like that.

Before making our name in football, nobody never really heard about St Anthony’s College. Because of the football they got added recognition. And when they got that recognition, the school grew, and I was a part of that.

Because of football we got sixth form. When our players reached to fifth form they were leaving for other schools. I told the principal that we needed a sixth form in order to keep the players because they were getting good grades as well, and that happened. I would have loved to end off by winning the Premier Division trophy.

In 2015, we lost to Naparima in the National Intercol final, and I would have had the same team for the next year. It was a teething process, and I felt as though that team had reached the point where they were ready to win something. There were good players on that team, and I was looking forward to coaching them because I know we would have won.

Wired868: Telling us about your time coaching at the national youth level.

Grosvenor: I coached the National Under-17 team in 2004, and it was very nice.

We went to Cuba, but I was very inexperienced in this thing. We had nowhere to stay as the rooms weren’t ready yet and the game was the next day. When we left to go for the game, we left the same time as the Cuban team and we reached about half an hour before the game.

The driver took us all through traffic and stalled us. In those days we were naive to it, but now coaches know what to expect. When we got to the venue, the Cubans were there long time. They ended beating us 2-1 or something like that.

That is what happens when you play matches away from home. The opponent does everything to try and sway the game in their favour. But yeah it was a nice experience.

On the downside, we weren’t given anything when it came to preparation. I had to organise training jerseys for them through sponsors from St Anthony’s. I organised food for them. One of my assistant coaches was in the Army, and he organised for us to train at a ground in Teteron barracks.

That’s what was happening with that national team. But I won’t complain because I knew the circumstances and I took the job. I could have said no, I don’t want the job. It was a nice experience with a nice bunch of guys.

If you ask me to do it again, then the answer would be no.

Wired868: Why would you have said no?

Grosvenor: You get nothing. You don’t get to travel with the team to play matches abroad. You have to fight for this and fight for that. In those days I’m talking about. […] I used to get a $1,000 a month for coaching the national team.

Wired868: Any closing words?

Grosvenor: I’m 62. You might say that’s young eh. But it’s what you do and what you put out. In all my years of coaching, I put out 100%. Also, I was a dean and a teacher so that wasn’t easy at all. I’m no longer a teacher and I’m not coaching anymore, so now friend, I’m going to spend time playing with my granddaughter and take in SSFL games; she’s one and a half. She says, ‘Papa Papa.’ And I just love that.

I will be on the bench, but a different bench, so I’m looking forward to that. I put out all when I coach—all my energy. The night before a game, you can’t sleep and it’s the same the night after the game, even if you win or lose. I have been doing that for 30-plus years, so next season, please God, I’ll have my fold-up chair in the trunk and whatever the game of the day is, I’ll be there. I’ll go with my chair and just sit back and watch football.

Somebody told me I should write a book, but I would not even know where to start.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2020, 03:52:21 PM »
Guys I met Nigel in DC in 1977. He was attending GWU in DC. His sister Janine was attending HU at the time. GW had a absolutely good team. They had some Nigerians and Iranians on their squad. One Saturday there was this big game between Howard and GWU at 32nd and M streets NW public field. Guys it was like in front the Grand Stand. Fans right up to the line. The only thing missing was the police on a horse. Howard was unbeaten at the time. Guys the game was like an intercol affair. Howard had a rhythm section, GW fans singing them american football songs, "let's go colonials, let's go".

The game is a ding dong affair. Attack counter attack. Then a Nigerian for GWU score a half-volley from about 20 yards on Trevor Leiba. Lord, bachanal in place. They scored another. Pressure. More attack, counter attack. We scored one. Then with 15 mins to go, they send on Nigel. Did not know he had that amount of speed. They won 2-1. We became friends after that.

He then transferred to Montgomery Junior College. He did fantastic things there and got the scholarship to West Virginia. We also played amateur football for an American team from Takoma Park, Maryland. And we traveled with the Washington Trini teams to Toronto and NY. After he had graduated from WVU, he said that he was heading home. I encouraged him to go to Essex. I had played with them from 74 to 76. I was recruiting for my old team. Sammy and a lot of their top players had gone over to ASL. Some had gone to Malvern.

Well like he said, a life changing play in a match can happen anytime. He was on the verge of the national team selection when the misfortune happened. I was not surprised that he went into coach. He was a phys ed major. I was surprised at his success at the high school level. Especially St. Anthony. He and whoever was supporting him transformed that team. The same way Sando Tech. came on the seen in 70 and dominated football for a 3 year period.

Nigel outside of football was a bon vivant. He loved to party. He loved to DJ. I went on some of his DJ runs. But it was pressure with the heavy lifting of them speaker boxes. Is a wonder I did not get goadie. He was real kicks, though. He, Chinapoo and Derek Lewis were close buddies. Anyway, Blessings and God Speed, Nigel. Luv to You and  Your Family, Janine, Shelly and Your younger brother. Can't remember his name. Peace. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Offline Tallman

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Iconic youth coach Nigel "Grovey" Grosvenor dies
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2020, 08:48:08 AM »
Iconic youth coach Nigel "Grovey" Grosvenor dies
By Stephon Nicholas (T&T Newsday)


ICONIC former St Anthony's College football coach Nigel Grosvenor has died. Grosvenor contracted covid19 over a month ago and had been hospitalised since.

