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Offline Errol

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Financial Fair Play.
« on: February 27, 2014, 06:24:48 PM »
I really not feeling to read a book to find out what or how the Financial Fair Play works.

Can anyone explain it in short?

Thanks in advance.


Offline Flex

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Re: Financial Fair Play.
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2014, 05:08:57 PM »
Manchester City, PSG set to discover FFP verdicts
By Kris Voakes (Goal.com)


Manchester City and Paris Saint-Germain are set to find out this week whether they will be punished for breaches of UEFA’s Financial Fair Play (FFP) regulations.

The European governing body’s Club Financial Control Body (CFCB) will meet Tuesday and Wednesday to investigate a slew of cases relating to possible breaches, with the two heavyweights believed to be among the total 76 clubs under the spotlight.

Under UEFA’s FFP rules, clubs must register soccer-related losses of no more than 45 million pounds for the three years ending June 2014, with year-on-year reviews determining whether they might realistically meet the targets put in place.

City and PSG have posted huge annual losses over the last two full seasons, but each have covered those deficits with controversial commercial deals worth hundreds of millions of euros. The Qatari-owned French champions have signed a 200-million-euro-a-year deal with the Qatar Tourism Authority, while the English League Cup winners signed a 475-million-euro sponsorship contract with Etihad and pumped millions into the formation of New York City FC and the rejuvenation of Melbourne Heart in Australia.

UEFA has said it will study the suitability of such cases very carefully, and a judgment is expected to be handed down by the CFCB’s investigatory chamber during its two-day meeting.

If outfits are deemed to have seriously breached the FFP regulations, they will be referred to the CFCB’s adjudication panel for a final verdict. Sanctions will then be announced by UEFA at the beginning of May. The two major clubs under investigation are both expected to appeal any sanctions they face, with a final adjudication by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) possible in every case.

However, former Chelsea chief-executive Trevor Birch told Goal recently that cases which go to CAS could well be played out by some of the world’s finest lawyers.

"Presumably, Manchester City and PSG are being very well advised," Birch said. "They have taken a view that what they have done is appropriate and will stand up to scrutiny by the Fair Play panel.

"On the face of it, it sounds feasible for them to have set up franchises in Australia and America, and for them to buy intellectual property there. But it will come down to the fine detail, and the accountants at City will have to sign off on it. The proof of the pudding will be in the eating in that once these start being adjudicated upon, these clubs will be represented by some very clever lawyers."

Sanctions imposed on those clubs failing to provide good reason for making losses outside of the regulations could range from transfer bans to suspension from UEFA competitions.

The regulations came into force from the summer of 2011 as part of a push for financial equality by UEFA president Michel Platini.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Financial Fair Play.
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2014, 10:53:09 AM »
I really not feeling to read a book to find out what or how the Financial Fair Play works.

Can anyone explain it in short?

Thanks in advance.


For the Premier League? For UEFA? For what?

Offline Flex

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Re: Financial Fair Play.
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2014, 05:44:05 AM »
City face £50m fine, squad cut over FFP
By PA Sport


Manchester City are facing UEFA sanctions for breaching financial fair play rules which would see the club limited to a 21-man Champions League squad instead of the usual 25 players next season, the Press Association reports.

City, who are still strongly challenging the settlement offer from UEFA, are also facing a fine in the region of 60 million euros (around 50 million pounds, $83.5 million) over three years, and a cap imposed for next season to ensure there is no rise on this season's Champions League A squad wage bill.

The reduction in the size of the Champions League squad to 21 would potentially hit the club hardest, and City would also have to ensure that there are still eight locally-trained players in that A squad.

Press Association Sport reports that the sanctions are very similar to those being handed to Paris Saint-Germain -- the two clubs are among nine European sides being dealt with by UEFA's club financial control board (CFCB) for FFP breaches.

City have until the end of the week to reach an agreement with UEFA over the sanctions, but PA Sport claims they are the club furthest away from reaching any final settlement. If no agreement is reached City face the prospect of the case being handed to a panel for a non-negotiable decision.

Neither City nor UEFA would comment but, according to PA Sport, the Manchester club have been negotiating forcefully for a significant reduction in that sanction but have been struggling to make progress.

The risk, however, is that if they are unable to agree a deal with UEFA then they could face even stiffer sanctions from the CFCB's adjudicatory panel.

