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Author Topic: TTFF eyes constitutional reform, new technical committee and 2006 W/Cup pact  (Read 3841 times)

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Offline SWF Reporter

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Power to the clubs; TTFF consider constitutional reform
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868.com)


Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation (TTFF) president Raymond Tim Kee yesterday vowed to push through reform of the local body’s controversial constitution after confirming the appointment of ex-FIFA technical committee member and former football manager Richard Braithwaite, former local referees association president and ex-FIFA referee Osmond Downer and Veteran Footballers Foundation of Trinidad and Tobago (VFFOTT) president Gwenwyn Cust.

“When they are finished, they will bring their proposals to me,” Tim Kee told Wired868, “and I will take those proposals to the (TTFF) Executive to ratify them. I am determined to change (the constitution).”

Braithwaite prefers to think of the project before him as an independent review rather than a committee. But he revealed that the idea is change the present system for electing TTFF officials, which puts the base of power in zonal bodies as opposed to local football clubs.

“I have been asking to review the constitution with a view towards reverting to the ‘one club one vote’ system,” said Braithwaite. “It is an effort to give the clubs a greater say within the administration of football in terms of the election of officers.”

At present, zonal associations and recognised football bodies, like the Pro League and Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL), are allowed to vote for the TTFF executive but not clubs.

Downer told Wired868 that he is also bent on restoring a football council to local administration, which would essentially dilute the power of the TTFF Executive Committee and ensure that the various bodies have a voice in the running of the game beyond election day.

“In between annual general meetings, the council used to meet once a month or every two months to decide on things related to the administration of football,” said Downer. “It was the council that would run football and appoint committees including the executive committee, which was beholden to the council.

“The executive committee made day to day decisions for the good of the association but those were ratified by the council. But what happened is that the council was wiped out by the executive which became all powerful.”

If Tim Kee succeeds in pushing through the proposed reform, the effect is likely to be a paradigm shift in the way the local game is run.

The football president has also set up a new technical committee, which will be chaired by Rudi Thomas and should include former Trinidad and Tobago football icons Everald “Gally” Cummings, Leroy De Leon and Selris Figaro.

The technical committee, according to Tim Kee, is meant to oversee and support the national coaching staff as well as assist in the implementation of a style of play for local teams.

As if the idea of joint coaches was not radical enough, the “Soca Warriors” seem set to appoint six technical men, exclusive of technical director Anton Corneal, trying to map the team’s path in the near future.

“I want to have those fellows working with the (present) coaches,” he said. “Our coaches will not just be able to do what they want unless they discuss it with the technical committee first.

“I am trying to make a paradigm switch as far as getting people working together. I want them to work with the coaches with a view of correcting mistakes.”

Tim Kee was not as strong on details as he was on ideology and, almost certainly, there would be long discussions between the relevant parties in the near future. He said the technical committee positions will be unpaid ones.

He further declared that the TTFF would attempt to utilise local coaches wherever possible and would only seek foreign assistance if a particular area of weakness within the system is identified.

However, Tim Kee has his work cut out to keep his technical committee together, even before its first meeting, as Cummings denied any agreement with the president in a press statement today. (Gally Cummings statement)

“While I have been having discussions with the President on my involvement in national football no final decisions have been made,” stated Cummings. “In fact, Mr Tim Kee indicated that we would meet on his return from Zurich on Friday and that meeting has not yet taken place.

“I have already indicated to Mr Tim Kee that my services are not free…

“Based on the performances I have seen and the most recent remuneration of over $300,000 per month paid to 73 year old (Otto) Pfister who could not get past Guyana in the World Cup preliminaries, it is disturbing that such a suggestion could be made for the public’s consumption.”

There is arguably more pressing business for the TTFF in the local High Court as members of the 2006 World Cup squad have stated their intention to initiate liquidation proceedings against the football body over owing bonus payments. (World Cup 2006 players press statement)

Tim Kee said that he spoke to ex-Soca Warrior and Central FC managing director Brent Sancho regarding the legal dispute between the two bodies and is due to meet him again on Monday evening.

He expressed surprise that the players did not wait for feedback from his trip to Zurich and New York to meet FIFA president Sepp Blatter and CONCACAF president Jeffrey Webb respectively before making their statement.

However, Tim Kee insisted that he will do everything in his power to remedy the situation and he claimed that Blatter and Webb were both open to the idea of allowing the TTFF a four or five-year loan, which it could use to fulfil its obligation to the Warriors.

“The TTFF has nothing to liquidate at this point in time,” he said. “But I have asked Blatter and Webb to tell me to get this monkey off my back and give Trinidad and Tobago football the chance to start clean again.

“I am cautiously optimistic about getting the money from them.”

He admitted that no specific figure was discussed with FIFA and CONCACAF but said he would have a better idea of what they would need to raise after meeting the players.

The aggrieved Warriors, who are still owed interim payments awarded by the High Court as well as accounting documents related to the 2006 World Cup, have vowed to apply for liquidation of the TTFF by early March unless the organisation honours court orders in the seven-year case.

« Last Edit: January 29, 2013, 06:21:32 AM by Flex »

Offline Trini _2026

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We better watch this man

The technical committee, according to Tim Kee, is meant to oversee and support the national coaching staff as well as assist in the implementation of a style of play for local teams.

"As if the idea of joint coaches was not radical enough, the “Soca Warriors” seem set to appoint six technical men, exclusive of technical director Anton Corneal, trying to map the team’s path in the near future.

“I want to have those fellows working with the (present) coaches,” he said. “Our coaches will not just be able to do what they want unless they discuss it with the technical committee first."
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/sh8SeGmzai4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/sh8SeGmzai4</a>

Offline Trinitozbone

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Role of these persons seems convoluted, Good intentions but messy!

Offline Flex

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Gally denies technical committee appointment
By Mark Pouchet (Express).


Former head coach of the Strike Squad, Everald "Gally" Cummings says he is only in discussions with Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation (TTFF) president Raymond Tim Kee about his role on a TTFF technical committee.

