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Poll

Should coach Hart quit T&T?

No
8 (36.4%)
Yes
3 (13.6%)
Stay Under Circumstance
11 (50%)

Total Members Voted: 22

Author Topic: Stephen Hart Thread  (Read 138901 times)

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Offline dreamer

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Stephen Hart opens up in long interview
« Reply #360 on: January 25, 2016, 07:10:23 PM »
Stephen Hart has a long discussion recently with George Matheson on Scoreboard

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/xfs52QiPB3A" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/xfs52QiPB3A</a>
Supportin' de Warriors right tru.

Offline maxg

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Re: Stephen Hart opens up in long interview
« Reply #361 on: January 25, 2016, 11:10:31 PM »
nice talk...would have liked to hear opinions about the brain & football drain as far as National development is concerned
http://www.socawarriors.net/us-college-players.html

and how can things be put into place to attract these players and the experience they have gained back to our shores, to live, operate and help develop the country not only on a socially responsible level, but obvious sporting mental level as well, in a secure environment. If we keep exporting our better & many smart players whether to college or professional contracts, and have few opportunities to their returning and be respected, then the youngsters would hardly ever have the opportunity to learn from the best, just from who is left - not that those left do not try their best. Is just the returning deportees are not the examples they need.

Offline Soccerpro

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Re: Stephen Hart opens up in long interview
« Reply #362 on: January 26, 2016, 12:19:55 AM »
Here is a new Stephen Hart interview. He discusses T&T, Canada and more.

https://somesoccerplayingcanadians.wordpress.com/2016/01/25/manager-talk-stephen-hart/

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #363 on: February 05, 2016, 12:11:50 AM »
Troubled Hart wants proper tools
By Walter Alibey, The Guardian


A troubled national football coach Stephen Hart maintains he will resign if he does not get the tools necessary to properly prepare the Soca Warriors to qualify for the 2018 World Cup in Russia. The Trinidadian-born Canadian coach threatened to walk away from the team last year, sighting lack of funding which at the time had hampered his team’s preparations.

Yesterday Hart told the Guardian his stance remains the same, explaining it’s either we are serious about providing what is necessary for qualification or we are not. “If you are going to hold the players and myself responsible for results, then everything must be in place to ensure we are provided with the tools to give us a chance at being successful,” Hart said.

He added: “World Cup qualifiers are a marathon and in international football consistency is very difficult to achieve. Successful teams take care of all the details they are in control of to ensure proper preparation. The association has assured us they will do their best to assist in aspects where they are in control. As always we will do whatever it takes to get it right on the field.”

The T&T Soca Warriors have four points from the two matches to date, following a win over Guatemala (November 13) and a goalless draw to the United States. The qualifiers resume in March with matches at home and away against St Vincent and the Grenadines. But Hart’s men are unsure if they will be involved in a friendly encounter before the qualifiers, although it appears to be necessary.

Hart said this arrangement was being made by the T&TFA which is being led by new president David John-Williams. Attempts to reach John-Williams proved futile and general secretary Azard Khan said the president was dealing with arranging the game on his own. But even if this match is arranged, the Soca Warriors would field an under-strength team as it would be difficult to get players outside of a FIFA break.

 Hart noted: “Understand that there are no FIFA dates that allow a team to play International football, which means that even if we have a game, clubs are not obliged to release players.

With MLS clubs beginning their pre-season, clubs in season and the pro league in full swing, it will be difficult to get a squad to play. However, the Association is  working on a potential International game, where some of the players may be able to play.”

Following on the heels of a disappointing performance by the T&T team which saw them succumb to a heart-wrenching 0-1 loss to Haiti in the Copa America Centenario Play-Off in January, the coach is eager to get back his full team for the coming matches.

Having his full team will depend on which players are consistently playing well, which have clubs and which are fit and ready. The Vincentians are still to get a point in the qualifiers having lost their opening two matches of the campaign, 1-6 to the USA and 0-4 to Guatemala.

In spite of this, Hart said he will not be taking them lightly as he described the regional team as good with proper balance and team speed.

“They will want to get maximum points at home and put on a good performance for their supporters. In today’s International climate if you are not fully concentrated, you can easily drop points. Even if we win the next two games we will still need a result from Guatemala or USA,” Hart explained

Offline FF

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #364 on: February 05, 2016, 05:00:28 AM »
Sighting lack of funds eh
THE BEATINGS WILL CONTINUE UNTIL MORALE IMPROVES

Offline lefty

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #365 on: February 05, 2016, 05:56:40 AM »
this whole campaign going and fall apart and all progress made destroyed...watch d ride.....we traded sputtering along clumsily with reasonable results for completely clueless with ting falling apart, based on a "manifesto"
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 05:59:28 AM by lefty »
I pity the fool....

Offline Quags

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #366 on: February 05, 2016, 06:17:08 AM »
Don't understand the article , he wants to walk for a friendly with no overseas based players .?

Offline Flex

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #367 on: February 05, 2016, 06:36:09 AM »
Troubled Hart wants proper tools
By Walter Alibey, The Guardian


A troubled national football coach Stephen Hart maintains he will resign if he does not get the tools necessary to properly prepare the Soca Warriors to qualify for the 2018 World Cup in Russia. The Trinidadian-born Canadian coach threatened to walk away from the team last year, sighting lack of funding which at the time had hampered his team’s preparations.

Yesterday Hart told the Guardian his stance remains the same, explaining it’s either we are serious about providing what is necessary for qualification or we are not. “If you are going to hold the players and myself responsible for results, then everything must be in place to ensure we are provided with the tools to give us a chance at being successful,” Hart said.

He added: “World Cup qualifiers are a marathon and in international football consistency is very difficult to achieve. Successful teams take care of all the details they are in control of to ensure proper preparation. The association has assured us they will do their best to assist in aspects where they are in control. As always we will do whatever it takes to get it right on the field.”

The T&T Soca Warriors have four points from the two matches to date, following a win over Guatemala (November 13) and a goalless draw to the United States. The qualifiers resume in March with matches at home and away against St Vincent and the Grenadines. But Hart’s men are unsure if they will be involved in a friendly encounter before the qualifiers, although it appears to be necessary.

