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Author Topic: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing  (Read 4531 times)

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Offline Bakes

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Los Angeles police reopen case that led to fugitive ex-cop's firing


By Michael Martinez and Paul Vercammen , CNN
updated 11:47 PM EST, Sat February 9, 2013
CNN.com

Big Bear Lake, California (CNN) -- Los Angeles police said Saturday that they would reopen an investigation into the firing of Christopher Jordan Dorner, a former cop accused of killing three people as part of a revenge plot targeting law enforcement officers.

Dorner wrote a manifesto declaring war on police in retaliation for being fired from his job as an LAPD officer and losing an appeal to be reinstated. He promised to bring "unconventional and asymmetrical warfare" to officers and their families, calling it the "last resort" to clear his name and strike back at a department that he says mistreated him.

"I do this not to appease a murderer. I do it to reassure the public that their police department is transparent and fair in all the things we do," Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck said in a statement.

He said police would also look into any allegations made in the manifesto.

Beck addressed what he described as the "ghosts of the LAPD's past," and said that one of his biggest worries was that those ghosts would be "resurrected by Dorner's allegations of racism."

"As hard as it has been to change the culture of the Los Angeles Police Department, it has been even more difficult to win and maintain the support of the public. As much as I value our successes in reducing crime, I value even more our gains in public confidence," he said.

The development came as police continued their search for Dorner, 33, in snowbound mountains. Bundled up in winter gear, teams returned to the pine forests and trails surrounding Big Bear Lake in the San Bernardino Mountains.

As the dragnet entered its third day, questions continued Saturday about whether Dorner was still in the area, but police in California, Nevada and Arizona remained on alert.

Scouring the terrain by land and air, police were using helicopters, snowcats and armored personnel carriers with snow chains. The search resumed after overnight temperatures dipped into the teens.

Officers trudged through knee-high snow with rifles at the ready. Patrols again visited homes Saturday in Big Bear Lake, knocking on doors and peeking into windows. They had checked on the community's 400 homes Thursday.

"I don't think he is up here, to be quite honest with you, in this quite brutal weather," resident Justin Owen said. He was shoveling snow out of his driveway when a police team asked him if he had seen suspicious activity.

No, he told them.

Unlike his son, father Ed Owen believed Dorner could be hiding in any of the houses that serve as second residences in the mountains and are often vacant, frequently the case where families have owned the property for decades and lose interest in it, he said.

"I would guess the occupancy rate on my block is just 10%," Ed Owen told CNN. "If you really wanted to scout things out, you probably could find a home that is never occupied and hide in there."
 
Not far from the manhunt, skiers and snowboarders enjoyed an ideal day for winter recreation in the resort community.

"The possibility exists that he is here, somewhere in the forest, so we're going to keep looking ... until we determine that he's not here," said Cindy Bachman, a spokeswoman for the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department.

Calamitous dragnet

The manhunt in Southern California hasn't been without calamity.

Los Angeles police mistakenly shot and wounded two persons Thursday in Torrance as they drove a blue pickup truck resembling Dorner's vehicle. Torrance police also fired upon another blue pickup the same day, but no one was injured in that incident, a law enforcement source said.

The Los Angeles officers involved in the wounding of innocent civilians were put on paid administrative leave, police spokeswoman Rosario Herrera said Saturday. A day earlier, the LAPD had said the officers weren't put on such leave.

Unconfirmed sightings of the 270-pound, 6-foot Dorner have been reported as far away as Las Vegas and the California-Mexico border, according to reports.

LAPD spokesman Andrew Smith urged Dorner to turn himself in.

"That would be the best resolution for this whole thing right now," he said. "No one else has to be shot. No one else has to be injured. No one else has to die. He can turn himself in anywhere, and he'll be taken into custody, and he'll be able to get his side of the story out."

Dorner, who also served in the Navy, is suspected of killing two people in Irvine, California, on Sunday and shooting Thursday at three Los Angeles-area police officers, one of whom later died.

One of the victims of the Irvine killings, Monica Quan, was the daughter of the retired police officer who represented Dorner in his efforts to get his job back, police said.

According to a criminal complaint, someone claiming to be Dorner called the retired officer after the killing, telling him he "should have done a better job of protecting his daughter."

The call was traced to Vancouver, Washington, but the complaint went on state that it was unlikely Dorner was in Washington at the time of the call.

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa described Dorner as "a very sick individuaI."

"There is absolutely nothing that was done to this individual that would rationalize in any way the murder of three innocent people," Villaraigosa told CNN on Saturday. "The notion that somehow this deranged individual be given any credence boggles my mind."