At a media conference on Friday, Tim Kee said the technical committee has been reshaped with the introduction of Cummings and former national footballers Leroy De Leon and Selris Figaro, and that the committee will be convening its first meeting next week.

Cummings denied this.

"I wish to clarify that while I have been having discussions with the President of the TTFF, no final decision was made on the role I will play. In fact we were scheduled to meet on his return from his meeting in Zurich," Cummings stated in an e-mail to the media.

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Offline AB.Trini

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Add Stephan Hart ./ Shaka/ Latapy/Yorke to a Foreign consultant/Scouting recruitment  Training Camp.This will be an extension of the TTFF to  foster positive relations  and pride in  ah new Campaign: COME BACK and represent the Red White and Black!!!!!

Offline King Deese

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We better watch this man

The technical committee, according to Tim Kee, is meant to oversee and support the national coaching staff as well as assist in the implementation of a style of play for local teams.

"As if the idea of joint coaches was not radical enough, the “Soca Warriors” seem set to appoint six technical men, exclusive of technical director Anton Corneal, trying to map the team’s path in the near future.

“I want to have those fellows working with the (present) coaches,” he said. “Our coaches will not just be able to do what they want unless they discuss it with the technical committee first."

I agree.

Raymond "Idi Ah mean" Tiny Tim, the ability to adjust your style of play is of the utmost importance in this day and age. Emphasising on a brand of football that accomplishes the goals of winning over and satisfying both the public's appetite for exciting football and simultaneously winning football tournaments should be the objective of your administration, allowing the coaches the flexibility to bring their own winning style to the table. If those are your goals, then by all means entertain different ideas and perspectives on the technical and strategic aspects of the game that recognize a broader spectrum of styles, concepts and possibilities. I know that I am oversimplifying things and yes, I know that it will take time, but these objectives require considerable planning and initiatives that must be cautiously appproached, developed overtime, and implemented by a team of individuals that know how to be successful for it to become a reality. Is it possible? Yes, it is. As I said before, it is going to take time. Those minds belong to people who must be paid. No if's, and's, or but's.
I am guessing that you, Tiny Tim, are fixated on the Dutch style of play but I beg the question. Why? One could argue that they revolutionized the game in a sense, and maybe rightfully so, but that moment has passed and you should take a look at your own development program and the skills and talent level you are producing or not producing and ascertain what style of play matches the type of players being developed. With flexibility being one of the keys. Let's take a look at the teams that actually won the World Cup and their playing style, before and since the Dutch made it to the finals. Almost everyone of these winning teams adjusted their style of play going forward.
Don't get me wrong, I think Johan Cruff was one of the best midfield generals to ever play the game but for some reason it just wasn't enough to win a championship.

Uruguay, a Latin nation, is by far the smallest nation (in terms of population size) to win a World Cup, twice, Brazil, which won the Cup five times, as well as Argentina, which won the Cup twice, are known for playing a very skillful, creative, free-flowing, fast-paced style. Because Brazilians, Uruguayans, and Argentines, are often not as big and physically strong as many Europeans, technical ability is very important. For example, dribbling is an essential part of their style. Latin players are confident with the ball, good dribblers, creative.
Characteristics of the Latin game are very distinctive because of its possession-oriented character. Attacks are developed using possession. The ball is moved spontaneously with a lot of individual-based plays. Latin teams from Spain, Uruguay, Portugal, Brazil and Argentina are typical examples. Brazil takes it to the extreme with their improvisational and free-flowing style.

Efficient and highly organized, the Germans play a disciplined, hard-working style that sees them become contenders in almost every international tournament they take part in. Making use of the considerable physical stature of the players, German soccer often relies on raw physicality.  Crosses are often swung in to tall target-men, who can gain aerial control using their height, or using their stature to hold off opponents. The team is disciplined which is to say, each player has a specific role and adheres to this role strictly.  Players are rarely out of position, with ranks within formations almost always rigidly kept.  Improvisation is rarely seen, with direct attacks at goal the usual method of going forward.  The style is not particularly attractive, but the fact that it is brutally effective cannot be denied. Strategically, the last World Cup won by the German's saw them play the counter attack game to absolute perfection. With strength at every position, the German’s were able to soak up pressure from opposing teams and counter-attack quickly with fast, highly skilled players leading the charge.
And finishing.

Without a doubt, the strength of Italian soccer has always been its stellar defence. The Italian's are perhaps best known for their "catenaccio" strategy. Catenaccio literally means "door-bolt" in Italian, which is to say that the Italians meant to literally lock up their opponent attack. There are two real important aspects of the catenaccio strategy:
1.   Man-to-man marking
2.   The sweeper or libero in Italian
The original styles of catenaccio evolved in the 1970's when the Dutch Total Football revolution began to take hold. This free flowing system where players were not fixed in any one role made man-to-man marking impossible.
While some of the original aspects of the strategy became outdated, it evolved into something the Italians called "Zona Mista" (Mixed Zone). Zone Mista strategy basically brought the catenaccio formation to a kind of more modern, fluid zone defence. The big difference versus regular zone defence is that the catenaccio strategy allowed for the double marking of stronger players using the sweeper.
The Italians played this Zone Mista strategy to perfection in the 1982 World Cup Tournament, eventually leading them to their third title.

Known for its positive, attack oriented philosophy and constant stream of world class players, Dutch soccer is responsible for essentially revolutionizing the game with the spread of its total football style developed in the 1970's. Known as the greatest team to have never won a World Cup. In the early 1970's, the Italian catenaccio was getting much success in international play, leading the Dutch to develop a style of play that would neutralize this defensive wall. Because of its emphasis on man-to-man marking, the Dutch needed something that would confuse the opposition. Total football relies on each player being able to play at every position and its success is determined by how well each player's ability to adapt to each position. Every player on the field would rotate in and out of position across the field, throwing any man-to-man marking schemes into disarray and creating a very fluid looking game in the process. At its heart, total football is all about space. Players must be able to create, organize, and utilize the space on the field to stretch and confuse opposition defenses.