Hart said this arrangement was being made by the T&TFA which is being led by new president David John-Williams. Attempts to reach John-Williams proved futile and general secretary Azard Khan said the president was dealing with arranging the game on his own. But even if this match is arranged, the Soca Warriors would field an under-strength team as it would be difficult to get players outside of a FIFA break.

 Hart noted: “Understand that there are no FIFA dates that allow a team to play International football, which means that even if we have a game, clubs are not obliged to release players.

With MLS clubs beginning their pre-season, clubs in season and the pro league in full swing, it will be difficult to get a squad to play. However, the Association is  working on a potential International game, where some of the players may be able to play.”

Following on the heels of a disappointing performance by the T&T team which saw them succumb to a heart-wrenching 0-1 loss to Haiti in the Copa America Centenario Play-Off in January, the coach is eager to get back his full team for the coming matches.

Having his full team will depend on which players are consistently playing well, which have clubs and which are fit and ready. The Vincentians are still to get a point in the qualifiers having lost their opening two matches of the campaign, 1-6 to the USA and 0-4 to Guatemala.

In spite of this, Hart said he will not be taking them lightly as he described the regional team as good with proper balance and team speed.

“They will want to get maximum points at home and put on a good performance for their supporters. In today’s International climate if you are not fully concentrated, you can easily drop points. Even if we win the next two games we will still need a result from Guatemala or USA,” Hart explained


Maybe that's exactly what they what....

 ;D

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Sando

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #368 on: February 05, 2016, 07:08:37 AM »
Anyone ever notice David John Williams never around for comments, is like he have no respect for the people.

That could be a big problem, because people don't have to go to games either.

Let him keep up his shit.

Like Flex pointed out, that's probably exactly what they want for Hart to resign and then the TTFA will quietly slip in Stuart Charles.


Offline R45

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #369 on: February 05, 2016, 11:01:37 AM »
The nepotism of this new administration is looking to be worse than the previous (maybe as bad as the JW era?).

Offline maxg

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #370 on: February 05, 2016, 11:46:22 AM »
mind he don't get a 'Oliver letter' for calling a backhoe ah spade.
"oh, so if things don't improve you will consider walking ? well walk now ! We have someone else. "
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 11:47:58 AM by maxg »

Offline Controversial

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #371 on: February 05, 2016, 01:28:32 PM »
Troubled Hart wants proper tools
By Walter Alibey, The Guardian


A troubled national football coach Stephen Hart maintains he will resign if he does not get the tools necessary to properly prepare the Soca Warriors to qualify for the 2018 World Cup in Russia. The Trinidadian-born Canadian coach threatened to walk away from the team last year, sighting lack of funding which at the time had hampered his team’s preparations.

Yesterday Hart told the Guardian his stance remains the same, explaining it’s either we are serious about providing what is necessary for qualification or we are not. “If you are going to hold the players and myself responsible for results, then everything must be in place to ensure we are provided with the tools to give us a chance at being successful,” Hart said.

He added: “World Cup qualifiers are a marathon and in international football consistency is very difficult to achieve. Successful teams take care of all the details they are in control of to ensure proper preparation. The association has assured us they will do their best to assist in aspects where they are in control. As always we will do whatever it takes to get it right on the field.”

The T&T Soca Warriors have four points from the two matches to date, following a win over Guatemala (November 13) and a goalless draw to the United States. The qualifiers resume in March with matches at home and away against St Vincent and the Grenadines. But Hart’s men are unsure if they will be involved in a friendly encounter before the qualifiers, although it appears to be necessary.

Hart said this arrangement was being made by the T&TFA which is being led by new president David John-Williams. Attempts to reach John-Williams proved futile and general secretary Azard Khan said the president was dealing with arranging the game on his own. But even if this match is arranged, the Soca Warriors would field an under-strength team as it would be difficult to get players outside of a FIFA break.

 Hart noted: “Understand that there are no FIFA dates that allow a team to play International football, which means that even if we have a game, clubs are not obliged to release players.

With MLS clubs beginning their pre-season, clubs in season and the pro league in full swing, it will be difficult to get a squad to play. However, the Association is  working on a potential International game, where some of the players may be able to play.”

Following on the heels of a disappointing performance by the T&T team which saw them succumb to a heart-wrenching 0-1 loss to Haiti in the Copa America Centenario Play-Off in January, the coach is eager to get back his full team for the coming matches.

Having his full team will depend on which players are consistently playing well, which have clubs and which are fit and ready. The Vincentians are still to get a point in the qualifiers having lost their opening two matches of the campaign, 1-6 to the USA and 0-4 to Guatemala.

In spite of this, Hart said he will not be taking them lightly as he described the regional team as good with proper balance and team speed.

“They will want to get maximum points at home and put on a good performance for their supporters. In today’s International climate if you are not fully concentrated, you can easily drop points. Even if we win the next two games we will still need a result from Guatemala or USA,” Hart explained


Maybe that's exactly what they what....

 ;D




DJW won't remove Hart but he also won't pay him or fund the team, because he has an ulterior motive ...it's simple.. He wants Hart out ..

DJW is destructive and will destroy everything Hart has built in the last few years for his own greedy objective..

I was one of the first men on here to say this and it's coming to pass.. The reason DJW quiet is because he knows what he is doing... Men like him don't care about national football, he cares about his own pocket..

Then you have fools coming on here to tout their horn about him because they have an agenda or just plain stupid to see what he wants to do..

TT govt have the money to allocate to our football, where is the money? Where is that idiot Sando...
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 01:32:53 PM by Controversial »

Offline Flex

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #372 on: February 19, 2016, 05:35:00 AM »
Don’t lose Hart says ‘Tiger’ Phillips.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


National coach Stephen Hart is the coaching model needed to take T&T football to the point of professionalism. This is the view of former national goalkeeper and technical director of local football Lincoln ‘Tiger’ Phillips.

Back home from his US-base, Phillips noted that the sport appears to be dangling on the comeback curve and suggested a number of key factors were preventing regular qualification to World Cup tournaments, as well as stunting T&T’s progress in the CONCACAF region. 

Though in existence for well over a decade, the T&T Professional League according to Phillips, was still grappling to become self sustainable while the public seem unconvinced of its quality.

Phillips feels the work he started as technical director a few years ago should be continued and would lead to the production of coaches such as Hart and solve the problem of finance, which has been a thorn in local football.