No club is expected to be excluded from the Champions League for breaching the spending limits, the maximum possible sanction -- although UEFA president Michel Platini said last month he does not envisage that to happen.

Both Manchester City and Paris Saint-Germain are believed to have fallen foul of the FFP rules with sponsorship deals related to each clubs' owners.

Abu Dhabi-owned City have a 40 million pounds-a-year deal with Etihad airways, while Qatar-owned PSG have a back-dated deal with the Qatar Tourist Authority (QTA) which is worth up to 200 million euros (165 million poinds) a year.

French newspaper L'Equipe has reported that UEFA has ruled the QTA deal should only be valued at half that sum, and that the French champions will be hit with a four-pronged punishment for their own breaches of the rules.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Flex

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Re: Financial Fair Play.
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2014, 05:49:04 AM »
PSG set for quadruple FFP sanctions.
By Ian Holyman, France Correspondent


Paris Saint-Germain can expect to be hit by a four-pronged punishment when UEFA hands out its first financial fair play (FFP) sanctions later this week, L'Equipe has claimed.

France's main sports daily reported on Tuesday the French champions have failed to convince European football's governing body their recently signed contract with the Qatar Tourism Authority (QTA) is not overvalued.

The deal, which brings the club up to 200 million euros a year, thus allowing them to squeeze inside FFP thresholds, has reportedly been valued at only half that amount by UEFA experts.

Consequently, UEFA and PSG have reached agreement on a moratorium which protects the club from any further, immediate sanctions, but does impose upon their owners, Qatar Sports Investments (QSI) a number of damaging restrictions.

PSG, which boasts Europe's highest wage bill at 240 million euros, will not be allowed to increase the amount it pays in salaries, and they will have to sell players before being able to spend in the coming transfer window.

UEFA will also reportedly ask PSG to limit their transfer activity, allowing them to buy one player at 60 million euros, but forbidding them to break down that sum to buy two players, for example, at 30 million euros or three at 20 million euros.

PSG's Champions League campaign next season will be hit with Les Parisiens permitted to only name a 21-man squad instead of the usual 25. Eight of those players will need to be homegrown, thus restricting coach Laurent Blanc's options.

Furthermore, PSG will have to pay a 60 million euro fine spread over the next three years and reduce their losses to 30 million euros, rather than the 45 million euros stipulated by FFP regulations, by the end of the 2014-15 season.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Tallman

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Re: Financial Fair Play.
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2014, 06:12:02 AM »
I really not feeling to read a book to find out what or how the Financial Fair Play works.

Can anyone explain it in short?

Thanks in advance.



http://www.financialfairplay.co.uk/financial-fair-play-explained.php
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Offline Sam

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Re: Financial Fair Play.
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2014, 01:11:24 PM »
UEFA Confirm Share of City FFP Fine Will Go to Liverpool, Chelsea, and Arsenal
By Noel C [sbnation]


With the Champions League group stages about to get underway, UEFA have finalised plans for how the extra money coming in this season from clubs who violated their financial fair play rules will be divided up. As expected for some time, they have chosen to spread it around amongst all compliant Champions League and Europa League sides.

The result of this finalised decision is that fines paid by Manchester City, Zenit St. Petersburg, and Paris Saint Germain will be divided equally amongst every club in the Champions and Europa Leagues this season that complied with FFP last season. This means that in England, Liverpool, Chelsea, Arsenal, Tottenham, and Everton all stand to receive additional funds.

It sounds an amusing and potentially effective way to discourage clubs from violating FFP, at least on the surface. However, between the two competitions, there are eighty participants. And the portion of the fines paid out to UEFA this summer—punishments are paid over multiple years and later payments can be avoided by reaching compliance—is around £20M.

Amongst compliant clubs, that means an extra quarter-million pounds when everything is said and done. UEFA can champion the fact that they're giving money back to the clubs, but compared to what's already awarded for making it into Europe, it is a pittance, and certainly not an amount that will cause the likes City to lose sleep over their domestic rivals receiving it.

City, Zenit, and PSG can afford the combined £20M they're paying out this season. And an extra quarter-million or thereabouts to league rivals isn't going to frighten them or put their positions near the top of domestic tables at greater risk. UEFA will be holding meetings in October to determine if there are alterations that could be made to the system, but change seems unlikely.

It shouldn't be, though, and as when their current system was first proposed, the answer seems obvious—fines should, rather than being divided amongst all clubs, be divided only domestically. Rather than giving a pittance to every club playing in Europe this season, give a significant sum to domestic rivals who are in Europe or who might have been if the offender hadn't qualified.

