March 03, 2024, 12:49:01 AM

Author Topic: Racism in football Thread.  (Read 197036 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Mad Scorpion a/k/a Big Bo$$

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2720
  • a/k/a Optimus Prime
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #990 on: October 24, 2013, 09:47:54 AM »
Make sure allyuh see Zlatan's third.

Dis man have a flair for the spectacular!  Da goal was like ah flekkin laser beam!  I doh care wha nobody say I always enjoy watching him play.  Not just for the goals but also for his ability to find players and create opportunities as well.  Is no wonder his teams are almost always league winners.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 25214
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #991 on: October 24, 2013, 11:37:33 AM »
Make sure allyuh see Zlatan's third.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/sS_uOsF0GXA" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/sS_uOsF0GXA</a>
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Dansteel - The Iceman

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 1032
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #992 on: October 24, 2013, 12:00:30 PM »
Arsenal are riding high with Ozil - totally changed the mentality as for 10 years they were semi-ambitious youngsters. Showing ambition has really done wonders and they'll make the Semis I'm sure. Manchester who knows - with bad league form cups can buck the trend. Chelsea are consistent, especially with José at the helm, and Man City are another dice roll.

Semi finals this year might be a step too far for Arsenal I'm sorry to say. Perhaps if they get their wingers back for the knockout phase and they don't have too many new injuries. Quarters I think.
Victoria concordia crescit

Offline futbolfan

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 1703
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #993 on: October 25, 2013, 07:31:17 AM »
Make sure allyuh see Zlatan's third.

Dis man have a flair for the spectacular!  Da goal was like ah flekkin laser beam!  I doh care wha nobody say I always enjoy watching him play.  Not just for the goals but also for his ability to find players and create opportunities as well.  Is no wonder his teams are almost always league winners.

Who would you rather see in the WC, Zlatan or CR7?
The darkest hour is just before the dawn.

Offline Mad Scorpion a/k/a Big Bo$$

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2720
  • a/k/a Optimus Prime
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #994 on: October 25, 2013, 08:24:04 AM »
Make sure allyuh see Zlatan's third.

Dis man have a flair for the spectacular!  Da goal was like ah flekkin laser beam!  I doh care wha nobody say I always enjoy watching him play.  Not just for the goals but also for his ability to find players and create opportunities as well.  Is no wonder his teams are almost always league winners.

Who would you rather see in the WC, Zlatan or CR7?

Dan I rell upset one ha to get eliminate oui!  Both are very special players in different ways.  I really can't choose.

Offline Tallman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 25214
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #995 on: October 25, 2013, 01:57:17 PM »
Make sure allyuh see Zlatan's third.

Dis man have a flair for the spectacular!  Da goal was like ah flekkin laser beam!  I doh care wha nobody say I always enjoy watching him play.  Not just for the goals but also for his ability to find players and create opportunities as well.  Is no wonder his teams are almost always league winners.

Who would you rather see in the WC, Zlatan or CR7?

Both have played in two World Cups, but Zlatan has never scored a goal in de tournament, and Ronaldo has scored two. I would say de WC  would be better off with Ronaldo playing because he in his prime, and he go be in any kinda talk concerning who is de best player in de world right now.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Bakes

  • Promethean...
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 21980
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #996 on: October 25, 2013, 03:07:25 PM »
Both have played in two World Cups, but Zlatan has never scored a goal in de tournament, and Ronaldo has scored two. I would say de WC  would be better off with Ronaldo playing because he in his prime, and he go be in any kinda talk concerning who is de best player in de world right now.

Agreed... plus Zlatan is a kinda nanny.  Ronaldo have his ways, but I could deal with he primadonna issues more than I could suffer Zlatan.

Offline Cocorite

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2406
  • John 5:24
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #997 on: October 25, 2013, 08:36:14 PM »
Ronaldo
Socawarriors Need A Winning Mentality

Offline SWF Reporter

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 687
    • View Profile
Football's farcical response to Yaya Toure racist abuse
« Reply #998 on: October 30, 2013, 02:50:08 PM »
UEFA makes farcical response to Yaya racism; but whither Webb and Blatter?
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868)


Shhhh! Did you hear that?

