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Author Topic: 2014 Carifta Games Thread: Sat.19th to Mon.21st April, Martinique (Videos added)  (Read 40709 times)

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Offline STMB

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instead of being content with lower placings.

STMB, I don't think we are contented with the lower places. JA just have better athletes than us. They work hard with their talent pool. We have a lot of cating up to do.

I looked at most every finals. In races 800m and above, and the relays, not just T&T but most other runners would simply LET the Jamaican athletes lead, take the front to set the pace, even when they themselves were in contention. When races are being won by less than 1-2 seconds, you think a more mentally tough or confident approach may have resulted in a medal of a different color? I do

Offline STMB

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I have been talking about kayelle clarke for a while....she is a good talent with a great attitude and strong work ethic.

You hit it on the head - ATTITUDE

Offline STMB

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So I see why Farhina did not run the 200. They kept him for the relay. They kept him for the relay.

That was his brother - they run for Abilene

Offline STMB

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I don't know what to make of this medal haul. The slide towards teen numbers that started in 2010-2013 was averted, but looking at the numbers it seems like the decline still hasn't been halted.

Number of golds is one more than Barbados, and lower than should be expected for us.

The positive spin should be signs of progress, I guess, but looking beneath the surface - still much to be desired... :-[



Sadly the cards are stacked in Jamaica's favor for years to come now that they have an established IAAF High Performance Center like the one in Havana. Advanced equipment, coaching, financed program by the IAAF....

In addition to a strong school/alum based culture for track and field, corporate recognition of value of sports, an establishment of a collegiate level of competition like the US, they now have the Zharnel Hughes of the Caribbean living and training in Jamaica, benefitting not just Hughes but Jamaican athletes training with and competing against him. Then you have international athletes from around the world also training and competing in the sprints against local talent a la Eldoret in Kenya for distance runners.

T&T have a few options to catch up or stay within distance but requires an astute "salesman" to convince those holding the purse strings who can make it happen. Some options may take 2-3 years, others longer:
1. Finance and conduct 1-2 IAAF coaching and officiating training schools at home each year, not weekend sessions but 1-2 week classroom and practical programs, capturing as many local coaches, officials, and volunteers as possible
2. As Cedenio has done, send some of our best to Jamaica, Cuba, or Florida to train. This may however serve those out of school in their last 2 years of juniors, as I expect most parents will be concerned to send younger athletes away from home and comforts, not knowing what level of education their child might obtain
3. NAAA may convince NGL or other like companies to finance quality international meets (1-2/year) as we had with Hampton Games of old. Even small Martinique, Cayman Islands have joined Jamaica in establishing their invitationals. Which international athlete would not want to visit and compete at a quality meet in the Caribbean? In addition, providing exposure to this level of competition to the public, corporations, club athletes, and coaches would help expand the sport's appeal culturally to levels of bygone years
4. In conjunction with the oil & gas sponsors and the government, approach NACAC's president Victor Lopez to establish an HPC or center of excellence in TT. We can build a quality training center and track at either UTT or UWI, where athletes regardless of club can go and get technical help from resident coaches, sport doctors, and nutritionists
5. Continue with some of the caravan type roads shows to attract talent to the sport in greater numbers.

It would take an engaged Minister of Sports, a cadre of high profile TT legends and current stars, others with access to corporate leaders in Trinidad to work strategically together to push like initiatives to get launched.

I mean, Jamaican athletes are no different to any other Caribbean athlete. We all come from the same continent genealogically, eat the same types of diets, love athletics the same way. What it comes down to is structure, support, hunger, attitude, quality coaching, and financial commitment. Kudos to Jamaica for recognizing an ore and polishing it into a gem.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 07:06:07 AM by STMB »

Offline jai john

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...." While athletics is not as popular as football and cricket in Trinidad and Tobago it offers the best return on the dollar compared to any sport in Trinidad and Tobago. "  Orville London, THA Chairman, at the opening of the Tobago Falcon games last weekend at the National stadium. While those words have been spoken by others in the past ...Ato comes to mind years ago on this forum and he got some flack for it ...... truer words were never spoken.

It is alright to speak of the great potential of our young athletes but unless and until our Politicians realize this potential and the great benefit to tourism etc. of athletics these words, will be like a clanging cymbal.

So Jamaica has gone clear in athletics ......world athletcs !! ... nowforeign athletes are going to Jamiaica to train, US Universities are hiring Jamaican coaches ..Jamaica has a High performance training Centre etc...things dont happen overnight but also not without a plan

what is our plan for athletics ? the future of our young athletes seem to rest in a university scholarship then let some university coach take over ....and hope you get a college degree in the mix ...amateur at best ...shamateur at worst. Look at the example of jehue Gordon who is completing his degree at home while competing as world champion in the 400 metre hurdles.. with the right facilities we can achieve more in a sport in which we alredy  have current world and olympic champions. we now have UTT and other Institutions which can ensure our athletes  acquire a skill to their level of competence.

Jamaica on the other hand have put things in place to keep their athletes under their supervision where they wont be exploited by the US run for points for your school system which has killed off many a promising athlete.

well I hope to see a vision somewhere which will at least plan a course to take us further than the next stop ...something which will will result in an athletics industry and I hope politicians wanted to leave a legacy would consider the actions necessary to enhance the abilities of our young people in an area where they are excelling but in too few numbers. ..a hgih performance way of thinking perhaps ??

Offline Socapro

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So I see why Farhina did not run the 200. They kept him for the relay. They kept him for the relay.

