June 07, 2020, 03:17:56 AM

Author Topic: The David Nakhid Thread  (Read 106357 times)

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Offline Mad Scorpion a/k/a Big Bo$$

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #930 on: May 06, 2019, 03:05:30 PM »
Big up Nakhid!!!

Offline Tallman

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #931 on: November 01, 2019, 12:41:08 PM »
Hall of Fame soccer player sues AU for race-based discrimination sues American University for race-based discrimination
Kimberly Cataudella (The Eagle)

A former American University soccer player accused the University of racial discrimination, according to a lawsuit filed in a D.C. federal court on Wednesday.

David Nakhid applied for the men’s soccer head coach position following the dismissal of Todd West in December 2018. Zach Samol, the team’s current head coach, took over the position in early 2019.

On April 26, Nakhid filed a charge of discrimination with the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission, according to Bloomberg Law, who first reported the lawsuit.

Nakhid, originally from Trinidad and Tobago, identifies as black. The soccer player believed he was most qualified for the position because of his past experience. The lawsuit states that he “is widely recognized as one of the most prominent players to have played soccer with the University.”

Nakhid played soccer at AU from 1983 to 1986. He was inducted into the Stafford H. Cassell Hall of Fame in 2005, as he went on to play soccer professionally in Switzerland, Belgium and Greece after graduating, according to his website. Upon retiring from professional soccer, he went on to own and be the head coach for the David Nakhid International Football Academy.

The lawsuit alleges that Nakhid reached out to the University’s assistant athletic director, Andrew Smith, to ask about the open position, and he was directed to the online application. After filling it out, the lawsuit says, University officials “declined” to interview him.

The lawsuit also states that Samol, who is white, was offered the position only after Mike Brady, who is also white, declined it. Brady is currently the associate head coach of the men’s soccer team at Duke University, and he served as the head coach of the women’s soccer team at AU for eight seasons, beginning in 2010.

AU Athletics declined to a request for comment, stating the department does not offer any statements on pending litigation.

Nakhid’s attorney could not be reached. A representative from their office said they would let the attorney decide whether to respond to the Eagle’s request for comment.

AU spokesperson Kelly Alexander told The Eagle that the University cannot comment on pending litigation.

“American University is committed to ensuring inclusive excellence in all parts of our community,” Alexander wrote in an email to The Eagle. “Our commitment includes hiring practices that enhance recruiting and onboarding processes and deliver an employee experience that attracts and retains high-performing and diverse faculty and staff at all levels. AU views each hire and the hiring process as critical to the success of our students and our University.”
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #932 on: February 10, 2020, 04:41:44 PM »
T&T’s contract mafia is destroying the future of the working class; we must stand up
David Nakhid, Wired868


The year was 1986, and my American University Soccer team was having an average season compared to our previous season having reached the National Championship game against perennial powerhouse, UCLA. Seven of our starting team had graduated, including three fellow Trinbagonians who were players of outstanding quality.

I was now co-captain with an excellent English player, Keith Trehy, who was truly the first poor white boy that I had encountered in my lifetime. Our players mostly freshmen and American, except for one Chris Morgan—a Jamaica national youth team player and one of the best dribblers I have ever seen in my career; and I’ve seen and played with the best.

Midway through our average season and we were down in Florida scheduled to play against University of South Florida (USF), another college powerhouse and ranked in the top 25 nationally. We were not optimistic.

After breakfast an urgent knock on my hotel door: “Nak, Nak….yuh dey?”

Fearing the worst, I hustled to the door. After all, college freshmen virtually unmonitored in a hotel room down in the ‘Sunshine Sate’; well, the possibilities were endless. It was Morgan.

“Nak bwoy, me and de boys just seen a USF game program and dem have three white South African players pon dem side; and two of dem was in de South African army.”

His words lingered in the air to the point that I felt I could literally pluck each word with my bare hands. By this time, the whole team minus my co-captain was crammed into my room waiting for my reaction. They had seen me many times on my way to the anti-apartheid rallies mostly held outside the South African Embassy on Massachusetts Avenue, just down from our place of learning.

I had spoken to them of Nelson Mandela. Not the shuffling, smiling, dancing, eager to please the white voices Mandela, that all you house negroes like to portray the man as; but the militant Mandela, the one who spoke about economic and social reform for the monstrously oppressed black South Africans; the Mandela who knew that a vote without structural and political context was nothing but that: just a vote.

I spoke about Steve Biko, Patrice Lumumba and Malcolm the X man. People they had never heard of but were eager to hear their stories. My reaction could only be one: “fellas get some white cardboard strips and some markers.”