The former national youth coach was in charge of Queen's Royal College for three seasons before retiring. Grosvenor had a huge impact at St Anthony's College where a number on players went on to become national stars.

Grosvenor and his wife had both contracted covid19. His wife recovered and was discharged just under two weeks ago.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline FF

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Re: Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2020, 09:56:26 AM »
RIP Grovey

Never played for him but competed against his teams several times.
He was a classy fella and well respected by his players and peers.
He will be missed
THE BEATINGS WILL CONTINUE UNTIL MORALE IMPROVES

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Re: Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2020, 10:07:41 AM »
:salute:

Offline Tallman

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Former Tigers, QRC coach Nigel Grovesnor passes
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2020, 12:56:23 PM »
Former Tigers, QRC coach Nigel Grovesnor passes
By Walter Alibey (T&T Guardian)


The football fraternity was plunged into mourning on Friday following the early-morning death of former national, St Anthony's College and Queen's Royal College football coach Nigel "Grovey" Grosvenor. He was 63 on Independance Day.

A man who has dedicated his entire life to football, Grovesnor has been battling cancer for the past years, and only a couple months ago he was admitted to the Couva hospital when he contracted the deadly coronavirus.

He appeared to have been recovering well from the virus, but at 3 am Friday morning the coach known popularly as 'Grovey' passed away this morning reportedly from kidney complications.

Grovesnor was a household name in T&T football particularly in the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) where he won five Coca Cola National InterCol titles and two League titles during his 33 years stint with St Anthony's College, known as the Westmooring 'Tigers'. He also won countless North Zone titles. However, Grovesnor will be remembered for his dedication to producing allround individuals through football.

Under his wings, the country became the beneficiary of players such as Kenwyn Jones and Carlos Edwards, both of whom played in the English Premier League, Sean Cooper who played in Portugal and Brazil, Julius James and Evans Wise, among many others.

Due to his successes 'Grovey' also earned the right to coach the country's Under-15 Boys team.

Only in December, last year Grovesnor retired as a coach after spending the last three years of his coaching career at Queen's Royal College where he failed to win anything.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Tallman

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Kenwyne: 'Grovy' was my Sir Alex
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2020, 02:05:10 PM »
Kenwyne: 'Grovy' was my Sir Alex
By Jelani Beckles (T&T Newsday)


FORMER T&T football captain Kenwyne Jones on Friday described former St Anthony’s coach Nigel Grosvenor as a mentor and father figure to him, labelling him as “my Sir Alex Ferguson.”

Grosvenor, 63, a recovering cancer patient, contracted covid19 over a month ago and had been hospitalised since. He died on Friday morning.

Grosvenor, fondly called Grovy by his peers, started his journey with St Anthony’s in 1983 and spent more than 30 years at the school. He was always one of the top coaches in the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) as he turned the Westmoorings school into a powerhouse. He led the “Tigers” to multiple Intercol and SSFL League titles.

After leaving St Anthony’s a few years ago he spent three years with Queen’s Royal College (QRC) where he helped the school to creditable performances in the premiership division.

Several players he coached at St Anthony’s went on to represent the national senior team including Jones, Jan-Michael Williams and Carlos Edwards. Grosvenor was a physical education teacher and dean at St Anthony’s.

“Like myself and many others, Grovy and his family meant a lot,” Jones told Newsday.

Jones, a student at St Anthony’s from 1995 to 2002, made 91 appearances for the national senior team from 2003 to 2017. He was a member of the T&T 2006 World Cup squad.

Jones said Grosvenor was not simply a coach. “He touched so many lives for almost 40 years. He has been a mentor, a father figure, coach, a teacher. I think more than anything he embodied what care is supposed to be. When you interact (with him), when you had the chance to be touched by someone like that, it impacts your life for all your days. That is the type of personality he is and he will forever be remembered as a legend, as an icon.”

Jones compared Grosvenor to legendary coach Sir Alex Ferguson, who coached Manchester United for decades.

“For me, personally he is my Sir Alex Ferguson. The way that players feel about him and even people who are not players…it is a sad day for his immediate family, for the extended family, for the school family, for the sporting family, for St Anthony’s College. TT has definitely been blessed by his dedication, his talent, his ability and he will forever live on.”

Jones, 35, said after he left school he always kept in contact with Grosvenor.

Jones recently spent one season coaching under Grosvenor at QRC.

When Grosvenor reached out to Jones to join him on the coaching staff at QRC, Jones did not hesitate to help his mentor.

“One day I was working out at the Hasely Crawford Stadium and he happened to pass in and was like, ‘Kenwyne boy, what you doing? I want you to help me out at QRC?’ He asked me to come and do it and without a doubt (I accepted). He could have asked me anything and I would have done it for him.”

St Anthony’s principal Maurice Inniss, reflecting on the life of Grosvenor, said, “The amount of people he has touched as a teacher, but also as a coach (is remarkable). He was a big father figure to all the boys who he coached.”

Inniss added, “His impact on St Anthony’s (is tremendous) and how people look at St Anthony’s and the pride of St Anthony’s. His life impacted a lot on all of that and what you see at St Anthony’s.”

Inniss, the principal at St Anthony’s for the past ten years, said students put the school as their Secondary Entrance Assessment first choice school because of the rich football history.

The St Anthony’s principal said Grosvenor was not only a football coach.