That was his brother - they run for Abilene

So this means that Jonathan was probably injured why he pulled out of the 200m final.

I hope it is nothing too serious then and that he makes a speedy recovery.  :-\
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 11:53:34 AM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline Socapro

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4x400m final. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_vkZH7jH-U

Trinidad Defeats Jamaica 3:06.02 wins U20 Boys 4x400m Final Carifta Games 2014
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/A_vkZH7jH-U" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/A_vkZH7jH-U</a>

I just timed the T&T splits with the stopwatch on my phone and I think they were:-
Leg 1: Asa GUEVARA with 46.0
Leg 2: Nathan FARINHA with 48.4
Leg 3: Theon LEWIS with 45.82
Leg 4: Machel CEDENIO with 45.8;

So it is obvious that Nathan Farinha (Jonathan Farinha's twin brother) and who is coming back from injury was the weak link on the T&T team that just won the U-20 4x4 Carifta gold.

I believe our 2nd leg needs to be strengthened with someone who can run a guaranteed 46.low or 45.xx for the WJC if we want to contend with USA and Jamaica for the WJC gold medal.
So if Nathan is not yet fit and conditioned enough to guarantee us a 46.low or 45.xx on the 2nd leg then he needs to be replaced by someone else who is guaranteed to be up to it come the 2014 World Junior Champs U-20 4 x 400m Relay Final which we will hopefully qualify for and get a good lane.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 02:09:33 PM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline Deeks

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I did not know Johnathan had a twin brother 8)

Offline Deeks

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i am not holding my breadth on any HPC in TT in the near future. First off all TF need there own facilities, NOW. NOT NEXT WEEK, BUT NOW. FOR TF ONLY.  Let's start there first, then come back talk HPC.

Offline Socapro

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Record medal haul for Jamaica at Carifta Games 2014
« Reply #189 on: April 22, 2014, 07:29:13 PM »
Record medal haul for Jamaica at Carifta Games 2014
April 22nd 8:23pm (trackalerts.com)
By Anthony Foster in Fort-de-France, Martinique


Jamaica won a record 88 medals, as the 43rd Carifta Games came to an end here on Monday night in Fort de France, Martinique.

On Monday the final day, Jamaica added 32 medals, winning three of the four 200m runs, with similarities in the 800's and the 4x400m relays, to end with 42 gold, 34 silver and 12 bronze.

Trinidad & Tobago finished second in the medal count with 6 gold, 7 silver and 12 bronze, while Barbados ended third with 5 gold, 5 silver and 6 bronze.

Rounding out the top ten on the medals table was Guyana 3 gold and 1 silver; Guadeloupe 3 gold and 8 bronze; Dominica 2 gold; Bahamas 1 gold, 8 silver and 11 bronze; Grenada 1 gold, 3 silver and 2 bronze; Bermuda 1 gold, 3 silver and 1 bronze and St. Lucia 1 gold, 1 silver and 1 bronze.

In the 800m finals, Ryan Butler, Monique McPherson and Kevon Robinson led home three, 1-2 finishes, for Jamaica.

Butler, who left it until the final 200m, finished strong in 1:55.61 ahead of his teammate Ryan Dunkley 1:56.03 and Justin Pinder of Bahamas 1:56.37.
McPherson led from the front to take the Under-20 girls 800m in 2:09.85, ahead of her teammate Sasha-Gaye Whyte 2:13.19 and Cheryl Farial of Guadeloupe 2:13.29.

Robinson, who also waited until the last 200m to make his move, crossed the line in 1:51.02 mins just ahead of his teammate Rajay Hamilton, 1:51.05 and Claudius Russell of Bahamas, 1:51.86.

In the two lap Under-18 girls event, Faheemah Scraders of Bermuda spoiled the Jamaicans' party with 2:10.68. The Jamaican pair of Junelle Broomfield 2:10.79 and Britnie Dixon 2:13.33 were next to the line.

Jamaica also dominated the 200m finals with six medals, which included three golds.

Michael O'Hara, the World Youth champion, stepped up to win the Under-20 boys final in 20.50 ahead of teammate Jevaughn Minzie 20.56, with Levi Cadogan of Barbados finishing third in 20.64

Natalliah Whyte, who won the Under-17 sprint double last year, topped the Under-18 girls 200m in 23.36, with her teammate Shellece Clark taking bronze in 23.61. Sada Williams of Barbados 23.43 got 2nd place.

Chad Walker 20.99 finished ahead of his Jamaican teammate Jhevaughn Matherson 21.13 and Bahamian Javan Martin 21.15 in the Under-18 boys 200m final

Kayelle Clarke of Trinidad & Tobago took the the U20 200m girls finals in 23.10 ahead of Kadecia Baird. The 400m champion from Guyana was in the lead with 10 meters to go when her legs came out from under her. She still managed to run a personal best and a Guyanese national record with a 23.13 clocking. Jamaica's Kadisha Dallas was third with 23.69.

In the sprint hurdles, Jamaica with Janeek Brown 13.48 and Sidney Marshall 13.62 finished 1-2 ahead of Jeminise Sade Parris (Turks) 13.79.

Jaheel Hyde, the World Youth champion, topped the boys Under-18 110mH field in 13.10secs, ahead of his Jamaican teammate Roje Chin Jackson 13.46 and Michael Nicholls of Barbados 13.69.

Hyde said, “the plan was to come out here and go below my PR 13.13, so therefore I am happy.” The mark, however, was a wind-assisted 2.2m/s.