For the next three hours, almost up until game time, this group of mostly white Americans made some of the finest protest placards that one could imagine. ‘Down with apartheid’, ‘free Mandela’ and ‘Justice for Biko’ were just samples of the placards hurriedly made.

We thought we would hold them aloft as the teams lined up, the crowd would cheer and praise us, we’d be satisfied with our noble behaviour and we would have done our small part to abolish the oppressive scourge that is apartheid. Well none of that imagined scenario played to script.

First of all, we were joined by my co-captain, the poor English white boy who was very aware of the significant part that the UK government played in not only propping up the apartheid government but eliminating the voices of dissent from the African diaspora.

‘I’m with you guys’, he proclaimed and picked up a placard on his way out the door. Great, I thought, we are all in now.

As we lined up for the game, it was easy to spot the white South Africans on USF. They were physically imposing with white faces that were abnormally red from the hot Florida sun. I had a couple of the bench players bring out the placards so they’d go unnoticed by our coach Peter Mehlert, a Chinese-American man who was competent enough as a coach but wished he was British and had a despicable personality, especially towards the black players.

I remember it like it was yesterday. As the players distributed the placards to our starting team already at centre circle, my eyes were on our coach as he began walking towards us.

He quickly saw the signs and made a beeline towards me. Seething with anger, he said this can affect all those on scholarship. But he was looking only at my co-captain, Trehy, and myself. The message was clear. We were due for graduation next semester.

And it was then I realised, literally in the blink of an eye, that I was not of the mettle of Malcolm, Lumumba or Mandela. Everything became surreal. I saw the disappointment in my parents’ faces as I came back to Trinbago expelled. The glee on my enemies’ faces as my four years of hard work and footballing achievements expunged.

The feeling became worse as my co-captain dropped his placard where he stood and moved to the end of the line. All the players were looking at me from both sides, my dubious pretence at nobility in plain sight. I felt like I was floating, I kid you not, almost looking at myself to see my reaction.

To this day, I cannot tell you what I would have done if I didn’t hear a voice from the stands, as he moved from the viewing area closer to the field, shouting: “yes Nakhid, yes Nakhid!” I made him out immediately, it was Paul Peña, an ex-St Mary’s College boy I had not seen in years; and an older friend of mine.

He continued: “yes Nakhid, yes Nakhid, down with apartheid!”

My players took the cue and all except my co-captain held up their placards, the white South African oppressors began cursing at us, officials were scrambling everywhere; and our point was made. Our average team went on to play our best game of the season, beating a nationally ranked USF 6-3. I had a goal and three assists and as Morgan, who was dribbling the USF players to the point of embarrassment, would tell me later: “Nak, you looked liked if you were floating over the field.”

I don’t remember much of the game details to be honest but I remember that our coach never said a single word about that game or the preceding events. Nothing. Crickets!

Why my trip down memory lane? Firstly, I think at this point in my life I should, while I’m able to share some of experiences I’ve encountered during a truly blessed life full of failures and, yes, intermittent successes.

Secondly and more importantly, as our Trinidad and Tobago hurtles in overdrive to social and economic destruction, maybe some of our citizens might take heart from knowing that no-one is as brave or as noble as he seems or even proclaims. But nothing is insurmountable including our deepest fears.

The collective oppression inflicted on us—whether we claim to be so called Indo-Trinbagonians or so called Afro-Trinbagonians—by both major political parties, the PNM primarily and the UNC or PP version is now down to us as citizens to overthrow, and that revolution cannot be an armchair one. It must be feet on the ground, protesting, educating, engaging and exercising our right to civil disobedience at all levels.

If we as a people could read and learn about the corruption of both parties in facilitating the payments of rents to politically influential families—including the wife of our present AG, Mona Nahous Al-Rawi—to the tune of 440 million dollars a year and not have widespread protests to demand this government’s resignation and the complete sidelining of T&T’s corrupted political class, then I don’t know what else will move us.

Maybe the self-realisation that we are not who we imagine ourselves to be just might. Maybe it is when we let it sink in that money paid for empty buildings is frittered away at the expense of our disastrous healthcare system, failing education system, our manufacturing and agricultural industries, and our sporting facilities.

Do we honestly expect that a few burglaries targeting the affluent contract mafia in our country will change the way our politicians—corrupted and complicit with this contract mafia—conduct their modus operandi?

Just look at on the ongoing revolution in Lebanon for guidance. No chance in hell my brothers and sisters.
I will leave you with this and I know some of you with your pretences to democracy may disagree. When a country that has been corrupted to its core, along most—if not all!—of its institutional structures, then the practice of voting is no longer relevant as a tool for change.