Even though they were outclassed and subsequently outplayed by Holland in 1974, Argentina were one pretty good football team in 1978. Strong in defence, where the rugged Daniel Passarella ruled the roost, they were flamboyant in attack, Leopoldo Luque leading the line as well as any centre-forward in the tournament, and formidable in midfield, where they not only boasted one of the world's all-time greatest ball players in Osvaldo Ardiles but also the prodigiously talented Mario Kempes, surely the star of the 1978 World Cup, against the team that embarrassed them in the previous tournament.

Bottom line. Gotta have the players and the program to enter that stratasphere.

TTFF and Tiny Tim, you are on the clock.
I am the punishment of God...If you had not comitted great sins, God would not have sent a punishment like me upon you.

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The technical committee, according to Tim Kee, is meant to oversee and support the national coaching staff as well as assist in the implementation of a style of play for local teams.

"As if the idea of joint coaches was not radical enough, the “Soca Warriors” seem set to appoint six technical men, exclusive of technical director Anton Corneal, trying to map the team’s path in the near future.

“I want to have those fellows working with the (present) coaches,” he said. “Our coaches will not just be able to do what they want unless they discuss it with the technical committee first."

I agree.

Raymond "Idi Ah mean" Tiny Tim, the ability to adjust your style of play is of the utmost importance in this day and age. Emphasising on a brand of football that accomplishes the goals of winning over and satisfying both the public's appetite for exciting football and simultaneously winning football tournaments should be the objective of your administration, allowing the coaches the flexibility to bring their own winning style to the table. If those are your goals, then by all means entertain different ideas and perspectives on the technical and strategic aspects of the game that recognize a broader spectrum of styles, concepts and possibilities. I know that I am oversimplifying things and yes, I know that it will take time, but these objectives require considerable planning and initiatives that must be cautiously appproached, developed overtime, and implemented by a team of individuals that know how to be successful for it to become a reality. Is it possible? Yes, it is. As I said before, it is going to take time. Those minds belong to people who must be paid. No if's, and's, or but's.
I am guessing that you, Tiny Tim, are fixated on the Dutch style of play but I beg the question. Why? One could argue that they revolutionized the game in a sense, and maybe rightfully so, but that moment has passed and you should take a look at your own development program and the skills and talent level you are producing or not producing and ascertain what style of play matches the type of players being developed. With flexibility being one of the keys. Let's take a look at the teams that actually won the World Cup and their playing style, before and since the Dutch made it to the finals. Almost everyone of these winning teams adjusted their style of play going forward.
Don't get me wrong, I think Johan Cruff was one of the best midfield generals to ever play the game but for some reason it just wasn't enough to win a championship.

Uruguay, a Latin nation, is by far the smallest nation (in terms of population size) to win a World Cup, twice, Brazil, which won the Cup five times, as well as Argentina, which won the Cup twice, are known for playing a very skillful, creative, free-flowing, fast-paced style. Because Brazilians, Uruguayans, and Argentines, are often not as big and physically strong as many Europeans, technical ability is very important. For example, dribbling is an essential part of their style. Latin players are confident with the ball, good dribblers, creative.
Characteristics of the Latin game are very distinctive because of its possession-oriented character. Attacks are developed using possession. The ball is moved spontaneously with a lot of individual-based plays. Latin teams from Spain, Uruguay, Portugal, Brazil and Argentina are typical examples. Brazil takes it to the extreme with their improvisational and free-flowing style.

Efficient and highly organized, the Germans play a disciplined, hard-working style that sees them become contenders in almost every international tournament they take part in. Making use of the considerable physical stature of the players, German soccer often relies on raw physicality.  Crosses are often swung in to tall target-men, who can gain aerial control using their height, or using their stature to hold off opponents. The team is disciplined which is to say, each player has a specific role and adheres to this role strictly.  Players are rarely out of position, with ranks within formations almost always rigidly kept.  Improvisation is rarely seen, with direct attacks at goal the usual method of going forward.  The style is not particularly attractive, but the fact that it is brutally effective cannot be denied. Strategically, the last World Cup won by the German's saw them play the counter attack game to absolute perfection. With strength at every position, the German’s were able to soak up pressure from opposing teams and counter-attack quickly with fast, highly skilled players leading the charge.
And finishing.

Without a doubt, the strength of Italian soccer has always been its stellar defence. The Italian's are perhaps best known for their "catenaccio" strategy. Catenaccio literally means "door-bolt" in Italian, which is to say that the Italians meant to literally lock up their opponent attack. There are two real important aspects of the catenaccio strategy:
1.   Man-to-man marking
2.   The sweeper or libero in Italian
The original styles of catenaccio evolved in the 1970's when the Dutch Total Football revolution began to take hold. This free flowing system where players were not fixed in any one role made man-to-man marking impossible.
While some of the original aspects of the strategy became outdated, it evolved into something the Italians called "Zona Mista" (Mixed Zone). Zone Mista strategy basically brought the catenaccio formation to a kind of more modern, fluid zone defence. The big difference versus regular zone defence is that the catenaccio strategy allowed for the double marking of stronger players using the sweeper.
The Italians played this Zone Mista strategy to perfection in the 1982 World Cup Tournament, eventually leading them to their third title.

Known for its positive, attack oriented philosophy and constant stream of world class players, Dutch soccer is responsible for essentially revolutionizing the game with the spread of its total football style developed in the 1970's. Known as the greatest team to have never won a World Cup. In the early 1970's, the Italian catenaccio was getting much success in international play, leading the Dutch to develop a style of play that would neutralize this defensive wall. Because of its emphasis on man-to-man marking, the Dutch needed something that would confuse the opposition. Total football relies on each player being able to play at every position and its success is determined by how well each player's ability to adapt to each position. Every player on the field would rotate in and out of position across the field, throwing any man-to-man marking schemes into disarray and creating a very fluid looking game in the process. At its heart, total football is all about space. Players must be able to create, organize, and utilize the space on the field to stretch and confuse opposition defenses.

