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Offline doc

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Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« on: February 25, 2014, 04:08:58 PM »
The MoS has placed an advert in today's Guardian for a number of positions from Director of Football Development, Technical Director (National), to Licensed A- E coaches.
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Offline Deeks

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2014, 04:41:14 PM »
Technical Director (National), ? Is this position currently vacant or will be vacant. Who is the current TD?

Offline doc

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2014, 04:51:07 PM »
Technical Director (National), ? Is this position currently vacant or will be vacant. Who is the current TD?
This is the Ministry of Sports, not TTFA
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Offline Flex

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2014, 05:27:08 PM »
Technical Director (National), ? Is this position currently vacant or will be vacant. Who is the current TD?

Anton.

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Offline Deeks

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2014, 06:46:43 PM »
Oh!?! My bad!

Offline palos

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2014, 07:28:13 PM »
Technical Director (National), ? Is this position currently vacant or will be vacant. Who is the current TD?
This is the Ministry of Sports, not TTFA
That's very interesting.
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Offline doc

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2014, 08:08:39 PM »
Technical Director (National), ? Is this position currently vacant or will be vacant. Who is the current TD?
This is the Ministry of Sports, not TTFA
That's very interesting.
I think not! They should provide grants ;D
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Offline Football supporter

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2014, 10:20:14 PM »
It always amazes me that these vacancies require degrees in various subjects. Of course, I understand that further education may develop additional skills. But there are many people out there who have far more ability yet few educational qualifications.

I have spent time with people who are studying for degrees in sports marketing. They have wonderful ideas which cost 10's of thousands of dollars to implement. They all are nonplussed when you explain that your marketing budget per month is TT2,000.   

It seems to me that the theory is great, but does not relate to the reality.

For example, Life Sport spent over a million TT$ hiring vehicles.  I submitted a country wide proposal that requested ex police vehicles which would have been an efficient use of funding and would provide assets on the balance sheet.

I would rather have an employee who had practical experience than a university graduate who you would have to train. I have nothing against further education, but I do feel that many valuable people do not even get to interview for these positions because a degree is a prerequisite.

Offline palos

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2014, 10:37:41 PM »
Quote
I would rather have an employee who had practical experience than a university graduate who you would have to train. I have nothing against further education, but I do feel that many valuable people do not even get to interview for these positions because a degree is a prerequisite.
Aren't there people with both and likely are the kinds of candidates being sought?
Carlos "The Rolls Royce" Edwards

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2014, 11:48:17 PM »
Quote
I would rather have an employee who had practical experience than a university graduate who you would have to train. I have nothing against further education, but I do feel that many valuable people do not even get to interview for these positions because a degree is a prerequisite.
Aren't there people with both and likely are the kinds of candidates being sought?

Well, of course, they would be ideal. I'm just saying that sometimes the criteria can exclude the best candidate

Offline Tiresais

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2014, 03:36:52 AM »
It always amazes me that these vacancies require degrees in various subjects. Of course, I understand that further education may develop additional skills. But there are many people out there who have far more ability yet few educational qualifications.

I have spent time with people who are studying for degrees in sports marketing. They have wonderful ideas which cost 10's of thousands of dollars to implement. They all are nonplussed when you explain that your marketing budget per month is TT2,000.   

It seems to me that the theory is great, but does not relate to the reality.

For example, Life Sport spent over a million TT$ hiring vehicles.  I submitted a country wide proposal that requested ex police vehicles which would have been an efficient use of funding and would provide assets on the balance sheet.

I would rather have an employee who had practical experience than a university graduate who you would have to train. I have nothing against further education, but I do feel that many valuable people do not even get to interview for these positions because a degree is a prerequisite.

I'm on the other side of this - I think football puts way too little weight on qualifications. You see this blanket assumption that because they're an ex-player they are somehow more qualified, when you see all the time players drop in and out of coaching jobs (partly due to short-termism). The reason there aren't international English Coaches in places like Spain, Italy and Germany is because we don't train them enough and they don't have qualifications - we think any player simply because they kicked the ball about is somehow qualified

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Offline doc

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2014, 07:28:50 AM »
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Offline doc

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2014, 07:30:34 AM »
For the A licensed coach, you need a B license...  :rotfl:  :rotfl:
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Offline Football supporter

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2014, 08:42:18 AM »
It always amazes me that these vacancies require degrees in various subjects. Of course, I understand that further education may develop additional skills. But there are many people out there who have far more ability yet few educational qualifications.