Both parties laugh at us, as they make provision for the security of their children’s children’s children, as the son of one of our late corrupted PNM ministers (who attended American University with me) coolly told us.

The corrupted privileged class, politicians included, understand only three things: loss of wealth, loss of power or loss of life. If they had any sense of empathy, they would not have brought us to this sorry pass.

Now, we can choose to act like Morgan; or we can drop the placard and move to the end of the line. It’s really up to us!
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #933 on: February 11, 2020, 08:05:22 AM »
The article posted above resonates with me for several reasons and on various levels.

The city: I spent an overlapping period of time in that city engaged in socio-cultural-economic and political activities at embassies or at which embassies were "patrons". At one point, I prepared briefs for someone whose office shall remain nameless.

I first visited the city as an 11 year old and had not the slightest idea that I would return on a permanent  basis 7 years later.

I too found myself standing in front of the Embassy of South Africa. I had a clear personal conviction that the circumstance of apartheid was the sole ground, barring economic misfortune, on which I was prepared to interrupt my studies. I remember the moments in front of the embassy almost as clearly as I recall watching Nelson Mandela walk liberated from almost 30 years as a prisoner of conscience some years later.

It is those activities, among others, that cemented in my mind in 2007/8 that Barack Obama could and would become President.

To be continued  ... on a plane about to takeoff.  When I land I'll bring it to the football thread part of the resonance.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2020, 08:11:33 AM by asylumseeker »
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #934 on: February 11, 2020, 05:49:44 PM »
PART II

One of the best ideas I had in the earlies was that of arranging my course schedule on a three day week. This meant I had two midweek days to go out and engage the city, do things out of the ordinary  routine, and think and relax. On one of the days-off I would ride from near where Reagan was shot to a place along the river in Northern Virginia called Monticello. It was a good physical challenge with pleasing  scenery, no stress and high rewards. I would return with a buzzing mind and ready to conquer.

Somewhere along the line I thought about transferring to an institution that offered the area of concentration in which I was most interested. The candidates were two: Georgetown and AU. On the day I rode to Georgetown to check it out critically it wasn't officially Spring yet, but it was warm and sunny and it seemed like the entire campus was sunbathing on any available patch of grass. I froze in my tracks at the gate and decided that I wasn't feeling the place culturally or demographically and I made an about turn.

On another day off,  when I went to AU,  I found a warm and very professional lady from Jamaica (with a hint of Chinese ancestry if I recall correctly) who was tasked with International Admissions. She gave me a list of things to do and a schedule on which to have them done, and as I got them done over the weeks,  the initial tinge of doubt that I had detected in her, disappeared.

It was after this that I met Pete Mehlert. We spoke for at least 30 minutes in his office. While I was listening to him attentively I was trying to figure out the puzzle that he presented me in stereotype, name, occupation, personality and energy level.  I wasn't successful at deciphering anything as to how a guy, who my best offering at supposition surmised might have been adopted from Korea, ended up coaching collegiate soccer - particularly in that time period.

Satisfied that all my documents had been submitted, and that pending end of semester grades, the transfer process was afoot and near completion, Mehlert picked up the phone and called someone who it was clear he wanted to engage in the process. Then he arranged for me to walk across campus and in less than five to ten minutes I was in David Nakhid's dorm room ... being greeted by a Trini who had a Big Man on Campus tag.

In Spanish, teammates and commentators use the term "figura" to refer to players with personality on and off the field. Leaders and decision-makers. And I use the term "iron sharpens iron" because it really captures how we should deal with our bredrin, the ones we know and the ones we don't know. However,  one man's "figura" and iron sharpener is often a fearful man's troublemaker. Something like the mantra that a coach shared with me as one of his operating axioms: having 3 Argentines on your squad spells trouble and 4 will mark your loss of the dressing room. The sheer personality of 1 Argentine should be duplicated cautiously but not multiplied beyond that according to him.

Anyway...

I walked into the room greeting the occupants and extended my hand.  As I did so, I recall pondering what weight of handshake should fit the moment. I decided to not be too non-Trini so I settled on the light-hearted grip that passes outside of business circles, up and down the island chain as a decent hail. BUT in an instant I regretted that choice, particularly because  I knew better.   

David Nakhid started "iron sharpening" immediately and left me with a lesson that I have since replicated to countless African and Caribbean youth and men over the decades, without ever invoking DN's name.

David read me the Riot Act on the protocol of a proper, firm handshake and why and my few fleeting seconds of wading in at the wishy washy end of life were banished, never to return. Frankly, I wanted a re-do: to repeat my entrance absent the faux pas.