In his book ‘Rising Above and Beyond the Crossbar’ Phillips describes a coach as a mentor, friend, disciplinarian, taskmaster, therapist and confidant, saying he is a brother, father and educator and someone who shapes and influences lives for better, which are qualities he has seen in the Canadian coach as he continues to inspire his troops to impressive performances and good results on the trail to the 2018 World Cup.

Phillips is urging the David John-Williams led T&T Football Association (TTFA) to not make the mistake and lose Hart, adding all the necessary tools needed should be given to Hart as he charts his way to the World Cup and continues to be an exemplar to coaches in the pro league, primary schools, academies and other youth teams.

He feels the downfall in local football, particularly at the pro league level, has been the focus on pro players making the professional league when it should be the other way around. “To have a successful league you need to start from the ground and go up, meaning that focus should be placed on developing the young players and coaches at the communities and gather the support at the same time” he explained.

During his reign as technical director, Phillips introduced a number of coaching courses that facilitated all levels of coaches, such as the ‘D’ License- which teaches the basics of the game of football, exposes different methods of coaching and educates all about the laws of the game. This focus on coaching, Phillips said, must be embraced by all, from the president of the various administrations to the groundsman, all of whom must view it as working for the federation and the players.

The courses, Phillips explained, must also involve players who are approaching the end of their careers, as was done by former United States coach Bruce Arena a few years ago and should be enhanced to include ‘C, B and A’ Licenses.

During these courses, coaches are expected to be demonstrators by showing how to execute the basics which would solve the problem of poor possession in T&T football. “I think the main problem in our football has been our inability to keep possession of the ball and this is crucial to improve
the quality of football at the club and national levels.”   

He expressed that coaches must be given something to look forward to, such as courses at top clubs abroad, like Barcelona, Manchester United and Real Madrid and called on the pro league to make very effort to have its coaches go out on international courses. “On their return from these courses, football administrators/administration are to ensure they are given the chance to test their knowledge of what they learnt at a team.” 

When asked about how clubs and leagues will ensure financial stability, Phillips said it should begin with government and corporate T&T. However he stressed that teams must see it as a responsibility and not a favour, to ensure financiers are given back for their input. “Teams must proudly tag the name of their sponsors on to their uniforms to give as much advertisement as possible,” Phillips said.

He commended pro league chief executive Dexter Skeene for his work but called for a team of experts in their respective fields such as Dr Iva Gloudon, Anton Corneal, Alvin Corneal, Margaret Ottley, Larry Romany, Bertille St Clair, Dwight Yorke and Stern John among others, to get the business of football together for the benefit of all.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Sam

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #373 on: February 19, 2016, 06:03:50 AM »

He commended pro league chief executive Dexter Skeene for his work but called for a team of experts in their respective fields such as Dr Iva Gloudon, Anton Corneal, Alvin Corneal, Margaret Ottley, Larry Romany, Bertille St Clair, Dwight Yorke and Stern John among others, to get the business of football together for the benefit of all.

Watch de names Lincoln callin nah, same setta people all de time.

Lincoln, go an sleep nah and stop kissing ass.

Sheldon cah get back he wok.

Romany, Corneal, Skeene, St Clair, you bring them up in de States and train them, you could get them too.

Faster than a speeding pittbull
Stronger than a shot of ba-bash
Capable of storming any fete


Offline Deeks

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #374 on: February 19, 2016, 08:17:22 AM »
The way United playing these days, it kinda hard to use them as a model for ball possession football.

Offline SWF Reporter

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Hart feelings: Dribblers wanted, what the Warriors miss and the new Bert Neptune
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868)


“The genuine quality to pick up the ball and run at defenders and penetrate or draw attention,” Trinidad and Tobago National Senior Team coach Stephen Hart told Wired868, “and then be able to dish the ball off to players is now absent in Trinidad and Tobago football. When you go to the Pro League, who really excites you when they get the ball?

“Of course players can still shake and have quick feet. They can elude somebody. But they don’t destroy and I think it is a disappearing quality.”


“Soca Warriors” coach Stephen Hart spoke to Wired868 about the qualities he wants to bring to the National Team, the depth of his player pool and the strengths and weaknesses of the Pro League. And why he enjoys watching Central FC attacker Kadeem Corbin and the Shivu Boys Hindu College player of Tyrel “Pappy” Emmanuel and Quinn Rodney.

Wired868: What can Trinidad and Tobago football fans look forward to in 2016? And how costly was our 2016 Copa America Centenario play off defeat to Haiti?

Stephen Hart: Not getting to the Copa America was not only a disappointment, it was an opportunity lost to develop against some of the better teams in world football at the moment.

But we have to look forward. We (had) the first opportunity to have an all-local camp—a short camp albeit—and a game in Grenada. Now, we have two games against St Vincent (and the Grenadines), which to me is the ultimate priority at the moment.

Once that is completed, we will look at (our schedule for the rest of the year).

We have already secured a game against Uruguay, which is one of the top five or six teams in world football on their last four years of performance. And we are trying to secure a second game.

We originally thought we would play Chile but they want to play on the same date as Uruguay. And it is understandable because they want to peak at the right time for the tournament. So we are working on a second game in that time period.

Wired868: What is the difference in facing a team like Argentina or Uruguay in a friendly and in a tournament?

Hart: Well, I think the thing about the friendly game against Argentina (is that) it was their last game before they went to the World Cup. So obviously the game was a little more competitive than a regular friendly international, simply because players were playing for their selection. And players were playing also to be on the starting eleven.

I think it is going to be the same thing against Uruguay and if we get another game (against a South American nation) so close to the tournament. It will be their last game and that’s a lot different than if we were playing them last December or something like that.

So it does make a difference to them at that stage.

Wired868: We have had a couple of injuries recently, are you satisfied with the depth of our player pool?

Hart: It’s the nature of football really (as far as injuries go). Contrary to popular belief, Trinidad and Tobago’s player pool is very small at the moment while we sort of wait for the maturity of some of the Under-20s to come up and to get themselves playing on a consistent basis. Not many of them are playing on a consistent basis.

The pool in general is a small pool. (Our talented young players from the National Under-23 and National Under-20 Teams) need more playing time and probably a couple of international friendlies to understand how to approach a camp environment and to observe them playing at a higher level.