Brutal past haunts L.A. cops

For now, the focus of the manhunt remains on Big Bear and the surrounding mountains, where Dorner's burned-out pickup was found Thursday.

The truck had a broken axle, which would have prevented the truck from moving, and footprints appear to show Dorner doubled back into the community, according to a source with knowledge of the investigation.

It was unclear where Dorner may have gone from there or by what means, the source said.

Armed and dangerous

Guns found in the truck also were burned, but authorities believe Dorner may have as many as 30 weapons with him, said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity. The source was not authorized to release details to the media.

Manhunt reminiscent of D.C. sniper case

Dorner, who retired from the Navy Reserve on February 1 as a lieutenant, was trained in counterinsurgency and intelligence, the source said.

It is also believed that he received flight training during his time in the Navy. Though the exact nature of his flying skills are not known, the Transportation Security Administration issued an advisory.

"While there is no specific information at this time that Dorner is considering using general aviation, TSA requests that operators use an increased level of awareness concerning any suspicious activity during the coming days," it said.

Meanwhile, Bob Dow, supervisor at the airport at Big Bear Lake, dismissed the possibility that Dorner left that airport on a plane, saying the airport monitors all planes coming in and flying out.

Navy installations throughout California and Nevada were on heightened alert, a U.S. military official told CNN.

"Security personnel are on the lookout," said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity. The measure was ordered late Thursday by Rear Adm. Dixon Smith, commander of the Navy's southwest region.

The official, who was not authorized to release details to the media, declined to discuss security procedures, but said the move was made after it became clear that Dorner gained access this week to the Naval Base at Point Loma and stayed in a motel there.

Two sailors reported Dorner approached them Wednesday and spoke with them for about 10 minutes at a San Diego coastal riverine unit -- a quick, small boat fighting team -- where Dorner served in 2006. As a Navy reservist, Dorner held security jobs at that unit.

The Navy is not certain whether Dorner still possesses any military identification he might try to use to enter a facility.

Investigators said they believe Dorner tried to steal a boat from someone in San Diego, according to the LAPD. Dorner "was not successful, and he fled the location," LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said.

A wallet containing Dorner's identification and an LAPD detective's badge was found near the San Diego airport, police said.

Authorities speculate that Dorner, who is familiar with LAPD policies and procedures, may be trying to lead authorities astray by planting clues.

"He understands the way police departments work: the policies, the procedures, the response times,'" said Brandon Webb, a security expert and editor of SOFREP.com, the Special Operations Forces Situation Report.

CNN's Chelsea J. Carter, Dana Ford, Nick Valencia, AnneClaire Stapleton, Deborah Feyerick, Sara Weisfeldt and Barbara Starr contributed to this report. Paul Vercammen and Stan Wilson reported from Big Bear Lake. Michael Martinez report and wrote from Los Angeles.

http://www.cnn.com/2013/02/09/us/lapd-attacks/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

giggsy11

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2013, 09:48:32 AM »
I doubt he will allow himself to be taken alive. Sounds like a one of those movie scripts that is playing out in real life. Trained by the government, now using that training to reek havoc and allude law enforcement. Interested in seeing how it all comes to an end.

truetrini

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2013, 12:12:39 PM »
I doubt he will allow himself to be taken alive. Sounds like a one of those movie scripts that is playing out in real life. Trained by the government, now using that training to reek havoc and allude law enforcement. Interested in seeing how it all comes to an end.
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I doubt he will allow himself to be taken alive. Sounds like a one of those movie scripts that is playing out in real life. Trained by the government, now using that training to reek havoc and allude law enforcement. Interested in seeing how it all comes to an end.

wreaking havoc is one thing, one man feeling he is Rambi is another, shit like that can only happen in the movies!

It will end only one way...he will die in a hail of police bullets.

The police have twice already shot up vehivles that looked like his now burnt out truck!


Offline fari

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2013, 12:57:25 PM »
what an intriguing case.  this man had to have felt pushed into a corner for him to take such drastic action.   sadly the police ent go let him have his day in court...them shooting to kill!

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2013, 01:56:31 PM »
How many were surprised to see that he is African-American?
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Re: Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2013, 03:10:23 PM »
I doubt he will allow himself to be taken alive. Sounds like a one of those movie scripts that is playing out in real life. Trained by the government, now using that training to reek havoc and allude law enforcement. Interested in seeing how it all comes to an end.

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Offline Bakes

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2013, 04:53:02 PM »
How many were surprised to see that he is African-American?

I for one.