I have spent time with people who are studying for degrees in sports marketing. They have wonderful ideas which cost 10's of thousands of dollars to implement. They all are nonplussed when you explain that your marketing budget per month is TT2,000.   

It seems to me that the theory is great, but does not relate to the reality.

For example, Life Sport spent over a million TT$ hiring vehicles.  I submitted a country wide proposal that requested ex police vehicles which would have been an efficient use of funding and would provide assets on the balance sheet.

I would rather have an employee who had practical experience than a university graduate who you would have to train. I have nothing against further education, but I do feel that many valuable people do not even get to interview for these positions because a degree is a prerequisite.

I'm on the other side of this - I think football puts way too little weight on qualifications. You see this blanket assumption that because they're an ex-player they are somehow more qualified, when you see all the time players drop in and out of coaching jobs (partly due to short-termism). The reason there aren't international English Coaches in places like Spain, Italy and Germany is because we don't train them enough and they don't have qualifications - we think any player simply because they kicked the ball about is somehow qualified

Don't ask the Derby-winning Racehorse how to win the next one.

I agree with regards to coaching....coaches simply must obtain their licenses. I'm talking about administration, marketing, management!

Offline elan

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2014, 09:28:48 AM »
For the A licensed coach, you need a B license...  :rotfl:  :rotfl:

It seems they copy and paste a bit.
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Offline elan

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2014, 09:31:45 AM »
They need to post the salary and benefits.
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/blUSVALW_Z4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/blUSVALW_Z4</a>

Offline Football supporter

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2014, 09:45:32 AM »
They need to post the salary and benefits.

I have noticed that salary etc is usually not contained in the ads in T&T. Not sure if you're supposed to negotiate, but how can you tell if its a decent wage or not?

Here is a recent example from UK. Now, I'm sure that a degree would be welcomed, but it's not a prerequisite.

The Football Supporters’ Federation is seeking to recruit a Diversity and Campaigns Officer, based in central London but with national responsibilities. This is a great opportunity to help shape the diversity agenda in football, at a time of change, when fan bases are more diverse than ever before.

The post-holder will, as part of the FSF staff team, be involved in supporting, organising and on occasions leading FSF campaigning activity. In particular the post-holder will work with partner organisations to develop, lead and deliver campaigning activity among football fans to oppose all forms of discrimination and to promote diversity within football.

Hours: 37.5 hours/week

Salary: £28,000
The successful applicant will need:

    Knowledge of the issues around diversity and anti-discrimination in football
    Experience as a football supporter and awareness of the issues affecting match-going fans
    Excellent written and oral communication skills
    An ability to work both independently and as part of a team

The Football Supporters’ Federation strives to be an equal opportunities employer. We would particularly welcome applications from candidates with a BME heritage.

Offline dreamer

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2014, 10:21:51 AM »
Nice constructive debate.
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Offline elan

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2014, 11:12:58 AM »
They need to post the salary and benefits.

I have noticed that salary etc is usually not contained in the ads in T&T. Not sure if you're supposed to negotiate, but how can you tell if its a decent wage or not?

Here is a recent example from UK. Now, I'm sure that a degree would be welcomed, but it's not a prerequisite.

The Football Supporters’ Federation is seeking to recruit a Diversity and Campaigns Officer, based in central London but with national responsibilities. This is a great opportunity to help shape the diversity agenda in football, at a time of change, when fan bases are more diverse than ever before.

The post-holder will, as part of the FSF staff team, be involved in supporting, organising and on occasions leading FSF campaigning activity. In particular the post-holder will work with partner organisations to develop, lead and deliver campaigning activity among football fans to oppose all forms of discrimination and to promote diversity within football.

Hours: 37.5 hours/week

Salary: £28,000
The successful applicant will need:

    Knowledge of the issues around diversity and anti-discrimination in football
    Experience as a football supporter and awareness of the issues affecting match-going fans
    Excellent written and oral communication skills
    An ability to work both independently and as part of a team

The Football Supporters’ Federation strives to be an equal opportunities employer. We would particularly welcome applications from candidates with a BME heritage.


