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Offline Peong

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #900 on: November 01, 2015, 06:28:13 PM »
You need to pack yuh garlic, wooden stakes and silver bullets to navigate amongst those vampires Mr. Nakhid.
He brave to have a go at the presidency after renraw muddy the waters for all Trinis.
Good luck.

Offline Sam

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #901 on: November 01, 2015, 07:18:44 PM »
Talk about opening a can of worms.

He to f00king chupid.

He had a good chance now he blow it.

Faster than a speeding pittbull
Stronger than a shot of ba-bash
Capable of storming any fete


Offline Flex

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #902 on: November 02, 2015, 02:56:22 AM »
Nakhid denies receiving $$ from Bin Hammam
T&T Newsday Reports.


FORMER TRINIDAD and Tobago football team captain and midfielder David Nakhid has denied ever receiving any money from disgraced Qatari football official Mohammed Bin Hammam.

In fact, Nakhid is quoted in a story done by the Daily Mail as saying that he has never even met Bin Hammam.

His denial comes in the wake of the newspaper report, which cited documents in which money was transferred by Bin Hammam to someone bearing the name David Nakhid.

Nakhid threw his hat in the ring recently seeking the presidency of FIFA in its forthcoming elections. But the 51-year-old former TT footballer was forced out of the FIFA race last week due to a nomination error.

According to the Daily Mail, paperwork summarises money distributed from bank accounts controlled by Bin Hammam and includes payments to someone with the name David Nakhid.

The transfers in question include a sum of $11,390 (£7,400) in April 2009 and a payment of $11,000 (£7,100) in June 2009.

But the newspaper reports further, that Nakhid, when showed the details purporting to show money transferred to someone with a name similar to his, said, “I have no idea what that is … I’m ready to show my accounts to anyone. I’ve never even met Mohammed bin Hammam, ever, in my life. I can’t imagine what that (reference) is in 2009, or at any other time. I’ve never met the guy. Never.”

In an exclusive interview last week with the Mail on Sunday, Nakhid said his bid for the FIFA presidency was being funded by “family and friends.” Bin Hammam, a former president of the Asian Football Confederation and former vice-president of FIFA has been banned for football for life amidst reports of a series of bribery and conflict of interest scandals.

Nakhid, according to the Mail report, was widely perceived as a breath of fresh air in the FIFA presidential race. He played at club level in Switzerland, the USA and Sweden among other places, played for his country, and launched his presidential candidacy on a platform of reform, transparency and redistribution.

Since 2006 he has run a football academy in Lebanon.

Nakhid’s nomination for the FIFA presidency was supported by five Caribbean football associations.

However, last week, FIFA announced his candidacy had been deemed ineligible because one of the nominating FAS — the US Virgin Islands — had nominated more than one candidate, which is against the rules.

Therefore the USVI’s nomination for him was effectively struck off, meaning he did not have the five required nominations to continue.

Nakhid is appealing to FIFA’s electoral committee, saying they should have known about the multiple nominations, and given him a chance to rectify it, before striking him out.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #903 on: November 02, 2015, 04:06:08 AM »
The work of invisible hands ...

Offline Mad Scorpion a/k/a Big Bo$$

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #904 on: November 02, 2015, 10:23:19 AM »
The work of invisible hands ...

Those hand very busy

Offline Deeks

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #905 on: November 02, 2015, 10:34:25 AM »

Offline Sando prince

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #906 on: November 13, 2015, 10:41:48 AM »

Former Trinidad and Tobago player David Nakhid will lodge an appeal soon against FIFA's decision to disqualify him as a presidential candidate. His legal team will present their case at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), stating there was a violation of Fifa's electoral regulations.

https://www.facebook.com/cnewslive/posts/10153688162850610:0

Offline ribbit

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #907 on: November 24, 2015, 09:24:53 AM »
so now the fifa ethics committee is seeking to ban platini.

too bad nakhid no longer in de race.