Nakhid was a figure and the manner, tone and sincerity with which he dealt with the matter rivalled the quality of a reasoning session with a serious Rastafarian elder steeped in the firmness of livity. I walked out of the room chastised, but ever faithful and ever sure and since then I've taken my iron sharpening seriously and frontally.

Some years later in a NYC lobby,  the smile of an attractive woman caught my attention. Turns out she was Lebanese.  From Lebanon. Some weeks later she invited me to meet some of her compatriots who were also in the city temporarily.  Two things stayed with me: one was that one of the compatriots  was the Beirut-based cousin of someone I was schooled with in T+T and the other was the near mysticism of the cult of David Nakhid in the imagination of those young Lebanese.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2020, 06:15:28 PM by asylumseeker »
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

Offline Cocorite

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #935 on: February 11, 2020, 10:13:06 PM »
Well, as a connoisseur of good writing, both of storytelling and of the promotion of human dignity, this thoughtful piece was indeed a delight.

Yes, some people have so groomed themselves that one cannot be in their presence and leave unscathed.

Thanks for sharing, Seeker.

My favorite line . . .Nakhid was a figure and the manner, tone and sincerity with which he dealt with the matter rivaled the quality of a reasoning session with a serious Rastafarian elder steeped in the firmness of levity.
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #936 on: February 12, 2020, 12:48:18 PM »
Well, as a connoisseur of good writing, both of storytelling and of the promotion of human dignity, this thoughtful piece was indeed a delight.

Yes, some people have so groomed themselves that one cannot be in their presence and leave unscathed.

Thanks for sharing, Seeker.

My favorite line . . .Nakhid was a figure and the manner, tone and sincerity with which he dealt with the matter rivaled the quality of a reasoning session with a serious Rastafarian elder steeped in the firmness of levity.

The handshake schooling took place about 6 months before the protest action Nakhid describes.  Two years later I would be confronted with a slightly more complex  situation than the one Nakhid faced,  but which required similar psychological resources.  Nevertheless they drew on the informal schoolings of 1986 and 1987, but were really fundamented on 1983 through 1985.

He wrote: "Why my trip down memory lane? Firstly, I think at this point in my life I should, while I’m able to share some of experiences I’ve encountered during a truly blessed life full of failures and, yes, intermittent successes." Totally agree.  Indeed, 1987 is totally related to the decision to make that about face at Georgetown's gates and the decision that I made after the transfer to AU went through. Barring that decision I would have been making placards in Florida on the day Nakhid describes.

Side note: Around 2014/5 the attractive lady was on a plane and she told me she had a good chat during the flight with a Trini baller.  I still have no idea who the player/former player was, despite calling about 10 names. There are only a handful to two handfuls of players that should have been on that flight path. Lebanon outbound.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2020, 12:55:23 PM by asylumseeker »
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

Offline Cocorite

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #937 on: February 12, 2020, 03:14:56 PM »
Now, we can choose to act like Morgan; or we can drop the placard and move to the end of the line. It’s really up to us!

Waaaaay too many choose to drop their placard and move to the end of the line; most, never bothering to pick it up in the first place. And to think that by now the masses should have been sufficiently schooled in, and frustrated with the insistence of the oppressors to inflict corruption.

As a people we still don't like ourselves enough to demand a more dignified life for ourselves and posterity.

As for Nak, may his tribe increase.

Thanks for sharing
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Offline Tallman

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #938 on: March 22, 2020, 09:07:44 AM »
WATCH: With Trinidad and Tobago at a crossroads, former T&T footballer David Nakhid, who has been outspoken on social issues throughout his life, talks about his time as a footballer, both as a player and as a coach and what brings him back to T&T.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/lQPkQdhqyNY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/lQPkQdhqyNY</a>
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Offline Controversial

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #939 on: March 22, 2020, 02:27:15 PM »
WATCH: With Trinidad and Tobago at a crossroads, former T&T footballer David Nakhid, who has been outspoken on social issues throughout his life, talks about his time as a footballer, both as a player and as a coach and what brings him back to T&T.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/lQPkQdhqyNY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/lQPkQdhqyNY</a>

Some takeaways:

Most of what he says, aligns with my perspective, however...

He will join a political party, it won’t be pnm I assume bc he mentioned their long tenure in power and the country is still behind, I agree but I also don’t support unc for many reasons as well

He must realize once you are in that party setting, the whips and pm will keep you in check, partisan doctrine and towing the line, once you step out of that, you become blacklisted and serve your time as an independent

You cannot change the country through a political party, it has to come from private sectors of the society who have a will to change the nation and through revolution

How will he sidestep the colonial mentality where both political parties are subservient to the bigger nations and heel to them?