That's the thing. I sent this to a couple buddies in the states who may be interested, but they were like is it worth it to leave their jobs up here to take up one of these positions. The compensation package will assist greatly in the quality and quantity of applicants.
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/blUSVALW_Z4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/blUSVALW_Z4</a>

Offline elan

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #19 on: February 26, 2014, 11:35:03 AM »
Conspiracy Theory: Anil Roberts is starting to get involved in football [it proved very lucrative for JW & friends]. He is attending NT training with the women's and may start making a play with the men's. These appointments are the first steps in setting up a structure for an association. Maybe AR is setting things up so that when he is about to be out of government he make a petition to his government to run football in T&T. The TTFA will lose their mandate to run football and AR will have his organization in place to run T&T football.

Most of the info in the ads are from USSoccer website. Like doc noting requiring a B license for an advertised A license job is the USSoccer requirement for a B license candidate to do the A license course.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/blUSVALW_Z4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/blUSVALW_Z4</a>

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #20 on: February 26, 2014, 12:25:35 PM »
They need to post the salary and benefits.

Reading between the lines, there appears to be decent compensation on offer. From my perspective, even intangible benefits ... on paper ...

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #21 on: February 26, 2014, 12:52:41 PM »
For the A licensed coach, you need a B license...  :rotfl:  :rotfl:

It seems they copy and paste a bit.

Yes, clearly an element of extraction from the US Soccer hierarchy of coaching credentials. However, I'm not sure about aspects of the wording re: the apparently intended purpose in this context.

RE: Coach ('E' License) Football:
Quote
Applicants must be at least 18 years of age and have been volunteering in football programmes for a minimum of 12 months, or has several years of coaching and/or playing experience, with knowledge of Teaching skills, ability to conduct Psychology sessions and focus on positive reinforcement.

Will this person be considered an E licensed coach? When? How?

RE: Coach ('D' License) Football:
Quote
Required Skills and Experience
Applicants must be at least 18 years of age and have held the National “E” License for a minimum of 12 months, or has several years of coaching and/or playing experience

Will this person be considered a D licensed coach? When? How?

RE: Coach ('C' License) Football
Quote
Required Skills and Experience:
Applicants must be at least 18 years of age and have held the National “D” License for a minimum of 3 years, or with considerable experience as a player, coach or administrator.

Will this person be considered a C licensed coach? When? How? Can a 15 year old hold a D license? Is there a D license in T&T? Is the National "D" referred to the US "D"? What about equivalencies?

RE: Coach ('B' License) Football
Quote
Required Skills and Experience:
Applicants must be at least 19 years of age and have held the National “C” License for a minimum of 5 years or suitable experience as a player coach

Will this person be considered a B licensed coach? When? How?

Would a 14 year old be able to do a C? Is it likely that the 5 year requirement is tied to the bounteous disbursement of C licenses recently. However, "suitable experience as a player ... coach" ... is poorly stated.

RE: Coach ('A' License) Football
Quote
Required Skills and Experience
Applicants must be at least 21 years of age and have held the National “B” License for a minimum of 8 years or with considerable experience as a player, coach or administrator.

Some of the same concerns as above ... Also, note the difference between "suitable" and "considerable". Think about the implication about what this means in terms of the minimum of age of the person permitted/eligible to function in this role.



« Last Edit: February 26, 2014, 12:58:17 PM by asylumseeker »

Offline FF

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2014, 01:22:47 PM »
The wording is not clear at all.

However I suspect, what they mean is that they will accept a B licence coach for the A position provided they are working towards the A licence and so forth.

Thais just some guesstapo work on my part.
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #23 on: February 26, 2014, 02:07:33 PM »
It always amazes me that these vacancies require degrees in various subjects. Of course, I understand that further education may develop additional skills. But there are many people out there who have far more ability yet few educational qualifications.

I have spent time with people who are studying for degrees in sports marketing. They have wonderful ideas which cost 10's of thousands of dollars to implement. They all are nonplussed when you explain that your marketing budget per month is TT2,000.   

It seems to me that the theory is great, but does not relate to the reality.

For example, Life Sport spent over a million TT$ hiring vehicles.  I submitted a country wide proposal that requested ex police vehicles which would have been an efficient use of funding and would provide assets on the balance sheet.