Wired868: What do you look out for when you go to Pro League games?

Hart: When you’re building a team, you have to look at it positionally. You can’t just pick players because they are having a good season or half a season or a couple of good games.

If in the position you are looking for, a player shows consistency or qualities. Or there is a player who can bring something completely different to the team that you can use tactically, of course you look for that player.

But, in building a team, you look for what you need  positionally. You need two players per position roughly. (And) you need some sort of flexibility in terms of the thinking of the player, etcetera.

Wired868: You have complained about the fitness levels of Pro League players before? How do you gauge players’ individual fitness when a game is slow?

Hart: I can’t. I have seen a couple games in the Pro League and 90 percent of the games start off well; tactically, shape-wise, pressing and so on. Everything is beautiful.

But by the 40th minute, you already see a breakdown in shape and organisation and recovery and things like that. If one or two players are not physically capable, the whole team starts to break down. And even at an international level.

You saw in the US game for example, they were able to push in with a little more strength and vitality in the second half of the second half. And only in the last 10 or 15 minutes, we caught ourselves with the changes and started to push them back again.

I think that is the difference in international football. It is those that can mentally endure when things are past your comfort zone.

Wired868: What qualities are you looking to add to your squad right now?

Hart: We need a couple box to box midfielders. It will be very good if they have good shooting ability from outside the penalty area. Because I’m concerned with the amount of shots statistically from my team.

And I think right now in Trinidad and Tobago football, there is an absence of wide players who can pick up and destroy and penetrate and create opportunities from wide positions. So you are always looking for that.

And I love to play with full backs who can come forward. And full backs are far and few between in the league.

And I am talking about genuine fullbacks. No disrespect but some of them can defend and they do okay. But there are very few that have the capacity to get up and down the field.

Wired868: So you are finding it harder to find dribblers? Is it a crisis in the local game now?

Hart: The genuine quality to pick up the ball and run at defenders and penetrate or draw attention and then be able to dish the ball off to players is now absent in Trinidad and Tobago football.

When you go to the Pro League, who really excites you when they get the ball?

Of course players can still shake and have quick feet. They can elude somebody but they don’t destroy and I think it is a disappearing quality. Even when I watch a lot of (SSFL) games, there is not a lot of it. I think is something we need to address in our player development model.

Wired868: How would we address that?

Hart: I think there has been a lot of emphasis on faking and shaking and less emphasis on dribbling as a penetrative action (and) attacking the space behind the defender.

(I am talking about) not just off-balancing the defender but going past; and now you are one player up because they are one player down. And now the second defender has to make a decision. Does he stay marking somebody or does he come to help cover the space you are attacking?

I think that kind of destructive dribbling is something that we need to encourage. When a player has that quality at a very young age, stop saying to them ‘pass the ball’.

You can teach them to pass the ball later. You can teach them to combine later. But if you don’t (nurture penetrative players then) you have to break teams down with passing, very intricate passing. And that is extremely, extremely difficult. Especially on our pitches.

Wired868: I know you won’t want to give examples from the Pro League? But what about from the SSFL? Does Shiva Boys’ Quinn Rodney fit that role as a destructive dribbler?

Hart: Yes. Definitely. And I think he should be encouraged. And even the midfielder, “Pappy” (Tyrel Emmanuel). He should be encouraged when he shakes his man to attack that space in the midfield. Because getting between the lines is a very modern part of football.

It is not good enough to just shake your man and then next thing you know the man is back on top of you. Then you haven’t really done anything.

So you have to make defenders commit and make lines commit and then your players run off of that and you can be creative from the midfield. So it is not only about (dribbling) out wide. It is about from the midfield too.

So if I give you a modern example, you look at (Barcelona midfielder Andres) Iniesta and how he makes it happen. Even (Santi) Carzola with Arsenal. They get behind the midfield line and force the backline to make decisions.

Wired868: Are there other qualities we are missing now?

Hart: I think we used to have a lot of strikers like (Jerren) Nixon and Stern (John) who were really good in the box. Nixon could also come (at you) from outside the box.

We are not really producing the strikers I would like, who are aerially strong and two footed. We are limited at the moment.

But we are a small country and top player are always going to be like waves in an ocean rather than a river.

Wired868: So it is just cycle and not that we are doing something wrong in player development?

Hart: At the end of the day, if you have a lot of football at youth level, the cream will rise to the top. That is what the big countries have. They have a lot of football and there is a lot of competition. Competition is what breeds excellence.

So when you have a lot of competition at the youth level, you will find that you would probably raise those kinds of players. So, yes, I would put it down to player development too. Maybe 50/50.

But right now I am racking my brain thinking who is coming through as a striker that can put fear into people.

I think Corbin has tremendous talent. But he needs guidance and he needs to be playing on a consistent basis. But certainly he has a good energy level and he gets into good positions and he can score goals. He has proven that.

He reminds me a lot of Bert Neptune and he wouldn’t know how big a compliment that is. But I fear for him that, like so many other players, he might not realise the potential he really has.

« Last Edit: March 27, 2016, 09:43:15 AM by Flex »

Offline Flex

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Hart feelings: Haitian/Honduran lessons, the Cornell dilemma and balls like grapefruits.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868)


“I remember the decision in the (2013) Gold Cup when we were going to play Honduras (for a place in the knockout round) and I made six changes,” Trinidad and Tobago National Senior Team coach Stephen Hart told Wired868. “And Leo Beenhakker was completely against it. He said: ‘I would not do that’. Those were his words: ‘I would not do that’.

“And I felt the players were emotionally and physically finished and I made the six changes and we got the result against Honduras. And I remember him coming to the dressing room and saying: ‘You have balls like grapefruits’!”


In Part Two of our exclusive interview, “Soca Warriors” head coach Stephen Hart talks about harsh lessons against Haiti and Honduras, why Trinidad and Tobago football cannot afford the Pro League’s collapse and the Cornell Glen dilemma:

Wired868: You are in your third year as Trinidad and Tobago coach. How far along is the project in terms of the qualities you want to combine into a squad? 50 percent? 60 percent?

Stephen Hart: I would say that figure sounds about right. It is very hard for me to assess in terms of success and failure because the bottom line to me is the result. But in terms of me building a team, the players have been tremendous.