That was the sound of football’s highly paid administrators sending a message out that racism would not be tolerated. And it was not emphatic enough to stir a sleeping baby.

The UEFA Control and Disciplinary Body ordered today that CSKA Moscow must close one stand of the Arena Khimi Stadium for its next Champions League match after its spectators were found guilty of racially abusing Manchester City and Ivory Coast star Yaya Toure.

It was the least UEFA could do. Really, it was.

According to Article 14 of UEFA’s Disciplinary Regulations: “If one or more of a member association or club’s supporters engage in (racist or discriminatory behaviour), the member association or club responsible is punished with a minimum of a partial stadium closure.”

Take a bow, UEFA president Michel Platini.

Platini, during his previous incarnation as a top class footballer, once worked closely with persons of African heritage like former France teammate Jean Tigana.

His office buddies are not as diverse anymore. The UEFA executive committee that Platini heads comprises 16 other officials; 15 are middle-aged or elderly white men while the other is a middle-aged white woman.

But that is not to say the presence of more minorities in administration necessarily makes your body any better at this stuff. N’est pas, Jeffrey Webb?

Webb, who is Jack Warner’s successor as CONCACAF president, requested a meeting with Toure in his capacity as the FIFA anti-racism task force.

The Cayman Islands banker emerged from that discussion with some forthright opinions. But, bizarrely, they were all about the England FA.

“The (English) game must reflect society and the community,” Webb told the BBC. “It doesn’t do so… Many of (the players of African descent) are becoming very demoralised and these are issues, of course, that we hope the FA will take on.”

And what about Russia and its racist fans?

They are getting the 2018 World Cup and FIFA president Sepp Blatter warned that it is “impossible” to even contemplate moving the showpiece tournament. Do not waste your breath.

Yet, always happy to have his cake and eat it too, Blatter then talked up FIFA’s fight against racism with the dreaded “zero tolerance” cliché.

“If we are not able to go zero tolerance,” said Blatter, “we have failed.”

No reporter apparently interrupted Blatter or Webb’s lectures to insist on more details.

If Webb was so concerned about the shortage of “black” administrators in England, what did he think about the fact that, according to its website, FIFA’s anti-racism task force has just two confirmed members, Webb and Ivory Coast administrator Jacques Anouma? (There were just over a dozen “participants” at the sole meeting since its formation.)

Why has this body met just once since its formation in May, Mr Webb? And, if FIFA thinks so highly of its anti-racism work, why not make it a standing committee instead?

And, Mr Blatter, why must a club be found guilty of two cases of racist abuse before FIFA applies even a partial stadium ban? Does the term “zero tolerance” mean something different within FIFA’s corridors than it does in the rest of the world?

Toure’s case further highlights the fact that football’s most precious resource, the players, still does not receive the bare minimum in human dignity at the workplace. And UEFA does not think the players deserve any better either.

If Toure had retorted with so much as a gesture to the CSKA Moscow fans, then according to Article 54 of the FIFA Disciplinary Code, he could have been suspended for two matches and given a minimum fine of CH 5,000 (TT$35,668).

Perhaps Platini and his executive committee members are too out of touch with the young employees whose work continues to make football the most popular sport in the world.

Might I suggest that, twice a month on Wednesdays, the UEFA executive should allow several hundred hooligans to come into their office and scream the most belittling and obscene insults at them for hours in front of their family and friends.

On those Wednesday mornings, as they head for work, the UEFA bigwigs would know how the likes of Theo Walcott, Ramires and Didier Drogba feel when they face a flight to the more extreme corners of the Eastern Bloc. Maybe that will provoke a bright idea from Platini’s gang about dealing with this scourge.

And, before Toure considers a World Cup boycott, perhaps he and his colleagues should think about where FIFPro, the worldwide representative organisation for all professional players, stands in this matter too. Racist abuse on the football field is at least partly a labour issue for players, after all.