I would rather have an employee who had practical experience than a university graduate who you would have to train. I have nothing against further education, but I do feel that many valuable people do not even get to interview for these positions because a degree is a prerequisite.

Further education "may" develop additional "skills"? How about it does!?! develop additional competencies. I won't dwell too much on the bias in the "many ppl out there with far more ability ..." comment ...

However, I'll accept that getting a formal education is not the only way to proceed successfully. But, in doing so ppl have to accept that there's a consequence for not having acquired that legitimacy.

Paper establishes a qualitative and quantitative measure that cumulative experience doesn't lend itself to measurably (see the wording of the SPORTT ad?!?).

Also, in the modern world, ppl with degrees/certificates etc. are compelled to immerse themselves in practical experiences as part of getting the degree/certification etc. On top of all ah that ... the very same FIFA recognizes the importance of formal education (FIFA Masters etc.). The football market is credential driven. It's the currency required.

+++

You've referred to the marketing students before ... I get it, but yuh can't indict them for your budget limitations. This doesn't mean that they don't fit the bill. Likely, it suggests they were unaware of the constraints ahead of making the proposals.

+++

There's room for a balance, but while the debate is driving on ...some ppl are arming themselves for the reality (yuh need formal education!) ... and that is not a theory that can be rejected.

In fact, gehhin "paper" would be the commonsense approach. The battle within Babylon still rages even if yuh have it ... 
« Last Edit: February 26, 2014, 02:15:22 PM by asylumseeker »

Offline Football supporter

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #24 on: February 26, 2014, 10:01:30 PM »
Asylumseeker, I agree that a degree is a valuable tool in your cv. However, my point is that there are people who may be equally or more capable who do not have the paper. It's not always about choice. Some people have to earn a living from a young age and may not have the fortitude to attend evening classes.

Some people have very practical organising skills yet cannot read or write well.

While I agree that playing sport does not necessarily make you a good coach or sports administrator, there are many sportspeople who are very capable.

All I'm really saying is that in areas such as this, positions should not be inaccessible due to a lack of educational certificates. The question then arises about how you would shortlist applicants for interview. But if there is a track record of proficiency, or expertise, that should do the trick.
 

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2014, 10:52:06 AM »
Ultimately, this is about the increased professionalization of football particularly (and, sport generally). To get to that point domestically, it's inevitable that formal credentials will be pre-eminent.

At some point in time, society made a decision to validate the formally trained physician from the traditional herbalist. While this hasn't dispelled reliance on traditional healing, it has created an environment of standardization, safeguards, etc. in the medical context. Also, largely, it has instilled confidence among the consuming public.

I would prefer to spend my days shadowing Sunil Gulati, Fernand Duchaussoy, Justino Compean and/or Julio Grondona. However, even after doing so for 3 years, my most compelling case for contribution to national football would be for that as an insight-filled advisor or consultant, rather than as an executive gifted with exquisite decision-making ... Unless I did more.

There is a place for the informally trained. No doubt. However, in a country in which the formally trained seem to muck up protocol as a matter of a blind article of faith, ceding that authority to the informally trained promises to be an experiment with predictable abuses or indiscretions.

Leadership constitutes more than accumulated commonsense. Lula became President of Brazil on the heels of a humble background to exude creditable governance in leading Brazil. It took him decades of knowledge acquisition and network cultivation to get there. More than anything, he had to gain legitimacy ... and relevance.

I know people in local football who have accomplished much with little, yet there's a reason we see the same faces in the mix ... or clamour for the inclusion of foreign faces ... because there's a limit within our experience.

There is no room for sentiment in professionalization. Nor, should there be.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2014, 10:26:49 PM by asylumseeker »

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #26 on: April 14, 2014, 12:39:00 PM »
NB: I thought it best to place this article on this thread because it invokes an aspect of "development". I didn't want to limit the implications to solely to "women's football".  :thumbsup:



Change through football
Monday, April 14, 2014
Anand Rampersad

http://www.guardian.co.tt/sport/2014-04-14/change-through-football

After receiving increasing calls from several quarters, FIFA at its March 1 annual general meeting (AGM), approved the recommendations of the International Football Association Board (IFAB) to revoke the ban on the wearing of religious headwear by female and male players.