Offline Sando prince

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #908 on: December 12, 2015, 11:21:53 PM »

FIFA presidential hopeful David Nakhid has appealed against his exclusion from the election at the Court of Arbitration for Sport. CAS says it expects a verdict next week. Nakhid, a former Trinidad and Tobago international, was among seven election applicants in October. FIFA's election committee blocked him because one of the five FIFA member federations nominating him broke rules by also proposing another contender.

https://www.facebook.com/cnewslive/posts/10153738718960610:0

Offline dreamer

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #909 on: December 14, 2015, 10:11:35 AM »
Good luck Nakhid. Perseverance.
With Uncle Tim out of the way, more can be achieved if the appeal is successful.
Supportin' de Warriors right tru.

Offline Sando prince

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #910 on: December 14, 2015, 01:50:21 PM »

JUST IN: T&T's David Nakhid has lost his appeal against being excluded from FIFA’s presidential election.

https://www.facebook.com/cnewslive/posts/10153743943405610:0

Offline dreamer

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #911 on: December 14, 2015, 02:06:13 PM »
The mafia says eh eh. Next time.
Supportin' de Warriors right tru.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #912 on: December 14, 2015, 02:19:23 PM »

Offline dreamer

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #913 on: December 14, 2015, 11:41:27 PM »
 :beermug:
Supportin' de Warriors right tru.

Offline SWF Reporter

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FIFA vs David Nakhid: the shocking truth of their CAS battle and why it matters
« Reply #914 on: December 28, 2015, 02:12:17 PM »
FIFA vs David Nakhid: the shocking truth of their CAS battle and why it matters
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868)


If you are a football fan or stakeholder, then this may be the most important case that you have barely heard of.

On 14 December 2015, the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ruled against Lebanon-based football coach and ex-Trinidad and Tobago international player David Nakhid in his bid to be re-instated into the FIFA presidential race, which culminates in the 26 February 2016 elections in Zurich, Switzerland.

You might have heard that much. But what you are unlikely to grasp is exactly what was at stake and the machinations at play that could potentially raise searching questions of not only FIFA but CAS as well.

If CAS had ruled in favour of Nakhid—whose candidacy was seen as barely plausible to begin with—the judicial body would not have simply increased the number of FIFA electoral candidates from six to seven. Rather, a Nakhid win could have potentially prompted an inquest into the FIFA Ad-hoc Electoral Committee’s operations and the disqualification of several nominations for current presidential candidates.

And who knows what that would mean for the scheduled elections and FIFA’s already damaged reputation?

The CAS decision itself gave little hint about what the case was really about.

FIFA ruled, on 28 October 2015, that Nakhid’s candidacy as invalid on the grounds that one of his nominators, the United States Virgin Islands, had also issued a declaration of support a for rival candidate, Jerome Champagne. As such, the USVI’s two nominations were disregarded in keeping with Article 13.1 (c) of the electoral rules.

Unlike Champagne, Nakhid was, as a result, left short of the required five nominations.

CAS supported FIFA’s initial decision: “In line with the FIFA AEC, the CAS panel found one member association had issued declarations of support to two candidates, including one for Mr Nakhid, in violation of the applicable FIFA rules.

“As a consequence, those letters of support were disregarded, meaning David Nakhid had not met the qualifying criterion of obtaining declarations of support from at least five member associations.”

However, Nakhid’s case did not hinge directly on whether his five letters of support were valid. Instead, he argued, through Lebanon attorney Jalal El Mir, that the USVI’s letter of support for Champagne’s candidacy was invalid and should not have been considered in the first place.

Crucially, for Nakhid’s case at least, FIFA’s electoral regulations article 13.2 states: “Members must notify the FIFA general secretariat, in writing, of a candidature for the office of FIFA President within the deadline stipulated in the FIFA Statutes.”

Further, Article 24.1 of the FIFA statutes states: “Only the Members may propose candidatures for the office of FIFA President (…) Members must notify the FIFA general secretariat, in writing, of a candidature for the FIFA presidency…”

And, simply put, the USVI did not notify the FIFA general secretariat of any decision to support Champagne. Instead, the Caribbean association sent a letter of support to Champagne, who subsequently relayed it to FIFA on his own behalf.

