January 23, 2021, 08:39:49 AM

Author Topic: Brazilian league  (Read 4159 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

truetrini

  • Guest
Brazilian league
« on: February 12, 2008, 09:23:19 PM »
Adriano could face suspension knockout
Tue Feb 12, 4:37 PM ET
SAO PAULO (AFP) - Troubled Brazilian international striker Adriano could face over a year's suspension for assaulting another player during a match last Sunday it was revealed by his club Sao Paulo on Tuesday.

 
The 25-year-old, who has been on loan there from Serie A side Inter Milan since December with a view to helping them try and win the Copa Libertadores, risks between four to 18 months on the sidelines after headbutting Santos defender Domingos during the 3-2 win for Sao Paulo for which he was sent-off.

He will go before a tribunal on Monday.

His career has been freefall since appearing at the 2006 World Cup and returned with the agreement of Inter to recover from alleged weight and drink problems.

Inter claimed that the barrel-chested forward looked great last December after a period of rest and were looking forward to welcoming him back but instead he was loaned to Sao Paulo.

The striker was an instant hit in his first two seasons at Inter but has fallen by the wayside, suffering injury problems and a loss of form.

He has featured just four times in the league this season, scoring only once, and was almost transferred away from the San Siro in the summer.

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 16397
    • View Profile
Re: Adriano could face suspension knockout
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2008, 10:37:03 PM »
Just heard he got a 2 match suspension instead of the many months speculated ...
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

Offline Observer

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5428
  • The best gift for a footballer is Intelligence ---
    • View Profile
Brazil League
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2009, 06:32:09 PM »
Watching the Brazilian League. Not many people in the stands, poor support in general. On average 7000 people per game. The quality of the league not bad, but the games are marked by fouls and slow football.
I have to admit I rather watch the League in Argentina, dem youths playing wid pepper in their game.
To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead
                                              Thomas Paine

Offline Trini Madness

  • Heart....miles and miles of heart
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2270
    • View Profile
Re: Brazil League
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2009, 07:32:05 PM »
who was playing? most of the teams there usually play with a fast tempo.
A dream you don't fight for will haunt you for the rest of your life.

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 17654
    • View Profile
Re: Brazil League
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2009, 07:51:12 PM »
To me, is the opposite. while not always fluid the tempo of the games are fast. Yes, some of the game as sparse. I generally do not like the stadiums in Brasil. They are old and the stands are far from the pitch. Maybe we get to accustom to the English field where the stand are so near to the players.

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 17654
    • View Profile
Brazilian league
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2009, 05:52:12 PM »
Anybody follow the Brazilian league. I know most people follow the league up north passionately. I look at the Brazilian on GolTV. I know some of the games are not all that pleasant to the eyes but their fans are no less passionate than the Euro fans. Their championship just finished and my favorite team, Flamengo do Rio won it. Andriano was joint top scorer with 17 goals. All yuh think Dunga go pick him or is he finished.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0ly-VuqyzM
« Last Edit: December 08, 2009, 06:38:28 PM by Deeks »

Offline Tenorsaw

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3247
  • YNWA
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2009, 08:11:50 PM »
Rumor has it that he is being looked at by some Prem clubs....Spurs and company.  Dunga always seems to like him.  If he has a good secong half of the season in Europe, he might very well be on that team, even thought the Brazilian front line is tough to make.

Offline Blue

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2009, 12:37:57 PM »
Anybody follow the Brazilian league. I know most people follow the league up north passionately. I look at the Brazilian on GolTV. I know some of the games are not all that pleasant to the eyes but their fans are no less passionate than the Euro fans. Their championship just finished and my favorite team, Flamengo do Rio won it. Andriano was joint top scorer with 17 goals. All yuh think Dunga go pick him or is he finished.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0ly-VuqyzM


Went to Rio last summer and got hooked on Brazilian football...been followin Serie A, and especially d Rio teams, ever since. And my side is Flamengo (was coastin d kit all summer, lol) so I was rel glad 2 c dem win, especially since dey started d season in indifferent form...but Brazilian league is like dat, anyone could beat anyone. I was criticizing Adriano earlier in de season, but under all seriousness, de man came back strong, looks like he is enjoyin his football. I think he is a definite in Dunga's squad for d World Cup

