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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #120 on: August 27, 2011, 12:02:16 PM »
Well, its the old adage of pulling out the roots. You can't just take the ones visable coz those remaining will simply take over and grow again. Its gonna be tough to make a sustainable dent in the drug trade, especially when the drug lords in prison have phones and still control things.

Again, I know Bakes won't agree, but I'm in favour of those convicted as senior drug criminals should be sent out to Nelson Island and put under draconian conditions for the first 5 years. Why should they have all of these rights? No visits, no letters, no nothing. They chose their careers, so get on with it.

Note: I'm not suggesting this for the majority of prisoners, just those who can continue to influence the drug trade. I don't give a sh*t about their families, in fact their women and children would finally have the chance of living a decent life.

Also, from what I saw in London, these Mr Bigs are generally very affable, generous men and you have to remind yourself that they are causing misery for tens of thousands, both directly and indirectly.

Offline Bakes

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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #121 on: August 27, 2011, 04:05:46 PM »
Well, its the old adage of pulling out the roots. You can't just take the ones visable coz those remaining will simply take over and grow again. Its gonna be tough to make a sustainable dent in the drug trade, especially when the drug lords in prison have phones and still control things.

Again, I know Bakes won't agree, but I'm in favour of those convicted as senior drug criminals should be sent out to Nelson Island and put under draconian conditions for the first 5 years. Why should they have all of these rights? No visits, no letters, no nothing. They chose their careers, so get on with it.

Note: I'm not suggesting this for the majority of prisoners, just those who can continue to influence the drug trade. I don't give a sh*t about their families, in fact their women and children would finally have the chance of living a decent life.

Also, from what I saw in London, these Mr Bigs are generally very affable, generous men and you have to remind yourself that they are causing misery for tens of thousands, both directly and indirectly.

I neither here nor there on that... as long as it's fair, non-discriminatory, human and not ex post facto then I have no problems with escalated penalties for the kingpins.  Where I have always taken issue with your positions is when you've favored knee-jerk restraints on the rights of all, such that innocent people end up suffering for the few criminals amongst us.

Offline weary1969

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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #122 on: August 27, 2011, 04:10:14 PM »
9600 EURO cyah b TT. Because if all yuh need 2 b a big fish is 9600 TT then it have real big fish 
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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #123 on: August 27, 2011, 06:07:37 PM »
It was a US$150 per night room

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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #124 on: August 27, 2011, 06:37:10 PM »

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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #125 on: August 27, 2011, 07:13:07 PM »
Trinidad police is real kicks yes..seriously now.  Arresting man, by grabbing he shorts?  lol wey de fack is de handcuffs.  And then loading dem in de back ah pick up tray?  steups...what ah ting.

Offline Boodsy

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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #126 on: August 29, 2011, 07:14:20 AM »
2 men in court today
By ALEXANDER BRUZUAL Monday, August 29 2011

THE TWO alleged gangsters, who were arrested last week hiding out at the Hyatt Regency in Port-of-Spain, are expected to appear before a Port-of-Spain Magistrate to answer charges under the Anti-Gang Act (10 of 2011).

The men, identified by police as Cedric Burke, 36, and Keon Baine, 31, were charged with being the leader of a gang and being a member of a gang, respectively. The two were detained in separate cells at the Central Police Station yesterday and were visited by their lawyers and relatives.

On Friday at about 11.30 am, officers of the Port-of-Spain CID, acting on a tip off from information provided to them by the Criminal Intelligence Unit (CIU), went to the Hyatt Regency hotel, where they saw the two suspects in the company of a 22-year-old woman in the lobby area. Officers later followed the group to the 16th floor, where they detained them under the Anti-Gang legislation. Officers also seized cash from a safe in one of the two rooms where the men were staying and this was later handed over to relatives. Persons are also expected to be brought to court and charged under the new legislation as a result of police exercises conducted on the weekend.


FOR COURT TODAY: Cedric Burke (left) and Keon Baine, arrested last week at the Hyatt
Regency, will appear before a Port-of-Spain Magistrate today, charged with being a gang
leader and a member of a gang, respectively.


Read More...

Offline Jah Gol

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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #127 on: August 29, 2011, 07:38:18 AM »
2 men in court today
. Officers also seized cash from a safe in one of the two rooms where the men were staying and this was later handed over to relatives
What ?

Offline Mr Fix-it

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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #128 on: August 29, 2011, 07:46:23 AM »
2 men in court today
. Officers also seized cash from a safe in one of the two rooms where the men were staying and this was later handed over to relatives
What ?

Same thing I was thinking ???
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Offline Socafan

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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #129 on: August 29, 2011, 08:22:23 AM »
2 men in court today
. Officers also seized cash from a safe in one of the two rooms where the men were staying and this was later handed over to relatives
What ?

Same thing I was thinking ???

LOL....Trini. The problem in Trini is not crime. Thats just a symptom. We doh have good policing. In fact we have terrible policing, so crime will just blossom, just like it would anywhere else.

They give out the proceeds and evidence of the criminal activity that they lock up the men for to their family...LOL.

Maybe its a misprint.
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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #130 on: August 29, 2011, 08:40:41 AM »
I see Ian Alleyene help a victim's family burn a bloody sheet in their yard a few days after a shoot up sometime earlier this year in the Arima area.

I see that and say to myself, but dais not evidence??  Then I chalked it up to watching too much CSI..... ::) ::)

And as for the police apparently moving willy nilly with evidence, we doh need a SOE to deal with that eh....just saying....