And Champagne, by FIFA’s own testimony, was not the only one who seemingly flouted FIFA’s regulations on eligibility for the post of president.

If CAS had ruled for Nakhid, it could have forced FIFA to reveal grounds for invalidated nominations for other candidates too, which might have turned the election campaign—already overshadowed by lengthy suspensions to current president Sepp Blatter and would-be president Michel Platini—into chaos.

The problem, though, is not that CAS refused to be swayed by Nakhid’s legal argument but whether he got a fair chance in the first place.

And CAS, unusually, is yet to offer grounds for its judgment or even provide a deadline by which to explain its decision. In its own December 14 media release, the judicial body stated that: “the full award with the grounds will be notified to the parties in a few days.”

That was 14 days ago and, in its own code, CAS makes it clear that it ignores holidays and weekends in its deadlines.

CAS has not responded to requests for information on the delay.

Thanks to leaked documents, Wired868 has been able to piece together the legal arguments for FIFA and Nakhid to provide the truth of a shocking case that threatened the football body’s eagerly anticipated February elections.

Nakhid’s case essentially has two parts. First, the former Grasshoppers and New England Revolution midfielder and Caribbean Player of the Year argued that the Ad-hoc Electoral Committee violated the principle of transparency by inviting him to submit a letter of support from USVI, three days after it already received a letter from Champagne for the same member association.

El Mir argued, on behalf of the Trinidadian, that: “such (an) act is not only a violation of the integrity and transparency obligation of the Ad-hoc Committee, but a clear manipulation of the election process, by intriguing Mr. Nakhid into a disqualification situation, for an act that he is absolutely not personally responsible of (sic).”

In its written response to CAS, FIFA sought to dismiss the suggestion that it had entrapped Nakhid and played an active role in his subsequent disqualification.

“The FIFA Ad-hoc Electoral Committee merely informed the appellant that it had not received letters of support for him from St Lucia Football Association and USVI Soccer Association, Inc,” stated FIFA. “It did not, however, request the Appellant to submit letters or have them submitted, let alone indicate that letters should be submitted to the FIFA general secretariat directly.”

The governing body further insisted that it had no obligation to warn Nakhid of a potential invalidation under its electoral regulations and pointed to the final sentence of Article 13.1 (c), which states: “If a member association presents declarations of support for more than one person, all its declarations shall become invalid.”

“Through this clear provision, legal certainty, predictability of decisions as well as equal treatment of all candidates is ensured,” stated FIFA. “A duty of the FIFA Ad-hoc Electoral Committee to advise any of the two candidates in context with letters of support (…) is not contained the FIFA Statutes and/or any FIFA regulations.”

However, in the second and crucial part of the appeal, it was “Team Nakhid” that insisted the letter of the law should be followed.

El Mir noted that FIFA confirmed that its only USVI letter of support for Champagne came from the candidate and not the member association.

“Therefore, it appears clearly that the letter of USVI Football Association in support for Mr Jerome Champagne, was not submitted within the conditions of the provisions of Articles 13.1 of Electoral Regulations and 24.1 of FIFA Statutes and therefore cannot be considered a valid letter of support by a FIFA Member,” stated El Mir. “Consequently, the USVI Letter in support of Mr Jerome Champagne being invalid due to its infringement of its submission condition set in Electoral Regulations and FIFA Statutes, the USVI Letter in support of Mr Nakhid submitted by the USVI Football Association directly to the Ad-hoc Committee shall be the only valid support letter issued by USVI.

“And thereby the candidacy of Mr Nakhid shall be considered acceptable and requiring (sic) all conditions stipulated in the Electoral Regulations including the five support letters from FIFA Members.”

Again, for ease of reference, El Mir hinged his appeal on the FIFA Statutes which state that: “Only the Members may propose candidatures for the office of FIFA President (…) Members must notify the FIFA general secretariat, in writing, of a candidature for the FIFA presidency…”

FIFA’s response to this challenge came in three parts.

First, the governing body, which was represented by director of legal affairs Marco Villiger and head of corporate legal Oliver Jaberg, offered its own grammatical interpretation of the word “must” in the aforementioned context.