The current approach doesn't offer a real deterrent to the likes of City, Zenit, and PSG. Giving a million pounds or more to each of their nearest rivals domestically just might. It would also do more to compensate those sides that are directly impacted by non-compliance, as it could be weighted towards those whose position in Europe was threatened by a non-compliant side.

In England, it would mean City compensating Liverpool, Chelsea, Arsenal, Everton, and Tottenham—as well as Manchester United, who missed the Europa League by one spot. Everton would be given a larger sum for missing the Champions League by one spot. Arsenal and Tottenham would have stood to receive more had they failed to make European group play.

Instead, UEFA have set up a system that offers little deterrent value when it comes to big-spending offending clubs like City, Zenit, and PSG. Perhaps the intent is commendable, yet the execution is sorely lacking, providing only the appearance of deterrent for over-spending clubs while doing little that might actually cause them to reconsider their approach.

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Offline Flex

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Re: Financial Fair Play.
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2014, 12:53:48 PM »
After Gunners’ Wage Bill Exceeds Chelsea’s, Is More Success On The Way To The Emirates?
By Jason Le Miere


The financial landscape in the English Premier League is shifting. In recent years the competition has been transformed by the unparalleled spending of multi-billionaire owners, chiefly Russian oligarch Roman Abramovich at Chelsea and member of Abu Dhabi’s ruling family Sheikh Mansour al-Nahyan at Manchester City. But the revelation that one of the league’s traditional, much more modestly run powers, Arsenal, now has a higher wage bill than Chelsea's, as reported by the Telegraph, further points toward a leveling of the playing field.

Since flying into Chelsea in 2003, Abramovich has spent in excess of £2 billion ($3.3 billion) on improving the club both on and off the pitch. For his investment Abramovich has garnered 11 major trophies -- more than the total of their previous 98 years of existence -- including three Premier League titles and, most pleasingly to the owner, the Champions League in 2012. Five years after Abramovich changed the face of English soccer, Sheikh Mansour upped the ante. Making an immediate impact when taking over a club known primarily for its propensity to shoot itself in the foot, his massive wave of spending led to a first major trophy in 35 years and made them Premier League champions in two of the last three seasons, at a cost of around £1.2 billion ($2 billion).

Abramovich’s first season was marked by Chelsea’s rival across London, Arsenal, becoming only the second team in history to win England’s top division without losing a game. That they have not won the title since is no coincidence. Suddenly Arsenal were struggling to compete to sign the elite players, while, even more worrying, having their best players poached by the nouveau riches. The loss of defensive star Ashley Cole to Chelsea in 2006 and then a string of talent leaving Arsenal for Manchester City -- including French-born players Samir Nasri and Gael Clichy -- only emphasized that Arsenal, one of the great names of English soccer, couldn't compete financially or on the field. A move to a new stadium at Ashburton Grove in 2006 only exacerbated its struggles, as repayments on the stadium further curtailed its spending.

The club regularly stressed the need to spend within its means, while famed manager Arsène Wenger lambasted the “financial doping” of its newly flush rivals. Still, fans, more concerned with wins than spreadsheets, grew frustrated. After seven trophies in the previous 80 years, nine years went by without further silverware. But Arsenal’s lifting of the FA Cup in May to finally end that drought signals change.

As Arsenal’s finances improved, thanks to the repayments on their stadium decreasing coupled with increasing revenue from commercial deals -- such as a new kit agreement with Puma -- and from the Premier League’s new television deal, the club now has significant money to spend again. In 2013, it almost tripled its previous record transfer fee by bringing in German superstar Mesut Özil from Real Madrid for £42.5 million ($69.4 million). As well as crucially now avoiding losing its best players, this summer a further outlay of around £75 million ($123 million) followed.

Just as significantly is that, according to the Telegraph’s figures, the latest arrivals take Arsenal’s wage bill over £180 million ($294 million), and in excess of Chelsea’s. Such a scenario would have been unthinkable just a few years ago. At the same time, another of England’s established powers run as a business rather than an indulgence, Manchester United, saw its wage bill grow to £215 million ($351 million) over the past year. And, after a massive summer of spending, that figure is likely to get even closer to Manchester City’s Premier-League leading £233 million ($381 million). The traditional powerhouses with their existing strong fan bases and infrastructure are now coming back to the fore in terms of spending. It is clear that Financial Fair Play (FFP) is making its impact felt.