We does rob ole ladies and shoot ex-lovers in fits of passion... anything that requires this much foresight and planning "ain't nobody got time for that!"
« Last Edit: February 11, 2013, 04:54:34 PM by Bakes »

Offline Deeks

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2013, 05:12:41 PM »
I doubt he will allow himself to be taken alive. Sounds like a one of those movie scripts that is playing out in real life. Trained by the government, now using that training to reek havoc and allude law enforcement. Interested in seeing how it all comes to an end.

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Offline Deeks

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2013, 05:14:08 PM »
How many were surprised to see that he is African-American?

 I was. But some ah we does break under pressure. Even the strongest(physically).

truetrini

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2013, 05:14:57 PM »
what an intriguing case.  this man had to have felt pushed into a corner for him to take such drastic action.   sadly the police ent go let him have his day in court...them shooting to kill!

How about he is a delusional, narcissistic asshole?

truetrini

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Re: "Dorner pinned down"
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2013, 03:50:27 PM »
Shoot out in Big Bear California two officers shot, Chris Dorner somewhere close by.  stay tuned...
« Last Edit: February 12, 2013, 03:52:04 PM by truetrini SC »

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2013, 07:02:11 PM »
the cabin has been on fire for the past hour - no shots since

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Offline Bakes

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2013, 10:50:12 PM »
what an intriguing case.  this man had to have felt pushed into a corner for him to take such drastic action.   sadly the police ent go let him have his day in court...them shooting to kill!

How about he is a delusional, narcissistic asshole?

I'm sure it gives you some sort of comfort to call him "delusional" and "narcissistic"... but there is nothing in the public record to suggest either of these labels are correct.  At any rate it seems like it's all over now.  It will be interesting to find out how that fire started.

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2013, 11:00:50 PM »
BBC Breaking News (@BBCBreaking) tweeted at 11:15 PM on Tue, Feb 12, 2013:
No body found or identified yet in California cabin, police say: "we will continue as if #Dorner is still out there" http://t.co/KPO4X3yC
(https://twitter.com/BBCBreaking/status/301545068010029060)

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Offline Bakes

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2013, 11:21:54 PM »
Well they remove the roadblock, stopped searching vehicles and from a high of 150 police officers on the scene CNN now reports only 30 something.  All that plus they no longer actively searching for him, so from all indication they believe pretty conclusively that he's dead.

truetrini

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #15 on: February 13, 2013, 04:37:48 AM »
what an intriguing case.  this man had to have felt pushed into a corner for him to take such drastic action.   sadly the police ent go let him have his day in court...them shooting to kill!

How about he is a delusional, narcissistic asshole?


I'm sure it gives you some sort of comfort to call him "delusional" and "narcissistic"... but there is nothing in the public record to suggest either of these labels are correct.  At any rate it seems like it's all over now.  It will be interesting to find out how that fire started.

Comfort? He fits the profile as mentally ill for sure!   And delusional and narcisstic fit to a TEE!  No need to be anything in the public record.  None whatsoever.  How many times have we ehard  "He was such a nive fella,"  noone would have guessed? 

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2013, 06:15:11 AM »
I haven't read the "manifesto", and I'm only passingly acquainted with what went dong. I'm not giving him a pass, and I'm not giving the LAPD a pass either.

The LAPD is not an organization of choir boys. Let's find out whether perverse institutional forces stimulated this outcome or whether they did not, and whether the dude was merely a bad actor relying on any tenuous pillar in justifying his responses.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 06:25:08 AM by asylumseeker »
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Offline Bakes

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #17 on: February 13, 2013, 10:58:14 AM »
Comfort? He fits the profile as mentally ill for sure!   And delusional and narcisstic fit to a TEE!  No need to be anything in the public record.  None whatsoever.  How many times have we ehard  "He was such a nive fella,"  noone would have guessed? 

Come nah man... yuh supposed to be an intelligent fella, simply repeating your claims isn't going to make them persuasive.  Everything we have learned about this fella says that he was a selfless person before all of this began.  In fact what kicked it off was him ratting out a former colleague for abusing a suspect... that wasn't about him.  Narcissistic doesn't "fit to a TEE!"  Delusional?  Hardly.  He speaks in very concrete terms about how he thinks he was wronged (and he was), and that this was about forcing the LAPD to account for the rampant racism in the organization, and the pattern of reprisals against police officers who stand up to the corruption.  He was very realistic about the fact that he wasn't going to live to see this thru.  Hardly delusional.  Repeating yourself in a louder voice is hardly an effective way to make your case.