Grosvenor was also a pan fanatic and would wear his All Stars t-shirt to school, according to Inniss.

“The entire country will be mourning his loss and we continue to pray and support his family in prayer because Grosvenor was not just football, he was All Stars…anything going on with All Stars the whole school had to know.

“From culture to sport and as a teacher, it is a lot of TT mourning his loss today.”

Inniss also said he was the “livewire in everything that he did.”

RELATED NEWS

‘Grovy’ remembered by football community
By Ian Prescott (Express).


Selfless

FORMER TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO national footballer Angus Eve described it as a “massive loss” while friend and coaching counterpart Shawn Cooper tagged him as a “unique individual” who helped to create better young men for Trinidad and Tobago.

The legacy of Nigel “Grovy” Grovesnor—the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) stalwart who impacted the lives of scores of young men over his 36-year career—is sure to be secured after his passing early yesterday morning, caused by complications from the Covid-19 he contracted last month.

And in the middle of the imbroglio swamping Trinidad and Tobago football that includes a FIFA suspension, he will be remembered even more fondly.

“In light of what is going on, (it is) a massive loss,” Eve, a national Under 23-coach, said. “‘Grovy’, as we all called him, had some (health issues) for awhile and I thought everybody really rallied around him because he had affected our lives in one way or the other —coached us, coached against us or given us advice or that kind of thing.”

Eve added Grovesnor, who turned 63 on Republic Day, was very instrumental in a lot of careers with the likes of Kenwyne Jones and Carlos Edwards, to name a few.

“I was fortunate to be able to coach alongside him and learn things from him .For me he has impacted at the administrative level because he was the North Zone president of Colleges League. That was where his passion was developing young people so that would be a massive loss for us especially where we have administrators these days only seeking their own interest and agendas. So he would be a massive loss as one of the people who cared about the children.”

Eve recalled how his relationship with Grovy developed from his playing days at Mucurapo Senior Comprehensive -- where he simultaneously praised his play and devised plans for his players to prevent Eve from scoring—to his coaching days when he got to know him more intimately through Grovey’s son involvement with the national U-23 team and their battles with Eve at the helm of Naparima College vs ST Anthony’s and Grovy’s final three years at QRC.

“So Grovy has been a part of my life from young to now and throughout my life and he is somebody who I will truly miss,” Eve ended.

Cooper, the Presentation College head coach, said he and Grovy developed a very close relationship despite an always-competitive nature when they faced each other on the field.

“Over a number of years we have gotten closer, exchanging ideas but I think Grovy has done Trinidad a wonderful service in terms of creating young men. I think he has impacted on a lot of young minds and I think he was more a father figure to me than a coach,” Cooper said.

He continued: “It is a great loss. He was really a standout in society. A lot of youngsters will be feeling heartbroken because he did a lot of good work in the community and at St Anthony’s College with those boys and then presently with QRC.

“He is a unique gentlemen. I don’t think there are much coaches around like Grovy, I think Grovy was more about the individual and the success and the development of the players after football than on football. So he was really creating young men for Trinidad and Tobago,” added Cooper.

Former St Anthony’s College player Abiola Clarence stated on his Twitter account: “This man was one of the most influential figures in my life. He was a teacher, coach, friend and father figure to myself and many others. We shared so many great memories together and I am forever thankful. My condolences goes out to the Grovesnor family. RIP #Grovey #Tigers

Jones was more terse on his Facebook page. “SIP (Sleep In Peace) Grovey, thank you a million times over #onceatigeralwaysatiger”

« Last Edit: September 26, 2020, 12:45:53 AM by Flex »
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Offline soccerman

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Re: Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2020, 02:12:22 PM »
RIP Grosvenor. You played an integral part in youth development in T&T.

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Re: Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2020, 04:33:48 PM »
This is a real sad day. I never got the opportunity to play for Grovey because I migrated.  I will never forget how disappointed he was when I told him I was leaving.  I never went out for football even though I had enough talent. But right as I was leaving basketball was about to start up and from his reaction I was among the people he envisioned on the team.  We had a few run ins because I liked mild trouble. But despite his gruff voice and bearish look he was ah rell cool individual. Grovey was a class act and before Covid happened I had in my head that the next time I visit, I had to go and check him.  Guess it wasn't meant to be.  He will live on in so many people's minds. SMH R.I.P Grovey boi!!!

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Re: Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2020, 07:28:08 PM »
What years were you at St Anthony's Mad Scorpion?
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Re: Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2020, 07:33:08 PM »
What years were you at St Anthony's Mad Scorpion?
86-89

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Re: Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2020, 07:41:30 PM »
What years were you at St Anthony's Mad Scorpion?
86-89

Respek, I taught there from 92-93.  Grovey was a boss, one of the coolest guys you'd know.  RIP
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Selfless: ‘Grovy’ remembered by football community
« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2020, 10:47:24 AM »
Selfless: ‘Grovy’ remembered by football community
T&T Express


FORMER TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO national footballer Angus Eve described it as a “massive loss” while friend and coaching counterpart Shawn Cooper tagged him as a “unique individual” who helped to create better young men for Trinidad and Tobago.

The legacy of Nigel “Grovy” Grovesnor—the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) stalwart who impacted the lives of scores of young men over his 36-year career—is sure to be secured after his passing early yesterday morning, caused by complications from the Covid-19 he contracted last month.