Fluminense is my nex team...dey were rock bottom of de league for ages, looking like no hopers, but dey came back from de death wid a ridiculous series of results, and mashup Coritiba on d last day to stay up and send Coritiba down...cue mass riots on d pitch, and serious blows for d referee and his linesmen  ;D

And looking down to Serie B, good to see Vasco getting promoted back to Serie A...a good year for Rio's teams.  :beermug:

Offline Observer

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5428
  • The best gift for a footballer is Intelligence ---
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2009, 01:12:36 PM »
Wow! 16 Years for Flamingo. I cannot believe it was so long
To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead
                                              Thomas Paine

Offline Blue

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2009, 01:35:31 PM »
Wow! 16 Years for Flamingo. I cannot believe it was so long

A next stat for allyuh...the team with the most domestic fans in the world is not Man U or Juventus or Barcelona....it is Flamengo....dat celebration must have been crazy ;D


Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 17654
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2009, 06:23:47 PM »
Ryan boy,
               I envie yuh. I would do almost anything to see Flamengo play in the Maracana. To me that red and black hoops is the best uniform in the world. I would love to see TT wear that for a game or two. As a lil boy I use to follow Santos because of Pele. Even Pele said he has had a soft spot for flamengo.Santos use to travel all over the world. I thought they were the most popular team until I saw a newsreel of Flamengo and Flu. I was hook. Then I saw them play for the SA club championship with Zico, Junior, Adilio and the current coach Andrade. They were a fluid team.  Then they beat Liverpool easily in Tokyo for the Toyota cup.

I saw clips of the fight between Coritiba fans and the police. That was outrageous. They damage a police in the fracas.

The captain of Fluminense(I think his name is Fred) is a pretty good player. He scored some crucial goals for them. Unfortunately he and the team came up against a brick wall in Quito and was soundly beaten. He played well in the return but got over exuberent and was sent off when his team had the upper hand. All yuh tink Dunga go take him.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2009, 06:39:17 PM by Deeks »

Offline Observer

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5428
  • The best gift for a footballer is Intelligence ---
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2009, 07:03:38 PM »
Wow! 16 Years for Flamingo. I cannot believe it was so long

A next stat for allyuh...the team with the most domestic fans in the world is not Man U or Juventus or Barcelona....it is Flamengo....dat celebration must have been crazy ;D



Ryan how the ass yuh go support Flamingo and then Fluminese  ;D Ah bet yuh eh tell no Flamingo fan dat one  :-\
To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead
                                              Thomas Paine

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 23183
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2009, 07:43:14 PM »
Wow! 16 Years for Flamingo. I cannot believe it was so long

A next stat for allyuh...the team with the most domestic fans in the world is not Man U or Juventus or Barcelona....it is Flamengo....dat celebration must have been crazy ;D



Ryan how the ass yuh go support Flamingo and then Fluminese  ;D Ah bet yuh eh tell no Flamingo fan dat one  :-\

What is dis Flamingo yuh keep talking bout?

The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 17654
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2009, 08:15:29 PM »
 
 Tallman,
                    Urubu the cobo!!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=seTAi29-dGQ
« Last Edit: December 09, 2009, 08:45:49 PM by Deeks »

Offline Big Magician

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 6725
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league
« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2009, 11:02:45 PM »
nah Nigel...nah....lol
Little Magician is King.......ask Jorge Campos


Offline Blue

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league
« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2009, 12:24:22 AM »
Wow! 16 Years for Flamingo. I cannot believe it was so long

A next stat for allyuh...the team with the most domestic fans in the world is not Man U or Juventus or Barcelona....it is Flamengo....dat celebration must have been crazy ;D



Ryan how the ass yuh go support Flamingo and then Fluminese  ;D Ah bet yuh eh tell no Flamingo fan dat one  :-\

lol, good call. but i jus like 2 c d rio teams doin well, i am not no die-hard  :D

Offline Blue

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league
« Reply #16 on: December 10, 2009, 12:28:38 AM »
Ryan boy,
               I envie yuh. I would do almost anything to see Flamengo play in the Maracana.