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2013, 11:23:39 AM »
I haven't read the "manifesto", and I'm only passingly acquainted with what went dong. I'm not giving him a pass, and I'm not giving the LAPD a pass either.

The LAPD is not an organization of choir boys. Let's find out whether perverse institutional forces stimulated this outcome or whether they did not, and whether the dude was merely a bad actor relying on any tenuous pillar in justifying his responses.

All the information is there:

He reported his training sergeant, a white female (Teresa Evans), for abusing a suspect in custody.
His specific claims were that after he cuffed the suspect, a mentally ill homeless white male, she kicked the suspect twice in the chest and once in the face, under the left eye.
The suspect, Christopher Getler, told his father what happened.
They both testified before the LAPD disciplinary board, asserting the same.
Despite the fact that they both described exactly what Dorner states: two kicks to the chest and one that connected beneath the left eye, leaving a bruise.
The board dismissed Getler's testimony on the basis that he was mentally ill and therefore unreliable
The board dismissed his father's testimony as hearsay
Rather than simply dismissing the accusation against Evans; the board went the extra step of finding him guilty of filing a false report and fired him.
This administrative proceeding completed, a judge then reviewed his termination and upheld it stating that he wasn't certain that Evans kicked Getler.  Instructive that he didn't find that Dorner lied, just that there wasn't enough evidence to substantiate his charges.
Somehow the judge found that despite the difficulty in ascertaining the truth, that the board did not act improperly in terminating Getler.
Given the lack of hard evidence, an Appellate court reviewing his appeal of the judge's affirmation of his termination had no choice but to leave the decision undisturbed.
The final nail in the coffin was that two weeks ago the Navy discharged him from his reserve officer position (he was a Lieutenant with 8 years of service) as a result of the charges by the LAPD. 

Simply put, they ruined his life for having the nerve to break the blue wall of silence.  Doesn't justify his killing anyone, let alone innocent people, but it helps put this entire tragedy in perspective.

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #19 on: February 13, 2013, 12:33:16 PM »
tipping point, exists for every one, just takes the right scenario/conditions
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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #20 on: February 13, 2013, 01:03:08 PM »
tipping point, exists for every one, just takes the right scenario/conditions

Yeah, for some ppl it's rush hour traffic on say, Valentine's Day ... dahis tomorrow, lehwe see what happens.

:devil:
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 01:04:44 PM by asylumseeker »
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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #21 on: February 13, 2013, 03:19:38 PM »
Ex-LA Cop Brian Bentley on Dorner Manifesto: ‘Not Only do I Believe it, but I Lived it’

February 13, 2013


Ex-LAPD officer speaks out about the LAPD, racism, and Christopher Dorner   

by Jasmyne A. Cannick



Ex-LAPD Officer Brian Bentley today in Los Angeles, Calif.


Brian Bentley, 49, doesn’t agree with what Christopher Dorner — the ex-cop at center of a massive manhunt for the killings of three people—has done, but he certainly understands it.

As a former LAPD officer, Bentley, who is now an author, says that a Dorner-like situation was just a matter of time.
“It took longer than I thought it would for something like this to happen.”

In fact, Bentley says that when he was a police officer, there were frequent positings of “look out” bulletins on the walls at police stations featuring officers who’d been terminated and who were believed to have vendettas.

“When the Department terminated you, they intentionally tried to ruin your life,” Bentley explains.  “That’s how they discredited you.  Dorner isn’t the first ex-police officer to have a manifesto or some sort of hit list.”
And he should know.


Ex-LAPD officer Brian Bentley


Brian Bentley left the LAPD in 1999 after serving ten years with the Department. He was a police officer in 1992 during the uprising and was assigned to guard O.J. Simpson’s house in Brentwood during the infamous trial.  He served under police chiefs Daryl Gates, Bayan Lewis, Willie Williams, and Bernard Parks.  However, he was fired for writing the book One Time: The Story of a South Central Los Angeles Police Officer that detailed the massive misconduct and racism he witnessed during his time at the LAPD’s Southwest and West L.A. divisions.
He says that when he left the Department he had a manifesto of his own.  Not one that involved killing anyone, but a list of people who had wronged him during his time at the Department.

Bentley originally joined the department in 1989 after working as an assistant manager and loan officer for Security Pacific National Bank on 29th and Crenshaw in the West Adams area of Los Angeles.  He says that the bank was robbed so many times that the LAPD was always in and out the bank and over the years he developed a relationship with the officers who would respond.
“Back then the LAPD was making a big push bring on more professional people,” Brian says.  “They wanted college graduates, Blacks, and gays.”