“I found I am crashing into the hurdles a bit quicker than normal so what I do is to try and slow down a bit,” added Hyde as to the reason why he did not run faster.

“The Carifta Games is a success for me, because the aim coming in was to take home two individual gold medals.”

Akeela Jones of Barbados ended a seven-year career at Carifta with her first ever 100m hurdles victory in 13.55secs, to beat Peta-Gaye Williams of Jamaica 13.57 and Chrystie Lange of Guadeloupe 13.59

Jones described the victory as “fantastic” while adding “I have never won this event, so this time it feels really good to win the gold medal.”
She continued, “it’s something people don’t think I can do, but I can be the best at (the 100m hurdles).”
“Three gold medals, no record, but I am leaving with a bang,” said Jones, who won the high jump and long jump.

Wilhem Belocian of Guadeloupe 13.23, beat Jamaica’s Tyler Mason 13.25 and Ruebin Walters of Trinidad and Tobago 13.57 in the boys’ Under-20 110mH final.

Jamaica also finished 1-2 in the 5,000m final with Obrien Frith 15:48.51 and Romario Foote 15:51.66 mins.

Trinidad & Tobago closed out the Championships with Machel Cedenio taking them to victory in the boys’ Under-20 4x100m in 3:06.02 ahead of Jamaica (3:07.71), who pocketed gold in the other three finals.

Jamaica won the U18 girls 4x4 finals in 3:37.65 mins, ahead of Bahamas 3:41.90 and Guyana 3:46.23; the U18 boys final in 3:12.63 ahead of Bahamas 3:13.16 and Trinidad and Tobago 3:13.77 and the girls U20 event in 3:38.20 over Trinidad and Tobago 3:46.11 and Bahamas 3:47.64

Jamaica with Olivia Leckford 44.41m and Isheka Binns 43.32m finished 1-2 in the U20 girls javelin final, so too did Glenfford Watson 52.00m and Demar Gayle 51.96 in the boys Under-20 discus.

Obrien Wasome of Jamaica won the boys long jump with a leap of 7.66m over Trinidad & Tobago’s Andweulle Wright 7.38m.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 07:36:59 PM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline Socapro

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Waithe inspired by Walcott’s Olympic gold
« Reply #190 on: April 22, 2014, 08:35:53 PM »
Looks like the spin by our NAAATT to make themselves look good has started. Ephraim Serrette forgot to mention that we won less gold medals than last year and only won one more gold than tiny Barbados.
See section in the article highlighted.

Waithe inspired by Walcott’s Olympic gold
By Roger Seepersad (T&T Express)
Story Created: Apr 22, 2014 at 9:19 PM ECT


Shakeil Waithe’s Carifta javelin gold medal did not come by chance. It was a result of a two-year journey inspired by Keshorn Walcott’s Olympic gold medal in 2012. The Tobago athlete was one of six Trinidad and Tobago Carifta gold medalist who returned to Trinidad, yesterday, after competing in the 2014 Carifta Games, at the Stade Pierre Aliker in Fort de France, Martinique.

The T&T athletes were greeted with a welcome reception at Piarco International Airport VIP Lounge following a good showing at the Games at which they won six gold medals, seven silver, and 12 bronze as T&T finished second overall in the medal haul with a total of 25. Jamaica (42 gold, 34 silver, 12 bronze) and Barbados (five gold, five silver, six bronze) were first and third, respectively.

Waithe won the boys’ under-20 javelin with a 67.53m throw and although he said it was not his best performance, he was still pleased to have topped the field. “It feels good to go into a competition and win a gold medal for my country but I was not too pleased with my performance but I still thank the Lord for winning a gold medal,” he told the media yesterday.

Speaking about the influence of Walcott, Waithe said: “Before he (Walcott) won the (Olympic) gold medal, I was doing the javelin and it had a point in time I was going to give up on the javelin and do something else but when he won that gold medal, it kind of pushed me forward to work harder and make sacrifices that I did not want to make before. “I saw what a gold medal could do for the country,” he added.

Last year the 18-year-old from Mary’s Hill in Tobago made the necessary sacrifices, did the work with his coach Ismael Lopez Mastrapa and got the reward. “I was not really surprised by my performance. I just went out there to do my best. My coach kept on pushing me and trying to keep me relaxed. I kept thinking about what I wanted to do and forget what had gone before and that helped me.

“They (the T&T athletes) were supporting me all the way,” he added. He and the rest of the athletes also had the support of hurdler Jehue Gordon who went with the team and supported from the sidelines.

President of the National Association of Athletic Administrations (NAAA) Ephraim Serrette praised the performance of the team describing it a “magnificent showing”.
“We had some exceptional performances, too many to mention. We had five more medals than we got last year and we look forward to analysing our performance from this championship and looking forward to CAC (Central American and Caribbean) Juniors and World Juniors later this year,” he added.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 09:55:40 PM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline Socapro

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GOOD HAUL: T&T manager satisfied with Carifta showing
« Reply #191 on: April 22, 2014, 09:03:57 PM »
Is this just more spin by the T&T Carifta Team management or are we really improving in relation to how Jamaica has been improving? Check this article....

GOOD HAUL
T&T manager satisfied with Carifta showing

By Kwame Laurence Fort-de-France
Story Created: Apr 22, 2014 at 9:22 PM ECT (T&T Express)


Trinidad and Tobago team manager Dexter Voisin was a satisfied man at the end of the 2014 Carifta Games, in Fort de France, Martinique. T&T finished second on the medal table with six gold medals, seven silver and 12 bronze. Jamaica produced yet another dominant performance, topping the table with 42 gold medals, 34 silver and 12 bronze, for a grand total of 88.