He is better served running for a football post, only if he becomes sports minister can he influence some change but even then he will be under manners from the heads of the party, namely unc...

That’s the mistake of some people who have a will to help the nation, they believe committing to a political party is the answer, it’s not...

Unless it’s a money move that is unaware to all of us... eat ah food type deal
« Last Edit: March 22, 2020, 02:30:28 PM by Controversial »

Offline Cocorite

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #940 on: March 22, 2020, 03:56:12 PM »
Bachoo did a decent job getting to the point of his presence. Well, Nakhid may have called for the interview to start turning the soil for his motives, which I believe is ultimately Prime Minister. He is an out-and-out leader. He will not settle for less than that.

Contro, I like some of your thoughts: You cannot change the country through a political party, it has to come from private sectors of the society who have a will to change the nation and through revolution

I think there may be other effective ways to lead. . .Grassroots. But he has already identified where he thinks the power lies in one of the political parties.

Well Well.
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Offline maxg

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #941 on: March 22, 2020, 05:42:03 PM »
Some of us heard the start of such rhetoric in 1970, deserted by the ppl who they thought they were trying to help. Abu thought it what the ppl wanted. Again he was wrong. Now again you come talking revolution, don’t be fooling yourself my youth.

There are other alternatives, I feel Nakid is aware. He has seen the failure of at least 2 methods.

Offline pull stones

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #942 on: March 22, 2020, 11:25:02 PM »
i watched this interview and thought that he was very ideolistic and has very strong views, most of them being very unrealistic. i have been spending a lot of time in trinidad in the last few years and has been familiarizing myself with the economic and political landscape.

i have found out that there are lots of folks in TT who suffers severely from illusions of grandeur, they truly believe that tons of money flowed into TT and nothing came of it, but in my opinion this is a misrepresentation of reality. the people down there somehow believe that we were as rich as kuwait and everyone should get a monthly stipend for doing absolutely nothing, as my grand dad would say, hog wash.

i still remember my grand father who was a very strong pnm supporter and very vividly the elections of 1976 stayed in my mind. we were living in his house in cascade and i remembered his yard, car and our wall fencing was covered in pnm posters, this big tall redskin half white man who adored dr willie would always talk about how williams civilized trinidad after the british left our shores in shambles.

he talked about the schools, housing, the roads, the industries the socialized medicine and the infrastructure and made the point that all that took tons of money to be realize. i remember daddy as he was affectionately called, chased mr eligore out the yard because they were drinking and mr eligore called dr willie a thief and daddy was having none of it.

the old man said how could anyone claim such when even him didn't know how dr willie did so much with such a modest revenue stream without borrowing? fast forward to today and people still assume that mr williams and his cabinet ministers robbed the country dry, so recently i went out to do some of my own research just to understand why my grandpa was so adamant about this man's integrity.

in my research i found that the country even though most popular opinions differ, trinidad and tobago did not earn as much as most of the williams detractors would have imagined, in fact i thought it was quite admirable of the state to have gotten so much done with such a modest amount of money.

back then the government was the largest employer with public servants making up 60% of the country's work force, they were also the largest real estate developers and it was estimate that that 50% of expenditure went to social programs like old age pension, school book grants, government payroll, health care and school subsidies.

back then our total oil revenue was just under a billion usd while others cry out that were we bathing in oil revenues. i laughed to myself as to how ridiculous their assertions were and that we somehow could have looked like singapore as the political leader of the PEP pointed out recently on social media.

it's quite unfortunate that this narrative is the norm in TT and i think we need to have an honest discussion about where we are and where we came from, as controversial tries to indulge us in the most popular assertions that the pnm some how was a bandit party who stunted the growth of this nation.

i believe nothing could be farther from the truth, and though there might have been pockets of corruption here and there with public official and government ministers who indulged in inflated projects and cost over runs or project kick backs, i still believe it's overly exaggerated.

as for david nakid, i have always admired his commitment to the sport of football especially to national service. he is the kind of guy if his enthusiasm were tempered could make a very good colonel, minister, deputy political leader, but i'm very apprehensive of him in a leadership position as the head honcho,

 and as in this case i fear he's piggy backing on an old misguided narrative that should be put to bed, and in my opinion dr willie did more than most, and if nothing else, just the pt. lisas industrial estate alone should have put this man as the greatest visionary that the caribbean has ever seen.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2020, 12:41:40 AM by pull stones »

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #943 on: March 22, 2020, 11:46:55 PM »
Beware of years with noughts.
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #944 on: March 23, 2020, 02:05:52 AM »
Beware of years with noughts.

It’s upon us my friend...