A graduate of Westchester High School and California State University, Los Angeles, Brian remembers going downtown to apply for a public relations specialist job with the City of Los Angeles.

“I walked in and I saw big poster of a black guy in a uniform with a badge.  I saw what they were making and what public relations specialists were making and so I applied.”

Prior to joining the Department, Brian says that didn’t have any negative feelings about the LAPD.
“I signed up because I wanted to make a difference in my community—I wanted to change lives,” he says.

Young, eager to serve, and ready get involved, Brian says that he will never forget what he was told on his first day at the Los Angeles Police Academy.

“I was told that ‘we don’t want people like you here. We have people like you in Nickerson Gardens’.”
Brian continues, “It was horrible for me from day one.  I had people pushing me to quit and resign.  It was always a fight.”
The ex-police officer recalls that his training officer told him that he didn’t belong there because he was Black.
Having grown up being taught to be involved in his community, Brian lived in the same area that he patrolled.  He said that he didn’t want to be one of those officers who lived in the Inland Empire or Orange County who came in to Los Angeles.  He was a part of the community, on and off the clock.

For his “rookie year” Bentley was assigned to West L.A. and worked alongside former LAPD detective Mark Furman best known for his part in the investigation of the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman and his subsequent felony conviction for perjury.
When trying to figure out where he wanted to work permanently, Brian reflects in his book, that he eliminated 77th division after speaking to Black officers with seniority.  These officers told him that 77th division had the most outwardly racist officers of all of South Central Los Angeles along with white and Hispanic officers who went out of their way to make Black officers feel uncomfortable.

Brian settled on the LAPD’s Southwest division which was at the intersection of Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. and Denker Avenue in South Los Angeles.

At the time, Southwest had the second largest population of Black officers next to the Wilshire division which had been nicknamed “the plantation.”

He writes in his book, One Time: The Story of a South Central Los Angeles Police Officer:
Quote
Unfortunately, at the time of my arrival, the division was recovering from a highly publicized multi-million dollar lawsuit.  Several police officers from the division demolished an alleged rock house on 39th and Dalton Ave.
On top of that, two officers from the division were in the county jail awaiting trial for robbery and rape charges.  The station motto was: “We don’t get days, we get time.”  The motto meant officers didn’t get suspended without pay for misconduct, they got sentenced to prison for felony crimes. As a result, the division was nicknamed “South’s Worst.”
Despite the bad reputation of the division, I was happy to be there and nothing about the station bothered me.
But that feeling quickly changed.

When Brian Bentley joined the LAPD, he explains that it during the time that personnel complaints were not taken.
He remembers trying to make a complaint to his captain about the racism he experienced and was told, ‘I’ve been on the job for 35 years, you don’t think I know there’s racism.  Who do you want me to bring it to?  The deputy chief or the chief are just as racist?’ and then proceeded to kick him out of his office.

When asked if he thought the Department had changed since he was a part of it, Brian said no.
Diversity training for officers not just in how to deal with the community that they serve but with the officers they work with is part of what’s needed he says.

“Even though officers today can file personnel complaints—look at what happens,” he says referring to Christopher Dorner.  “There are clearly flaws in the system and Dorner is just one example of something that African-American officers have been experiencing for decades in the LAPD.”

Brian said that he’s still in close contact with friends who are LAPD officers and he says that he knows for a fact that it’s still a bad environment for African-American officers.

Sadly he recalls the experience of three of his fellow officers who also had similar manifesto’s to Christopher Dorner’s, two Black officers and one white female officer, who instead of acting on their manifesto committed suicide.  Something that Brian says is common amongst officers who are terminated and believe the Department has wronged them.

When asked if he believed the claims made in the Dorner manifesto, Brian is very clear.
“Not only do I believe it, but I lived it.”

After writing his book, Brian says that he was the subject of an investigation that was led by two officers profiled in his book that had been promoted to Sergeant and transferred to the Internal Affairs department.

Several interrogations later, including one that lasted 7 hours, Brian says that he was given a charge of misconduct for every incident of racism that he documented in his book that he didn’t report—thus giving him the most charges of misconduct in the history of the LAPD.
So why write the book?

Brian says that what was happening everyday in South Los Angeles at the hands of LAPD officers was wrong and he knew it was wrong.  He felt that he needed to write about it and that what was happening needed to be exposed.  He didn’t think he’d be fired for writing the book, reprimanded maybe, but not fired.

14 years later, today Brian Bentley is a father of three and fully invested in his children’s lives.  He’s written a second a book, a novel entitled Honor With Integrity: A Journey Behind the Blue Line.