And in the middle of the imbroglio swamping Trinidad and Tobago football that includes a FIFA suspension, he will be remembered even more fondly.

“In light of what is going on, (it is) a massive loss,” Eve, a national Under 23-coach, said. “‘Grovy’, as we all called him, had some (health issues) for awhile and I thought everybody really rallied around him because he had affected our lives in one way or the other —coached us, coached against us or given us advice or that kind of thing.”

Eve added Grovesnor, who turned 63 on Republic Day, was very instrumental in a lot of careers with the likes of Kenwyne Jones and Carlos Edwards, to name a few.

“I was fortunate to be able to coach alongside him and learn things from him .For me he has impacted at the administrative level because he was the North Zone president of Colleges League. That was where his passion was developing young people so that would be a massive loss for us especially where we have administrators these days only seeking their own interest and agendas. So he would be a massive loss as one of the people who cared about the children.”

Eve recalled how his relationship with Grovy developed from his playing days at Mucurapo Senior Comprehensive -- where he simultaneously praised his play and devised plans for his players to prevent Eve from scoring—to his coaching days when he got to know him more intimately through Grovey’s son involvement with the national U-23 team and their battles with Eve at the helm of Naparima College vs ST Anthony’s and Grovy’s final three years at QRC.

“So Grovy has been a part of my life from young to now and throughout my life and he is somebody who I will truly miss,” Eve ended.

Cooper, the Presentation College head coach, said he and Grovy developed a very close relationship despite an always-competitive nature when they faced each other on the field.

“Over a number of years we have gotten closer, exchanging ideas but I think Grovy has done Trinidad a wonderful service in terms of creating young men. I think he has impacted on a lot of young minds and I think he was more a father figure to me than a coach,” Cooper said.

He continued: “It is a great loss. He was really a standout in society. A lot of youngsters will be feeling heartbroken because he did a lot of good work in the community and at St Anthony’s College with those boys and then presently with QRC.

“He is a unique gentlemen. I don’t think there are much coaches around like Grovy, I think Grovy was more about the individual and the success and the development of the players after football than on football. So he was really creating young men for Trinidad and Tobago,” added Cooper.

Former St Anthony’s College player Abiola Clarence stated on his Twitter account: “This man was one of the most influential figures in my life. He was a teacher, coach, friend and father figure to myself and many others. We shared so many great memories together and I am forever thankful. My condolences goes out to the Grovesnor family. RIP #Grovey #Tigers

Jones was more terse on his Facebook page. “SIP (Sleep In Peace) Grovey, thank you a million times over #onceatigeralwaysatiger”
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Thank you, ‘Grovy’
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2020, 10:48:57 AM »
Thank you, ‘Grovy’
By Kern De Freitas (T&T Express)


He will be remembered and respected by most as the man who coached the St Anthony’s College Tigers to eight national secondary school football titles. Nigel ‘Grovy” Grosvenor was much more than that. He was a family man, disciplinarian, educator, business owner, and investor.

The last one had nothing to do with money. He invested in youth and their development, helped mould those who had disciplinary problems into outstanding young men, and helped turn footballers with potential into professionals and scholars. He walked with a swagger; a limp that ended his promising football career more than four decades ago. Still, he used that knowledge gained in his youth, not to live vicariously through his charges, but to help them to become winners on and off the field, and to live their dreams.

Ricky Aleong, Carlos Edwards, Kevin Pierre, Marvin Gollop, Randy Samaroo, Kevin Pinder, Gary Gibbons, Sean Cooper, Mikeil Germain, Kenwyne Jones, Julius James, Dwight Ceballo, Moriba Ballah, Yohance Marshall, Uriah Bentick, Mekeil Williams, Micah Lewis and Qian Grosvenor—son of the now late, legendary youth coach—and so many more young men (too many to name here) came to the school with potential and left with confidence and promise for the future.

That was his job. Yet, to Nigel Grosvenor, it was his mission to turn precocious and mischievous teens into responsible young men who aspired to greater things in life. As a proud St Anthony’s alum, who admittedly was never close to being good enough with a football to sit on the floor next to the bench in any of his Tigers teams, I saw the transformation of many students under the guidance of ‘Grovy’.

More than just a coach and teacher

I had to leave the school to understand the real impact of our coach, and to understand that he was more than a football-winning trainer/PE teacher and disciplinarian. I hasten to say this change in perspective saw us develop a friendship and a greater level of mutual respect despite the generation gap between us.

What I want most for the memory of Nigel Grosvenor is for others to recognise that his legacy was not about football, the sport he loved and devoted his life to—it was about the young men whose lives he had a chance to impact. He supported those who were talented but less fortunate, often out of his own pocket. He was a father-figure when needed, and a friend when necessary. The entire school respected him and admired him and he was well loved by most of the players who joined his teams. He wanted to see them grow and enjoy the opportunities the game offered, and he wanted to see them mature into decent young men that he could boast about with pride. Even more, he wanted to see all the students succeed, even if they had no football talent whatsoever. As a PE teacher, he made sure, though, that every single student—even the one in the wheelchair—became more than acquainted with a football. Perhaps he was secretly scouting… I have no idea, and I never had the brain to ask him. Maybe this had a subconscious influence on my choice of career path as a sport journalist, which I enjoyed for over 12 years.