The last thing people wanted to hear from me many years ago was a political discourse on the eventual fall..

With a depression looming, 2020 as I have always maintained is a year that will be the crucial turning point in human history... TT is sadly not ready for the fallout, and the two political parties have led the nation towards oblivion unless a revolutionary mind can exact that grassroots change which will turn the tide that threatens to drown the nation

Offline Deeks

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #945 on: March 23, 2020, 10:01:40 AM »
and in my opinion dr willie did more than most, and if nothing else, just the pt. lisas industrial estate alone should have put this man as the greatest visionary that the caribbean has ever seen.

I know we don't agree on everything. But your statement is true. But I have also questioned some Williams reaction to things that have happened during his time in office. Lots of scandals. Always a commission of inquiry, and nothing else is done. Nobody punished or held accountable. So now when another power gets in power, the same thing happens and the situation slides. That is why Jack Warner will never be brought to court in TT or the US. If Eric had really enforced the corruption laws in the early days, we would not have in this present situation.

Offline maxg

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #946 on: March 23, 2020, 12:10:34 PM »
and in my opinion dr willie did more than most, and if nothing else, just the pt. lisas industrial estate alone should have put this man as the greatest visionary that the caribbean has ever seen.

I know we don't agree on everything. But your statement is true. But I have also questioned some Williams reaction to things that have happened during his time in office. Lots of scandals. Always a commission of inquiry, and nothing else is done. Nobody punished or held accountable. So now when another power gets in power, the same thing happens and the situation slides. That is why Jack Warner will never be brought to court in TT or the US. If Eric had really enforced the corruption laws in the early days, we would not have in this present situation.
Sounds like the blame Obama soundbite  ;)

Offline pull stones

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #947 on: March 23, 2020, 12:23:35 PM »
and in my opinion dr willie did more than most, and if nothing else, just the pt. lisas industrial estate alone should have put this man as the greatest visionary that the caribbean has ever seen.

I know we don't agree on everything. But your statement is true. But I have also questioned some Williams reaction to things that have happened during his time in office. Lots of scandals. Always a commission of inquiry, and nothing else is done. Nobody punished or held accountable. So now when another power gets in power, the same thing happens and the situation slides. That is why Jack Warner will never be brought to court in TT or the US. If Eric had really enforced the corruption laws in the early days, we would not have in this present situation.
in my research what I gather is that the majority of us failed to realize that we were still a very young nation when mr williams was the prime minister. just look at places that have been independent for hundreds of years and they’re still not as prosperous as us, greece, Poland, bulgaria, even sicily, compared to these places we have a better GDP a higher quality of life and lower on the corruption index.

yes eric did not imprison some of his ministers for corruption, but there was a reason for that, Eric Williams had great plans for this country and his plans superseded the mentality of the people of TT. most trinis were impressionable unworldly people who did not understand the concept of first world values and in particular those who were given positions of relevant importance.

a lot of these people though educated could not adhere to the concept of patriotism and nation building simply because it was beyond their grasp and were still stuck in a colonial mental grip, who instead set out to help themselves and the people around them. Williams on the other hand bit off way more than he could chew in that regard and was of the opinion that everyone was on the same page, only to his dismay.

his intention was to take a country with very little infrastructure with no highways, few roads, no running water, no indoor plumbing and I do mean no indoor plumbing, septic tanks at best, limited street lights, limited schools, 18th century housing arrangements with shanti towns spread throughout the capital city and beyond and bring it into a modern up to date situation.

remember back then education was only for the upper class and the very brilliant children who couldn’t afford schooling. one of Williams biggest pet peeves was illiteracy and he wanted more than anything else a functioning literate society, so his first initiative as head of government was to create an educational system to incorporate all the children of this nation, and trade schools for those who missed out on higher learning.

his dream could only be realized if he remained in power, he didn’t want the country in the hands of the opposition at the time because he feared inequality and a return to a colonial value system that plagued the rest of the caribbean like jamaica, guyana, barbados and antigua.

I sat down with a former member of the williams cabinet (whom I will not name) who told me that the boss did not trust most his ministers and was very wary of them, but he didn’t want to expel them for fear of losing the election so he tolerated them, he said Williams had big plans for the country and needed more time to implement his ideas, he said of everyone that he knew williams had the biggest love affair with trinidad and tobago and wanted to bring us into first world status by the new millennium but died before it could be realized.

as for the mayhem we’re seeing today, this was certainly not a williams creation and in essence one of williams biggest fears realized. this is exactly where he envisioned us had he not been in the lead to steer us clear of danger. he often referred to his political opponents as clueless, out of touch with current affairs and a disaster waiting in the wings. i guess he was right after all.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2020, 01:17:32 PM by pull stones »

Offline Deeks

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #948 on: March 23, 2020, 01:44:42 PM »
I would agree with much of what you have said, but damn if you do or damn if you don't. I still feel, if he had jailed a couple them, it may have made them and the public knew he meant business. But PNM was in power so long that it kept happening again and again. And towards the end of his term, he was frail. His cabinet did not fear him, though they respected him.