Even though they were outclassed and subsequently outplayed by Holland in 1974, Argentina were one pretty good football team in 1978. Strong in defence, where the rugged Daniel Passarella ruled the roost, they were flamboyant in attack, Leopoldo Luque leading the line as well as any centre-forward in the tournament, and formidable in midfield, where they not only boasted one of the world's all-time greatest ball players in Osvaldo Ardiles but also the prodigiously talented Mario Kempes, surely the star of the 1978 World Cup, against the team that embarrassed them in the previous tournament.

Bottom line. Gotta have the players and the program to enter that stratasphere.

TTFF and Tiny Tim, you are on the clock.

WTF???

Offline just cool

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What's so ridiculous about kingdeese's post TT? not that i like it or endorse it, or even in opposition of your reply, just want to know why the objection, and please elaborate if you can.
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We better watch this man

The technical committee, according to Tim Kee, is meant to oversee and support the national coaching staff as well as assist in the implementation of a style of play for local teams.

"As if the idea of joint coaches was not radical enough, the “Soca Warriors” seem set to appoint six technical men, exclusive of technical director Anton Corneal, trying to map the team’s path in the near future.

“I want to have those fellows working with the (present) coaches,” he said. “Our coaches will not just be able to do what they want unless they discuss it with the technical committee first."

I agree.

Raymond "Idi Ah mean" Tiny Tim, the ability to adjust your style of play is of the utmost importance in this day and age. Emphasising on a brand of football that accomplishes the goals of winning over and satisfying both the public's appetite for exciting football and simultaneously winning football tournaments should be the objective of your administration, allowing the coaches the flexibility to bring their own winning style to the table. If those are your goals, then by all means entertain different ideas and perspectives on the technical and strategic aspects of the game that recognize a broader spectrum of styles, concepts and possibilities. I know that I am oversimplifying things and yes, I know that it will take time, but these objectives require considerable planning and initiatives that must be cautiously appproached, developed overtime, and implemented by a team of individuals that know how to be successful for it to become a reality. Is it possible? Yes, it is. As I said before, it is going to take time. Those minds belong to people who must be paid. No if's, and's, or but's.
I am guessing that you, Tiny Tim, are fixated on the Dutch style of play but I beg the question. Why? One could argue that they revolutionized the game in a sense, and maybe rightfully so, but that moment has passed and you should take a look at your own development program and the skills and talent level you are producing or not producing and ascertain what style of play matches the type of players being developed. With flexibility being one of the keys. Let's take a look at the teams that actually won the World Cup and their playing style, before and since the Dutch made it to the finals. Almost everyone of these winning teams adjusted their style of play going forward.
Don't get me wrong, I think Johan Cruff was one of the best midfield generals to ever play the game but for some reason it just wasn't enough to win a championship.

Uruguay, a Latin nation, is by far the smallest nation (in terms of population size) to win a World Cup, twice, Brazil, which won the Cup five times, as well as Argentina, which won the Cup twice, are known for playing a very skillful, creative, free-flowing, fast-paced style. Because Brazilians, Uruguayans, and Argentines, are often not as big and physically strong as many Europeans, technical ability is very important. For example, dribbling is an essential part of their style. Latin players are confident with the ball, good dribblers, creative.
Characteristics of the Latin game are very distinctive because of its possession-oriented character. Attacks are developed using possession. The ball is moved spontaneously with a lot of individual-based plays. Latin teams from Spain, Uruguay, Portugal, Brazil and Argentina are typical examples. Brazil takes it to the extreme with their improvisational and free-flowing style.

Efficient and highly organized, the Germans play a disciplined, hard-working style that sees them become contenders in almost every international tournament they take part in. Making use of the considerable physical stature of the players, German soccer often relies on raw physicality.  Crosses are often swung in to tall target-men, who can gain aerial control using their height, or using their stature to hold off opponents. The team is disciplined which is to say, each player has a specific role and adheres to this role strictly.  Players are rarely out of position, with ranks within formations almost always rigidly kept.  Improvisation is rarely seen, with direct attacks at goal the usual method of going forward.  The style is not particularly attractive, but the fact that it is brutally effective cannot be denied. Strategically, the last World Cup won by the German's saw them play the counter attack game to absolute perfection. With strength at every position, the German’s were able to soak up pressure from opposing teams and counter-attack quickly with fast, highly skilled players leading the charge.
And finishing.

Without a doubt, the strength of Italian soccer has always been its stellar defence. The Italian's are perhaps best known for their "catenaccio" strategy. Catenaccio literally means "door-bolt" in Italian, which is to say that the Italians meant to literally lock up their opponent attack. There are two real important aspects of the catenaccio strategy:
1.   Man-to-man marking
2.   The sweeper or libero in Italian
The original styles of catenaccio evolved in the 1970's when the Dutch Total Football revolution began to take hold. This free flowing system where players were not fixed in any one role made man-to-man marking impossible.
While some of the original aspects of the strategy became outdated, it evolved into something the Italians called "Zona Mista" (Mixed Zone). Zone Mista strategy basically brought the catenaccio formation to a kind of more modern, fluid zone defence. The big difference versus regular zone defence is that the catenaccio strategy allowed for the double marking of stronger players using the sweeper.
The Italians played this Zone Mista strategy to perfection in the 1982 World Cup Tournament, eventually leading them to their third title.

Known for its positive, attack oriented philosophy and constant stream of world class players, Dutch soccer is responsible for essentially revolutionizing the game with the spread of its total football style developed in the 1970's. Known as the greatest team to have never won a World Cup. In the early 1970's, the Italian catenaccio was getting much success in international play, leading the Dutch to develop a style of play that would neutralize this defensive wall. Because of its emphasis on man-to-man marking, the Dutch needed something that would confuse the opposition. Total football relies on each player being able to play at every position and its success is determined by how well each player's ability to adapt to each position. Every player on the field would rotate in and out of position across the field, throwing any man-to-man marking schemes into disarray and creating a very fluid looking game in the process. At its heart, total football is all about space. Players must be able to create, organize, and utilize the space on the field to stretch and confuse opposition defenses.