He’s closely monitoring the Dorner situation and hoping for a peaceful end for a man whom he says that while he doesn’t condone the killings, he can definitely understand his frustration.

For this ex-police officer, he has hopes that through Christopher Dorner’s manifesto that a real conversation can take place in Los Angeles about LAPD’s internal policies as well as the racism that still exists in the Department.
On whether or not the LAPD is capable of investigating itself, Brian doesn’t believe that it is possible.

“We’ve seen what happens when the LAPD investigates the LAPD.”

Brian S. Bentley’s books One Time: The Story of a South Los Angeles Police Officer and Honor Without Integrity: A Journey Behind the Blue Line are available on Amazon.com.

Chosen as one of Essence Magazine’s 25 Women Shaping the World,  Jasmyne A. Cannick is a radio and television politics, race, and pop culture critic.  Follow her on Twitter @jasmyne and on Facebook at /jasmyne.


http://www.eurweb.com/2013/02/ex-la-cop-brian-bentley-on-dorner-manifesto-not-only-do-i-believe-it-but-i-lived-it/
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 03:21:21 PM by Bakes »

truetrini

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #22 on: February 13, 2013, 03:43:47 PM »
Comfort? He fits the profile as mentally ill for sure!   And delusional and narcisstic fit to a TEE!  No need to be anything in the public record.  None whatsoever.  How many times have we ehard  "He was such a nive fella,"  noone would have guessed? 

Come nah man... yuh supposed to be an intelligent fella, simply repeating your claims isn't going to make them persuasive.  Everything we have learned about this fella says that he was a selfless person before all of this began.  In fact what kicked it off was him ratting out a former colleague for abusing a suspect... that wasn't about him.  Narcissistic doesn't "fit to a TEE!"  Delusional?  Hardly.  He speaks in very concrete terms about how he thinks he was wronged (and he was), and that this was about forcing the LAPD to account for the rampant racism in the organization, and the pattern of reprisals against police officers who stand up to the corruption.  He was very realistic about the fact that he wasn't going to live to see this thru.  Hardly delusional.  Repeating yourself in a louder voice is hardly an effective way to make your case.


How do you explain a man who says felt he could wage war on the LA police department....
Quote
I will bring unconventional and asymmetrical warfare to those in LAPD uniform whether on or off duty. ISR is my strength and your weakness. You will now live the life of the prey.
  YET he went to a neighboring community to kill people who not on watch for him?  Delusional....as evidenced by his dead charred body!

How do you describe a man other that narcissistic when he feels he was the best shot in the LA Police department?  laughable and narcissistic to the TEE!  vulnerable narcissist.   Internal feelings of inadequacy fighting against hsi feelings that he is better than everyone else.  Comparing himself to Rodnaey King..looking for frens...

How do you define a man who wantonly kills innocent family members of his defense attorney?   Blaming him for his (Dorner's) failures?

And why would you post your "manifesto" online for all to see?  becasue you feel you can outwit and outsmart the police...delusional and narcissistic!  Because yuh looking to make a case where none is...posting info shows he did not want to kill all dem people, he wanted an audience and used killing to get it...describe that personality for me.


« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 04:29:04 PM by truetrini SC »

Offline Bakes

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #23 on: February 13, 2013, 05:03:35 PM »
How do you explain a man who says felt he could wage war on the LA police department....
Quote
I will bring unconventional and asymmetrical warfare to those in LAPD uniform whether on or off duty. ISR is my strength and your weakness. You will now live the life of the prey.
  YET he went to a neighboring community to kill people who not on watch for him?  Delusional....as evidenced by his dead charred body!

How do you describe a man other that narcissistic when he feels he was the best shot in the LA Police department?  laughable and narcissistic to the TEE!  vulnerable narcissist.   Internal feelings of inadequacy fighting against hsi feelings that he is better than everyone else.  Comparing himself to Rodnaey King..looking for frens...

How do you define a man who wantonly kills innocent family members of his defense attorney?   Blaming him for his (Dorner's) failures?

And why would you post your "manifesto" online for all to see?  becasue you feel you can outwit and outsmart the police...delusional and narcissistic!  Because yuh looking to make a case where none is...posting info shows he did not want to kill all dem people, he wanted an audience and used killing to get it...describe that personality for me.




Steups... you just talking shit.  He didn't say he was THE best shot, he said he was one of the best (best in HIS class) and that has been verified by CNN. Of the three levels (I forget the names: something, marksman and expert) he was marksman with shotgun and rifle and expert with the handgun.  The highest level.

As for waging unconventional war... criminal though it was, that is precisely what he did.  He even got them to re-open his case.  Where's the "delusion"?