Curiously, FIFA also suggested that although its own statutes stipulated the way it must be done, it did not expressly say it could not be done in another manner.

“The term ‘must’ used in both article 24 paragraph 1 of the FIFA statutes and article 13 paragraph 2 of the electoral regulations for the FIFA presidency indicates that candidatures can only be notified to the FIFA general secretariat by members and not by any other entities or persons,” stated FIFA. “This follows from the grammatical interpretation of the mentioned provisions, in particular the term ‘must’ following immediately after ‘members’.

“If there was an obligation for members to notify the FIFA general secretariat directly (i.e. if it was FIFA’s intent to exclude letters of support or notifications of candidatures from members to be submitted by other parties), such prerequisite would have had to be expressly included in the FIFA statutes or regulations. This, however, is not the case.”

FIFA followed up on its interpretation of the grammar in its own statutes by explaining that it has, arguably, violated its own constitution in other instances in the current election and in previous ones as well.

Therefore, CAS, according to FIFA, should allow the governing football body to continue doing so, since it was now a “well-established” habit.

“The practice of FIFA Ad-hoc Electoral Committees to allow letters of support from member associations to be submitted by candidates themselves is furthermore well-established,” stated FIFA. “According (sic) submissions have been admitted in the past and also in the present electoral process.”

The third and final line of defence from Villiger and Jaberg was a counter-punch. FIFA claimed that Nakhid had also violated Article 13.2 by allegedly submitting the letter of support for St Lucia himself.

“Should the appellant’s argument that notifications have to be submitted by members directly to the FIFA general secretariat be considered valid and therefore apply,” stated FIFA, “quod non, the letter of support for the appellant from St Lucia Football Association, dated 12 October 2015, would also have to be considered invalid, as FIFA did not receive this letter directly from St Lucia Football Association.

“On the contrary, this letter was provided to the FIFA Ad-Hoc Electoral Committee by Ms Josanne Leonard on the appellant’s behalf.

“The Appellant’s arguing (sic) would therefore make this letter invalid, leaving him, again, with only four letters of support. Therefore, he could still not be admitted as a candidate for the election for the office of FIFA President on 26 February 2016.”

Even more importantly, though, was the timeline.

FIFA’s counter-accusation was dispatched to CAS on December 3 and relayed to Nakhid’s attorney. Hours later, on December 4, El Mir informed CAS that FIFA had tried to mislead the judicial body with “flagrantly erroneous” information, which they intended to expose through written evidence at their subsequent hearing on December 11.

According to Team Nakhid, the St Lucia Association had sent its letter of support for his candidacy directly to the the Ad-hoc Electoral Committee.

“Based on the respondent’s reply letter dated the 3rd of December 2015, and the arguments and allegations of defense presented within,” stated El Mir, “… FIFA regulatory texts (are) flagrantly erroneous and such allegations being refutable by undisputable written evidence.

“Therefore, and based on parties confirmation of availability on the proposed date of 11th December 2015 for the potential hearing before CAS Panel, we would like to request a hearing to be held at the date proposed by CAS.”

But Nakhid and El Mir were, allegedly, not allowed to submit email documents at the CAS hearing, which sought to prove that St Lucia sent its letter of support directly to the Ad-hoc Electoral Committee.

FIFA objected when El Mir attempted to introduce “undisputable (sic) written evidence” on St Lucia’s nominations and CAS supposedly refused to hear the counterpoint to the football body’s alleged false testimony.

CAS’ website offered further information on the procedure for its cases.

“The proceedings before the (CAS) Panel comprise written submissions and, if the Panel deems it appropriate, an oral hearing,” states CAS. “Upon receipt of the file and if necessary, the President of the Panel shall issue directions in connection with the written submissions. As a general rule, there shall be one statement of claim, one response and, if the circumstances so require, one reply and one second response.

“The parties may, in the statement of claim and in the response, raise claims not contained in the request for arbitration and in the answer to the request.

“Thereafter, no party may raise any new claim without the consent of the other party.”