Even though they were outclassed and subsequently outplayed by Holland in 1974, Argentina were one pretty good football team in 1978. Strong in defence, where the rugged Daniel Passarella ruled the roost, they were flamboyant in attack, Leopoldo Luque leading the line as well as any centre-forward in the tournament, and formidable in midfield, where they not only boasted one of the world's all-time greatest ball players in Osvaldo Ardiles but also the prodigiously talented Mario Kempes, surely the star of the 1978 World Cup, against the team that embarrassed them in the previous tournament.

Bottom line. Gotta have the players and the program to enter that stratasphere.

TTFF and Tiny Tim, you are on the clock.

Hmm... what happened to France and England (I know everybody hates us, but we must have done something right in 66!!)

Offline King Deese

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Sorry FS, but you only won the '66 World Cup because Portugal did you a favor. See Portugal vs Brazil. What happened in '70? And as for France.....well, I know Zinadine was great, but that final would have been different had Ronaldo not caught a case of Epilepsy and had to beg his coach not to leave him off the team. He just was not himself. But in each case and in each lost to the team that won the tournament four years before, Brazil came back and won the tournament after. They are the only team that have been to the finals 7 times. Lost it twice and came back and exacted revenge on the winners. See the 2002 tournament.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2013, 10:00:19 AM by King Deese »
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Offline Sam

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What about a new constitution !!

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Offline ZANDOLIE

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What about a new constitution !!



i suspect that is where much of the recent tension in the ttff is coming from. certain people have benefitted and continue to benefit from the current system and doh want change.
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What about a new constitution !!



i suspect that is where much of the recent tension in the ttff is coming from. certain people have benefitted and continue to benefit from the current system and doh want change.

Agreed...but this is not some heir loom or family tradition, no one in this administration or any administration for that matter has a life long tenure to his position...this is not a right of birth, it is a privilege. These old useless motherf#%kers like Watson and the other imps have to go, it's time for a change. Tiny Tim said he is a leader, it's time for him to lead.
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Wow!! How did they let this guy end up in charge?
I ask only because I'm surprised that the old guard let this guy through to make all these changes.
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Offline Tenorsaw

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We better watch this man

The technical committee, according to Tim Kee, is meant to oversee and support the national coaching staff as well as assist in the implementation of a style of play for local teams.

"As if the idea of joint coaches was not radical enough, the “Soca Warriors” seem set to appoint six technical men, exclusive of technical director Anton Corneal, trying to map the team’s path in the near future.

“I want to have those fellows working with the (present) coaches,” he said. “Our coaches will not just be able to do what they want unless they discuss it with the technical committee first."

I agree.

Raymond "Idi Ah mean" Tiny Tim, the ability to adjust your style of play is of the utmost importance in this day and age. Emphasising on a brand of football that accomplishes the goals of winning over and satisfying both the public's appetite for exciting football and simultaneously winning football tournaments should be the objective of your administration, allowing the coaches the flexibility to bring their own winning style to the table. If those are your goals, then by all means entertain different ideas and perspectives on the technical and strategic aspects of the game that recognize a broader spectrum of styles, concepts and possibilities. I know that I am oversimplifying things and yes, I know that it will take time, but these objectives require considerable planning and initiatives that must be cautiously appproached, developed overtime, and implemented by a team of individuals that know how to be successful for it to become a reality. Is it possible? Yes, it is. As I said before, it is going to take time. Those minds belong to people who must be paid. No if's, and's, or but's.
I am guessing that you, Tiny Tim, are fixated on the Dutch style of play but I beg the question. Why? One could argue that they revolutionized the game in a sense, and maybe rightfully so, but that moment has passed and you should take a look at your own development program and the skills and talent level you are producing or not producing and ascertain what style of play matches the type of players being developed. With flexibility being one of the keys. Let's take a look at the teams that actually won the World Cup and their playing style, before and since the Dutch made it to the finals. Almost everyone of these winning teams adjusted their style of play going forward.
Don't get me wrong, I think Johan Cruff was one of the best midfield generals to ever play the game but for some reason it just wasn't enough to win a championship.

Uruguay, a Latin nation, is by far the smallest nation (in terms of population size) to win a World Cup, twice, Brazil, which won the Cup five times, as well as Argentina, which won the Cup twice, are known for playing a very skillful, creative, free-flowing, fast-paced style. Because Brazilians, Uruguayans, and Argentines, are often not as big and physically strong as many Europeans, technical ability is very important. For example, dribbling is an essential part of their style. Latin players are confident with the ball, good dribblers, creative.
Characteristics of the Latin game are very distinctive because of its possession-oriented character. Attacks are developed using possession. The ball is moved spontaneously with a lot of individual-based plays. Latin teams from Spain, Uruguay, Portugal, Brazil and Argentina are typical examples. Brazil takes it to the extreme with their improvisational and free-flowing style.

Efficient and highly organized, the Germans play a disciplined, hard-working style that sees them become contenders in almost every international tournament they take part in. Making use of the considerable physical stature of the players, German soccer often relies on raw physicality.  Crosses are often swung in to tall target-men, who can gain aerial control using their height, or using their stature to hold off opponents. The team is disciplined which is to say, each player has a specific role and adheres to this role strictly.  Players are rarely out of position, with ranks within formations almost always rigidly kept.  Improvisation is rarely seen, with direct attacks at goal the usual method of going forward.  The style is not particularly attractive, but the fact that it is brutally effective cannot be denied. Strategically, the last World Cup won by the German's saw them play the counter attack game to absolute perfection. With strength at every position, the German’s were able to soak up pressure from opposing teams and counter-attack quickly with fast, highly skilled players leading the charge.
And finishing.