Imagine it took years for relatives of a missing woman to get the results of DNA testing.....in 2011!!  steups!!  I hope the SOE solve that too..... ::)
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Offline elan

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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #131 on: August 29, 2011, 10:59:23 AM »
2 men in court today
By ALEXANDER BRUZUAL Monday, August 29 2011

THE TWO alleged gangsters, who were arrested last week hiding out at the Hyatt Regency in Port-of-Spain, are expected to appear before a Port-of-Spain Magistrate to answer charges under the Anti-Gang Act (10 of 2011).

The men, identified by police as Cedric Burke, 36, and Keon Baine, 31, were charged with being the leader of a gang and being a member of a gang, respectively. The two were detained in separate cells at the Central Police Station yesterday and were visited by their lawyers and relatives.

On Friday at about 11.30 am, officers of the Port-of-Spain CID, acting on a tip off from information provided to them by the Criminal Intelligence Unit (CIU), went to the Hyatt Regency hotel, where they saw the two suspects in the company of a 22-year-old woman in the lobby area. Officers later followed the group to the 16th floor, where they detained them under the Anti-Gang legislation. Officers also seized cash from a safe in one of the two rooms where the men were staying and this was later handed over to relatives. Persons are also expected to be brought to court and charged under the new legislation as a result of police exercises conducted on the weekend.


FOR COURT TODAY: Cedric Burke (left) and Keon Baine, arrested last week at the Hyatt
Regency, will appear before a Port-of-Spain Magistrate today, charged with being a gang
leader and a member of a gang, respectively.


Read More...

Them men eh no "big fish".  I say them really lock somebody up. These men just passing money from the streets to the higher ups. Lower middle men.
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Offline g

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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #132 on: August 29, 2011, 02:08:43 PM »
2 men in court today
By ALEXANDER BRUZUAL Monday, August 29 2011

THE TWO alleged gangsters, who were arrested last week hiding out at the Hyatt Regency in Port-of-Spain, are expected to appear before a Port-of-Spain Magistrate to answer charges under the Anti-Gang Act (10 of 2011).

The men, identified by police as Cedric Burke, 36, and Keon Baine, 31, were charged with being the leader of a gang and being a member of a gang, respectively. The two were detained in separate cells at the Central Police Station yesterday and were visited by their lawyers and relatives.

On Friday at about 11.30 am, officers of the Port-of-Spain CID, acting on a tip off from information provided to them by the Criminal Intelligence Unit (CIU), went to the Hyatt Regency hotel, where they saw the two suspects in the company of a 22-year-old woman in the lobby area. Officers later followed the group to the 16th floor, where they detained them under the Anti-Gang legislation. Officers also seized cash from a safe in one of the two rooms where the men were staying and this was later handed over to relatives. Persons are also expected to be brought to court and charged under the new legislation as a result of police exercises conducted on the weekend.


FOR COURT TODAY: Cedric Burke (left) and Keon Baine, arrested last week at the Hyatt
Regency, will appear before a Port-of-Spain Magistrate today, charged with being a gang
leader and a member of a gang, respectively.


Read More...

Them men eh no "big fish".  I say them really lock somebody up. These men just passing money from the streets to the higher ups. Lower middle men.

My understanding is that while these men are not the big fish, they are very high up the criminal order.

The two of them own real estate in Westmoorings, Maraval and Glencoe. They drive expensive vehicles (benz, audis, teannas, etc) and they own many businesses, especially in construction and private security.

Strange enough while they own all these properties they reside primarily in the Sea Lots area, i guess to maintain a presence and control of their operations.

It's one thing to catch these two but i hope there is enough evidence to get them convicted and keep them incarcerated for a while. If this turns out to the the biggest catch of the SOE then i will use their ability to convict these two in particular as a litmust test on the overall the success of this SOE
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Re: Duo held in $9,600 suite.
« Reply #133 on: August 29, 2011, 03:06:48 PM »
Thing is with a lot of these guys, you can take the man out of Sealots, but you can't take Sealots out of the man. They strive to be accepted by the rich, but not only do not become accepted, they don't enjoy the company. Its not just education, it manners, politeness, tact.

I'm not saying all of these guys are mindless thugs, but I know a guy who inherited real money and despite the houses, cars and wads of cash, he just don't fit in. He tries to buy everybody and it becomes vulgar. In Sealots these guys are kings, in the Hyatt, they were probably regarded as oafs, flashing their money and ordering hoes, and looked down upon even by Hyatt staff. Just not the done thing in polite society, don't you know?

Offline Flex

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Gangs in T&T.
« Reply #134 on: October 16, 2013, 02:06:31 AM »
US agency on spiralling T&T crime: Gangs Stronger Than Government
By Geisha Kowlessar (Guardian).


A major think tank based in Washington, DC, believes gangs are the “new war” in T&T, a report on Caribbean 360 said yesterday. It added that recent incidents of intense violence in the country have also drawn international attention to the “rampant gang problem” in the country.

Caribbean 360 said a report by the Council on Hemispheric Affairs (COHA) yesterday noted that regardless of size, all forms of gangs in T&T were more pervasive than those to be found in developed nations and have now become societal institutions that go beyond social purposes, “and are coming to resemble governments in and of themselves.”
 
It also charged that Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar has been unable to effectively deal with gang activity, adding that legislation passed by the People’s Partnership Government to fight crime, such as the Anti-Gang Act, “has proven to be ineffective.” “As it now stands, gangs have a stronger hold on the Trinidadian population than its government does,” the organisation said.

COHA cited the September 11, 2013 incident in which Michael Piper’s severed head was discovered on Nelson Street, Port-of-Spain. Police have remained clueless as to the motive for his death. COHA, however, has theorised this is a movement towards a form of violence used in South American countries.

“There is now a trend towards this so-called ‘South American method of warfare,’ in which beheadings and other extreme forms of violence are the norm in dealing with rival gangs and in which only 14.3 per cent of T&T’s youth is confident in its satisfaction with the police force,” COHA said. It said the Government’s recent decision to “simply amp up the police force” is not likely to hinder the persistent gang presence.