I rel wanted 2 c dem play too, but missed out. I arrived shortly after a Fla-Flu derby and left on the same day as Flamengo-Corinthians....when I realised, I tried to change my flights but it was too late  :(

Offline Bourbon

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5153
    • View Profile
Unlike Europe, Brazilian league preserves its competitive balance
« Reply #17 on: May 03, 2010, 06:51:50 AM »
Real Decent Read


Quote
In England, Chelsea and Manchester United are fighting for the domestic title. In Spain, it's Real Madrid and Barcelona. Inter Milan is out front in Italy, as are Bayern Munich in Germany.

It's the same old same old.

The fact that a season that lasts nine months always ends up with the same teams at the top would appear to be a problem. U.S. sports would certainly seem to see it as such, with their draft systems rigged in a bid to ensure competitive balance -- the club finishing last is rewarded with first pick of the best young players.

Though this has been carried into the MLS, it is anathema elsewhere in soccer, and could only conceivably survive in a single entity system. Elsewhere, the law of the market prevails, and the big get bigger. Manchester United, for example, have a much bigger catchment area than clubs from neighboring small towns such as Wigan, Burnley and Blackburn. Over time this advantage is transformed into tradition, which feeds on itself as the club's brand goes global, revenue pours in from a variety of sources, making it possible to attract and retain a quality squad, fight for more titles, attract more fans, open up more revenue streams and so on.

Losing competitive balance is the price the English Premier League pays for having such super clubs.

But there is one major domestic league where no artificial measures are in place to level the playing field, and the outcome remains gloriously unpredictable. That country is Brazil, and the 2010 version of its domestic campaign kicks off on May 8.

There was a forerunner in the 60s, but it is only since 1971 that Brazil has had a genuine national championship -- the Campeonato Brasileiro da Serie A or Brasileirao. Despite the relatively short life span of the competition, of the 20 first division teams, 14 have already won the title--- plus two (or three -- this wouldn't be Brazil without a dispute) others who have since been relegated. If you are looking for a league campaign with a dose of unpredictability, this is the place to be.

But is this dose healthy or unhealthy? Is the unpredictability the product of positive or negative forces? I would argue that it is both.

The big positive is the sheer scale of the country. Brazil is the size of a continent. Indeed, this was the reason that the national championship only started in 1971. Previously travelling around this vast space on a weekly basis was seen as too problematic. Starting a national championship was part of a conscious governmental effort to improve infrastructure and bring the country closer together.

The scale of Brazil and the size of its population -- closing on 195 million and rising -- means that there are a number of clubs with a gigantic support base. Flamengo in Rio and Corinthians in Sao Paulo can count on over 20 million fans each, more than the entire population of many European countries. And there are plenty of other mass teams -- Vasco da Gama in Rio, Sao Paulo and Palmeiras in Sao Paulo, Atletico Mineiro and Cruzeiro in Belo Horizonte, Gremio and Internacional in Porto Alegre. Plus others with a glorious tradition -- Fluminense and Botafogo in Rio or Santos. There are ambitious relative newcomers such as Atletico Paranaense from Curtiba. True, large swathes of the country continue to be under-represented. Of Brazil's 27 states, only nine have clubs in this year's first division. The big clubs from the North East region have struggled to punch their weight at national level. Even so, the point remains -- this is a giant country capable of sustaining an interesting variety of massive clubs.

The other big positive point is the extraordinary number of players that Brazil produces. Soccer is the only genuinely mass sport, and the pleasure of playing it, mixed in with the dreams of making the big time, lead to the production of a conveyor belt of talent unrivalled elsewhere in the world. The championship, then, boasts excellent strength in depth.

But not everything is so worthy of praise. The size of the country and the quantity of good players force the general standard up -- but there are plenty of forces working in the opposite direction.

The obvious one is that the truly outstanding players are unlikely to stay for long. In the current realities of the global soccer market, Brazil is a seller, continually losing its stars to Europe. Even the biggest clubs have become dependent on selling players to balance their books -- indeed, the most successful clubs are often those who have the best sales policy, producing future stars for European audiences to enjoy. The constant selling clearly has an effect on quality. Major Brazilian clubs are unable to retain the continuity of roster that Manchester United, for example, take for granted. They exist in a permanent state of transition -- which makes it very difficult to meet the expectations of their fans. Playing for a big club in such a situation brings huge pressures -- when results are poor, supporters have been known to attack their own team. The smaller clubs can go about their business unhindered by such pressures, and this clearly helps to level the playing field.