I can demonstrate his dedication with the story of Martin Anatol, a gifted young St Anthony’s star with a promising life ahead of him. While studying abroad, Martin tragically drowned. Yet he stayed in the memories of Tigers decades later, as up to the time when Grovy was rumoured to have been forced to leave the school, he had religiously and faithfully hosted the Martin Anatol Memorial… a tribute to a former Tiger that brought ex-footballers and students from every walk of life back to the place where it all began to remember their comrade and share in the camaraderie that makes this school special to me two decades after I said goodbye to its classrooms.

Founded St Anthony’s football programme

I know, because of his success, many, both within and without the school football system, questioned his intentions with rumours that Grovy recruited players to St Anthony’s with gifts and promises to get his school to win titles. It is my firm belief that those claims are spurious, and without merit or basis. For those who didn’t know, Grovy was not a big-name coach hired by the school to win titles. He was the founder of the school’s football programme, a PE teacher, and a school dean. What he got out of the game was knowing his players’ lives would never be the same. He even confided in me that it pained him that those accusations had been levied at him. Yet even knowing my status as a journalist with the Trinidad Express at that time, the friendship we developed over my career, and the influence of what the newspaper printed, he never asked me to print a story in his favour to address his concerns.

In truth, Grovy was St Anthony’s, and St Anthony’s was Grovy. In his last couple of seasons before leaving the game behind in 2018, he took over the football programme at QRC. Mr Grosvenor—only teachers called him that at school as a courtesy; he was plain Grovy to just about everyone—hated losing, but I’m sure his losses to the Tigers carried with it just a tinge of consolation. After all, he was the man with whom it all began, so maybe it wasn’t as difficult to lose to the team he loved.

The quintessential ‘Tiger’

His vision for the school showed in the name he himself gave us -- Tigers. He did it so the students would look at themselves with pride, and know that they were tigers. That they had something great within, had a destiny and the ability to succeed, that they represented a great institution, and that they could create a reputation for themselves that other schools would respect. It took him 13 years to win that first title during my Fifth Form experience.

I will never forget that night in 1997 at Queen’s Park Oval; the jubilation of the school, the feeling of conquest and excellence, the celebrations that went on late into the night, and the calm, relief, and joy emanating from Grovy in the wake of that hard fought 2-1 InterCol final victory over St Benedict’s on goals from Edwards and Cooper. That was only the beginning of things for St Anthony’s. In 2002, he became the first coach to have a team unbeaten throughout the school football season, a solitary draw vs longtime rivals St Mary’s College is the lone blemish.

But I will most of all remember Grovy the man—the friend who sat on the bench after games to talk to a cub reporter about anything but himself or his team being in the news, who was proud of what I had accomplished when I felt I had not even begun to achieve anything, the one who asked for no publicity, the one whose pride and passion over 35 years was in the young men that wore the white and khaki with the promise of “Service to All”. My heart goes out to his loved ones as they mourn his loss. I believe, though, that his is a life to celebrate. Rest well, Grovy, and thank you for everything. You are a bigger legend than you ever knew. The quintessential Tiger.

—Kern De Freitas is a former Express journalist and past student of St Anthony’s College
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Grovey's legacy will live on
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2020, 09:59:55 AM »
Grovey's legacy will live on
By Shaun Fuentes (T&T Guardian)


It is said that a good coach and good coaching can build will, skill, knowledge and capacity because it can go where no other professional development has gone before: into the intellect, behaviours, practices, beliefs, values and feelings of an educator and his or her students. You think I’m making this up? Ask any young student or footballer who passed through St Anthony’s College under the guidance of Nigel Grosvenor for just over the past two decades and they’ll tell you.

It was October 1997 and I had just settled into my first year of sports reporting for this newspaper. Former sports editor Valentino Singh took a chance with me. A youthful 16-year-old just out of CXC from the southland. It was my first Secondary School’s Football League (SSFL) and Intercol season. A few months later, I was also thrown deeper into the fire, covering the Craven A Semi-Pro League and the Caribbean Cup which was hosted by T&T in 1998. But one particular experience stood out for me from that period. The Queen’s Park Oval was near capacity filled for the 1997 National Intercol Final between underdogs St Anthony’s College and St Benedict’s College. Being a south boy I was naturally hoping for a win for the La Romaine Lions who had been flying all season under the coaching of Muhammad Isa and playmaker Kester “Blacks” Cornwall. But the boys from Westmoorings had other plans on the day and Grosvenor was the main architect behind it.

Young Carlos Edwards was in the squad that won the final 2-1 and the following day Singh sent me on an assignment to cover the celebrations at St Anthony’s. I was nervous not knowing what to expect plus inexperience at the time made it difficult for me to understand how it is the “underdogs” could triumph on the big stage. My first advice from Singh was to head directly to the Principal’s office, explain why I was there and figure out the rest on my own. So imagine me strutting into unknown territory with my Guardian notebook and a voice recorder. Mobile Phones weren’t yet popular. And up came the big figure of “Grovey” to meet me in the Principal’s office. From that moment, I was made to feel like I had been part of the “Tigers” camp all season. It was maybe one of the coolest experiences I’ve had in the company of a championship-winning side as “Grovey” made sure I obtained all the material that I had been in search of to put together my biggest story of the season.