“Violence is a serious problem in the islands, but targeting this alone will not make an effective reform,” it said, adding that “gangs in T&T, specifically in high-risk areas, like east Port-of-Spain, including Laventille, have become so institutionalised that they pose a threat to—and even control in some cases—T&T’s crucial infrastructures.” 

COHA said in T&T and Jamaica, gangs have a “very unusual and ultimately far more dangerous effect on their surrounding areas.” Claiming T&T had more than 100 gangs, COHA said in the absence of an adequate legal system, gangs “outsource their justice in situations as trivial as parents disciplining their children.”

Responding to the findings of the report yesterday, National Security Minister Gary Griffith said for far too long, gangs have been allowed to build their clientele to the extent where they have acquired “certain streets and blocks which they consider their own.” “We have created a monster and we are the ones who need to destroy it,” Griffith said in a telephone interview.

“I am not at all surprised. When I first took this position I realised one of the biggest problems we have is gang activity and we cannot continue to sit idly by and continue to bury our head in the sand and think that giving out these contracts is going to stop criminal activity...it is just the opposite.”

Asked to specify who the “we” referred to, since his comment referred to a recent promise he made to stop the practice of state contracts being given to gang leaders, Griffith said previous governments, as this problem stemmed from the days of the Unemployment Relief Programme (URP). Saying the Government needed to do a proper audit of the social projects, Griffith said these programmes have become an avenue for mass misappropriation of funds which are filtered into the hands of gang leaders.


“So where the plan was to have these projects reduce crime, it has in fact been increasing crime,” Griffith added. He said a new anti-crime measure expected to be rolled out within the coming weeks was an initiative, headed by him, in which people would be urged to pass on information about gangs and other criminal activities.

“Anybody who feels they have proper information to bring down these individuals, I am providing an avenue for them which I personally would be co-ordinating. I am asking the country to trust me on this,” Griffith urged.
 

Result of poor decisions

Public relations officer for the PNM Faris Al-Rawi said yesterday the COHA’s report was especially tragic, as T&T was “wrestling” to diversify its economy through tourism and trade. He also criticised the PP Government for dumping anti-crime measures implemented by the previous administration. “The PNM has cautioned the Government and people of T&T on umpteen occasions as to the deleterious effect of the Government’s wilful dismantling of national security systems and services,” Al Rawi said.

“In particular, we have been at pains to demand a replacement of the Anti-Gang Unit of the Special Anti-Crime Unit of T&T (Sautt), which the Government wilfully and recklessly threw out on 2010.” This move, he added, has resulted in an “exponential growth” in criminal gang activity, particularly in east Port-of-Spain. Saying the country has been faced with “gory news of decapitations gangland-style” Al-Rawi said these killings have become the centre stage of serious reports of international partners.


“This government, with four ministers of national security prior to Mr Griffith, has yet to account for the consequences of its actions and more particularily of its statement of a realistic and clearly articulated crime plan of T&T,” Al-Rawi added. He said Griffith had a “mountain” on his plate and seemed to have little assistance from the Government given recent statements made by Attorney General Anand Ramlogan.


Al-Rawi called upon Persad-Bissessar to step forward and take charge of the country’s national security systems in a fashion that “will demonstrate capability and inspire confidence in the people.”


what is coha

The Council on Hemispheric Affairs (COHA) is a Washington, DC-based non-governmental organisation (NGO) founded in 1975. It was established to “promote the common interests of the Western hemisphere, raise the visibility of regional affairs and increase the importance of the inter-American relationship, as well as encourage the formulation of rational and constructive US policies towards Latin America.” —Source Wikipedia

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Offline mal jeux

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Re: Gangs in T&T.
« Reply #135 on: October 17, 2013, 07:17:46 AM »
i hear they're bringing in an expert on gangs from "Alberta" Canada. a gentleman with a proven record working with gangs of prairie dogs, beaver, bison, raccoon and the fiercely territorial striped skunk. 
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Offline soccerman

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Re: Gangs in T&T.
« Reply #136 on: October 17, 2013, 02:55:17 PM »
COHA cited the September 11, 2013 incident in which Michael Piper’s severed head was discovered on Nelson Street, Port-of-Spain. Police have remained clueless as to the motive for his death. COHA, however, has theorised this is a movement towards a form of violence used in South American countries.

We reach to this now? That is real savage behavior.

Offline Flex

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Gangs in T&T.
« Reply #137 on: April 02, 2017, 05:29:17 AM »
‘Hostages’ in Enterprise war
By Kalifa Clyne (Guardian).


Residents of Enterprise are “hostages” within their own community as a vicious drug war continues to leave the streets bloody.

Police have few advantages in a community which has streets connecting stealthily and secretly, where residents are charged as voluntary and involuntary secret keepers, and gun and drug-toting criminals, mostly young boys, swallowed whole by gang life and its offerings.

For the hundreds of law-abiding citizens locked into the vicious battle, listening to the constant echoes of gunshots, leaving isn’t easy and staying is a nightmare.

This is the story of a young member of the Enterprise community (identity has been withheld), as told to Sunday Guardian journalist Kalifa Clyne.

There are sounds that have become as commonplace in Enterprise as a bird singing outside or a dog’s bark. I never thought I would ever become accustomed to the sound of gunshots. It is now almost an everyday occurrence. Police sirens and gunshots; those are the sounds that to me accurately sum up a typical day in my community.

My eight-year-old niece knows the difference in sound between a gunshot and a fire cracker. It breaks my heart to say that. She will never have the full childhood experience I had, playing cricket in the street and all the outdoor fun most children experience.