But, having said that, we have not played enough football… Some people would say we went to two Gold Cups and did reasonably well. The first one we lost in the 80-something minute to Mexico and the second one, we went out to a penalty shoot out situation (against Panama)…

But first you have to look at the best teams in CONCACAF and what they are doing. And the best teams are playing significantly more games than we are. So it is hard to evaluate (our progress).

Wired868: What lessons, if any, have been learnt from our 2016 Copa America Centenario play off defeat to Haiti?

Hart: I think everybody has to feel good about the environment they are in and the situation they are going into. And going into the Haiti game, there was a lot of tension.

The players had come off a euphoric situation with the United States (draw) and then, unfortunately, there was a strike situation and that kind of put a damper on things. And people can easily point the finger and say well you shouldn’t have picked those players. But at the end of the day, you have to support the players that have gone to fight for the country and play for you. Because as a coach you want players who buy into what you do. No coach wants players who don’t buy into what he is trying to do.

I watched the game a couple times and it was not as bad as I thought it was (when I was) looking from the bench. We had a lot of early chances in the game and even half chances. And even to the end of the game we had chances to take the game into overtime.

The goal was an unfortunate one. In every game of football there is always the possibility that you will lose. And the longer the game went on, the more confidence Haiti got. And their substitutes had a good impact on the game.

Wired868: You have never spoken much about that 8-1 loss to Canada in the Brazil 2014 World Cup qualifying campaign. What lessons are there in that defeat?

Hart: What happened with Canada is we started to lose a lot of quality. We lost Ali Gerber, who was a prolific scorer at international level, going into the qualification. And then we lost Josh Simpson who was a very dynamic wide player and gave us a lot of penetration and was just on his way to do very well in Europe. And Rob Friend was in Germany and he got injured.

Canada was not a team that scores a lot of goals but we had some good runs with those players in the side… But we were getting caught with a generation of players that were getting older. I had in the back of my mind that the players could not play the two internationals (within four days) in the qualification. But, as it turned out when we reached to play (Cuba), Dwayne De Rosario got injured and we lost not just one of your biggest players but one of your inspirations in the dressing room. And things started to fall apart.

So now I made a decision to lean on the players that I should have told I don’t think you can play the two games back to back. But because of the situation, I leaned. And it did not work out.

A lot of people said a lot of things but we played seven games and only gave away about three goals in that period. And then in one game, we collapsed mentally and physically. We completely collapsed.

It is funny because, when we played Honduras in Canada, we had 13 or 15 shots at Honduras and they had one and we ended up tying the game (0-0). And I remember Atiba Hutchinson walking off and saying to me ‘I hope this game doesn’t come back to haunt us’. We should have buried them… And then we go down there and they have 13 shots for the entire game and score eight. It was unexplainable.

And as a coach, just like (against) Haiti, you have to accept the responsibility. It is your team, so you accept the responsibility.

Wired868: What do results like that mean to coaches? Is there a feeling of impotence or doubt?

Hart: We have seen Manchester United get six, Arsenal get seven and (Manchester) City get five and six. Roma get seven, Jose Mourinho got five. There are games like that.

Now you go in the dressing room and you are faced with two decisions. And this was the big decision in Honduras (when Canada needed a point but trailed 4-0 at halftime). I could have said ‘save face, batten down the hatches and keep it at four’. But I thought that was a betrayal to football and the Canadian public.

There were players in the dressing room (at halftime) who were saying we need to have damage control. And I said: ‘No, what we need now is to go out there and show the public that we will at least fight to bring some respectability back into the game’.

And, rightly or wrongly, that was my decision. So, we scored one goal and we gave up four more…

I think 90 percent of the coaches would go for damage control. Make it 4-1 maybe and it doesn’t look so bad. People like to say: ‘Whether you lose by six or two, you still lose, so go for it’. But at the end of the day, they don’t believe that. They talk it; but they don’t believe that…

Wired868: What has been your biggest decision so far as Trinidad and Tobago coach?

Hart: There are some players that I left out that I probably could have gone with a little bit longer. But you have to think about the group dynamics: how the team moulds itself; how they operate off the field; are they good with each other. I think that is extremely important. So maybe there were a couple decisions along those lines.

I remember the decision in the (2013) Gold Cup when we were going to play Honduras (for a place in the knockout round) and I made six changes. And Leo Beenhakker was completely against it. He said: ‘I would not do that’. Those were his words: ‘I would not do that’. And I felt the players were emotionally and physically finished and I made the six changes and we got the result against Honduras.

And I remember him coming to the dressing room and saying: ‘You have balls like grapefruits’! (Laughs)

It was a big decision and one that fortunately paid off.

Wired868: Can you say more about the decision to leave out Cornell Glen?

Hart: You make a decision and you live with your decision, whether rightly or wrongly. I had Cornell for just the gold cup and he didn’t give me any trouble. I liked him; he is a talent. He came off the bench and he did his best. He started the Honduras game and he did well.

Maybe sometimes you get caught up when you look at a player’s age and you think of the contribution (you need). And you also have to think if you are going to bring a player of such status and tell them they are going to play off the bench. You don’t know how they are going to react to that…

Cornell is a player of high status in Trinidad football. So rather than take that kind of chance, you make a decision one way or the other, rightly or wrongly, and you live with it.

Wired868: Is it a final decision? Or might he be a super sub at some point in the World Cup qualifying campaign?

Hart: I had a chat with Cornell down at the Hasely Crawford Stadium one day and I tried to explain it to him. If you look at my situation, I have had very little opportunity to bring people in on an exhibition basis. Most of the times, you are going into a tournament with just one practice game… I explained that to him…

But I wouldn’t say the door is closed. He is far away (in India) eh. But if he says to me: ‘I will be a bit player or a part player or whatever you wish for me’. Then, yes, definitely.

The Caribbean Cup is coming up (and) we have a lot of football this year. So who knows. I will keep an eye on him. I try to see some of his games and he had a good season last year…

I think the (India) league is a technical kind of league. There is a lot of space to play. But he can still do what he does, (which is) score goals.

Wired868: And what of our Pro League? How do you rate this season, as compared to the last one?

Hart: It started off well (with) a lot of parity between the teams and it is still somewhat that way. But I must admit that I am a little disappointed in the quality in the second half of the season.