Initiated by UEFA in 2011 and later the Premier League to prevent clubs from spending beyond their means, even if funded by a benefactor, FFP has quelled the carefree spending of Chelsea and Manchester City. Both clubs will still challenge for the game’s biggest honors having made their initial splurges just in time, but the established order in English and European soccer is now set to be preserved and, especially in England with its manner of distributing revenue from television deals, equality enhanced. And that is good news for Arsenal.

“I would say that the balance of power is a bit more even than it was five or six years ago,” Wenger said in August. “With the financial fair play added to the fact we have more financial power than five years ago, it gives us a better chance.” Arsenal’s move to their new stadium, while initially painful, is now bearing the long-term benefits. In terms of match-day revenue, its £93 million ($152 million) -- for 2012-2013, is some way ahead of Manchester City’s £40 million ($65 million), and even Chelsea’s £71 million ($116 million), according to figures released by Deloitte. In terms of commercial revenue, though, Arsenal still languishes some way back. Indeed, their earnings are less than half those of Manchester United’s.

Still Arsenal’s finances are undoubtedly healthy, as illustrated by their £208 million ($340 million) in cash reserves, easily the most in the Premier League. That figure is somewhat misleading, with Arsenal’s summer transfer spending not yet accounted for and £35 million ($57 million) going toward debt repayment on the Emirates Stadium. As financial blogger Swiss Ramble points out, the real amount available to spend on transfers is likely to be nearer between £40 million ($65 million) and £50 million ($82 million).

Nevertheless, the available resources coupled with Arsenal’s wage bill having now eclipsed Chelsea’s is entitled to leave fans wondering why the club’s squad is noticeably short of quality and quantity in key areas, especially in comparison to its rivals. In continuing to qualify for the money-spinning Champions League, Wenger, an owner of a degree in economics, has guided Arsenal through the troubled waters of a stadium move and its rivals welcoming of billionaires, but the barriers to the club’s success on the pitch now increasingly rest with him.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Flex

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Re: Financial Fair Play.
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2015, 06:03:43 AM »
Chelsea's Jose Mourinho wants FFP violators docked points
By PA Sport


Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho believes clubs that breach Financial Fair Play regulations should be docked points and should not be champions in a thinly veiled attack on Premier League title rivals Manchester City.

City -- and Chelsea's Champions League last-16 opponents Paris St Germain -- were issued heavy fines by UEFA for their outlandish spending in recent years. Regulations dictate clubs should spend within their means.

Chelsea, who are five points clear of City after their 1-1 draw last weekend, are bidding to comply with FFP and made a profit for the third successive transfer window despite signing Colombian World Cup ace Juan Cuadrado on Monday's deadline day.

"I enjoy the challenge of the English competition," said Mourinho, speaking ahead of Saturday's trip to Aston Villa.

"It's a good challenge. The only thing that is not nice is that you compete against the ones (clubs) who don't follow the same rules.

"That's the only problem. I don't think -- and it's happened before -- a team can be champions when you are punished because you didn't comply with Financial Fair Play."

City were fined 49 million pounds last May, after winning the 2013-14 title, for infringing FFP regulations, but made the biggest English outlay of the transfer window in spending 28 million pounds on striker Wilfried Bony.

Asked what the penalty should be, Mourinho said: "Points. Of course. I don't know [how many]."

It is not the first time Mourinho has spoken of City's spending.

Mourinho, who spent lavishly during his first spell as Chelsea boss from June 2004 to September 2007, is happy with the transfer strategy imposed at Stamford Bridge by owner Roman Abramovich.

Chelsea sold Andre Schurrle to Wolfsburg for a reported 8 million-pound profit on a player bought 18 months previously from Bayer Leverkusen, allowing them to buy Cuadrado from Fiorentina.

The sale of Ryan Bertrand to Southampton for a reported fee of 10 million pounds allowed the Blues to make a profit once again as Mourinho reshapes his squad.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Flex

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Re: Financial Fair Play.
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2019, 06:29:33 AM »
Manchester City under investigation for FFP violations, UEFA confirm
Goal.com


Manchester City are under investigation for potential breaches of UEFA's Financial Fair Play (FFP) regulations, the governing body of European football has announced.

UEFA released a statement confirming the Premier League champions were being looked at, and noted the alleged violations have been made known via media outlets.