I won’t even risk sending her to the nearby parlour that is a few houses away for fear of what may happen. Last year, I took that risk. She wanted to go to the shop for a snack. She got home safely. Later that same day, we heard the sound of screeching cars, police sirens, gunshots being exchanged and a loud crashing sound that I will never forget.

Police were chasing a car whose occupants were shooting at them. The police were returning fire. The car with the assailants crashed into a galvanise fence. This occurred along the same path my niece walked earlier that day to the shop. I have not allowed her to go to the shop or even play in the street outside our home since that incident.

Violence has become almost synonymous with Enterprise. In earlier times, when the rivaling gangs first started murdering each other, I remember feeling shocked, sad and bitterly angry every time someone was killed.

Now I feel numb and exhausted.

It occurs too often.

Before I can wrap my head around someone getting murdered, someone else is murdered and I have to deal with new feelings of hopelessness. I am so fed up of this violence.

BEFORE THE VIOLENCE

I have lived in Enterprise all my life. As a child I remember being able to play outdoors long after the street lights would come on. I had friends from all over the area and there were no concerns on my part or my parents whether or not it was safe for me to play with my peers, irrespective of which street they were from. My teenage years were no different. Enterprise people love to party and would find any excuse to do so. The entire community and environs would come together and there would be massive street parties or “blockos.”

I had so much fun when there were community events in Dass Trace, Crown Trace, African Grounds or Bhagaloo Street and I would attend these events without fear of being shot or hurt because rivalling streets “warring” or anything to that effect.

Like any other community, we would be hit with criminal activity, but it wasn’t the norm. As I’m older I now understand that there was always a drug dealing problem in the area however, I can’t remember there being this many murders at any given time back then. Gang violence of this magnitude only really erupted within the last three years.

I live on Bhagaloo Street. The epicentre of the current gang war is actually between Bhagaloo Street (the alleged Rasta City hub) and Crown Trace, home of the “Unruly Isis” crew. Most of the streets in Enterprise are connected and even I am at a loss sometimes since the lines are blurred as to where each gangs’ territory starts and ends. For instance, I know many self-proclaimed Unruly Isis members who live in Walcott Lane which is an offshoot of Bhagaloo Street. It’s all very confusing and very stupid.

I can’t remember the last time I felt happiness, excitement or any positive emotion that was the result of some experience in Enterprise. It actually makes me very sad to say that because I love my community and the people who live here however, nothing about Enterprise inspires me to smile.

Last year, I felt proud of my community when Nigel Paul, who is from Enterprise, represented our country at the Olympics. That was a good moment for our community. Other than that, I can’t recall feeling anything other than profound anxiety, fear, hopelessness, disappointment and sometimes anger.

WHEN ROBOCOP WAS KILLED

I am no longer shocked by anything that happens here. Things that I never thought would happen here have already occurred. Maybe the most shocking might be Robocop’s murder. As someone who grew up here, we all grew to be very wary of that man.

He was very charismatic but we knew he was dangerous. Everyone frequented his grocery store and we all thought the last place he’d meet his demise was there. It was his fort, so to speak. So when I heard he was murdered, along with his friend and the alleged Isis perpetrator, it was shocking.

You see, all those Unruly Isis members were at some point under Robocop, we all knew it. Most of Unruly Isis were known to be liming at Robocop’s. I saw them myself. When they split from Robocop because of conflicting ideologies I never expected that they would garner the power to do what they did.

Everyone underestimated their strength and how radicalised they were in their ideology. When they murdered Robocop, who I and everyone else thought was untouchable, we knew that no one was safe here.

At least I knew that. Robocop, who many consider the most dangerous man in Enterprise, was murdered by an Unruly Isis member and it was at that point I stopped being nalve and acknowledged how strong the Unruly unit really was. I think this even made me finally accept that there was a real war occurring in my community and that Enterprise was under siege. I started being a lot more afraid for myself, family and friends after that.

STREETS FILLED WITH DRUGS AND GUNS

Enterprise is a known drug hub. There are blocks set up in all the major streets in the area like Bhagaloo Street, Crown Trace and Enterprise Street, just to name the more popular blocks. Hence, it is no surprise that these three areas have seen the most gang-related violence. Drugs have been one of the main contributing factors to the violence in these areas. All these gang members represent their block and their turf. They all want to be the top selling block because that would mean more money to spread around. Bhagaloo Street’s block was very popular and, from what I observed, would make a lot of money when I observed the calibre of people going to purchase marijuana and whatever else. Crown Trace gang members felt disenfranchised because they were not getting enough “bread” from the amount Bhagaloo Street was making and tensions began to slowly rise on their end until things eventually exploded. In those initial few months it was like a real war zone. Men would walk around boldly with guns and it was terrifying.

Another reason there is so much violence is the availability of guns. Young men have easy access to weapons in Enterprise and are certainly not willing to part ways with them especially now when this war is at its peak. Also, these guys prefer to stay home and lime on the block than look for a job and attain an honest dollar to support themselves. My father personally tried to help one of those young men get a job and the morning for him to go the interview he did not show up. That young man was shot recently. He escaped unscathed but is currently hiding, he is fearful for his life.

Another major contributing factor is the so called “community leaders” in Enterprise. Most of these “leaders” are actually the drug bosses who are recruiting teenagers. They start indoctrinating those boys at a young age and advertise the benefits of the fast life culture that typically involves money, cars, drugs, guns and sex. My brother was caught up by this façade as a teenager, too. He eventually got some sense and left that life and is now gainfully employed, thank God. But it wasn’t easy for my parents to convince him to abandon that lifestyle.