For T&T, the 2014 haul represented an improvement of five medals—25 as opposed to 20 in Nassau, Bahamas last year, a total that included eight gold medals, two silver and ten bronze. “The performances were very encouraging,” Voisin told the Express on Monday night.

“The mere fact that we had a lot of younger athletes means that we have a bright future. Twenty-five medals at the end of Carifta...very promising, a lot of good performances. We should leave here satisfied. Every year, we strive for excellence and improvement. This year was an improvement. “And then,” the manager continued, “some of the athletes were very disappointed in their performances, based on the goals that they would have set.

“The organisational part of the Games was not at the best. We had a lot of challenges. But as we told the athletes before we left, they have to learn to adapt to the different environment and situations because not all meets will be as smooth as we expect. At the end of the day, those who could adapt more came out on top.”

Voisin said he was particularly impressed with Machel Cedenio’s successful defence of his boys’ under-20 400 metres title. The 18-year-old quarter-miler clocked 45.95 seconds for a huge margin of victory in the one-lap final. “That is the performance that stood out,” said Voisin, “notwithstanding that we got five more gold medals.”

Kevin Roberts was also in a class by himself, the T&T athlete striking gold in the boys’ octathlon with 5,696 points--438 points more than the silver medallist. “Over the past couple years,” the manager explained, “Kevin had disappointing performances, so to come and basically dominate this year, it was a great achievement on his part. In terms of the combined events for Trinidad and Tobago, it’s very promising.”

The other T&T gold medallists at Carifta 2014 were Chelsea James in the girls’ under-18 shot put, boys’ under-20 javelin thrower Shakeil Waithe, Kayelle Clarke in the girls’ under-20 200m, and the boys’ under-20 4x400m combination of Asa Guevara, Nathan Farinha, Theon Lewis and Cedenio.

Clarke, who won the half-lap final in a wind-assisted 23.10 seconds, was thrilled with her success.
“I felt the performance was very good,” she told the Express. “I didn’t know what I would have come out in the race, but I gave it my all. My goal for the rest of the season is to continue winning in the 200 metres.”

Voisin is hoping for more success for T&T at the July 4-6 Central American and Caribbean (CAC) Junior Championships in Morelia, Mexico, and the July 22-27 IAAF World Junior Championships in Eugene, Oregon, USA.

“Carifta is just the first indicator in terms of these meets later in the year, so it’s back to the drawing board for most of the athletes with regard to their personal coaches, their club coaches.

“We have to wait and see how they progress going on to the World Juniors because that’s a different level. But again, it’s very promising. If some of them continue with their training, and with improvement, we can see some good performances coming out of the World Juniors.”

Many of the top performers at Carifta 2014 will be on show at the World Juniors meet. The list includes Barbadian Akela Jones, who received the Austin Sealy Award for being the most outstanding athlete at the Games. She struck gold in the girls’ under-20 100m hurdles, high jump and long jump events. Jones was chosen as the Austin Sealy winner by the newly-formed Caribbean Alliance Sports Journalists Association (CASJA).
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 09:18:33 PM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline Socapro

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Carifta Wrap up - Those 'Other' Countries
« Reply #192 on: April 22, 2014, 09:14:51 PM »
Carifta Wrap up - Those 'Other' Countries
Top performances from the rest of the region

By Elmo of Caribbean Track & Field Forum
Tue Apr 22, 2014 18:46


Okay!!!
So Jamaica dominated the 2014 Carifta Games and as we have now come to expect, the performances at these games have been top quality. Jamaica was responsible for a number of quality performances, especially in the sprints. But the rest of the region also stepped up to the plate, and world class performances from these athletes prove that the region has certainly ‘lifted their game’ at the youth and junior level.

Akela Jones (Barbados)
Winning three individual events at the Carifta Games is certainly no easy feat. But Multi talented Akela Jones did thus that. She broke Jamaican hearts when she relegated her Jamaican competitors to silver medals in the long Jump (6.32M), High Jump (1.84M) and 100M hurdles (13.55 seconds). One wonders if there will be a world heptathlon medal waiting for her at the WJG this year.

Wilhem Belocian (Guadeloupe)
The World Youth record holder in the sprint hurdles has dominated the Carifta games and usually wins the event easily. In the 110M hurdles finals, he showed the world he could hold his composure when he was challenged by Jamaica’s Tyler Mason and had to pull out all the stops to eke out a narrow victory in a world leading 13.23.

Kadecia Baird (Guyana)
At the 2012 World juniors, the then 16 yr old Baird ran 51.04 winning the silver medal and great things were expected of her. But she had a poor 2013 season and could only win a bronze medal (54.28) at the Carifta games. But she changed all that at the 2014 games, first winning the gold medal in the 400M and then looked the class of the field in the 200M before losing the gold medal at the tape. After leading the field up to 190M and looking to run sub 23 seconds, she lost form, miscalculated the position of the finish line, staggered and fell but still ran a respectable 23.13.

Casey George (Guyana)
In 2013, George won the U18 girls 1500M and placed second in the 800M. This year she opted to drop the 800M and run the 3000M. The move paid off because she won gold in both the 1500M and 3000M events, thus placing Guyana firmly on the Carifta regional track and field map and joining the selected few athletes who win double gold.