Without a doubt, the strength of Italian soccer has always been its stellar defence. The Italian's are perhaps best known for their "catenaccio" strategy. Catenaccio literally means "door-bolt" in Italian, which is to say that the Italians meant to literally lock up their opponent attack. There are two real important aspects of the catenaccio strategy:
1.   Man-to-man marking
2.   The sweeper or libero in Italian
The original styles of catenaccio evolved in the 1970's when the Dutch Total Football revolution began to take hold. This free flowing system where players were not fixed in any one role made man-to-man marking impossible.
While some of the original aspects of the strategy became outdated, it evolved into something the Italians called "Zona Mista" (Mixed Zone). Zone Mista strategy basically brought the catenaccio formation to a kind of more modern, fluid zone defence. The big difference versus regular zone defence is that the catenaccio strategy allowed for the double marking of stronger players using the sweeper.
The Italians played this Zone Mista strategy to perfection in the 1982 World Cup Tournament, eventually leading them to their third title.

Known for its positive, attack oriented philosophy and constant stream of world class players, Dutch soccer is responsible for essentially revolutionizing the game with the spread of its total football style developed in the 1970's. Known as the greatest team to have never won a World Cup. In the early 1970's, the Italian catenaccio was getting much success in international play, leading the Dutch to develop a style of play that would neutralize this defensive wall. Because of its emphasis on man-to-man marking, the Dutch needed something that would confuse the opposition. Total football relies on each player being able to play at every position and its success is determined by how well each player's ability to adapt to each position. Every player on the field would rotate in and out of position across the field, throwing any man-to-man marking schemes into disarray and creating a very fluid looking game in the process. At its heart, total football is all about space. Players must be able to create, organize, and utilize the space on the field to stretch and confuse opposition defenses.

Even though they were outclassed and subsequently outplayed by Holland in 1974, Argentina were one pretty good football team in 1978. Strong in defence, where the rugged Daniel Passarella ruled the roost, they were flamboyant in attack, Leopoldo Luque leading the line as well as any centre-forward in the tournament, and formidable in midfield, where they not only boasted one of the world's all-time greatest ball players in Osvaldo Ardiles but also the prodigiously talented Mario Kempes, surely the star of the 1978 World Cup, against the team that embarrassed them in the previous tournament.

Bottom line. Gotta have the players and the program to enter that stratasphere.

TTFF and Tiny Tim, you are on the clock.

Hmm... what happened to France and England (I know everybody hates us, but we must have done something right in 66!!)

Not really:  the ref gave the Cup to England when he decided to give Hurst de goal... :beermug:

Offline Football supporter

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"Not really:  the ref gave the Cup to England when he decided to give Hurst de goal... :beermug:"

Thanks Tenorsaw. I quite forgot that back in 1966 a 3-2 victory wasn't enough to win a world cup and the rules would only allow the World Cup to go to a team winning 4-2, hence the reason England paid the ref. My bad.  :devil:

Offline trini_stallion

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Only thing constant in life is change...bring it...doing better than scamps thats for sure. This is positive!
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Offline Tallman

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Change coming, says Tim Kee
« Reply #17 on: February 04, 2014, 01:18:10 PM »
Change coming, says Tim Kee
By Mark Pouchet (T&T Express)


Raymond Tim Kee, president of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA), says constitutional change is coming to the TTFA.

Tim Kee made the announcement at the TTFA’s Congress, at the VIP Lounge of the Hasely Crawford Stadium in Port of Spain, on Sunday.

In an hour-long address, Tim Kee said the time had come to change how the organisation is structured.

“Our constitution needs a serious overhauling because in many regards the structure is archaic and does not lend itself to good corporate governance or for progress,” he stated.

“It is not as all-embracing as it ought to be...in business we have a saying ‘from the broom room to the board room’ meaning that everybody must have a say, so we have to fashion what we do if we want to sustain our business by following best practices.”

Tim Kee said the TTFA does not have to reinvent the wheel because organisations had spent millions of dollars to change management and restructure. His organisation, he explained, just has to follow that model.

Tim Kee said the constitutional reform commission is currently working on a new constitution. Without giving a specific date, he said that once the commission is done with its work, the document will be submitted to the TTFA executive.

“It is hoped we could move forward what we have now (the current constitution). We have to make best use of what we have but I know some comparatives have been done in the drafting (of the new constitution) which looked at football industry and organisations. It (the constitution) has to change, it has to change,” Tim Kee stated.

“We are looking to restructure things in a good, progressive way.”

Earlier in his address, Tim Kee said futsal and beach soccer are to be ratified, and that the TTFA, currently housed at the Hasely Crawford Stadium, is looking for a new home.

“We would love to acquire our land, which I am working on feverishly, and put up a new structure...and that is not far-fetched at all.”

Tim Kee also revealed that the TTFA is looking to hire coaches for each of the national football teams, and is seeking a new sponsor for the Super League whose contract with Anthony Harford expires at the end of February. Tim Kee said the TTFA had embarked on its grassroots programme called Shoreline that will be facilitated by the 250 coaches trained by TTFA technical director Anton Corneal last year.

On the international scene, Tim Kee said the TTFA proposes to play international friendlies overseas, and the organisation is currently working out the financial viability of such ventures that would include negotiation for broadcast rights.

He said besides the Argentina and Iran friendlies, the TTFA is working on securing three more games against opponents that “would surprise everyone”.

Tim Kee also spoke about the TTFA’s relationships with corporate T&T and the Ministry of Sport. He said both are on the mend, adding that the TTFA is on the verge of signing contracts with three companies, and now enjoys a much improved relationship with Minister of Sport Anil Roberts.

Tim Kee explained that the TTFA will keep segregated accounts and sponsorship money will be used for the purpose given.

“So no mixing up of people’s money in one account. That does not bring confidence, and the companies and the organisation have the right to request at anytime the accounts. That brings confidence.”
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Offline Fyzoman

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We better watch this man

The technical committee, according to Tim Kee, is meant to oversee and support the national coaching staff as well as assist in the implementation of a style of play for local teams.

"As if the idea of joint coaches was not radical enough, the “Soca Warriors” seem set to appoint six technical men, exclusive of technical director Anton Corneal, trying to map the team’s path in the near future.