Soccer all over South America is caught in this cycle of selling, but there is one problem that is peculiar to Brazil -- the calendar.

The national championship runs from May 8 to Dec. 5. It is out of sync not just with Europe, but with the rest of its own continent.

The action gets under way at the very point that the Copa Libertadores, South America's Champions League, moves into the quarterfinals. Those Brazilian clubs participating will usually give priority to the continental title and field reserve sides in the early rounds of the domestic competition. And then when they are eliminated, they often go into a post-Libertadores depression, with league results suffering as a result. Fighting this battle on two fronts is a very difficult trick to pull off.

Furthermore, the national championship is immediately preceded by the -- entirely separate -- state tournaments, one for each of the 27 states. These sacrifice the interests of the big clubs by obliging them to spend months playing against tiny teams. They also generate crises for the big clubs -- only one team per state can win the local trophy. The others are all judged as failures, and will tend to react by sacking their coach. So there is a change of command just a few days before the national competition starts, and not enough time for the new man to build and prepare for a seven month campaign.

And, of course, the global transfer window opens up right in the middle of the championship. More players are sold, some are brought back from Europe and the Far East, and so the composition of the teams changes in mid-campaign.

With all these factors working together, it is hardly surprising that the Brazilian Championship is so difficult to call.

However, since the switch in format in 2003, when a league system replaced the previous playoffs, it's become a little easier to predict the winner. The longer the campaign, the more chance the big clubs have of coming through. Under the previous system Atletico Paranaense, from the provincial city of Curitiba, were champions in 2001. They gave themselves the mission of becoming the best soccer club of the Americas -- but little has been heard from them since the change to the league format. Instead, the title has gone to clubs from bigger cities, capable of sustaining stronger squads.

Also, as Brazil's economy grows and the club administration becomes more professional, opportunities appear -- but not for everyone. A club like Corinthians can attract a player such as Ronaldo and pay him either with money from sponsors of with a cut of merchandising sales. A smaller club without such a fan base could not offer a similar deal.

The giant clubs, then, should be increasingly able to pull away from the pack. But Brazil has so many giants that the race to win its domestic title is unlikely ever to become a European-style two horse race.

Now..for me personally..its refreshing that the major european leagues going down to the wire. However, still if you look at la liga...where the gap between second and third is ridiculous...you wonder if this is good or bad for it. Especially in La liga..where Barcelona and Real negotiate TV rights themselves.....they command higher earning potential than smaller clubs. I remember reading another article that outlined it...i'll try to dig it up. And apparently....they (Barca and Real) really are not eager to change that system, as it would cut into their earnings. Is it really good for the league? What should be maintained to ensure competitiveness?




« Last Edit: May 03, 2010, 06:58:19 AM by Bourbon »
The greatest single cause of atheism in the world today are Christians who acknowledge Jesus ;with their lips and walk out the door and deny Him by their lifestyle. That is what an unbelieving world simply finds unbelievable.

Offline Zeppo

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 1462
    • View Profile
Brazilian league lacks bite
« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2010, 07:12:40 AM »
Brazilian league lacks bite

The example of Petkovic illustrates the pitfall. At his advanced age, he is one of the top playmakers in Brazilian football. Even in his prime, he was unable to make such a mark in Europe. It has become relatively easy to build up a reputation in domestic South American football. The pace of the game is slower, there is more time and space available and, especially in Brazil, referees give fouls for the slightest contact.

Ganso and Neymar are being told that they are footballing phenomena. Yet when they make the move to Europe, they are likely to experience their own kind of "reality shock".

That is certainly what happened to Robinho. When he was first making his name with Santos, he kept being told he was a genius. One pundit, the former World Cup striker Casagrande, used to argue that he was going to be better than Diego Maradona. It was just a matter of time before he received the Fifa World Player of the Year award.

(continue)
"Donovan was excellent. We knew he was a good player, but he really didn't do anything wrong in the whole game and made it difficult for us."
- Xavi

Offline Controversial

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 6728
    • View Profile
    • Gino McKoy
Re: Brazilian league lacks bite
« Reply #19 on: July 19, 2010, 09:45:20 AM »
since when... always loved watching brazilian league ball, the skill is above other leagues imo

Offline fish

  • Sr. Warrior
  • ****
  • Posts: 325
  • "Study the past if you would define the future"
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league lacks bite
« Reply #20 on: July 19, 2010, 10:00:51 AM »
Dah article...smh...