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #949 on: March 23, 2020, 01:47:48 PM »
and in my opinion dr willie did more than most, and if nothing else, just the pt. lisas industrial estate alone should have put this man as the greatest visionary that the caribbean has ever seen.

I know we don't agree on everything. But your statement is true. But I have also questioned some Williams reaction to things that have happened during his time in office. Lots of scandals. Always a commission of inquiry, and nothing else is done. Nobody punished or held accountable. So now when another power gets in power, the same thing happens and the situation slides. That is why Jack Warner will never be brought to court in TT or the US. If Eric had really enforced the corruption laws in the early days, we would not have in this present situation.
Sounds like the blame Obama soundbite  ;)

maxg, explain. what is the soundbite, mine or his? And why you say so?

Offline Deeks

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #950 on: March 23, 2020, 01:49:30 PM »
the people down there somehow believe that we were as rich as kuwait and everyone should get a monthly stipend for doing absolutely nothing, as my grand dad would say, hog wash.


I agree with this "soundbite" et all.

Offline maxg

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #951 on: March 24, 2020, 12:50:33 AM »
and in my opinion dr willie did more than most, and if nothing else, just the pt. lisas industrial estate alone should have put this man as the greatest visionary that the caribbean has ever seen.

I know we don't agree on everything. But your statement is true. But I have also questioned some Williams reaction to things that have happened during his time in office. Lots of scandals. Always a commission of inquiry, and nothing else is done. Nobody punished or held accountable. So now when another power gets in power, the same thing happens and the situation slides. That is why Jack Warner will never be brought to court in TT or the US. If Eric had really enforced the corruption laws in the early days, we would not have in this present situation.
Sounds like the blame Obama soundbite  ;)

maxg, explain. what is the soundbite, mine or his? And why you say so?
We had 7 ELECTED PMs after Eric (Manning twice) from 3 Parties, voted in by the ppl, covering 39 years . (was the elections fixed? ) How can Eric even be considered as a reason for our present situation is beyond me.  In 39 years, governments elected by the people followed Eric plan to bring us to this state ? I don't think so. The similarity is Trump blaming Obama for everything that a minority opinion didn't like, but even Trump didn't go back 39 years and blame Jimmy Carter. No. Brilliant as Eric was, he had his mistakes, faults even, but no way he can be responsible for the fk-up that our ppl(so-called Africans, Hindu, Muslimeen, Syrian, Lebanese, Chinese, Spanish et al) and following govts put ourselves in currently.(not including Covid19). You must know how the governments wasted resources on themselves and a lesser on a people who themselves had become greedy and decadent, where for many (not all) the only real work and worry was dedicated to Carnival. Further encouraged by many expats(not all) every year, informing them, with the help of many local opportunist who didn't give a shite about the well being of what should have been their fellow countrymen, of all the things they shouldn't be missing out on, available to us in foreign, so much so that they lost site of the paradise that was staring them in their faces. We NEEDED everything we saw on cable, and on top of that nobody can't party like a Trini. Wave yuh flag, yet it cyah be Eric fault. We all play a part in this performance.

add: It can still be corrected/realized, although it requires some drastic growth and positive evolution, a revolution may cause more problems. Maybe Covid will cause a reflective change. it most certainly is causing one here.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2020, 12:57:22 AM by maxg »

Offline Tallman

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Nakhid distributes hampers in hometown
« Reply #952 on: May 03, 2020, 09:00:20 AM »
Nakhid distributes hampers in hometown
By Jelani Beckles (T&T Newsday)


FORMER national football captain David Nakhid, along with family and friends, distributed hampers in Mt D’or to needy families affected by the covid19 pandemic. TT, despite flattening the curve over the last few weeks, has been impacted by the virus as people have lost their jobs.

Nakhid,along with his team which included his childhood friend Shawn Romain, collected essential items such as rice, macaroni, peas, milk and canned foods to distribute.

The former midfielder, who made 35 appearances for TT between 1992 and 2005, said his parents and other members of the community in the past made hampers to distribute.