“I want to have those fellows working with the (present) coaches,” he said. “Our coaches will not just be able to do what they want unless they discuss it with the technical committee first."



WTF???

 :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: ENT?!?!?!??!
"Practice is the best of all instructors"

Offline Tiresais

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Well this is bloody good to hear. Tim Kee's stock rises again.

England's WC win was all about the innovative 4-3-3 "Wingless wonders" we fielded - I guess teams had a hard time adapting to the narrowness of the formation, combined with the quality we had in the centre. Especially deadly against Germany's 4-2-4

I wouldn't say Portugal did us a favour - Brazil weren't good enough.

If you want to watch that final - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGN8BtnupEk

Offline Flex

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Change coming, says Tim Kee.
By Mark Pouchet (Express).


Raymond Tim Kee, president of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA), says constitutional change is coming to the TTFA.

Tim Kee made the announcement at the TTFA’s Congress, at the VIP Lounge of the Hasely Crawford Stadium in Port of Spain, on Sunday.

In an hour-long address, Tim Kee said the time had come to change how the organisation is structured.

“Our constitution needs a serious overhauling because in many regards the structure is archaic and does not lend itself to good corporate governance or for progress,” he stated.

“It is not as all-embracing as it ought to be...in business we have a saying ‘from the broom room to the board room’ meaning that everybody must have a say, so we have to fashion what we do if we want to sustain our business by following best practices.”

Tim Kee said the TTFA does not have to reinvent the wheel because organisations had spent millions of dollars to change management and restructure. His organisation, he explained, just has to follow that model.

Tim Kee said the constitutional reform commission is currently working on a new constitution. Without giving a specific date, he said that once the commission is done with its work, the document will be submitted to the TTFA executive.

“It is hoped we could move forward what we have now (the current constitution). We have to make best use of what we have but I know some comparatives have been done in the drafting (of the new constitution) which looked at football industry and organisations. It (the constitution) has to change, it has to change,” Tim Kee stated.

“We are looking to restructure things in a good, progressive way.”

Earlier in his address, Tim Kee said futsal and beach soccer are to be ratified, and that the TTFA, currently housed at the Hasely Crawford Stadium, is looking for a new home.

“We would love to acquire our land, which I am working on feverishly, and put up a new structure...and that is not far-fetched at all.”

Tim Kee also revealed that the TTFA is looking to hire coaches for each of the national football teams, and is seeking a new sponsor for the Super League whose contract with Anthony Harford expires at the end of February. Tim Kee said the TTFA had embarked on its grassroots programme called Shoreline that will be facilitated by the 250 coaches trained by TTFA technical director Anton Corneal last year.

On the international scene, Tim Kee said the TTFA proposes to play international friendlies overseas, and the organisation is currently working out the financial viability of such ventures that would include negotiation for broadcast rights.

He said besides the Argentina and Iran friendlies, the TTFA is working on securing three more games against opponents that “would surprise everyone”.

Tim Kee also spoke about the TTFA’s relationships with corporate T&T and the Ministry of Sport. He said both are on the mend, adding that the TTFA is on the verge of signing contracts with three companies, and now enjoys a much improved relationship with Minister of Sport Anil Roberts.

Tim Kee explained that the TTFA will keep segregated accounts and sponsorship money will be used for the purpose given.

“So no mixing up of people’s money in one account. That does not bring confidence, and the companies and the organisation have the right to request at anytime the accounts. That brings confidence.”

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Offline dreamer

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Good critiquing requires us to big up and condemn when good and bad respectively are observed.

1. Until the latest standoff with Sancho, I would big up Tim Kee and crew for being at the helm at the time of initial payment to socawarriors, payment to Shabazz, intiation of agreement with Latas, hiring of Hart, invitation to Beenie and securing international games of improved calibre. This news on changing the constitution seems to be another good step and the language addressing future transparency to corporate investors sounds good too. Would love to see retroactive transparency on where the stolen money went which has caused TTFA to owe as much as 60 million dollars!!!! causing players, coaches and all us fans to suffer so much and cannabalize each other.

2. I would mouth disappointment with Tim Kee on his dismissive language with Sancho and the Warriors, his refusal to officially distance himself from the behaviours / thievery of Jackula, Scamps and Rodent. It was disappointing that he did not seem to realize the degree to which his recent behavior resembling Jackula's was so revolting and damaging to his presumably new "turn-around" leadership style.  He was doing well scoring nice small points with the issues in 1, but now causing a BIG setback in public confidence by his recent behaviours here in 2.

Mr Tim Kee please try to make amends. We will have foregiveness in our heart once you do the right thing. You were showing potential. Show respect to our beloved socawarriors especially with the TONE of your words and sincerity of comments ... and please tell your underlings like Mr Fuentes to do the same.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2014, 05:38:35 PM by dreamer »
Supportin' de Warriors right tru.

Offline Controversial

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The TTFA constitution needs to be amended once again...
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2017, 05:35:27 PM »
The eligibility rules to be elected as President need to be amended:

To be elected you should not need to hold a management position in football for anytime length of time in TT. It should be based on whether you are a citizen of the nation and parentage only...

There should also be a restriction that you cannot hold a position on the board of directors nor the presidency if you are affiliated to a local club, whether it be coach, manager or owner... by doing so you eliminate bias and any favouritism that may be exhibited during the presidents tenure..

This rule about residency in Trinidad is also ridiculous and needs to be removed. Once you have trini parentage or you were born in Trinidad, you should have a right to run for president...

This will open up the choices and eliminate any herd mentality and local cliches and corruption which we are seeing right now..

These are the changes I argued with bake and shark about that he got on ignorant over, which I expected from him and others who didn't know what was to come if these requirements weren't removed or changed...

Offline ribbit

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Re: The TTFA constitution needs to be amended once again...
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2017, 08:40:56 PM »
Simple. KickStarter campaign to bribe convince them to vote for change.