Bear one thing mind, though; whatever one thinks about UEFA: Webb and Blatter, with their empty words and fake smiles, are probably worse.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2013, 04:20:00 PM by Bakes »

Offline royal

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 3492
    • View Profile
Re: Football's farcical response to Yaya Toure racist abuse
« Reply #999 on: October 30, 2013, 08:14:21 PM »
de African and Americas countries have de power to change dat but ah guess receiving money is more important.

Offline Football supporter

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5209
    • View Profile
Racism in football Thread.
« Reply #1000 on: November 04, 2013, 11:39:53 PM »
Excellent article by John Barnes concerning racism in football

From The Guardian Monday 4th November


I'm not interested in what happened to Yaya Touré at CSKA Moscow – as far as I'm concerned their supporters can abuse who they want because, for me, what happened in Russia is the tip of a wider issue and, quite frankly, something of a smokescreen. For instance, how many black coaches are there in this country? Very few, yet all we're focusing on is CSKA Moscow, and the more we push for clubs like them to get banned or have their stadiums shut down the more we don't need to look at what is going on here.

The truth is that those at the top of British football do not care about getting rid of racism, they just don't want to hear it or see it. As soon as someone like Touré or Danny Rose gets abused in Eastern Europe there is shock and outrage from players, clubs and the authorities, yet no one is speaking about the people living in inner cities like Brixton who, because of their appearance and their background, have become completely disenfranchised from society. Why don't they care? Because the powers-that-be have enough wealth to not worry about these people.

Black players, in particular, should be tackling these issues because ultimately it will affect them when they retire. There are so many intelligent former black players, guys like Luther Blissett and Cyrille Regis, who never got a chance to become a top manager or a top coach because of the perception that surrounds people who look like them. They are black – which, for many, means they are good athletes but incapable of being anything above and beyond that.

To a large extent this is down to unconscious racism and probably 99% of us are guilty of that – I know I am. We all have preconceptions of people based on what we have been told about them and their race and ethnicity.

I still come across managers of a certain generation, those in their fifties and older, who say to me: "I don't see you as black", and think that is a compliment. So what, I don't walk around with my jeans down by my arse, smoking a spliff, so that means I'm not black? These are the attitudes we need to change if black people as a whole are going to progress, and the only way we can achieve that is through education.

This is what footballers have to do – they cannot directly affect society but what they can do is use their standing in this country to make a wider audience aware of the wider issues surrounding race and stress the importance of understanding that what they have been told about a certain group of people is, in the main, wrong.

That, for instance, the best occupations black people can aspire to is being a footballer, or a runner, or a singer. People look at Barack Obama and say: "See, black people can be President" – no they can't. Any black person who has been successful, particularly Obama, has been lifted out of blackness and stands as the exception.

We need to talk openly about perceptions and not be afraid of the fact that we all have different views about different people based on how they look. There is nothing racist about an open, honest dialogue and it is certainly more productive then pointing the finger at the CSKA Moscow fans, or at Luis Suárez or John Terry, and demanding they are punished.

Personally, I don't blame Suárez or Terry for what they did – they are simply products of a society and environment that allows them to think it is OK to speak about certain people in a certain way. It would be far better if instead of banning them and demonising them, the Football Association aimed to educate them and make them see that black people are undeserving of racial abuse.

The truth is that Anton Ferdinand has more in common with Terry than he does with someone from Africa. They're wealthy guys from western culture who both drive Bentleys, both drink champagne and both listen to Tinie Tempah, yet Ferdinand is told he is different, that he is part of a race open to insults? That is ridiculous and, again, is the product of historically incorrect preconceptions.

Racism is never personal – it's about someone saying the group I am part of is superior to the group you are part of. How, for instance, can a handsome, talented, beautiful black footballer be personally affected by a fat, ugly, unemployed fan calling them a black this or a black that? I used to get that when I was playing and I used to just look at the people doing it and think: 'You're abusing me? Look at you, how can you even dare abuse me?!'