From then on it was always pure joy every time we crossed paths. “Aye Shauny how thing’s man” was a greeting I had grown accustomed to and most times it would be a case of Grovey calling me out before I even saw him. We would later work on the same team when he was appointed head coach of the National Under-17 Youth Team and though the results were not favourable, it was far from an unpleasant experience with him at the helm.

Roughly two weeks ago, myself and Carlos Edwards started a Zoom interview reminiscing about his days under Grovey. He recalled that his college head coach was the reason he ended up in the Defence Force both as an officer and a player before joining Wrexham in Wales. “It was the week that we won the Intercol in ’97 and one morning I heard horns blaring outside around 5:30 and when I look out it was Grovey calling out and telling me to get my bags packed ... we heading down Tetron. He had mentioned it before but he was serious now and only Grovey could have gotten me to enter the Army. The rest is history because when I look back now I could understand what he saw in me and why he pushed me to go that route which eventually led to my break in the UK,” Edwards told me.

Malcolm Gladwell, the author of Outliers: The Story of Success (2008), calculates that it takes 10,000 hours of deliberate practice—a practice that promotes continuous improvement—to master a complex skill. This translates into about seven years for those working in schools. The majority of teachers and principals want professional development; they want to improve their craft, be more effective, implement new skills, and see students learn more. St Anthony’s College got that from Grosvenor.

A coach can foster conditions in which deep reflection and learning can take place, where a teacher can take risks to change his practice, where powerful conversations can take place and where growth is recognized and celebrated. Grovey performed both roles. He was in charge of a space where healing took place and where a resilient, joyful community was built in the west.

Coaches impact their players by teaching life skills in hopes of developing positive relationships. Grovey did that. Just ask any of his players from the likes of Kenwyne Jones, Jan Michael Williams, Brent Rahim, Julius James, Edwards and others. He established a positive athlete-coach relationship where it was understood that no relationship, whether on or off the playing field would blossom without communication and the relationship between the player and coach. The players of St Anthony's felt that their coach cared about them as a person and not just as a tool to win games and titles. Players are people first and effective coaches take the time for the young student as well as the player. And as a positive athlete-coach relationship develops, many athletes begin considering their coaches as role models. Grovey was that! Your time on this earth would be cherished for years to come. It was a pleasure sharing these moments with you Nigel Grosvenor.
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Re: Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2020, 12:49:50 AM »
Williams: Grovy had a knack for getting the best out of players
By Jelani Beckles (Newsday).


FORMER St Anthony’s College goalkeeper Jan-Michael Williams and former Queen’s Royal College (QRC) footballer Radanfah Abu Bakr both had fond memories of former football coach Nigel Grosvenor, who died on Friday.

Grosvenor, 63, a recovering cancer patient, contracted covid19 over a month ago and had been hospitalised since.

Grosvenor began coaching St Anthony’s in 1983 and spent more than 30 years at the school. He transformed the Westmoorings school into a powerhouse, leading the “Tigers” to multiple Intercol and SSFL League titles.

After leaving St Anthony’s a few years ago he spent three years with Queen’s Royal College (QRC).

Several players he coached at St Anthony’s went on to represent the national senior team including Williams, Kenwyne Jones and Carlos Edwards. Grosvenor was also a physical education teacher and dean at St Anthony’s.

Williams, 35, was part of a formidable St Anthony’s unit under Grosvenor in the early to mid-2000s.

Reflecting on the life of his former coach, Williams said Grosvenor assisted all the young men at St Anthony’s.

“In terms of just gaining scholarships (to the US), in terms of helping them to secure jobs after they would have graduated from St Anthony’s and just helping them be generally better individuals…who were able to contribute and support their families and themselves.”

Williams, a former national goalkeeper, said all the players Grosvenor coached were special to him. However, Williams said the team of the early to mid-2000s meant a lot to him. That St Anthony’s team, which included Kenwyne Jones, won multiple titles.

A lot of top coaches in sport have the knack of getting the best out of their players. Williams said Grosvenor had that skill.

“Grovy, in terms of individually, I think he just knew how to get the best out of individuals on the football field. He wasn’t the greatest tactician in terms of setting up a team, but he was definitely one who was a good motivator. He was a good friend, he was a good father figure and a genuinely good person and I think the world kind of lacks that these days.”

Williams shared memories of Grosvenor’s team talks, saying that after players listened to him they felt that they “could move mountains.”

National defender Abu Bakr, 33, said, “Firstly I want to extend my condolences to his family. A huge void has been left by his passing. The numerous accolades and trophies he won over the years can’t compare to the countless lives he positively impacted through football. He always demanded the best out of those around him, staff and players alike. That, coupled with his passion for the game, in my opinion, made him so successful. His legacy will live on through the many talents that he moulded.”

Abu Bakr came up against St Anthony’s on several occasions in the North Zone while he was a student at QRC. Abu Bakr, who entered QRC in the late 1990s, said it was always a fierce battle against the Tigers with Grosvenor at the helm.

“I wouldn’t go as far as to say it was intimidating, but you were guaranteed a tough game against any Grovy team because of the winning mentality that he transferred to his players. I only remember beating Grovy’s St Anthony’s once. Not many teams did. That says a lot.”

Abu Bakr was the goal scorer that day in a 1-0 win for the Royalians. Abu Bakr also had the privilege of working alongside Grosvenor as an assistant coach at QRC for three months in 2019.