Offline Flex

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Re: The TTFA constitution needs to be amended once again...
« Reply #24 on: January 08, 2017, 08:24:34 AM »
CFA wants TTFA constitution amended.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


The Central Football Association (CFA), being led by Shymdeo Gosine is rejecting Samuel Saunders as the zone’s representative on the Board of Directors of the T&T Football Association.

The CFA in a strongly worded letter to the TTFA on January 3, made it clear that Saunders has breached the association’s constitution (TTFA) by not attending four consecutive meetings. Yesterday, the CFA’s General Secretary Clynt Taylor said his association intends to propose major amendments to the constitution of the TTFA which will allow Regional Associations the right to select its own representative to the football association’s board.

Their proposal will also enable the six regional associations-Northern Football Association (NFA), Southern Football Association (SFA), Central Football Association (CFA), Eastern Football Association (EFA), Tobago Football Association (TFA) and the Eastern Counties Football Union (ECFU) to have their representative immediately accepted as a TTFA member, in the event of a change.

In the constitution, if there is a change in the representative by the regional association, that person will be considered an observer until an AGM is held to approve their membership. Their proposal will again be raised at the next TTFA Congress next year.

Taylor, who was a candidate for the hotly contested race for presidency of the TTFA in 2015, told the Sunday Guardian that Saunders has not represented his association in anyway. “He has done absolutely nothing for the CFA. He does not attend meetings although we have been invited on many occasions and he has not responded to their messages to chart a way forward for the CFA” Taylor explained yesterday.

According to Taylor, Saunders who is an Attorney by profession, only met with the CFA when his executives made it public they wanted to remove him. The CFA has already chosen James Toussaint as the replacement for Saunders but Taylor said this is being blocked by the TTFA.

In its letter to the TTFA, Taylor pointed to the TTFA Congress on November 26, 2016 at Naparima Boys College, San Fernando, in which it was re-iterated that TTFA Board members who were absent for three or more consecutive meetings were automatically removed as Board members as stated by the constitution of the TTFA. This call was also reinforced by ex referee Osmond Downer.

Saunders who has failed to attend meetings on May 18, June 15, July 20 and August 17, 2016 automatically disqualifies himself from board membership, a call that was also made by the CFA at that congress.

Contacted, Joanne Salazar, the TTFA’s 3rd vice president said the CFA has been incorrect in their assumption that Saunders missed four meetings consecutively. She noted the meeting that was scheduled for June 15 was not held.

“No member to date, has missed four meetings” Salazar said and directed the CFA to its own constitution, which she said should be equipped with the necessary steps to discipline or take actions against its members.

The Guardian also learnt that the NFA, under new president Anthony Harford, has been experiencing similar problems with its representative.

RELATED NEWS

CFA wants Saunders out
By Ian Prescott (Express).


THE Central Football Association (CFA) has written to the governing Trinidad and Tobago Football Association, seeking to have its current representative Samuel Saunders removed from the TTFA’s board of directors.

The TTFA board of directors comprises: David John-Williams (president), Joanne Salazar, Ewing Davis and Allan Warner (vice-presidents), Samuel Saunders (Central FA), Sherwyn Dyer (Eastern Counties Football Union), Karanjabari Williams (Northern FA), Richard Quan Chan (Southern FA), Anthony Moore (Tobago FA), Joseph Taylor (Trinidad and Tobago Football Referees Association), Sharon O’Brien (Women’s League Football), Wayne Cunningham (Eastern FA) and Dexter Skeene (CEO of the TT Pro League).

Businessman Shymdeo Gosine was elected unopposed as president of the CFA for the next four years in November 2016, replacing Bryan Layne, who led Central football for over 20 years. Saunders has been portrayed as an absentee representative and through its general secretary and former presidential candidate and Referees Association president Clynth Taylor, the CFA is seeking his removal.

A December 2016 board meeting of the CFA voted to provisionally remove Saunders as the CFA’s rep on the Board of the TTFA. Previously, the TTFA Board at a meeting in Naparima last year, voted to suspend CFA representation on the Board due to Saunders’ absence.

In a release, the CFA said: “Please be advised that the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) was advised in a letter dated September 8, 2016, that Mr Samuel Saunders, board member, no longer represents the Central Football Association (CFA) as a representative to the Board of the TTFA.“

The CFA further said: “The CFA board of management met on December 29, 2016 and nominated a new member as the CFA representative to the board of management of the TTFA, subject to final confirmation by its members; and until such time, the CFA continues to advise that Mr Samuel Saunders, who has begun contacting the CFA for the first time in over a year, does not and no longer represents the CFA in any capacity.”

Central Football is arguing that Saunders should be automatically disqualified under a TTFA statute which suspends a representative who misses four consecutive Board meetings. However, in reply to the CFA, TTFA president John-Williams said that while it is the CFA’s decision to name their own representative, Saunders in fact only missed three consecutive meetings.

“I am aware that you requested and received from Mr Azad Khan the attendance summary of board members to the TTFA board meetings. I take the opportunity to advise that Mr Saunders did not miss four consecutive board meetings as you are claiming,” John-Williams replied.

“The TTFA’s board meeting of June 15, 2016 did take place because of the lack of a quorum and as such, cannot be constituted as and considered as a board meeting,” John-Williams said.

Likewise, former referee Osmond Downer has shed light on the issue. Downer thinks that in light of the June 15 TTFA board meeting being aborted, Saunders remains the CFA representative on a technicality.

“If the CFA can provide proof that Mr Saunders’ removal and replacement is done in accordance with the Constitutions of the CFA and the TTFA, the CFA will be able to have representation on the TTFA board until such representation is approved at the next AGM of the TTFA (Constitution Article 34 Section 9, paragraph 2),” Downer said.

Downer added: “The main reason for the decision of the AGM at Naparima College concerning Mr Saunders was the information that Mr Saunders had missed four consecutive meetings of the TTFA Board and so, according to the TTFA Constitution (Article 34, section 8.), Mr Saunders’ place on the board would automatically be forfeited.”

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Offline Deeks

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Wish Trump was a Trini. I would "vote" for he to drain the swamp.  ;D