He just proving that every league don't fit every player. He aint hadda go thru all dah setta ting. D headlines wrong and all.

Offline Blue

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league lacks bite
« Reply #21 on: July 19, 2010, 12:55:59 PM »
Vickery is a legend - he has lived in Brazil for years and is one of the best football writers out there...if he says the league lacks bite then it lacks bite.

Brazilian Serie A is nowhere near as strong as the European leagues...because all the top Brazilians play in Europe. This shouldnt be a surprise to anyone.

Dumplingdinho

  • Guest
Re: Brazilian league lacks bite
« Reply #22 on: July 19, 2010, 01:23:57 PM »
Vickery is a legend - he has lived in Brazil for years and is one of the best football writers out there...if he says the league lacks bite then it lacks bite.

Brazilian Serie A is nowhere near as strong as the European leagues...because all the top Brazilians play in Europe. This shouldnt be a surprise to anyone.

so vickery always right?....he had some good points but he mssing one key element which is the brazilian league is not physical like england so brazilian players tend to struggle when they leave home and play in england, how many brazilians have been succesful in england? who de hell is petkovic?...who said he is a star?...steups.

i agree some men does get real hype and buss big time such as denilson, mirandinha, etc but that happens in every league

Offline fish

  • Sr. Warrior
  • ****
  • Posts: 325
  • "Study the past if you would define the future"
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league lacks bite
« Reply #23 on: July 19, 2010, 01:53:18 PM »
He have some skill dey

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BhQ5KYGMlw

But not every football player could play in every football league.
For RVN could play in PFL? He aint getting he preferred service  ::)

Offline Blue

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league lacks bite
« Reply #24 on: July 19, 2010, 02:42:38 PM »
Vickery is a legend - he has lived in Brazil for years and is one of the best football writers out there...if he says the league lacks bite then it lacks bite.

Brazilian Serie A is nowhere near as strong as the European leagues...because all the top Brazilians play in Europe. This shouldnt be a surprise to anyone.

so vickery always right?....he had some good points but he mssing one key element which is the brazilian league is not physical like england so brazilian players tend to struggle when they leave home and play in england, how many brazilians have been succesful in england? who de hell is petkovic?...who said he is a star?...steups.

i agree some men does get real hype and buss big time such as denilson, mirandinha, etc but that happens in every league
petkovic is one of the only europeans playin in Brazil, and he has been doing so for years, with several teams...and he is regarded as a very good player...even though he failed to make a name for himself in europe. He won the award for top midfielder in Brazil last season. Look him up.

Offline Deeks

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 17654
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league lacks bite
« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2010, 03:19:51 PM »
Tim Vickery is a good football writer. What he says is true. But there is reasons for that. All the top players go overseas as soon as they make the limelights. Brazil exports a lot of players. It is having an effect on the quality. Some top team cannot keep a consistent 11 for 2 years. If they do that is a miracle.

Yes the top 4 Euro. leagues maybe stronger at this time than the Brazulian Div.1. Why? Money and foreigners. Foreigners rule the top Euro leagues. Not so in Brazil. Petrovic ia an exception. He is a very good player. By the way, So what if he is a star in brazil and not Euro.

 I like to look at South American ball. The only thing I don't like is the stadiums in Brazil and Colombia. The crowd is kind of far from the field. Kinder spoil by English football in that respect. But after seeing that players need police shields to take corner kick, I realize there is reason for them kind of stadiums.

The league may lack the money to keep their stars but that don't mean the Brazil clubs can't beat the Euro clubs.

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 16397
    • View Profile
Re: Brazilian league lacks bite
« Reply #26 on: November 01, 2020, 04:54:58 PM »
Flamengo hosted São Paulo, took the lead, squandered two penalties and conceded four goals. Victory would have put them on top of the table although possibly temporarily (a couple challengers including São Paulo have matches in hand).

Flamengo haven't lost a match in about 6 weeks when they were roughed up in the Copa Libertadores with pliant defending.
I'm hoping today's match doesn't eventually feature in a match fixing Q&A.
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.