CAS, apparently, issued no directions to El Mir, after he raised his dissatisfaction with FIFA’s testimony via email. And, once the hearing began, it was too late for Nakhid’s attorney to present new written evidence without support from either FIFA or CAS.

The CAS code does offer suggestions as to how Team Nakhid might have proceeded.

“A party may request the Panel to order the other party to produce documents in its custody or under its control,” states CAS code R44.3. “The party seeking such production shall demonstrate that such documents are likely to exist and to be relevant.

“If it deems it appropriate to supplement the presentations of the parties, the Panel may at any time order the production of additional documents or the examination of witnesses, appoint and hear experts, and proceed with any other procedural step.”

Wired868 is uncertain whether El Mir asked CAS to compel FIFA to produce emails, which could potentially prove that St Lucia did send Nakhid’s letter of support directly to the Ad-hoc Electoral Committee.

Wired868 is also unaware of whether the CAS Panel attempted to use its own initiative to order supplemental evidence related to the St Lucia email to be produced.

Here too, the timeline might be relevant.

Nakhid filed his statement of appeal to CAS on Friday November 13. FIFA responded  20 days later on the stipulated deadline of December 3.

If El Mir chose to offer a written response to FIFA, he had just seven days to do so before the scheduled hearing date of December 11.

Article R32 of the CAS code explained how Nakhid’s attorney could have requested a time extension.

“With the exception of the time limit for the statement of appeal, any request for a first extension of time of a maximum of five days can be decided by the CAS Secretary General,” stated CAS, “without consultation with the other party or parties.”

Notably, any such CAS extension would have meant a similar offer to FIFA, which could have significantly delayed the hearing.

“If a counterclaim and/or jurisdictional objection is filed,” states the CAS code 44.1, “the CAS Court Office shall fix a time limit for the claimant to file an answer to the counterclaim and/or jurisdictional objection.”

It is uncertain whether extensions were allowed in expedited matters like Nakhid’s. But nothing seemed to expressly suggest that option was unavailable.

CAS code 44.4 stated only that: “With the consent of the parties, the Division President or the Panel may proceed in an expedited manner and may issue appropriate directions therefor.”

El Mir had successfully petitioned CAS for an extension earlier in the case, although it had just been for roughly three days.

CAS initially gave Nakhid until 2 December 2015 to state whether he wanted an oral hearing or was happy for the judicial body to rule solely based on written submissions. However, FIFA had until December 3 to respond to the former’s appeal.

El Mir objected to the deadline for a hearing offered by CAS.

“CAS has requested from the parties, to express their intention, at the latest on the 2nd of December 2015, whether they will request an appointment of a hearing in the present matter, and such hearing to be held on the 11 of December 2015,” stated El Mir. “Whereas the decision by the appellant to request an appointment of a hearing, is dependent, in the course of fair justice, of the respondent’s reply, which deadline shall expire on the 3rd of December 2015 as per CAS letter dated 23 November 2015.

“Therefore we would like to request the extension of the deadline (…) for at least 48 hours after our notification of respondent reply, or after the expiry of such reply deadline in case of respondent’s failure to reply, allowing the appellant to assess the necessity of requesting such hearing based on arguments and evidence brought in respondent’s letter, taking into consideration the expedite procedure in the present matter.”

Both parties asked CAS  to compel the loser to foot the bill for arbitration while FIFA also requested compensation for its own legal costs. Nakhid threw in the cost of his election campaign and moral damages as well.

Thus far, Nakhid has declined comment on the CAS case.

Although FIFA now looks set to enjoy the last laugh, some important questions remain unanswered.

On what grounds did CAS dismiss FIFA’s apparent violation of Article 24.1 of its Statutes and Article 13.2 of its electoral regulations?

Did Nakhid’s failure to rebut FIFA’s allegation regarding the St Lucia letter of support play a key role in CAS’ decision? And, if so, did the fault lie with El Mir and a technicality?

Or had CAS failed to ensure justice and due process by not offering Nakhid time for a written response to FIFA’s allegations or allowing documentary evidence to supplement his presentation at the hearing?