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Re: Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2020, 12:34:24 AM »
SSFL pays tribute to Nigel Grosvenor
T&T Guardian Reports.


The legacy of coach Nigel "Grovey" Grosvenor left a lasting impression on many people in the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) community and beyond.

At the SSFL 50th Anniversary Ceremony in 2016, Grosvenor was recognised for his accomplishments and service in the League which ended with him winning six National Intercol and Three National League titles as head coach of St Anthony’s College. He later went to coach Queen’s Royal College.

On Monday, the SSFL in a statement said: "We all witnessed the deep passion he had toward the sport and the great love he had for his players, shine through in everything he did.

As we got to know him better it became abundantly clear that he did not do it to make a name for himself (which happened anyway) or to win championships (which his teams did anyway). Instead, he wanted to shape young individuals to act as leaders.

Grosvenor had the gift of understanding the teenage spirit. And therein laid his secret to success. He had high expectations of his teams and he pushed his players to realise their dreams.

We thank him for sacrificing his time at the dinner table with his family in an effort to attend practice and matches with his teams.

Thank you “Grovey” for pushing players outside of their comfort zones to show them that sometimes their comfort zones were hurting them from being the successful athletes they had the potential to become. Thank you for teaching players how to compete and hold a competitive mindset but never allowing themselves to be sore losers.

The SSFL will always remember you, Nigel Grosvenor. May your soul rest in eternal peace.

The football fraternity was plunged into mourning on Friday following the passing of the former national youth coach."

The 63-year-old, who dedicated his life to football, was battling cancer for several years before he admitted to the Couva hospital in July when he contracted the deadly coronavirus (COVID-19).

Grosvenor was a household name in T&T football particularly in the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) where he won five Coca Cola National InterCol titles and two League titles with St Anthony's College, better known as the "Westmooring Tigers". He also won countless North Zone titles. However, Grosvenor will be remembered for his dedication to producing allround individuals through football.

Meanwhile, the funeral will be held at St Peter’s RC church, School Street, Carenage tomorrow at noon. It will be streamed on YouTube the link will be forwarded when available. Cremation at 2:00 in St James.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

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Re: Nigel Grosvenor Thread
« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2020, 12:24:33 AM »
Coach Grovy remembered as a father figure to many
By Jelani Beckles (Newsday).


NIGEL “Grovy” Grosvenor was remembered for the love he had for his family, football and pan, but also for the care he showed for all the young footballers during his coaching career that spanned over 30 years.

Grosvenor, 63, a recovering cancer patient, contracted covid19 over a month ago and had been hospitalised since. He died on Friday.

Grosvenor began coaching St Anthony’s College in 1983 and spent more than 30 years at the school. He transformed the Westmoorings school into a powerhouse, leading the “Tigers” to multiple Intercol titles.

After leaving St Anthony’s a few years ago he spent three years with Queen’s Royal College (QRC) where he led the school to creditable performances in the Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) premiership division.

Several players he coached at St Anthony’s went on to represent the national senior team including Jan-Michael Williams, Kenwyne Jones and Carlos Edwards. Grosvenor was also a physical education teacher and dean at St Anthony’s.

On Wednesday, hundreds were glued to Youtube to view Grosvenor’s funeral at the St Peters Catholic Church in Carenage.

Among those who attended the funeral were his wife Vanessa and his three children – Qian, Quishelle and Qia.

In the eulogy, Qia said, “Our Daddy is a legend, our Daddy is a hero. He is an icon. He is the greatest father out there, not only to my brother, my sister and I but to many other young men and women out here.

“Daddy did everything for us without hesitation. He did not have a favourite child. We were all spoiled endlessly by him.”

His daughter remembered how much he cared for his students and players at St Anthony’s.

“He made it his priority to ensure that his students would grow up to become successful young men. He would try his best to ensure that they all left St Anthony’s heading in the right path either by getting them football scholarships, getting them in the Pro League teams, putting them on to scouts or even joining the Defence Force.”

Qia thanked QRC for accepting her father where he ended his coaching career.

“He was welcomed into QRC with open arms, with boundless love and respect from the principal Mr David Simon and his friend Shaky and all the other staff members. We thank you for loving him and welcoming him into the Royalian family.”

Qia said Grovy was delighted in his role as grandfather for the past two years, saying he had a special bond with his granddaughter Erin. “On the 8 of February 2018 he became the happiest man alive. He was a proud grandfather…he acted as if she was the last grandchild in the world.” Qia said every morning her father and Erin had a routine as they would feed birds together and look at cars drive by.

Simon was among many who made comments on the live stream, along with former QRC captain Anfernee Stokes.

Others who expressed their sympathy to the family online were former St Anthony’s College footballers Jones, Abiola Clarence, Julius James and Edwards. Several St Anthony’s College well-wishers wrote “Once a Tiger always a Tiger” during the service. The funeral was shown online because only ten people were allowed to attend because of covid19 regulations.

Grosvenor’s coffin was draped with an SSFL flag, along with St Anthony’s and QRC apparel.

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Fond farewell for beloved coach Grovy
By Ryan Bachoo (Guardian).


Had it not been for the COVID-19 pandemic, the funeral service of Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) legendary coach Nigel Grosvenor held at St Peter’s RC in Carenage, yesterday would have been overcrowded.