The big part of football for me is the intensity and the ability to attack and close down space. Most of the games I see are played in 60 and 65 yards of space and international football and the modern game is played in about 40. So you get a false sense of the ability of the players because for me it is when you are asked to play faster, which means think faster, can you do it.

I don’t think those demands are being made in the Pro League and the CONCACAF level of the Champions League sort of shows that.

Wired868: Do you think the problems are due to team preparation? Has the financial issues of the Pro League had an impact there?

Hart: I can’t talk about the preparation because I don’t know what coaches go through. And that would be unfair to judge from sitting in the stands where I am just like any other person in the public.

But certainly the financial situation is worrying because there are a lot of players who depend on the Pro League to feed their families and I’m sure it plays on their minds. Also the teams can’t get the players that they would like or bring in the players to raise the standard a little bit. I am sure that has an effect.

Wired868: A former national player, Makan Hislop, said many Pro League players head to the minor leagues because there they get money in their hand before kick off while sometimes their clubs are weeks late in paying. What do you think of that dilemma for the players?

Hart: It is a problem because why would I come to the Pro League and support the Pro League when I can see the same players in a minor league? So it diminishes the quality of your own product, which you are trying to create. I think if you have a made a commitment to a club, then you have to live up to that commitment.

Now having said that, it also goes for the owners. If you have made a commitment and the players have earned the right to be paid. They must be paid.

Wired868: What impact could there be on our World Cup campaign if, due to financial issues, the Pro League folds?

Hart: I think it would be devastating for our football. The quality of the local leagues in the top tier of Concacaf: Costa Rica, Mexico, the United States, Honduras and even Guatemala. They all have good club structure and a good league; a league good enough to keep standards relatively high and to create competitive players for the national team.

If we go down in Trinidad and Tobago, then more than likely all football (here) would go down. I think it would be devastating for the country and the players. I would not want that to happen to them at all.

« Last Edit: March 31, 2016, 02:52:45 AM by Flex »
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Hart feelings: Haitian/Honduran lessons, the Cornell dilemma and balls like grapefruits.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868)


“I remember the decision in the (2013) Gold Cup when we were going to play Honduras (for a place in the knockout round) and I made six changes,” Trinidad and Tobago National Senior Team coach Stephen Hart told Wired868. “And Leo Beenhakker was completely against it. He said: ‘I would not do that’. Those were his words: ‘I would not do that’.

“And I felt the players were emotionally and physically finished and I made the six changes and we got the result against Honduras. And I remember him coming to the dressing room and saying: ‘You have balls like grapefruits’!”


In Part Two of our exclusive interview, “Soca Warriors” head coach Stephen Hart talks about harsh lessons against Haiti and Honduras, why Trinidad and Tobago football cannot afford the Pro League’s collapse and the Cornell Glen dilemma:

Wired868: You are in your third year as Trinidad and Tobago coach. How far along is the project in terms of the qualities you want to combine into a squad? 50 percent? 60 percent?

Stephen Hart: I would say that figure sounds about right. It is very hard for me to assess in terms of success and failure because the bottom line to me is the result. But in terms of me building a team, the players have been tremendous.

But, having said that, we have not played enough football… Some people would say we went to two Gold Cups and did reasonably well. The first one we lost in the 80-something minute to Mexico and the second one, we went out to a penalty shoot out situation (against Panama)…

But first you have to look at the best teams in CONCACAF and what they are doing. And the best teams are playing significantly more games than we are. So it is hard to evaluate (our progress).

Wired868: What lessons, if any, have been learnt from our 2016 Copa America Centenario play off defeat to Haiti?

Hart: I think everybody has to feel good about the environment they are in and the situation they are going into. And going into the Haiti game, there was a lot of tension.

The players had come off a euphoric situation with the United States (draw) and then, unfortunately, there was a strike situation and that kind of put a damper on things. And people can easily point the finger and say well you shouldn’t have picked those players. But at the end of the day, you have to support the players that have gone to fight for the country and play for you. Because as a coach you want players who buy into what you do. No coach wants players who don’t buy into what he is trying to do.

I watched the game a couple times and it was not as bad as I thought it was (when I was) looking from the bench. We had a lot of early chances in the game and even half chances. And even to the end of the game we had chances to take the game into overtime.

The goal was an unfortunate one. In every game of football there is always the possibility that you will lose. And the longer the game went on, the more confidence Haiti got. And their substitutes had a good impact on the game.

Wired868: You have never spoken much about that 8-1 loss to Canada in the Brazil 2014 World Cup qualifying campaign. What lessons are there in that defeat?

Hart: What happened with Canada is we started to lose a lot of quality. We lost Ali Gerber, who was a prolific scorer at international level, going into the qualification. And then we lost Josh Simpson who was a very dynamic wide player and gave us a lot of penetration and was just on his way to do very well in Europe. And Rob Friend was in Germany and he got injured.

Canada was not a team that scores a lot of goals but we had some good runs with those players in the side… But we were getting caught with a generation of players that were getting older. I had in the back of my mind that the players could not play the two internationals (within four days) in the qualification. But, as it turned out when we reached to play (Cuba), Dwayne De Rosario got injured and we lost not just one of your biggest players but one of your inspirations in the dressing room. And things started to fall apart.

So now I made a decision to lean on the players that I should have told I don’t think you can play the two games back to back. But because of the situation, I leaned. And it did not work out.

A lot of people said a lot of things but we played seven games and only gave away about three goals in that period. And then in one game, we collapsed mentally and physically. We completely collapsed.

It is funny because, when we played Honduras in Canada, we had 13 or 15 shots at Honduras and they had one and we ended up tying the game (0-0). And I remember Atiba Hutchinson walking off and saying to me ‘I hope this game doesn’t come back to haunt us’. We should have buried them… And then we go down there and they have 13 shots for the entire game and score eight. It was unexplainable.

And as a coach, just like (against) Haiti, you have to accept the responsibility. It is your team, so you accept the responsibility.

Wired868: What do results like that mean to coaches? Is there a feeling of impotence or doubt?

Hart: We have seen Manchester United get six, Arsenal get seven and (Manchester) City get five and six. Roma get seven, Jose Mourinho got five. There are games like that.