Faheema Scraders (Bermuda)
800M defending champion Scraders of Bermuda revived memories of the days when Bermuda was a regional junior track and field powerhouse, when she defended her 800M crown running an impressive 2:10.68, just outside of Natoya Goule’s 2:9.59 record

Kayelle Clarke (Trindad & Tobago)
The surprise performance of the meet was certainly Clarke’s victory in the U20 girls 200M. Clarke had finished outside of the medals in the 100M, but showed her speed endurance in the 200M when she came from behind to win the event in an impressive 23.10 (+2.3w). Has T&T has found its new Kelly-Ann Baptiste?

Van Assen (Suriname)
Van Assen, the defending triple jump champion decimated the field in his pet event. His 16.33M performance was even better than the performance of the U20 boys. The future looks bright for the Surinamese youth and may even challenge for a medal at WJG this year.

Machel Cedenio (Trinidad & Tobago)
Cedenio has dominated the 400M at these games for quite a while. Last year he defeated Francis (Jamaica) and Newbold (Bahamas) in what is considered to be the greatest race ever run at the Carifta games. This year, he continued his dominance by easily winning the 400M finals and his devastating anchor leg in the mile relay broke the hearts of many Jamaicans who had hoped to end the games on a high note. Hopefully Cedenio will finally win his first individual medal at the 2014 WJG.

Sade Williams (Barbados)
From out of nowhere the Bajan lady stamped her class in the 400M, when she defeated Jamaica’s WYG bronze medalist Tiffany James in the U18 400M. Her time of 53.39 was an astounding 0.5 seconds faster than the 53.84 winning time of the U20 400M race. In the 200M on the final day, she placed second to defending champion Natalia White, but ran a 23.4 PR, not too bad for a newbie in the sport.

Levi Cadogan (Barbados)
Cadogan did not win an event at the games, but nevertheless, his performances in the U20 boys 100M and 200M deserve mention. In an extraordinary year of regional sprinting, Cadogan’s 10.25 and 20.60 shows that he could be the next Obadele Thompson.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 10:35:25 PM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline Deeks

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We should leave here satisfied.

nah Dexter, nah!!!!

Offline Socapro

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We should leave here satisfied.

nah Dexter, nah!!!!
I think us falling from high of 40 medals in 2010 (see link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_CARIFTA_Games) when we won more than half the amount of medals that Jamaica did to being satisfied with just 25 medals in 2014 (within 4 years), typifies why we are not improving at the same rate as Jamaica has been and are being left behind by them in almost every department.

In my opinion our medal target should be at least 40 medals (as we won 4 years ago) in 2010 with at least 15 to 20 of them being gold medals and anything less is us under performing from our full potential.
In most cases under performing is not necessarily the fault of the athletes themselves who tend to give of their best but more a reflection of the performance of our NAAATT and them not putting the things in place to find and develop our young talented athletes from the school level coming up.
We should never be satisfied with less than 35 total medals and less than 15 gold medals in my eyes or we are under-performing in regards to our true talent and potential!
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 11:23:02 PM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

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CARIFTA athletes lauded by NAAA
« Reply #195 on: April 23, 2014, 07:37:30 AM »
CARIFTA athletes lauded by NAAA
By JOEL BAILEY Wednesday, April 23 2014 (T&T Newsday)

MEMBERS OF the Trinidad and Tobago contingent at the CARIFTA Track and Field Championships in Fort de France, Martinique returned home yesterday with a haul of 25 medals — six gold, seven silver and 12 bronze.


After the three-day annual meet, Trinidad and Tobago finished second on the medal count, with Jamaica leading the way with 88 (42 gold, 34 silver and 12 bronze), while Barbados were third with 16 medals (five gold, five silver and six bronze).

The NAAA (National Association of Athletics Administrations of Trinidad and Tobago) held a brief welcome reception for the squad at the VIP Lounge, Piarco International Airport.

The experienced Machel Cedenio retained the boys Under-20 400-metre crown, while he was part of the victorious boys Under-20 4x400m relay team.

About the 400m win, he said, “it feels good, going out there and defending my title.”

He had more to say about the 1,600m relay gold medal. “2009 was the last time we won the 4x4 and last year, we had the opportunity to win but we didn’t. We kept that in mind and this year we kept focus, we went out there and win the 4x4.”

Looking ahead to the rest of 2014, Cedenio noted,“I’m looking to win World Juniors (in Eugene, United States), that’s my goal right now, that’s basically it, run good times and a couple of meets in Europe.”

NAAA president Ephraim Serrette pointed out, “we had five more medals than last year. Our athletes, I think, performed exceptional. It’s always nice when you leave on a high, and we left (on Monday) night on a high, with the boys 4x400 metres event.

“We had good success, both on the field and on track, very good performances,” he continued. “We look forward to analysing our performances from this Championship, and we look forward to the CAC Juniors and World Championships.”

Serrette was also appreciative of the fan support the TT team received.

“I also want to thank the supporters who would have travelled with the team. We have growing support from the parents as well as the track and field fans.”

Team manager Dexter Voisin praised the work of the local media in their coverage of the Games.

“It’s the first time I’ve seen the interest in the local media with regards to covering this meet before and even during the (Games),” said Voisin. “I’d also like to thank Jehue (Gordon) who travelled with the team in Martinique.

“Jehue, just like Keshorn (Walcott) and many of our top athletes, have passed through the CARIFTA before. It’s very good to see one of our prominent athletes travelling with the team. I saw him in the stands cheering on.”

Also speaking at the welcome reception was Huey Cadette, who extended greetings on behalf of the Tobago House of Assembly (THA) — he is the secretary for the Division of Education, Youth Affairs and Sport.