It may be a while before we hear from CAS on the matter.

“The Panel (…) announced the notification of the operative part of the award for 14 December 2015,” stated CAS. “The full award with grounds should be issued in due course. No specific date can be provided in this respect to the parties.”

Nakhid has lost his case. But FIFA and CAS are not yet out of the woods.

At present, the United States Department of Justice continues to zero in on FIFA’s sordid past. The football body’s ethics committee has made a mark on FIFA’s present, as it called Blatter and Platini to account.

In some ways, Nakhid versus FIFA tells a story about the beleaguered organisation’s immediate future. And maybe CAS’ too.

Nakhid can appeal to the Swiss Federal Tribunal, according a Trinidad and Tobago sports lawyer, if he can satisfy that body that there was “material injustice in the way that the matter was handled.”

However, there are very limited circumstances under which Nakhid could successfully plead for his case to be heard there.

Yet, CAS has been outed before for being overly sympathetic to sporting bodies.

On 5 January 2014, the Higher Regional Court of Munich overturned a ban on German ice skater Claudia Pechstein, who had been penalised for failing a doping test by the International Skating Union (ISU).

CAS had upheld the ISU’s ban while the Swiss Federal Tribunal twice rejected Pechstein’s appeals.

The Munich court stated that CAS judgment did not satisfy article 6 of the European Court of Human Rights and ruled that: the CAS Award amounted to a violation of German anti-trust/competition law, which prohibits the abuse of a dominant position (or monopoly) in a particular market; and whilst there was no identification of actual bias on the part of the Arbitral Panel appointed to hear CP’s appeal before the CAS, the composition and structure of the International Council of Arbitration for Sport (ICAS)—the body which is responsible for establishing the approved list of CAS arbitrators—was weighted heavily in favour of sports federations, which in turn fundamentally undermined the neutrality of the CAS itself.

“Put simply, sports associations such as the ISU and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) had a disproportionately strong influence on the selection of persons appointed as CAS arbitrators,” stated a translation of the Munich court’s ruling. “In turn, this structural imbalance gave risk that the arbitrators appointed to determine individual disputes at the CAS would (or may) have a tendency to favour the governing bodies, rather than acting in a wholly neutral, objective and independent manner.

“There was no rational justification for the structural imbalance identified by the Court.”

Should Nakhid refuse to bend, much more than his presidential candidacy is at stake. FIFA and CAS could be in the docks too.

« Last Edit: January 02, 2016, 06:20:40 AM by Flex »

Offline asylumseeker

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Was also trying to locate the expanded CAS decision/opinion. When Nakhid decides to go on record again, ask why El Mir.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #916 on: January 07, 2016, 09:28:21 AM »
Should Nakhid seek the CONCACAF presidency?

Offline soccerman

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #917 on: January 07, 2016, 09:53:46 AM »
Should Nakhid seek the CONCACAF presidency?
I think it will build his resume if he has aspirations of serving on a top executive position in FIFA, especially if he can come in and change the image. It will also depend on if he doesn't mind living in the region.

Offline Deeks

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #918 on: January 07, 2016, 11:45:29 AM »
Should Nakhid seek the CONCACAF presidency?
I think it will build his resume if he has aspirations of serving on a top executive position in FIFA, especially if he can come in and change the image. It will also depend on if he doesn't mind living in the region.

Why not. He has every right too. But does Concacaf want another Trini as prez. The zone reeling with corruption charges. Big indictment for the Trini man. You think the want to hear another Trini accent?

Offline Tallman

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The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.


Offline Deeks

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #921 on: December 13, 2017, 07:44:06 PM »
With David, anything is possible!

Offline Mad Scorpion a/k/a Big Bo$$

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Offline Tallman

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The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline Cocorite

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #924 on: April 27, 2018, 12:56:41 PM »
Socawarriors Need A Winning Mentality

Offline Deeks

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #925 on: April 27, 2018, 07:41:04 PM »
Congrats. Pity  he could not help Sancho.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #926 on: April 28, 2018, 06:05:23 AM »
Congrats. Pity  he could not help Sancho.