Appeals for the change gained momentum in 2011 from the Iranian authorities and supported by the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) through FIFA vice president Jordan’s Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein and the United Nations. The decision paves the way for Muslim women to wear the hijab, Sikhs to wear the turban and Jewish players to wear the kippah without fear of any rule violation.

In addition to the lifting of the headwear ban, Law 4—The Players’ Equipment—was also amended to regulate the wearing garments of players. For instance, Law 4 now categorically states that players’ outer and inner garments must not bear any kind of political, religious or marketing messages or slogan.

According to the IFAB this new ruling will allow for consistent regulations. Failure to do so will result in the sanctioning of the team. Players and referees would no longer be allowed to wear any form of jewelry (necklaces, rings, bracelets, earrings, leather etc.). Additionally, covering of jewelry is forbidden.
 
The modifications of the laws of the game would come into effect on 1st June 2014 in time for the FIFA 2014 World Cup which starts June 13th.

The issue of the hijab surfaced in 2007 when 11-year-old Asamahan Mansour of Ottawa was banned by the Quebec Soccer Federation (QSF) who cited that the headwear could have resulted in choking and even strangulation. FIFA banned the hijab in 2007. The ban was linked to similar concerns held by the QSF of potential head, neck and even choking injuries. 

The QSF was suspended by the Canadian Soccer Association (CSA) for its stance of preventing male Sikh players wearing their turbans on the field of play. The QSF lifted their ban when they were informed that the ban did not apply to male players.

In 2011, the Iranian women’s team dream of participating in the 2012 London Olympics were dashed because they were prevented from playing their second round qualifier against Jordan by the FIFA referee. They were denied because all their players wear hijab. In addition to being denied the opportunity to play, insult was added when Jordan were awarded the game 3-0. The Iranian authorities threatened to file a complaint to FIFA against the Bahrani official. 

The change in Law 4 vindicates Jordan’s Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein effort toward correcting what he deemed an unfair prejudice against women wearing the hijab. He claimed there were no reported cases of injuries from wearing the hijab. He cited that, if Chelsea’s Petr Cech is allowed to wear a protective cap for head injuries sustained then the case for allowing the hijab and other headwear is inevitably justified.

Given the issue of wearing the hijab was controversial in other quarters, the IFAB on the request of the AFC allowed a trial period of two years. The trial proved to be successful as there were no direct links between wearing head wear and the injury concerns that were raised. Additionally, the availability of new designs of Velcro pin-less headscarf supported the lifting of the ban. Once agreed upon it is recommended that the head wear should be the same colour of the team jersey. 

Jordan’s hosting of the 2016 women’s Under-17 World Cup and multicultural Canada hosting the 2014 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup would have weighed heavily in rescinding the previous ban. It would have been very embarrassing to FIFA if some of the teams such as Iran qualified for both these tournaments and were prevented from playing because of the previous ban! 

Additionally, FIFA was under mounting pressure to review its law on religious head wear as other sporting disciplines such as judo, weightlifting, fencing, taekwondo and rugby allow Muslim women to participate with hijabs in competition including the 2012 London Olympics. Taekwondo and rugby are very physical sports with the possibility of more frequent body contact than football!

The decision to allow for religious head wear has been applauded by many including the Quebec Soccer Federation and United Sikhs of Canada who hold on to the hope that this change will spread off the football field and into other social spaces. For instance, in countries such as France where bans have been placed on religious wear in public schools and public buildings.

Some Arab football officials have been expressing great optimism that the change will attract more women into football. If more Muslim women in the world including the Caribbean begin to play football without fear of being victimised because of their modesty in attire then sport would have again played a role in providing an important social space for engagement without discrimination. What is the position of the TTFF or TTFA?

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Trinidad and Tobago Football Development Unit
« Reply #27 on: April 14, 2014, 12:43:49 PM »
Mr. Rampersad seems to be a lil lazy, although definitely consistent in his messaging:

Quote
Headwear forces FIFA change of heart
March 17, 2014

If more Muslim women in the world including the Caribbean begin to play football without fear of being victimised because of their modesty in attire then sport would have again played a role in providing an important social space for engagement without discrimination. What is the position of the TTFF or TTFA?

http://www.guardian.co.tt/sport/2014-03-17/headwear-forces-fifa-change-heart
« Last Edit: April 14, 2014, 12:45:47 PM by asylumseeker »

 

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