TERRIFIED

I am afraid in my own home, so it goes without saying that I am extremely fearful walking through my community. On a daily basis, I would walk out Bhagaloo Street to get transport because it is easier for me. On my way home, I have resorted to paying a taxi to drop me straight home and I usually direct them through Crown Trace instead of Bhagaloo Street.

The reason for this is because the Government recently opened a new HDC housing scheme (Lion’s Gate) and taxis are more willing to drop passengers there than they are to go in Bhagaloo Street.

I’ve resorted to deceiving taxi drivers this way—they think I am dropping off at Lion’s Gate and when I direct them otherwise and they find themselves on the outskirts of Bhagaloo Street they are usually quite annoyed with me. I’ve grown accustomed to being cursed by them.

Before I leave home I pray and ask God to protect me. Whenever I see a young guy riding a bike I get scared sometimes because a lot of the gang members use bikes to escape after they shoot up the place. Also I hate when cars are passing next to me and I can’t see the occupants of the vehicle because of the dark tint. I get really scared when that happens.

I tell myself all the time that I need to leave this community, not only for my sake but my family’s as well. I want my niece to grow up in a “safe” area. I want her to feel a sense of pride about where she comes from. Unfortunately I do not have the financial ability to do so. My family and I have made a life here.

NO TRUST IN THE POLICE

Ironically, my family and I have been put in danger because of a gun but it wasn’t at the hands of gang bangers, it was actually due to the irresponsibility of police officers.

A few years ago, the police were conducting an operation in Bhagaloo Street which resulted in them chasing a guy (a known drug dealer) who was attempting to escape to avoid being arrested with a quantity of drugs.

In Enterprise it is almost impossible for the police to catch anyone on foot because all the streets are connected and the criminals who are from the area know the best escape routes and hiding spots.

That day, the drug dealer decided to use my yard as a means to get away from the police. Two of my nieces who were 11 and nine years old at the time were in the yard playing. My sister was also outside.

My grandmother and I were sitting in my bedroom. Suddenly I heard very loud explosions outside.

I had never heard gun shots at such a close range before, so I was terrified. I looked out my window and saw the drug dealer (his hands were empty) run past my window with a male police officer chasing him and shooting at him. The police never caught the guy and when things settled down a bit my family and I discovered bullet holes in our roof, and on the wall of our house.

That police officer endangered our lives shooting a weapon in a very irresponsible manner in close proximity to two young children who were playing in what we thought was the security of our home.

Needless to say, my nieces – and by extension my entire family – were incredibly terrified by the events of that day. I hate the fact that it was because of the drug dealers’ actions that we were even put in such a position. But I must hold the police accountable as well, since I believe they are trained on how to effectively deal with such sensitive situations where innocent civilians are involved.

The police definitely do not inspire feelings of safety for me.

I have seen too many shady police activity in my area to ever feel safe because of them. I have seen known drug dealers selling marijuana in front of the police. I have seen police officers liming on the block with their vehicle in police uniform. It is no wonder why people have no respect for police officers and by extension the law when every day we see police officers blatantly having no regard for the law and the oath that they themselves swore to.

The sad thing is that there are many good police officers but the few bad ones give them all a bad reputation.

This is why even though everyone in Enterprise knows who the drug dealers are, where the guns are located and such, no one speaks up or goes to the police because of bad cops who can potentially inform drug bosses who the “snitches” are in the community.

Chaguanas Police Station in my opinion is the most corrupt police station in the whole of Trinidad. There are a lot of drugs and guns in Enterprise but whenever the police conduct an operation they only find one or two weapons and little to no drugs.

Why do you think that is? The whole of Enterprise knows when a “secret” police operation is about to go down. It’s almost laughable. Many known police officers have sold their badges for blood money and then they come an arrest the same petty drug dealers they took the money from.

This just fuels more hatred for the police by these gang members who feel the police are backstabbing them after they allowed them to “eat ah food”. Just yesterday, I saw a bullet ridden police jeep drive past my home. Gang members shooting at police officers is a norm now. No one has respect for those flashing blue lights anymore.

I’ve heard too many gunshots to give a number. I usually feel extremely anxious whenever I hear gunshots. I have become such a gunshot expert that I can now decipher when the rivalling gangs are exchanging gun fire. An obvious “tell” are the intervals between gunfire. Also if you listen closely you can sometimes differentiate between gunshots from your typical revolver or pistol and semi/fully automatic weapons.

My niece is terrified of the sound of gunshots. She is only eight years old and I hate that she even knows what a gunshot sounds like. On Friday, when they killed Robocop’s brother, Sylvan Alexis, there was a hail of gunfire that absolutely terrified the poor child. She ran hiding under our sofa. It hurts me to see her so scared when things like that happen. I try to comfort her but she is usually shaken up for days after events like that take place.


FLASHBACK: An Enterprise resident chastises Central Division police for their inability to deal with the upsurge in gang murders in the area during a protest last week. PHOTO: ABRAHAM DIAZ

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Sando prince

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Re: Gangs in T&T.
« Reply #138 on: April 02, 2017, 01:07:58 PM »
Go through the Crime Situation in T&T thread and everyone will see at least 50% of the crime are gang related and can also be posted in this thread
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Offline Deeks

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Re: Gangs in T&T.
« Reply #139 on: April 04, 2017, 05:29:02 AM »
Go through the Crime Situation in T&T thread and everyone will see at least 50% of the crime are gang related and can also be posted in this thread
.

at least 50% of the crime are gang related


Black people devouring they own. reality bites, and it sucks too.

Offline Sando prince

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Re: Gangs in T&T.
« Reply #140 on: April 04, 2017, 11:20:04 AM »
Go through the Crime Situation in T&T thread and everyone will see at least 50% of the crime are gang related and can also be posted in this thread
.

at least 50% of the crime are gang related


Black people devouring they own. reality bites, and it sucks too.