This goes directly to something the TT Pro League is unclear about and/or has difficulty articulating: what's its value proposition.

P.S. The 'keeping players out of a life of crime' assertion is insufficient.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2018, 06:10:40 AM by asylumseeker »

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #927 on: April 28, 2018, 06:06:51 AM »
Congrats to David on his acquisition of a football club.

All the best bredda. Wish you success

Ditto.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2018, 06:08:50 AM by asylumseeker »

Offline maxg

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #928 on: April 28, 2018, 09:18:01 AM »
 :timeout: he real vex with TT boy.. doing everything elsewhere, wonder how he get where he reach ? Where did it start ?

Offline Flex

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #929 on: April 22, 2019, 03:56:12 AM »
Nakhid’s Academy wins Madrid Cup with three TTFA Elite Players
TTFA Media.


The David Nakhid International Academy (DNA), comprising of three players from the TTFA Elite Under 15 selection, defeated Atletico Madrid 3-2 on its way to capturing the Madrid Cup in Spain on the weekend.

Nakhid had initial talks with local coach Jamal Shabazz about the current Under 15 elite pool and after viewing videos of the team in action, he invited trio Josiah Wilson, Molik Khan and Nathaniel James to join his Academy under 16 team for the prestigious international cup.

DNA, founded by the former Trinidad and Tobago captain, registered Under 10,Under 12 and Under 16 teams in the four-day tournament. The Under 16s went onto defeat FC Valdemoro in the final 1-0. Valdemoro is a feeder team for Real Madrid and Atletico Madrid. The winner was scored by Trinidadian Curtis De Leon. De Leon was spotted by T&T U-17 head coach Stern John at the recent TTFA combine in Atlanta and invited to train with the National Under 17 team ahead of the CONCACF qualifiers next month. Curtis’ brother Shane was also part of the Academy team at the tournament.

The winning goal for Nakhid’s U16s came when Wilson combined with Hussein Ezzedine to free De Leon on the edge of the penalty area and he weaved past two players before slotting home. The U-16s earlier defeated Estudiantes de Alcorcon 3-1 in the semi final with James scoring a double in that encounter.

Nakhid’s U-12s won their championship match with a 3-1 victory over Rivellinos Academy of Brazil. The U-10s meantime won the consolation final 4-2 over FC Alcoria.

On the addition of the three T&T U-15 players, Nakhid said his discussions with Shabazz led to the move and he credited TTFA President David John Williams for putting travel arrangements in place for the players.

“I thought about it after having talks with Jamaal. I saw a video of them playing against an Under 20 team in Trinidad. Those three boys stood out – Josiah Wilson, Nathaniel James and Molik Khan,” Nakhid told TTFA Media on Sunday.

“They fitted in, they integrated into the team and our players were happy to have them. The Lebanese and Trinidadian mentality is not very far from each other and we have to try and get them to understand the culture of football which is something is common everywhere and that is a professional culture, The boys came in, the were very humble they did well and they are going to be part of our academy going forward. They were well liked. We had some scouts who saw us and will continue to look at our players in the future,” Nakhid continued. The Academy which is based in Lebanon, comprises of players from Lebanon as well as players born in Africa, Asia and Europe with Lebanese roots.

“This is a major result to beat Atletico Madrid…to beat a European team to win the Madrid Cup. It was a very nice experience for the boys with four days of top class competition. This is where the intensity is at in terms of what is required for international football for all the programmes and it would certainly be a boost for Trinidad and Tobago football to have more teams and players exposed to competitions like these,” Nakhid added

“It is not an overnight success. This is about eight years of work in the making and it is still a work in progress,” the ex-FC Grasshoppers midfielder concluded. During the trip, players also got the opportunity to train at Real Madrid facilities with coaches from that club as well a tour of the City. Nakhid’s academy teams have participated in other international tournaments such as the Milan Football Festival, Copa Santa and the Mediterranean International Cup in Barcelona, Spain and the Wales Super Cup.

David Nakhid talks about his Academy's success at Madrid Cup with Three T&T U-15 players

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