That is why it is pointless, and pretty ridiculous, to be worrying about a footballer getting racially abused – in no way are they the biggest sufferers, and, quite frankly, if I was someone like Touré or Rose I'd feel embarrassed if I had to look at someone who was suffering genuine racism and take their sympathy. A millionaire getting booed in Russia is nothing compared with generations of people never getting the chance to better their lives and those of their children.

Physically we are different – east Africans, for instance, are genetically inclined to run long distances in shorter spaces of time – but intellectually and morally we all have the potential to be the same. That is the type of equality I am interested in and is the message I give when speaking at universities and other public forums. And that is what more people involved in football, black players in particular should be doing. Because unless you get rid of racism in society, you can never get rid of it in football and as things stand there will always be these one-off moments when a player is abused or booed purely because of the colour of their skin.

Everyone goes into shock because they thought racism had disappeared from the game but how can it have done when it continues to exist in every other part of society at a more deep-seated, depressing level? Just because someone keeps their mouth shut for 90 minutes doesn't mean that for the rest of the week he isn't a racist, or hold unconsciously racist views, and until that is addressed, there will always be a problem.

Tackling racism is a long and complicated process but one thing's for sure; it cannot be solved by banning a player or closing part of a stadium. The problem is wider than that and if football really cared those involved in the game, players in particular, would worry less about one-off incidents like what happened to Touré when he played for Manchester City in Moscow and more about what is going on around them. Perceptions need to change and for that to happen, education needs to be pushed as the only way forward.

John Barnes has donated his fee for this column to charity

« Last Edit: July 14, 2014, 07:22:38 AM by Flex »

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18073
    • View Profile
Re: Excellent article by John Barnes concerning racism in football
« Reply #1001 on: November 05, 2013, 04:13:53 AM »
I have extra time for ballers who are socially engaged. I have even more time for ballers with a conscience who understand the superstructure of racism and its various locations and manifestations. I have even more time for ballers who can deliver and distill messaging about racism without doing themselves, and the cause of awareness, disservice. I have even more time than that for ballers who weigh in by addressing policy and solutions. In this range of ballers, I place contributors such as Thuram, Seedorf, and Roque Junior among others. Thuram, in particular, is a giant in this area. Lamentably, a lot of what they have to say is not often available in English, but it is nonetheless no less fascinating when it is, and is occasionally accessible on Youtube if it doesn't penetrate traditional media outlets.

My concern with John Barnes is that he treats a multifurcated issue as though it has solely a trunk, but no branches. Well, that's one concern.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2013, 04:18:24 AM by asylumseeker »

Offline Tiresais

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2817
    • View Profile
Re: Excellent article by John Barnes concerning racism in football
« Reply #1002 on: November 05, 2013, 06:47:53 AM »
My issue is that he seems to be suggesting we shouldn't get angry, as if we have a limited capacity to be outraged by racism. I can be angry at both!

Offline Football supporter

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5209
    • View Profile
Re: Excellent article by John Barnes concerning racism in football
« Reply #1003 on: November 05, 2013, 07:05:01 AM »
My issue is that he seems to be suggesting we shouldn't get angry, as if we have a limited capacity to be outraged by racism. I can be angry at both!

I think he's saying that professional footballers should not give these idiots the satisfaction of a reaction, but should, instead, use their considerable fame to lobby at a higher level. Rise above the shit, if you will. It's not easy, but as Barnes says, these guys are super rich while the idiot racists are often (but not always) lower class scum.

Just throwing out a question here: Are there any professional European clubs with a black owner or chairman? Just interested to see if they have employed black coaches?
There are so many really poor coaches in England, especially in League one and two, yet they always get work. There's gotta be a breakthrough for black coaches eventually....not coz they're black, but because they're good.

Offline dotless007

  • Sr. Warrior
  • ****
  • Posts: 357
    • View Profile
Re: Excellent article by John Barnes concerning racism in football
« Reply #1004 on: November 05, 2013, 08:31:31 AM »
A Link
Not to let you behind the curtain too much here, but the author of today's Mediawatch is white. Thus, we feel rather uncomfortable arguing with John Barnes, a victim of horrendous racism throughout his career, on this particular subject.

However.