The 2015 CARIFTA Track and Field Championships will take place in St Kitts.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 10:34:36 PM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline STMB

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i am not holding my breadth on any HPC in TT in the near future. First off all TF need there own facilities, NOW. NOT NEXT WEEK, BUT NOW. FOR TF ONLY.  Let's start there first, then come back talk HPC.

An HPC, Center of Excellence, whatever you want to call it is exactly that - a TF only facility. Even if Puma or Adidas were to gift a track tomorrow in any location of asking, you still need a maintenance crew, it is no good without a resident quality coach or two, no good without equipment storage, no good without an adjoining strength training facility. Call it what you want (HPC-lite) we need done.

Short term however the greatest need is quality coaching knowledge of new techniques or refreshers for all existing and any new coaches (in numbers). The fundamental difference I see between Jamaican athletes and us is conditioning, technical form, race strategy, and that air of confidence (expectation to win). That requires the least investment, and can bring the greatest short term impact, with or without promises of facilities or structured programs.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 07:49:42 AM by STMB »

Offline STMB

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CARIFTA athletes lauded by NAAA
By JOEL BAILEY Wednesday, April 23 2014 (T&T Newsday)

MEMBERS OF the Trinidad and Tobago contingent at the CARIFTA Track and Field Championships in Fort de France, Martinique returned home yesterday with a haul of 25 medals — six gold, seven silver and 12 bronze.


After the three-day annual meet, Trinidad and Tobago finished second on the medal count, with Jamaica leading the way with 88 (42 gold, 34 silver and 12 bronze), while Barbados were third with 16 medals (five gold, five silver and six bronze).

The NAAA (National Association of Athletics Administrations of Trinidad and Tobago) held a brief welcome reception for the squad at the VIP Lounge, Piarco International Airport.

The experienced Machel Cedenio retained the boys Under-20 400-metre crown, while he was part of the victorious boys Under-20 4x400m relay team.

About the 400m win, he said, “it feels good, going out there and defending my title.”

He had more to say about the 1,600m relay gold medal. “2009 was the last time we won the 4x4 and last year, we had the opportunity to win but we didn’t. We kept that in mind and this year we kept focus, we went out there and win the 4x4.”

Looking ahead to the rest of 2014, Cedenio noted,“I’m looking to win World Juniors (in Eugene, United States), that’s my goal right now, that’s basically it, run good times and a couple of meets in Europe.”

NAAA president Ephraim Serrette pointed out, “we had five more medals than last year. Our athletes, I think, performed exceptional. It’s always nice when you leave on a high, and we left (on Monday) night on a high, with the boys 4x400 metres event.

“We had good success, both on the field and on track, very good performances,” he continued. “We look forward to analysing our performances from this Championship, and we look forward to the CAC Juniors and World Championships.”

Serrette was also appreciative of the fan support the TT team received.

“I also want to thank the supporters who would have travelled with the team. We have growing support from the parents as well as the track and field fans.”

Team manager Dexter Voisin praised the work of the local media in their coverage of the Games.

“It’s the first time I’ve seen the interest in the local media with regards to covering this meet before and even during the (Games),” said Voisin. “I’d also like to thank Jehue (Gordon) who travelled with the team in Martinique.

“Jehue, just like Keshorn (Walcott) and many of our top athletes, have passed through the CARIFTA before. It’s very good to see one of our prominent athletes travelling with the team. I saw him in the stands cheering on.”

Also speaking at the welcome reception was Huey Cadette, who extended greetings on behalf of the Tobago House of Assembly (THA) — he is the secretary for the Division of Education, Youth Affairs and Sport.

The 2015 CARIFTA Track and Field Championships will take place in St Kitts.

The NAAAs is suffering from the same "seductive" logic that impacts TT corporations. In the midst of general sub-par team performance they focus on the "highlighters", those few athletes whose memorable performances put "a bow on a pig". Like an average-looking girl enhanced by make up and glitter, they can't see through to the fundamental flaws impacting TT athletics as a whole.

Come bet some corporation's marketing manager is going to make a media splash and fund Cedenio, Waithe, and maybe Clarke enormously whilst "throwing the rest of the athletes by the wayside", like opportunists sifting through tons of river sand for specks of gold.

Anybody know a journalist willing to write an article to open the eyes of these people. Maybe a little education in development strategy may sway the local corporate approach
« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 10:35:50 PM by Socapro »

Offline asylumseeker

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The fundamental difference I see between Jamaican athletes and us is conditioning, technical form, race strategy, and that air of confidence (expectation to win). That requires the least investment, and can bring the greatest short term impact, with or without promises of facilities or structured programs.

Amen!!!

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SPRINTERS AND HURDLERS SHINE AT CARIFTA GAMES
« Reply #199 on: April 23, 2014, 03:12:46 PM »
SPRINTERS AND HURDLERS SHINE AT CARIFTA GAMES
22 APR 2014 REPORT FORT-DE-FRANCE, MARTINIQUE
By Jon Mulkeen for the IAAF


As has been the case for the past 42 editions, this year’s CARIFTA Games in Fort-de-France, Martinique, was highlighted by outstanding performances in the sprints; not just on the flat, but over the barriers too.

Jamaica’s world youth champion Jaheel Hyde was one of the stars of the three-day event, which ended on Monday (21). Competing in the newly-formed under-18 category, which replaced the under-17 section, Hyde won the hurdles double, replicating his achievement from the recent Boys and Girls Championships.