What personal "failures" was Dorner blaming Randy Quan for?  Steups.. you eh see you just talking out yuh ass now?  He blamed Quan for f**king up his representation on the disciplinary matter.  In speaking to some of my lawyer friends all ah we saying the same thing.  Quan is a former police capt. who was appointed to represent him before IA by the union.  I don't know enough to fault his representation but I will tell you that there are a number of questions in my mind about how things went down and why they weren't able to get certain evidence in and to have other recusals granted.  Raising a reasonable allegation of police misconduct isn't some "personal failing" that is shit talk.

If you read his manifesto you would see there was nothing "narcissistic" about it... do you even know the meaning of the word??  He posted it to explain his side of the story and to say goodbye to his friends.  Who would kill to get an audience so people would finally listen to him??  How about a man pushed over the edge by a corrupt system.

truetrini

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #24 on: February 13, 2013, 08:42:48 PM »
ell he should have enlisted my help..I have expert in all three.   Bakes take win, I only worked in that field in the military for 2 decades.

If is one thing Dorner is is narcissistic.

And yeah I know what it means from a psychological angle too!

« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 09:10:28 PM by truetrini SC »

truetrini

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #25 on: February 13, 2013, 08:59:17 PM »
Look I went googling and found some fella or de other who feels Dorner is also as I described. 

http://lakeforest-ca.patch.com/articles/wedwcd

[quoteFriday, a clinical psychologist at George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, D.C., confirmed the anger his classmates saw more than a decade ago.

“You see a very fine line between homicide and suicide here—narcissism and depression are highly correlated,” said Dr. Alan J. Lipman, the psychologist, and founder of the Center for the Study of Violence.

“You usually see them together. ...It wouldn’t surprise me if he kills himself.

“The other possibility is that he puts himself in a situation where he can be seen and caught—not because he wants to be stopped but because he wants to be seen and to confront his accusers.”                                                 

The ex-Navy, ex-LAPD officer wanted for the slayings of three people and an all-out assault on Southern California law enforcement is probably an extremely thin-skinned, narcissistic depressive as likely to kill himself as he is to be caught, said Lipman.

Dorner’s 11-page manifesto is a fairly coherent text that spells out his extreme rage and delusions of grandeur.

“In the manifesto, the terms that are repeated over and over again indicate that he is completely enraged and enraged at what he regards as the injustice of his firing and, most importantly as he sees it, how it has destroyed his name. And that is intolerable to him,” Lipman said.

“He describes himself as having been depressed for a number of years and sees himself as destroyed and unlikely to live through this episode. This is a person hopeless about life, hopeless and envisioning vengeance and going out in a blaze of glory.

“We have seen this before in cases such as Columbine.”

Someone with this degree of narcissism has likely always been highly sensitive to perceived slights as reflected in his manifesto, which alludes to ‘injustices’ going back to his childhood, Lipman said in a phone interview.][/quote]


And then this fella....  http://www.myfoxny.com/story/21085769/ex-fbi-agent-chris-donner-is-a

Quote
One person taking a closer look is Joe Navarro, an ex-police officer who became one of the youngest agents recruited to the FBI. He spent more than 25 years as a counterintelligence agent catching spies.

Navarro, who we spoke to by phone, says he believes that Dorner is a very flawed individual with personality and character disorders; that he has an overvaluation of self and devalues others.

Basically, he's a pathological narcissist, Navarro says.

"It's amazing how much is in the manifesto," he told FOX 11. "One gets a sense about his personality and his character, and we begin to sense that this individual is very ego-centric, very narcissistic; has a high sense of himself, a high sense of entitlement."

The narcissistic personality tells us the trajectory of events is potentially more dramatic and spectacular and could lead to many more people getting hurt, he added.

"He addresses the letter to America, he talked about 'most of you,' that what he is going to do is a 'necessary evil,' and this is very much a part of aggressive narcissism, so it does tell us about his mind set," he said.



Read more: http://www.myfoxny.com/story/21085769/ex-fbi-agent-chris-donner-is-a#ixzz2Kq2cCtMG


And finally this guy...he seems totally inline with what I found.

Jim Clemente is a retired FBI agent and current advisor, writer and producer for the TV series “Criminal Minds.”  A graduate of Fordham University School of Law,  Jim was the head of the Child Sex Crimes Prosecution Team in Bronx County for the New York City Law Department.  As a result of undercover work that led to the imprisonment of a child sex offender, Clemente was recruited into the FBI.  From 1998 until October 2009 he was a Supervisory Special Agent in the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit in Quantico, Virginia. He is an expert in the fields of Sex Crimes Investigations, Sex Offender Behavior, Child Sexual Victimization, and Child Pornography.  Clemente has investigated and consulted on thousands of cases involving the violent and sexual crimes, sexual victimization of children, and he has interviewed hundreds of victims and offenders. He has also testified as an expert witness and lectured on these topics across the country and around the world.