Barnes writes an extraordinary piece in The Guardian, the tone of which is set from the very first line:

'I'm not interested in what happened to Yaya Touré at CSKA Moscow - as far as I'm concerned their supporters can abuse who they want.'

Blimey. Barnes does go on to explain that English people have bigger concerns than racism in Russia, given the racism that is still endemic in football and indeed society in this country, which is of course true, but as far as we're aware we don't have a finite capacity for outrage against outrageous things. We can be 'interested' in both things, we think.

Barnes goes on: 'As soon as someone like Touré or Danny Rose gets abused in Eastern Europe there is shock and outrage from players, clubs and the authorities, yet no one is speaking about the people living in inner cities like Brixton who, because of their appearance and their background, have become completely disenfranchised from society...

'...if I was someone like Touré or Rose I'd feel embarrassed if I had to look at someone who was suffering genuine racism and take their sympathy. A millionaire getting booed in Russia is nothing compared with generations of people never getting the chance to better their lives and those of their children.'

Again, there's a point in there somewhere, but it's surely counter-productive to imply that footballers have little right to complain about being racially abused because they are rich and there are other people disenfranchised. Does money give you a racism shield? What's the limit? What level of wealth does someone have to reach before he is no longer allowed to be offended by racism? £1million? £5million?

If footballers like Toure and Rose simply ignored abuse, would that not make it worse for everyone else? If we are to accept the notion that footballers are role models, would them reporting abuse not potentially encourage these people living in Brixton to stand up as well?

He continues: 'Personally, I don't blame Suárez or Terry for what they did - they are simply products of a society and environment that allows them to think it is OK to speak about certain people in a certain way.'

Odd then, that many other footballers and indeed people in general that are products of this society and environment can get through the day without calling someone a black c*nt. Excusing those found guilty of racist abuse because they're a product of a society is, if you'll excuse us, a cop-out.

Of course, Barnes raises a number of important issues in his column, and they are issues that should be debated. In the interests of pith, we have obviously only included extracts from the piece here, so we encourage you to read the whole thing and make your own mind up.

From- http://www.football365.com/mediawatch/9009657/The-Page-That-Can-Feel-The-Erotic-Energy-In-The-Air

Offline Peong

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 7398
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1005 on: November 05, 2013, 02:38:53 PM »
Yorkie is in the skysports studio for the Juve Madrid game.

Offline triniairman

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2733
  • ah doh puh water in meh mouth to talk
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1006 on: November 05, 2013, 03:33:33 PM »
I'm wrong for this, but it was nice seeing SHIT SNAKE Fellaini get a red card. He don't deserve to be at Man.United!!

Offline Bitter

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 9689
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1007 on: November 05, 2013, 03:36:40 PM »
I'm wrong for this, but it was nice seeing SHIT SNAKE Fellaini get a red card. He don't deserve to be at Man.United!!

I wish it was diving-ass Ashley Young who had get a card instead.
Bitter is a supercalifragilistic tic-tac-pro

Offline Toppa

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5518
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1008 on: November 06, 2013, 01:33:33 PM »
Hi, what station is showing the Arsenal vs Dormund match?
www.westindiantube.com

Check it out - it real bad!

Offline Bitter

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 9689
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1009 on: November 06, 2013, 02:35:01 PM »
Hi, what station is showing the Arsenal vs Dormund match?

Wish i could tell you, I watching on sopcast in russian.
Bitter is a supercalifragilistic tic-tac-pro

Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18073
    • View Profile
Re: Excellent article by John Barnes concerning racism in football
« Reply #1010 on: December 10, 2013, 04:42:21 AM »
Quote
"When I speak about racism, or Yaya Toure or Kevin-Prince Boateng speak, everyone knows what to expect," he said.

"But if tomorrow all the white players from Manchester City say that from now on if something happens we will refuse to go back out on to the pitch, and if the players from AC Milan, from Inter Milan and from all the big clubs say the same thing, you'll soon see that we'll find a solution."

 - Lilian Thuram


Quote
FIFA.com: You’re known as someone who’s always made a stand against racism. Has that determination to fight it always been in you or was it triggered by an incident you experienced as a player?