Despite having only competed in a small handful of 400m hurdles races, he won the one-lap event in 51.21. But it was in his specialist shorter event where he really impressed.

His winning time of 13.10 would have been a world youth best, had it not been for the marginally over-the-limit wind assistance of 2.2m/s. Nevertheless, he was pleased with his campaign and will now turn his attention towards qualifying for the IAAF World Junior Championships later this year in Eugene.

Hyde’s titles formed just two of the 42 gold medals won by Jamaica as they comfortably topped the medals table, winning seven times as many titles as the second-placed nation, Trinidad and Tobago.

Wilhem Belocian, the athlete whose record Hyde almost broke, also impressed in the older under-20 age group. The French athlete qualifies to compete at the CARIFTA Games through the flag of his birth nation, Guadeloupe.

Competing in his first race since breaking the world junior indoor 60m hurdles record, Belocian broke another record in Fort-de-France in winning the 110m hurdles with a championship record. But he was pushed all the way by Jamaica’s Tyler Mason, 13.23 to 13.25 (1.6m/s) as both athletes dipped under the previous championship best performance set in 2010 by world 400m hurdles champion Jehue Gordon.

Jamaica dominates flat sprints

World youth champion Michael O’Hara led home a Jamaican one-two in the under-20 200m, setting a PB of 20.50 to finish 0.06 ahead of Jevaughn Minzie. In third, Levi Cadogan of Barbados set a lifetime best of 20.64.

With O’Hara not contesting the 100m, Minzie took gold in 10.18 (1.7m/s) with Cadogan once again finishing one place behind, clocking 10.25.

The gold medals in the under-18 boys’ 100m and 200m also went to Jamaica. Raheem Chambers won the 100m in 10.27 (1.9m/s) with team-mate Waseem Williams taking silver in 10.33, while Chad Walker clocked 20.99 to take the 200m title.

Jamaican girls also took both 100m and 200m titles in the under-18 group with Kimone Shaw winning the shorter sprint in a windy 11.42 and Natalliah Whyte taking the half-lap event in a PB of 23.36.

Another Jamaican, Jonielle Smith, was also aided by the wind in the under-20 100m, winning in 11.17 with a strong 5.1m/s breeze behind her back. But Jamaica fell just one short of winning all the available 100m and 200m titles as the under-20 200m title went to Kayelle Clarke of Trinidad and Tobago.

Clarke was locked in a battle with Kadecia Baird, winner of the 400m in 53.84. But Baird stumbled near the finish as Clarke gained victory in 23.10 (2.3m/s), just 0.03 ahead of Baird.

Jones takes two golds in close contests

Akela Jones of Barbados was given the Austin Sealey award, an honour presented to the athlete who is adjudged to be the most outstanding. The 18-year-old came away from Fort-de-France with two gold medals, both won by the narrowest of margins.

First up was the long jump, in which the 18-year-old sailed out to a leap of 6.32m to win by just one centimetre from Jamaica’s Claudette Allen.

Two days later, Jones lined up for the 100m hurdles and the competition in that event was even closer, beating a field that included world youth champion Yanique Thompson. Jones came off the final hurdle best and was awarded victory in a photo finish as both she and Jamaica’s Peta-Gay Williams were timed in 13.55.

Jones is now the latest name on an illustrious list of Austin Sealey award winners, joining the likes of Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake, Jehue Gordon and Kirani James.

Trinidad and Tobago’s Machel Cedenio was another double gold-medal winner. He won the under-20 400m title in 45.95 and ended the championships by anchoring his team to victory in the 4x400m, clocking 3:06.02, less than half a second away from the national junior record.

Both under-20 4x100m titles were won comfortably by Jamaica. Individual champions O’Hara and Minzie teamed up to win the men’s title with 39.38, while 100m champion Smith anchored the victorious women’s team to gold in 44.16.

One of the best performances on the in-field came from Suriname’s Miguel Van Assen in the under-18 triple jump. Aided by a perfect 2.0m/s tailwind, the 16-year-old flew out to 16.33m to break the national senior record set 23 years ago.

As the under-18 category was a new addition to the CARIFTA Games, all winning marks in that age group were championship records by default. But Van Assen’s winning mark was just two centimetres shy of the championship record in the older under-20 category.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 10:05:53 PM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline willi

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i am not holding my breadth on any HPC in TT in the near future. First off all TF need there own facilities, NOW. NOT NEXT WEEK, BUT NOW. FOR TF ONLY.  Let's start there first, then come back talk HPC.

An HPC, Center of Excellence, whatever you want to call it is exactly that - a TF only facility. Even if Puma or Adidas were to gift a track tomorrow in any location of asking, you still need a maintenance crew, it is no good without a resident quality coach or two, no good without equipment storage, no good without an adjoining strength training facility. Call it what you want (HPC-lite) we need done.

Short term however the greatest need is quality coaching knowledge of new techniques or refreshers for all existing and any new coaches (in numbers). The fundamental difference I see between Jamaican athletes and us is conditioning, technical form, race strategy, and that air of confidence (expectation to win). That requires the least investment, and can bring the greatest short term impact, with or without promises of facilities or structured programs.

What HPTC have to do with Carifta? These are school kids and most have never seen the inside of the HPTC in Jamaica...that is mainly for elite senior athlertes. Jamaica's dominance comes from the large number of quality H-School coaches we have that have spewed out of the GC Foster Sports College. This has been going on for 30 years now. How old is the HPTC in Jamaica?

Offline STMB

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i am not holding my breadth on any HPC in TT in the near future. First off all TF need there own facilities, NOW. NOT NEXT WEEK, BUT NOW. FOR TF ONLY.  Let's start there first, then come back talk HPC.