Now you go in the dressing room and you are faced with two decisions. And this was the big decision in Honduras (when Canada needed a point but trailed 4-0 at halftime). I could have said ‘save face, batten down the hatches and keep it at four’. But I thought that was a betrayal to football and the Canadian public.

There were players in the dressing room (at halftime) who were saying we need to have damage control. And I said: ‘No, what we need now is to go out there and show the public that we will at least fight to bring some respectability back into the game’.

And, rightly or wrongly, that was my decision. So, we scored one goal and we gave up four more…

I think 90 percent of the coaches would go for damage control. Make it 4-1 maybe and it doesn’t look so bad. People like to say: ‘Whether you lose by six or two, you still lose, so go for it’. But at the end of the day, they don’t believe that. They talk it; but they don’t believe that…

Wired868: What has been your biggest decision so far as Trinidad and Tobago coach?

Hart: There are some players that I left out that I probably could have gone with a little bit longer. But you have to think about the group dynamics: how the team moulds itself; how they operate off the field; are they good with each other. I think that is extremely important. So maybe there were a couple decisions along those lines.

I remember the decision in the (2013) Gold Cup when we were going to play Honduras (for a place in the knockout round) and I made six changes. And Leo Beenhakker was completely against it. He said: ‘I would not do that’. Those were his words: ‘I would not do that’. And I felt the players were emotionally and physically finished and I made the six changes and we got the result against Honduras.

And I remember him coming to the dressing room and saying: ‘You have balls like grapefruits’! (Laughs)

It was a big decision and one that fortunately paid off.

Wired868: Can you say more about the decision to leave out Cornell Glen?

Hart: You make a decision and you live with your decision, whether rightly or wrongly. I had Cornell for just the gold cup and he didn’t give me any trouble. I liked him; he is a talent. He came off the bench and he did his best. He started the Honduras game and he did well.

Maybe sometimes you get caught up when you look at a player’s age and you think of the contribution (you need). And you also have to think if you are going to bring a player of such status and tell them they are going to play off the bench. You don’t know how they are going to react to that…

Cornell is a player of high status in Trinidad football. So rather than take that kind of chance, you make a decision one way or the other, rightly or wrongly, and you live with it.

Wired868: Is it a final decision? Or might he be a super sub at some point in the World Cup qualifying campaign?

Hart: I had a chat with Cornell down at the Hasely Crawford Stadium one day and I tried to explain it to him. If you look at my situation, I have had very little opportunity to bring people in on an exhibition basis. Most of the times, you are going into a tournament with just one practice game… I explained that to him…

But I wouldn’t say the door is closed. He is far away (in India) eh. But if he says to me: ‘I will be a bit player or a part player or whatever you wish for me’. Then, yes, definitely.

The Caribbean Cup is coming up (and) we have a lot of football this year. So who knows. I will keep an eye on him. I try to see some of his games and he had a good season last year…

I think the (India) league is a technical kind of league. There is a lot of space to play. But he can still do what he does, (which is) score goals.

Wired868: And what of our Pro League? How do you rate this season, as compared to the last one?

Hart: It started off well (with) a lot of parity between the teams and it is still somewhat that way. But I must admit that I am a little disappointed in the quality in the second half of the season.

The big part of football for me is the intensity and the ability to attack and close down space. Most of the games I see are played in 60 and 65 yards of space and international football and the modern game is played in about 40. So you get a false sense of the ability of the players because for me it is when you are asked to play faster, which means think faster, can you do it.

I don’t think those demands are being made in the Pro League and the CONCACAF level of the Champions League sort of shows that.

Wired868: Do you think the problems are due to team preparation? Has the financial issues of the Pro League had an impact there?

Hart: I can’t talk about the preparation because I don’t know what coaches go through. And that would be unfair to judge from sitting in the stands where I am just like any other person in the public.

But certainly the financial situation is worrying because there are a lot of players who depend on the Pro League to feed their families and I’m sure it plays on their minds. Also the teams can’t get the players that they would like or bring in the players to raise the standard a little bit. I am sure that has an effect.

Wired868: A former national player, Makan Hislop, said many Pro League players head to the minor leagues because there they get money in their hand before kick off while sometimes their clubs are weeks late in paying. What do you think of that dilemma for the players?

Hart: It is a problem because why would I come to the Pro League and support the Pro League when I can see the same players in a minor league? So it diminishes the quality of your own product, which you are trying to create. I think if you have a made a commitment to a club, then you have to live up to that commitment.

Now having said that, it also goes for the owners. If you have made a commitment and the players have earned the right to be paid. They must be paid.

Wired868: What impact could there be on our World Cup campaign if, due to financial issues, the Pro League folds?

Hart: I think it would be devastating for our football. The quality of the local leagues in the top tier of Concacaf: Costa Rica, Mexico, the United States, Honduras and even Guatemala. They all have good club structure and a good league; a league good enough to keep standards relatively high and to create competitive players for the national team.

If we go down in Trinidad and Tobago, then more than likely all football (here) would go down. I think it would be devastating for the country and the players. I would not want that to happen to them at all.

« Last Edit: March 31, 2016, 03:10:12 AM by Flex »

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Always an interesting and educational view from our Natinal coach, without airs and snobbery. Thanks

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The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

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Canada's ex-coach Stephen Hart has Soca Warriors dancing
« Reply #381 on: April 29, 2016, 07:04:40 AM »
Canada's ex-coach Stephen Hart has Soca Warriors dancing
By Kurtis Larson (Toronto Sun
)

Remnants of Stephen Hart’s tears still reside somewhere inside the belly of Honduras’ Estadio Olimpico Metropolitano, the site of Canada’s historic 8-1 World Cup qualifying defeat.

Canadian supporters will never forget said fixture or, for that matter, forgive Hart — something Canada’s ex-coach came to terms with moments after the lopsided loss that ended Canada’s 2014 World Cup hopes.

Four years later, Canada’s men are preparing for an eerily similar scenario in San Pedro Sula later this summer.

From his home in Halifax, N.S., 56-year-old Hart is doing the same. With two matches remaining, Canada’s former bench boss has tiny Trinidad and Tobago a draw away from securing passage to the final round of CONCACAF World Cup qualifying.