Roque Junior: Well, basically I think it’s all to do with my own background. I come from a family where everyone’s black, on both sides, and which has long suffered racism. When my grandfather, who died this February at the age of 97, arrived in my home town (Santa Rita do Sapucai, in the state of Minas Gerais) way back when, black people were only allowed to walk around the outside of the main square, while whites could walk in the middle. He was the first person from outside to break with all that, in a small rural town where racism was rife. So I’ve always had that awareness because of my family. I was born into a family that spoke about it, a family that was making a statement: that black people could achieve things, that there were no differences and that we could enjoy being who we are, end of story. I had that very clear in my mind because I experienced prejudice from an early age and I always knew how to handle it.

http://www.fifa.com/aboutfifa/socialresponsibility/antiracism/interviews/newsid=2208655/index.html?cid=twitter_fifacom


Offline asylumseeker

  • Moderator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18073
    • View Profile
Re: Excellent article by John Barnes concerning racism in football
« Reply #1011 on: December 10, 2013, 05:15:25 AM »
Quote
When I played, I received racial abuse but I was just one of a few black players and we weren’t backed up by the authorities. Now there are so many at the top of their profession and they have the backing of important people.

I used to ignore the abuse and felt powerless to change attitudes.My only weapon was my performances on the pitch and I am proud to have played for some of the  biggest clubs in the world, as well as winning the European  Footballer of the Year and World Footballer of the Year awards.

Players won’t take that type of abuse anymore. We had to because we had no backing, so I told myself that it was just happening because I was different. I felt I could tackle it by playing well. I looked different but, if I played well, I was accepted.

I used the racist abuse in a positive way. I thought people were afraid of me so I used it as my motivation.

- Ruud Gullit

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/euro2012/article-2156604/Euro-2012-Ruud-Gullit-exclusive--dont-racism-like-I-did.html#ixzz2n4N4YI7W

Offline Flex

  • Administrator
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 18043
  • A Trini 4 Real.
    • View Profile
    • Soca Warriors Online
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1012 on: December 16, 2013, 08:31:44 AM »
To be played Feb. 18, 19, 25, 26 and March 11, 12, 18, 19

Manchester City  v  Barcelona
Olympiakos v  Manchester United
AC Milan  v  Atletico Madrid
Bayer Leverkusen  v  Paris St Germain
Galatasaray  v  Chelsea
Schalke  v  Real Madrid
Zenit  v  Dortmund
Arsenal  v  Bayern

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline lefty

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5886
  • would u like to buy an 'O'.........
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1013 on: December 16, 2013, 08:40:37 AM »
wow drogba still at galatasaray .......wonder what it goh be like to be on d receiving end of d drogba treatment boy :( :o
I pity the fool....

Offline grimm01

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 1160
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1014 on: December 16, 2013, 09:44:31 AM »
Oh Gawd Arsenal, meh belly... But we look for that steups.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2013, 09:59:19 AM by grimm01 »

Offline mukumsplau

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 2035
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1015 on: December 16, 2013, 11:49:50 AM »

Offline Bitter

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 9689
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1016 on: February 18, 2014, 02:14:36 PM »
I'm surprised it took Man City this long to realize they can just attack Barca.
Sitting back was just wasting time.
Bitter is a supercalifragilistic tic-tac-pro

Offline Bitter

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 9689
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1017 on: February 18, 2014, 02:41:27 PM »
Dare to Zlatan!
Bitter is a supercalifragilistic tic-tac-pro

Offline Bitter

  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 9689
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1018 on: February 18, 2014, 02:55:48 PM »
Demichelis. You are the weakest link... goodbye!
Bitter is a supercalifragilistic tic-tac-pro

Offline 100% Barataria

  • aka Nachilus
  • Hero Warrior
  • *****
  • Posts: 5014
    • View Profile
Re: 2013/14 UEFA Champions League Thread
« Reply #1019 on: February 18, 2014, 03:38:21 PM »
Another day at the office
Education is our passport for the future for the future belongs to those who prepare for it today

 

1]; } ?>