Listen to what he ahs to say here:

http://thelip.tv/christopher-dorner-manhunt-manifesto-and-personality/

More:
Quote
Fmr. FBI negotiator: Dorner likely completely enamored with himself
This morning "Starting Point, Chris Voss, a former FBI Lead international kidnapping negotiator, weighs in on the final hours of a desperate manhunt for Chris Dorner

http://startingpoint.blogs.cnn.com/2013/02/13/fmr-fbi-negotiator-dorner-likely-completely-enamored-with-himself/
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 09:11:16 PM by truetrini SC »

truetrini

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #26 on: February 13, 2013, 09:04:02 PM »
Quote
Hopefully you analyst have done your homework. You are aware that I have always been the top shot, highest score, an expert in rifle qualifications in every unit I’ve been in. I will utilize every bit of small arms training, demolition, ordnance, and survival training I’ve been given.

Do you know why we are unsuccessful in asymmetrical and guerrilla warfare in CENTCOM theatre of operations? I’ll tell you. It’s not the inefficiency of our combatant commanders, planning, readiness or training of troops. Much like the Vietnam war, ACM, AAF, foreign fighters, Jihadist, and JAM have nothing to lose. They embrace death as it is a way of life. I simply don’t fear it. I am the walking exigent circumstance you created.

The Violence of action will be HIGH. I am the reason TAC alert was established. I will bring unconventional and asymmetrical warfare to those in LAPD uniform whether on or off duty. ISR is my strength and your weakness. You will now live the life of the prey.

Your RD’s and homes away from work will be my AO and battle space. I will utilize every tool within INT collections that I learned from NMITC in Dam Neck. You have misjudged a sleeping giant. There is no conventional threat assessment for me. JAM, New Ba’ath party, 1920 rev BGE, ACM, AAF, AQAP, AQIM and AQIZ have nothing on me. Do not deploy airships or gunships. SA-7 Manpads will be waiting. As you know I also own Barrett .50′s so your APC are defunct and futile.

You better have all your officers radio/phone muster (code 1) on or off duty every hour, on the hour.



Read more: http://ktla.com/2013/02/12/read-christopher-dorners-so-called-manifesto/#ixzz2Kq4SeaKy
Read more at http://ktla.com/2013/02/12/read-christopher-dorners-so-called-manifesto/#PaIreEql5yu1gzlp.99

EXTREME Narcissism on display here!
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 09:07:14 PM by truetrini SC »

truetrini

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #27 on: February 13, 2013, 09:14:32 PM »
http://www.americasradionewsnetwork.com/fbi-veteran-clint-van-zandt-profiles-lapd-rogue-cop-christopher-jordan-dorn

FBI Veteran Clint Van Zandt spoke with Rachel Sutheland and Lori Lundin about the LAPD Rogue Cop officer Christopher Jordan Dorner, who is accused of killing three and threatening to kill his former LAPD colleagues.

Clint Van Zandt is a popular television and radio commentator concerning crime and human behavior. Dr. Van Zandt served with the FBI for 25 years and has been party to high-profile conflicts as the Waco siege, the Oklahoma City bombing, and Unabomber.

Describes Dorner as Narcissistic too.

Listen here:

http://www.americasradionewsnetwork.com/uploads/mp3/showclips/vanzant02-08-2013_HR13.mp3
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 09:17:04 PM by truetrini SC »

truetrini

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #28 on: February 13, 2013, 09:18:56 PM »
 Retired FBI profiler: Christopher Dorner a "malignant narcissist"

Quote
Those who study the psyches of criminals said Dorner's aggressive and self-aggrandizing rant indicates a classic case of malignant narcissist personality disorder. Some people with the disorder are extremely thin-skinned and vengeful, said Mary Ellen O'Toole, a retired FBI profiler.


http://news.yahoo.com/court-file-la-ex-cop-disturbed-self-obsessed-233440436.html

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Re: Los Angeles Police Reopen Case That Led to Fugitive Ex-Cop's Firing
« Reply #29 on: February 13, 2013, 10:10:48 PM »
De Doc was sensitive to perceived slights too. He refused to see a succession of American ambassadors because of injustices he experienced and associated with the US. What does that make him?
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.