The Group C leaders are preparing to host Guatemala in Port of Spain before wrapping up Round 4 with a difficult qualifier in the United States. For most, Hart’s Soca Warriors would appear to be in good shape.

“Well, yeah, I thought that last time, too,” Hart told the Toronto Sun, his matter-of-fact manner evident over the phone. “I’m not singing any praises yet. We haven’t achieved anything.”

He’s selling himself short, of course. Hart wouldn’t refer to it as personal redemption, but guiding an embattled Caribbean nation in the wake of a debilitating FIFA scandal has been nothing short of remarkable.

Since 2013, T&T has advanced further than Canada at every Gold Cup and currently leads the U.S. in Group C World Cup qualifying. It has undoubtedly helped Hart move on from his time with the Canadian Soccer Association.

“You go into it with a fresh start,” Hart said of joining the T&T, where he was capped seven times as a player. “I’ve said it before, everything with Canada comes down to me being judged on one game.

“I got tremendous support in terms of coaches from all over the world at the international level, who wrote me and told me to get on with it. Really and truly, that’s what I did. I just got on with the new challenge. I’m honoured to coach Trinidad and Tobago.”

Without provocation, Hart wished Canada “all the best” as it prepares to face Honduras away on Sept. 2. He has been following his former team’s progress — and head coach Benito Floro’s lineup choices — from the start of qualifying.

Like everyone else, he’s waiting to see if the Canadians can exorcise the demons they took with them from San Pedro Sula back then. The result still haunts players currently on the team.

“Every situation is different. This is a different generation of Canadian players,” Hart said. “They have a good balance and mix. The situation is probably better in the sense that you go into Honduras but you still have El Salvador at home.

“You play them in Vancouver on the turf, which is probably better suited for Canada. Everything is still in Canada’s hands. Honduras has been sputtering. They’ve been giving up goals in almost every game.

“The solid defending they had four years ago ... that generation is out or on the way out. I think it’s a good time to play them.”

Honduras, of course, will like its chances just the same after watching Mexico toy with Canada last month. For nations not named the U.S. and Mexico, it’s about surviving and advancing at this stage.

“I think it’s very difficult to get to the hex,” Hart echoed Floro’s sentiments. “But once you get there, you have three-and-a-half (World Cup) spots to play for. The hex is where the meat-and-potatoes of the process is. But getting to the hex, there are so many things that can go wrong.

“The way it’s spread out, you might be in a good moment, but then you have to wait six months to play. Anything can happen in that time period — injuries, form. You’re starting over. I think getting to the hex is very difficult.”

Hart has been on the brink of reaching CONCACAF’S final stage before. Now he’s facing a similar fate if the Soca Warriors don’t hold their nerve at home.

“We’re a close-knit unit,” Hart said of T&T. “We have some very talented players at good, important positions on the field. We’ve been fairly focused in our task.

“(My players) are aware of the situation. The Trinidadian mentality is to play in a free way and to entertain. But we know what our situation is and what the priorities are. Hopefully we can be at our best during the home game against Guatemala.”

Meanwhile, three thousand kilometres away, Canada’s players will be retracing the steps they took alongside Hart four years earlier, hoping Honduras won’t replicate a result that’s synonymous with their former manager.

CURRENT CONCACAF WORLD CUP QUALIFYING GROUPS

GROUP A (Ranking, Team, GD, Points)
1) Mexico +10 12
2) Honduras -1 4
3) Canada -4 4
4) El Salvador -5 2

GROUP B
1) Costa Rica +5 10
2) Panama +2 7
3) Jamaica -4 4
4) Haiti -3 1

GROUP C
1) T&T +8 10
2) United States +7 7
3) Guatemala +1 6
4) St. Vincent and the Grenadines -16 0

*Top two from each group after six games advance to final round.
*Bold denotes team has secured place in final round.
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Offline Sando prince

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #382 on: May 21, 2016, 02:43:08 AM »

On Wednesday night we reported an alleged incident at a Warriors training session, where players were reportedly approached by the TTFA President to consider a 4th match added to their schedule. David John Williams and Head Coach Stephen Hart somewhat addressed the matter today.
WATCH: https://www.facebook.com/csportslive/videos/1179158602135770/

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #383 on: May 21, 2016, 11:21:56 AM »
That's my new line to get out of everything now.   "Why don't you ask the alleged victim?" 
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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #384 on: May 23, 2016, 07:56:20 AM »
That's my new line to get out of everything now.   "Why don't you ask the alleged victim?"

Preacher

Is   " Why don't you ask the alleged victim? the similar/equivalent to "Go ask your mudda?" D(JW) sounding or trying to sound like Uncle Jack Warner



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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #385 on: May 24, 2016, 11:02:57 AM »
Scary how DJW does not respect the space of Hart.  He is an ole school headmaster that only knows about cracking the whip.  He lacks tact and diplomacy. 


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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #386 on: August 25, 2016, 07:29:16 AM »
WATCH: Stephen Hart being interviewed by the T&T Warrior Fan Zone

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #387 on: August 25, 2016, 07:32:54 AM »
Good interview, well done Omar :beermug:

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #388 on: August 25, 2016, 08:50:59 AM »
hmmm.. Nice to hear Mr Hart, nice production, yet didn't hear any info, i didn't already get from this site. Questions might have been to easy, unless you wanted to cement the things we already know. The one thing SH has always been was open, so he added nothing new. Besides the man is a boss interviewee, questions about talent and development have already been answered. We already know the Bostock issue, we already know his feelings about Molino and Garcia, and everybody else he selects, he don't select if he don't like  ;D. we already know we support papsy. Ask him stuff you don't know.e.g what can you do on a personal level, if anything, to raise the level of football development in the country. (then look at possible answers - player & coaches clinics, assist in admin, sell vegetables in Puna ) then have questions based on possible answers, or move on to new questions. Make him hit yuh some "ahmm, ahmm...let me get back to yuh"..Sorry SH.  :D
  This would be a great interview for new fans in Toronto and Tokyo, for you and us Omar, we dun know. Thanks for the piece still, for many it may reassure our importance, and thus still good.

Offline kounty

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Re: Stephen Hart Thread
« Reply #389 on: August 25, 2016, 10:15:05 AM »
good job Fan Zone. build that rapport with the coach so we could get the scoop in the future.

 

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