Instead, there was only 10 people present mostly made up of family members, but the event was streamed live on video sharing website YouTube for the world to see. There were some 5,000 viewers by late yesterday evening virtually bidding farewell to the celebrated coach.

“Grovy” as he was fondly called by those who knew him was remembered as a great coach, a mentor to young men and a loving father and husband.

Lisa James, Grosvenor’s cousin remembered the countless boys, she said, he turned into men.

“What is more important was the way he impacted the lives of hundreds of young boys and gave them dreams and aspirations to become better persons,” James said.

The likes of Kenwyne Jones and Carlos Edwards, both of whom played at the highest level in England along with national players such as Brent Rahim, Julius James, Yohance Marshall, Lester Peltier all passed through Grosvenor. His career spanned three and a half decades on the sidelines with the bulk of it being at his beloved St Anthony’s College now known as the “Westmooring Tigers”. Grosvenor sent scores of players into the spotlight of national and professional club football.

As a coach, he won nine national secondary schools titles including six Intercol championships and three North Zone league titles. He was the mastermind behind the 2011 St Anthony’s team that played the season unbeaten.

His daughter Qia Grosvenor said, “Personally, we agree that our father is the Sir Alex Ferguson of local football.” She also shed light of how his long-time relationship with St Anthony’s College saw him also host his wedding reception there.

Off the field of play, Grosvenor loved steel-pan music and was a lifelong support of the Trinidad All Stars band. The former Trinity College student and footballer died last Friday at the age of 63. He had been battling cancer for the past years, and a couple of months ago he was admitted to the Couva hospital when he contracted the deadly coronavirus.

He appeared to have been recovering well from the virus, but reportedly passed away from kidney failure.

Shining star Tributes flow as ‘Grovy’ laid to rest
By Ian Prescott (Express).


A pan and music lover. The number one Trinidad All Stars fan. An iconic football coach and a St Anthony’s Tiger forever... Mentor to young men, a limer, comedian, old-talker. Loved by many and loving many others. But mostly, “Grovy” was a great human being.

Former St Anthony’s College and Queen’s Royal College coach Nigel “Grovy” Grosvenor was lovingly remembered yesterday at his send-off, a funeral consisting of just ten family members, due to Covid-19 restrictions. But having touched many, another 1,000 tuned in to the live stream of the memorial service for the local football coach, who won six secondary schools InterCol and three national league titles with St Anthony’s College before, at age 63, he fell victim to the Covid-19 pandemic which has already claimed a million lives worldwide.

Giving the eulogy, his daughter, attorney Qia Grosvenor, began nervously and was tear-filled, but at the end was glowing with pride in remembrance of his life. Cousin Lisa James re-lived childhood memories, while Debbie Nahous sang a rendition of Ave Maria. Having gotten to know Grosvenor through his earlier battle with cancer, father Harold Imamshah also had a few special words.

“A star shines and Grovy will be no exception. He will continue to shine,” father Imamshah said.

A former national Under-17 coach, Grosvenor was described by those closest to him as being a man of many parts. He was a Brazil and Arsenal fan, and also protector of his nieces and investigator of the characters of boys wanting to be with them. He was also a mentor to his nephews, friend of his many cousins and the old-talker on the group chat among the extended family.

Born on August 31, 1957, Grosvenor celebrated every birthday with relish, until September 25, 2020 when he died.

“He was a true never-see-come-see,” stated daughter Qia.

She also remembers “daddy” as a patient man, who would wait for three hours in the Hugh Wooding Law School car park, while his daughter sat exams.

“He would say that he preferred to pick us up at 4 a.m. from a party because he was sure we would all reach home safely,” Qia recalls.

“Daddy loved to boast,” Qia stated. “He proud to tell anyone willing to listen that his little girl had become a big lawyer. He was also thrilled when his daughter Qichelle gave him a grandchild.” Grosvenor’s aspiration to be a national footballer ended with a knee injury, but the academic and football accomplishments of his son—former national youth footballer Qian Grosvenor—brought him great joy.

Grosvenor was also a limer and a drinker whose grandmother lived on Henry Street, Port of Spain, around the corner from the All-Stars panyard.

“It was no surprise when Nigel became a lifelong member of the All Stars family. Nigel was a fixture in the panyard during the carnival season,” his cousin Lisa James recalled. “Although he couldn’t play a note, he knew what the arrangement was and was always the one to look out for on the stage, complete with towel on his shoulder.”

Grosvenor joined St Anthony’s College in 1983 as physical education teacher, after completing a four-year football scholarship at West Virginia University. He later took on the role of football coach and might have been St Anthony’s most popular Dean of Discipline, as established by the online contributions of some of the men he coached, among them Abiola Clarence, Julius James, Kenwyne Jones and Brent Rahim.

“S.I.P Grovy. Condolences from the Jones family,” former English Premiership striker and T&T captain Kenwyne Jones commented online. St Anthony’s College, where Grosvenor served for 35 years, became an extension of his life. He was later welcomed openly to Queen’s Royal College in 2018 where he served before he retired due to illness. Grosvenor met his wife at St Anthony’s College and loved the school so much, that his wedding reception was held there.

“His co-workers became our aunts and uncles. His players became our brothers,” stated his daughter, who recalled the many house limes and good times had at their home.

« Last Edit: October 01, 2020, 12:30:16 AM by Flex »
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