Ah know yuh not acting surprised. This has been the issue for MANY YEARS now

Offline Flex

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Re: Gangs in T&T.
« Reply #141 on: April 27, 2017, 01:47:55 AM »
$200,000 to keep the peace in Enterprise
Ryan Hamilton-Davis (Newsday)


IT COSTS taxpayers $200,000 monthly to keep the peace in Enterprise, Chaguanas.

This was revealed yesterday during the weekly police press briefing where Superintendent Richard Smith said that “Operation Enterprise” — a specific anti- crime operation for the Central Trinidad area — was a resounding success since its launch recently by National Security Minister Edmund Dillon. Supt Smith is coordinating the operation and yesterday reported to the media on its success.

He said that for the year, Enterprise in Chaguanas has experienced 18 murders during a bloody battle between two criminal gangs for control of turf in which to conduct illegal activities including robberies and drug trafficking.

He said that since “Operation Enterprise” was launched, which has seen a detailed and sustained police and solider presence in Enterprise, crime has fallen dramatically and there has been no murder recorded in that area for weeks. Asked why such a sustained approach could not be duplicated in communities across the country, Supt Smith said the Police Service does not have sufficient resources.

“If only we were able to sustain it, I would like very much to see the operations in Enterprise happen all over the country,” Supt Smith said. “But Operation Enterprise has taken a lot of resources.

We really deploy our personnel as and when the need arises. So to ask why can’t we deploy the same to all areas of Trinidad and Tobago, we just don’t have that amount of resources.” “Generally per capita we would say that we have enough officers, but when we have an area that has been affected you would have to pump more resources into that specific area to bring back a sense of normalcy.”

Supt Smith revealed that it costs $200,000 monthly, to sustain “Operation Enterprise” as both police and soldiers have to be paid overtime as officers work 24-hour shifts, meals and drinks for officers on shift and also to properly maintain vehicles used in the operation.

In addition to police and soldiers being visibly present in all areas of the Enterprise community on a 24 hour basis, “Operation Enterprise” has seen officers conduct town meetings and paid visits to schools in order to reconnect with the community. Smith said that from January to March, before “Operation Enterprise”, there were eight woundings, one burglary, one case of larceny and two cases of malicious damage, along with the 18 murders in that community. With the operation in place, there have been no murders committed in Enterprise.

“Our plan is to stay as long as it takes. We want to ensure the residents of Enterprise will feel a sense of safety and security so we will stay there for as long as it takes. We will not just uproot and run,” Supt Smith assured.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

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Gangs in T&T Thread
« Reply #142 on: July 07, 2019, 05:58:57 AM »
Report: 2,484 gang members in T&T
By Anna-Lisa Paul (Guardian).


More than a year af­ter the An­ti Gang Act 2018 was pro­claimed in­to law, not a sin­gle gang­ster has been con­vict­ed al­though po­lice have charged sev­er­al peo­ple.

It was a prob­lem laid bare by Com­mis­sion­er of Po­lice Gary Grif­fith when he re­vealed just two weeks ago that “over 50 shoot­ers, linked to var­i­ous gangs” are re­spon­si­ble for the “sig­nif­i­cant num­ber of homi­cides, via gang ac­tiv­i­ty.”

With the homi­cide count al­ready climb­ing past the 260-mark for the year, most­ly due to an up­surge in gang-re­lat­ed killings, for­mer Na­tion­al Se­cu­ri­ty Min­is­ter Carl Al­fon­so said some­one had to rise to the task.

“Some­body has to bell the cat and that some­body has to be the Min­is­ter of Na­tion­al Se­cu­ri­ty in col­lab­o­ra­tion with the Com­mis­sion­er of Po­lice and the At­tor­ney Gen­er­al to get this thing sort­ed out,” he said. “It is not an easy task but it has to be done.”

Na­tion­al se­cu­ri­ty stake­hold­ers have laid the blame square­ly on the shoul­ders of law en­force­ment agen­cies who they say are stum­bling block to the leg­is­la­tion’s suc­cess. Politi­cians, in their opin­ion, have been cleared as de­ter­rents to the leg­is­la­tion’s ef­fec­tive­ness.

Crim­i­nol­o­gist Dau­rius Figueira said: “The leg­is­la­tion can go no fur­ther. If it is to go any fur­ther, it has to strip us of all our civ­il rights.”

The most re­cent gang killing, ac­cord­ing to in­ves­ti­ga­tors, oc­curred at Main­got Road, Tu­na­puna, one week ago when 32-year-old Kevin Fi­garo was shot dead in his bed at his First Trace home. His mur­der fol­lowed that of 34-year-old Chir­von Brown who was shot and killed one week be­fore.

De­scrib­ing the cur­rent leg­is­la­tion as “very very very harsh,” Figueira added: “The prob­lem is en­force­ment and a crim­i­nal jus­tice sys­tem which is in cri­sis.”

That view was shared by Head of the Crim­i­nol­o­gy Unit, UW, Dr Randy Seep­er­sad.

“What we some­times have here in Trinidad and To­ba­go is knee-jerk re­ac­tions where we have a law that al­lows us to do cer­tain things and we may have prob­a­ble cause for some breach of the law, and then we ar­rest some­body with­out think­ing down the road about how we are go­ing to trans­late this ar­rest in­to a con­vic­tion and this is where the law falls short,” he said.

“The law al­lows us to do cer­tain things, but with­out oth­er things that could bring the law to fruition it is just go­ing to fall short and we would not get the ben­e­fits of the law. With­out that, those laws would not re­al­ly mat­ter or make a dif­fer­ence.”

Po­lice Com­mis­sion­er Gary Grif­fith dis­agreed.