“I spoke with my friend Shawn Romain from the community and he said there is an immediate need and he identified the neediest families. We put this together really quickly, as a matter of fact in a couple of days. We are going to distribute some hampers today (Friday), but from talking to him the need far exceeds what we have…so we are going to have to put this (together) on a weekly basis.” Nakhid said the first distribution of hampers was financed by the Nakhid family. He said they will target other areas such as Laventille, with hopefully some backing from other members of the community.

Nakhid said he was satisfied to give back. “We realise the need that is there, the need that is in the community is way too much. Not only in this community in all the communities. Whatever we could give as a family we are happy to do so…when I ask Shawn to look at specifics I realise that it’s way too many families below the poverty line.”
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #953 on: May 04, 2020, 07:29:43 AM »
It's going to be a busy Monday on the football and national  politics landscape in Trinidad and Tobago and there are many fomenting issues to address. There's probably no better place to start than this thread because its ultimate destination is the bridge of football to a political platform. Barring that destination, I'm not entirely sure the hamper distribution captivates the media. Nonetheless, I won't quibble about any rolling up of the sleeves that delivers direct impact to hungry bellies on the ground.

Also attracting my attention is the public emergence of Nakhid's opinion on the the impasse involving the national federation. I am piqued by this statement made to Newsday: “I would have liked them to have met halfway before. I would have liked the Wallace administration to have reconciled with the John-Williams (administration) and found a way that FIFA did not have to intervene.” According to Newsday that response was rendered when 'asked whether [Nakhid thought] the TTFA and FIFA could have attempted to meet halfway on the issue.'

What was there to be reconciled? Set the foxes down that path.  There's a rabbit there. And maybe a red herring.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2020, 08:20:12 AM by asylumseeker »
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Offline Cocorite

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #954 on: May 04, 2020, 12:22:16 PM »
Anybody who thinks Nakhid came back to Trinidad to "Eat Ah Roti & Bade in Maracas" is as naive as they come. Here is a man driven by a strong sense of values he's been given and picked up through his life's journey. It is my judgement he is back to lead  and implement his ideas in T&T.
A man who threw his hat in contention for FIFA presidency. This is a politician. So his answer to the Newsday reporter's question is a politician's answer.

I am just looking to see if he has designs on TTFA or your next PM.

Watch my words.  ;D
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #955 on: May 04, 2020, 01:21:32 PM »
I'll put it this way: it's not only his boots that are on the ground; so are his ears! 
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #956 on: May 04, 2020, 01:44:40 PM »
Anybody who thinks Nakhid came back to Trinidad to "Eat Ah Roti & Bade in Maracas" is as naive as they come. Here is a man driven by a strong sense of values he's been given and picked up through his life's journey. It is my judgement he is back to lead  and implement his ideas in T&T.
A man who threw his hat in contention for FIFA presidency. This is a politician. So his answer to the Newsday reporter's question is a politician's answer.

I am just looking to see if he has designs on TTFA or your next PM.

Watch my words.  ;D

Yuh know how the saying goes about politics and bedfellows. The sorting out bedfellows process appears to be afoot. Maybe I'm too generous with "appears". I await the announcement.  :)
"It is not possible to make successful policy in a state of ignorance or indifference to what goes on in the real world." --- Martin Daly.

Offline frico

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #957 on: May 06, 2020, 10:13:30 AM »
Mr.Nakhid we have to educate our people to vote not for race,Indian voting for Indian and Afro voting for Afro.It's true that after 58 years in power TT hasn't improved as a nation.

Offline ABTrini

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Re: The David Nakhid Thread
« Reply #958 on: May 11, 2020, 09:58:07 PM »
As someone who grew up at prior to the nation's independence and saw the inception of the first political parties  battle for the void left by the colonists, the presence of an ethnic divide has been part of our history. The DLP led by Capeldeo sought to create a platform for the I Dian vote ; The right honourable Dr. Eric Williams created a multi ethnic party - PNM that included  any diverse ethnic and religiously members.
The principles he advocated for was one of a national identity not one of divisiveness , not one bent on destabilizing nor one  that seemed to create havoc among the electorate.

Now Mr Nakhichevan. Choose wisely if that be a pathway  youent see how doltish some leaders could be during a national crisis? Your works and insights  visionand passionshould be at the forefront t of a relaunch- Stayclear of opportunist like BS- who jumped at yellow to get ag food and imagine he is on acommittee with another wanderer - a man that has a legacy as part of a mutinous past  who so.dhi self to any country seeking a football name now wanting to carve out a pathway for Caribbean football- these two could not even be successful cari g out that pathway for TnT and they are called upon to do so for the Caribbean!!! What a joke
MrN stay away from the circus and anyone wearing smelling or looking li,e they from hello - you ent see how they does carry on
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