"The Investigatory Chamber of the independent UEFA Club Financial Control Body has today opened a formal investigation into Manchester City FC for potential breaches of Financial Fair Play (FFP) regulations," the UEFA statement reads.

"The investigation will focus on several alleged violations of FFP that were recently made public in various media outlets.

"UEFA will make no further comments on the matter while the investigation is ongoing."

German magazine Der Spiegel made multiple accusations against Man City last year in a series of articles that were based on information obtained from whistleblower organisation Football Leaks.

The publication claimed Sheikh Mansour's City regime topped up multi-million pound sponsorship deals with Abu Dhabi companies, using their owner's fortune, allowing them to meet UEFA's FFP regulations.

Man City have denied any wrong doing when commenting on the Der Spiegel reports, claiming "the attempt to damage the club's reputation is organised and clear".

In light of UEFA's statement, the Premier League champions have responded by welcoming the investigation and denying any financial violations.

"Manchester City welcomes the opening of a formal UEFA investigation as an opportunity to bring to an end the speculation resulting from the illegal hacking and out of context publication of City emails," the club wrote.

"The accusation of financial irregularities are entirely false. The club’s published accounts are full and complete and a matter of legal and regulatory record."

In December, UEFA president Aleksander Ceferin called the case against City "concrete" and confirmed an "independent body" was working on the investigation.

At the time, reports suggested that if Man City were found to have violated FFP, the club could face a ban from the Champions League.

City are known to have violated FFP in the past, having reached an agreement over a settlement in 2014 with then-UEFA general secretary, now FIFA president, Gianni Infantino.

Der Spiegel also claimed Man City and Paris Saint-Germain received favourable terms for that settlement by Infantino.

Man City blast 'false accusations' as UEFA open spending rules probe
AFP


Paris (AFP) - UEFA on Thursday announced they were opening an investigation into whether or not Manchester City broke Financial Fair Play rules, a breach that could lead to a devastating Champions League ban.

However, English champions City insisted the accusations against them are false and that they welcomed the opportunity to clear their name.

German magazine Der Spiegel, using material purportedly obtained from the whistleblowing outlet Football Leaks, alleged in November that City had set up sponsorship deals to circumvent regulations limiting how much money owners can put into a club.

"The Investigatory Chamber of the independent UEFA Club Financial Control Body has today opened a formal investigation into Manchester City FC for potential breaches of Financial Fair Play (FFP) regulations," said a UEFA statement on Thursday.

"The investigation will focus on several alleged violations of FFP that were recently made public in various media outlets."

City responded immediately by saying they supported the investigation and that they had nothing to hide.

"Manchester City welcomes the opening of a formal UEFA investigation as an opportunity to bring to an end the speculation resulting from the illegal hacking and out of context publication of City emails," the club said in a statement.

"The accusation of financial irregularities are entirely false. The club's published accounts are full and complete and a matter of legal and regulatory record."

City had earlier responded to Der Spiegel's claims by saying there had been an "organised and clear" attempt to damage the club's reputation.

A ban from UEFA competitions, including the Champions League, is a potential punishment if City are found guilty of FFP breaches.

City were fined 60 million euros ($67.3 million) and subjected to squad, wage and spending caps in a 2014 settlement agreed with UEFA following a previous breach of the rules.

City coach Pep Guardiola has always insisted that City would accept a ban but does not believe it is likely after discussions with the club's UAE owners.

- Questions for PSG, Milan -

"We will not be banned, no. That's what I think because I trust in my chairman, with my CEO, what they have explained to me," he said.

"If it happens, because UEFA decide that, we will accept it and move forward."

City are not the only European heavyweight to be caught up in claims of breaking financial fair play rules.

French champions Paris Saint-Germain quashed reports they could be forced to sell either Kylian Mbappe or Neymar in a bid to circumvent eventual FFP sanctions.

Qatar-owned PSG, who splashed a combined total of more than 400 million euros in 2017 for Brazil star Neymar and France World Cup winner Mbappe, blasted allegations as "totally false and ridiculous".

Former European champions AC Milan were warned in December that they risk being excluded from European competition if they fail to "break even".

Milan had already been banned for a year from the Europa League due to breaching FFP regulations before winning an appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) last year.

But UEFA said the former seven-time European champions again face suspension from continental competition in future seasons "should the club not be break-even compliant at 30 June 2021".

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.