“The An­ti Gang leg­is­la­tion is prov­ing to be very ef­fec­tive in terms of pro­vid­ing a de­ter­rent to gangs,” he claimed.

How­ev­er, Figueira ar­gued: “The prob­lem is not the leg­is­la­tion but the way you go about build­ing the case.”

Cer­tain type of polic­ing need­ed

Re­fer­ring to gang ac­tiv­i­ty as or­gan­ised crime Figueira point­ed out: “The on­ly way you are go­ing to have suc­cess­ful cas­es is to have a spe­cif­ic type of polic­ing method­ol­o­gy.”

“You have to first pen­e­trate the gang. You have to have peo­ple will­ing to tes­ti­fy. You have to en­sure the safe­ty of wit­ness­es and the cas­es have to be fin­ished quick­ly. You can­not drag it out for years. It is a prob­lem of polic­ing and a prob­lem in re­spect of a crim­i­nal jus­tice sys­tem that has acute con­sti­pa­tion.”

Grif­fith coun­tered: “Imag­ine if you did not have such an Act. It means that a gang mem­ber can ac­tu­al­ly put out a full-page ad­ver­tise­ment invit­ing peo­ple to be­come gang mem­bers.”

He de­clared that this par­tic­u­lar leg­is­la­tion is not as straight-for­ward when it comes to la­belling some­one a gang mem­ber—as op­posed to when some­one is held with an il­le­gal weapon.

“It is a lot of ev­i­dence that has to be ac­cu­mu­lat­ed to en­sure the case is air-tight and that is not some­thing that is done overnight,” Grif­fith said

He added that with­out an­ti-gang leg­is­la­tion “gang mem­bers could have gone on the streets. They could have as­sem­bled. They could have been in spe­cif­ic lo­ca­tions. They could have been do­ing mas­sive re­cruit­ment.”

In polic­ing gangs and their mem­bers, Figueira said, time and re­sources must be de­vot­ed to the ef­fort.

“You have to dis­man­tle the op­er­a­tions of the clique by in­car­cer­at­ing the lead­er­ship. This is not a quick fix or an overnight thing. This is a lot of hard work and you have to in­fil­trate the gangs. At the lead­er­ship lev­el, the busi­ness of the play­ers is not in the streets. Every­body feels that the lit­tle young ones walk­ing around with the Glock in their waist are lead­ers but that is not the lead­er­ship as the lead­ers are very skilled at mask­ing their ac­tiv­i­ty,” he said.

Figueira raised a new con­cern: “Many peo­ple don’t un­der­stand there are play­ers in Trinidad and To­ba­go that are transna­tion­al so they don’t stick in a lit­tle place and hide there all day. Peo­ple feel that gang­land is these lit­tle shoot­ers that every­one sees on the road but that is not gang­land. Gang­land is de­fined by the play­ers and if you don’t un­der­stand how they op­er­ate, you could nev­er ar­rest gang­land.”

He was crit­i­cal of T&T’s crim­i­nal jus­tice sys­tem, say­ing: “We are not build­ing cas­es that stand scruti­ny in the courts of law.”

Figueira ex­plained: “Wit­ness­es are un­der as­sault as the max­im of death to in­former must be en­forced, hence the at­tacks on wit­ness­es.

The pas­sage of a case through the courts is way too slow which fa­cil­i­tates the as­saults on wit­ness­es.

“The prison sys­tem at present is not de­signed to grap­ple with a re­mand yard filled with mem­bers of gang­land await­ing tri­al for lengthy pe­ri­ods of time, which en­ables gang­land to launch re­peat­ed as­saults on the re­mand yard in or­der to con­trol it. Gang­land is now in con­trol of re­mand and they are run­ning their en­ter­pris­es from the re­mand yard.”

He said the is­sue was not the leg­is­la­tion but the knowl­edge base that in­formed the man­ner in which the po­lice went about build­ing cas­es.

“Not a sin­gle play­er of gang­land Trinidad and To­ba­go, from the decade of the 1990s to the present, was ever in­car­cer­at­ed for gang ac­tiv­i­ties,” he said. “Not a sin­gle gang from this pe­ri­od to the present was ever dis­man­tled.

“The re­al­i­ty is that the in­sti­tu­tions of the crim­i­nal jus­tice sys­tem need to be rapid­ly re­formed and up­grad­ed to grap­ple with the 21st-cen­tu­ry re­al­i­ty on the ground, as they are at present con­sti­tut­ed to face 1960’s re­al­i­ty. This in­sti­tu­tion­al in­er­tia must now end to en­sure peace and se­cu­ri­ty for the cit­i­zens of Trinidad and To­ba­go in the 21st cen­tu­ry.”

COP has con­fi­dence in leg­is­la­tion

Re­veal­ing he was the one to rec­om­mend the in­tro­duc­tion of the An­ti Gang Bill back in 2006 as an ad­vi­sor un­der the Con­gress of the Peo­ple, Grif­fith said: “I am ful­ly aware of the val­ue and how it has worked.”

He said while there were very strin­gent an­ti-gang laws world­wide, T&T was not close to what had been im­ple­ment­ed in oth­er coun­tries, “Be­cause every time we try to im­pose laws to look af­ter the rights of law-abid­ing cit­i­zens, some­body would jump up to find a way to de­fend the rights of crim­i­nals and that has al­ways been our is­sue.”

Ac­cord­ing to Grif­fith: “Every time some­one finds a way to de­fend crim­i­nals, it can be used as a get-out-of-jail-free card.”

Not­ing that gang mem­bers were be­ing re­cruit­ed at younger ages now, he added: “Now you are now get­ting ear­ly teens as gang mem­bers and that’s why you are see­ing 14-year-olds bran­dish­ing firearms and be­ing re­cruit­ed by gangs.”

He said this was in­dica­tive of a very se­ri­ous so­cial is­sue where young peo­ple were be­ing eas­i­ly in­flu­enced and ma­nip­u­lat­ed.

Grif­fith de­clared that he was com­mit­ted to pre­vent­ing fur­ther pro­lif­er­a­tion of gangs and warned: “If we don’t nip this in the bud, in the next five years the num­ber of gang mem­bers could grow to ten times more be­cause you are get­ting tens of thou­sands of men and women in their ear­ly teens be­ing eas­i­ly in­flu­enced by gang mem­bers in com­mu­ni­ties.

“The cat­a­lyst to­wards re­duc­ing gang-re­lat­ed ac­tiv­i­ty will con­tin­ue to be one thing and that is, gangs must stop get­ting state con­tracts.”

The CoP said this prac­tice had been al­lowed to flour­ish un­der the last four po­lit­i­cal ad­min­is­tra­tions.

“This es­ca­lates the prob­lem be­cause it em­bold­ens them, gives them the op­por­tu­ni­ty to prof­it and they use this, not to help their com­mu­ni­ties but to pur­chase more firearms, get more il­le­gal drugs and hire more gang mem­bers,” he said.

Grif­fith de­scribed state con­tracts as the Achilles heel of the T&T Po­lice Ser­vice (TTPS) as they fought against crim­i­nal el­e­ments.

“The gangs are aware that we out-num­ber them, that we out-gun them, that we have bet­ter tac­ti­cal and nu­mer­i­cal su­pe­ri­or­i­ty over them, so they would not chal­lenge the TTPS head on. What they are do­ing is they are fight­ing their wars among them­selves and as Com­mis­sion­er of Po­lice I am bul­ly­ing my way in­to these wars to stop them from killing each oth­er.

“When the num­bers go up, it is not a case of one gang mem­ber killing an­oth­er. The sta­tis­tics hurt and dam­age the coun­try and puts fear in­to the eyes of law-abid­ing cit­i­zens.”

Ex­pert: Adopt Ja­maican mod­el

Herald­ing the suc­cess of a crime-fight­ing mod­el re­cent­ly in­sti­tut­ed in Ja­maica, Seep­erasad ex­plained: “What they do dif­fer­ent­ly is that they pros­e­cute gang mat­ters us­ing the an­ti-gang laws. Their an­ti-gang laws are sim­i­lar to ours but they do it in such a way that they have the req­ui­site in­tel­li­gence in­for­ma­tion and the le­gal sup­port, so that they build their case and they build the in­for­ma­tion first in such a way that it can stand up in court be­fore they go and ar­rest some­one and put the law in­to ef­fect.”

He said there had been a con­sis­tent de­cline in crimes in Ja­maica since 2009 as they were tack­ling the is­sue of gangs and gang ac­tiv­i­ty head-on in terms of sup­pres­sive and pre­ven­ta­tive ap­proach­es.

“Their gang sit­u­a­tion is ten times worse than ours and if they can pull it off, we can too,” Seep­er­sad said.

“It is not the leg­is­la­tors, they have done their job. It is the peo­ple who need to put the leg­is­la­tion to use.”

Seep­er­sad said the Ja­maican au­thor­i­ties had very strong­ly em­braced an all of gov­ern­ment and all of so­ci­ety ap­proach to deal­ing with crime.

“What hap­pens here is that even though our jus­tice sys­tem as well as oth­er sup­port­ing en­ti­ties, are get­ting clos­er and clos­er, we still work in si­los. We com­pete with each oth­er among the law en­force­ment agen­cies.

“When we have in­tel­li­gence in­for­ma­tion, we don’t share it be­cause the in­for­ma­tion is pow­er and every­body wants their lit­tle slice of the pie. It is a com­pe­ti­tion rather than co­op­er­a­tion,” he said.

In or­der to avoid this pit­fall, Seep­er­sad said, the Ja­maican gov­ern­ment had cre­at­ed a spe­cial com­mit­tee com­pris­ing Cab­i­net mem­bers who were tasked with serv­ing as a co­or­di­nat­ing en­ti­ty from which they cre­at­ed pro­to­cols and mech­a­nisms for the se­cu­ri­ty sec­tor.

“It is every­body now work­ing to­geth­er on the same page with the same goals in mind, as op­posed to com­pet­ing with each oth­er. If we can do that here, if we can work with the law fra­ter­ni­ty where we have le­gal pro­fes­sion­als help­ing us to build a case us­ing the ev­i­dence and we have oth­er en­ti­ties sup­ply­ing the rel­e­vant in­for­ma­tion in­stead of hid­ing it or hoard­ing it, and we put all of that to­geth­er and we build some­thing, we know we can prob­a­bly con­vict that per­son,” he said.

For­mer min­is­ter con­cerned about gangs

Al­fon­so, who ex­pressed con­cern about gangs and gang ac­tiv­i­ty, said he was not en­vi­ous of Grif­fith and is con­fi­dent that once the ex­pe­ri­enced heads join forces they will come up with a so­lu­tion. How­ev­er, he said, it will not be an easy task.

“We have a lot of laws in place that are not en­forced. All of us know that,” Al­fon­so said as he urged cit­i­zens to pay par­tic­u­lar at­ten­tion to the chang­ing land­scape of gangs in this coun­try with the in­flux of mi­grants from Venezuela.

A few weeks ago, Guardian Me­dia re­vealed in­tel­li­gence re­ports in­di­cat­ing the pres­ence of Venezue­lan gangs in the coun­try.

Con­ced­ing no one per­son had the an­swer on how to solve the sit­u­a­tion, Al­fon­so called for greater co­op­er­a­tion among en­ti­ties.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

 

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