An HPC, Center of Excellence, whatever you want to call it is exactly that - a TF only facility. Even if Puma or Adidas were to gift a track tomorrow in any location of asking, you still need a maintenance crew, it is no good without a resident quality coach or two, no good without equipment storage, no good without an adjoining strength training facility. Call it what you want (HPC-lite) we need done.

Short term however the greatest need is quality coaching knowledge of new techniques or refreshers for all existing and any new coaches (in numbers). The fundamental difference I see between Jamaican athletes and us is conditioning, technical form, race strategy, and that air of confidence (expectation to win). That requires the least investment, and can bring the greatest short term impact, with or without promises of facilities or structured programs.

What HPTC have to do with Carifta? These are school kids and most have never seen the inside of the HPTC in Jamaica...that is mainly for elite senior athlertes. Jamaica's dominance comes from the large number of quality H-School coaches we have that have spewed out of the GC Foster Sports College. This has been going on for 30 years now. How old is the HPTC in Jamaica?

1. We don't have a specific sports college in Trinidad, nor a strongly established program of that nature.
2. We don't have a strong school-based athletic structure, ours is predominantly club-based, attracted much less talent.
3. Our coaches over the years have been simply athletes' parents, self-thought individuals, ex-athletes, and a minority who actually attended US universities in sports science.
4. We have depended on finding great natural talent upon which to improve with average coaching.
5. For decades when we went to train at the few facilities we had, those facilities were locked up or inaccessible even in the middle of the season. These facilities are multi-purpose so we could not train because a football or cricket game, cycling practice, Carnival/Parang fete/show preparation took precedence according to the town's management; or simply the gatekeeper was at the rum shop across the street with the keys.
6. We had ONE opportunity to see non-US international talent a year (Hampton Games), no other opportunity to measure ourselves against the best.
7. We are the last stop in the Caribbean, so it is expensive for our teams to go anywhere, a trip to Florida or Penn Relays is not as easy for a team from Jamaica or the Bahamas to fathom.

Yet we produce much fewer but very high quality athletes (compare our national records, especially the 400m - you would think JA would have a produced a sub-44 by now). So though Jamaica wins 7 times as many golds as T&T in the 2014 Carifta Games (the nest of future talent), we end up placing nearly as many in an international final at the World level because our talent finally comes to fruition by somehow playing catch up at US universities, until now with the Jehue Gordons and Keshorn Walcotts, but even them need exposure to the European circuit and the HPTC in Cuba.

So for Trinidad (maybe not Jamaica) we especially need an HPTC (or something like it) so that we can be EVEN better by producing high quality athletes in numbers. Our problem is (i) the limited production of high-level coaches, (ii) access to TF-only facilities, (iii) quality training groups for our returned athletes from the US, (iv) exposure to equipment/techniques/knowledge (sports medicine, nutrition, strength training, conditioning, etc) that we do not have or impart properly. And we need this for athletes at ALL levels (from U-12 to international). We excel without it but imagine what we could do WITH it.

Trinidad is rectangular in shape so having one centrally located or near the crossroads of our NS and EW highway system would make sense.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 06:43:08 AM by STMB »

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HPTC wont help you with Carifta results. Try the other shortfalls you mentioned...dedicated Sports College, school based competitive system, etc.

If you think you see the best of Jamaica at Carifta, you are mistaken. They are Champs drained.
Besides, our system is only slightly less dysfuctional than yours!

Look at WY Champs last year. Jamaica topped the WORLD. HPTC didnt do that. HPTC is what helps us with the transition to the Pros from Jnr ranks and it is open to everyone, not just Jamaicans. Puerto Rico has a HPTC too, but that is just facilities, devoid of real buzz.

As for talent, you have a smaller population and 50% is Asian, so big sprint disadvantage there already. Having said that numbers dont tell all, as no country can get more than 3 athletes per event in the Olys anyway, so the "nearly as many in finals" comment is misleading and reflect wrong thinking. If we have Bolt/Blake/Asafa in a 100m final and you have Bledman and RT, you think that is comparable?

As for 400m record, it would be far better by now if Bolt stuck to 400m, if Gonzalez was not so injury prone or if Blake and other sprinters took it up. Never mind that though, as we have a great wave coming up. When we had 3 class 2 boys running 46point at Champs 2013 and the 13 year Old Chris Walker from Cbar running 48 low, then we should not worry. Throw in Bann and Bloomfield and the future is bright. Oh and Forte may do 200m/400m combo too.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2014, 06:50:05 AM by willi »

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Willi, ok you made your point. HPTC may not help us. But TF in TT need its own dedicated facility. Like the man explain above, the stadia home are multi purpose facilities and depending on who has "strings" with the govament, they does get priority. We have to take a different approach to improve our performance at the developmental level. Credence to JA, they have their solid foundation. Ours is made of sand. We have to put some concrete in ours.

Offline STMB

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HPTC wont help you with Carifta results. Try the other shortfalls you mentioned...dedicated Sports College, school based competitive system, etc.

If you think you see the best of Jamaica at Carifta, you are mistaken. They are Champs drained.
Besides, our system is only slightly less dysfuctional than yours!
Look at WY Champs last year. Jamaica topped the WORLD. HPTC didnt do that.

As for talent, you have a smaller population and 50% is Asian, so big sprint disadvantage there already. Having said that numbers dont tell all, as no country can get more than 3 athletes per event in the Olys anyway, so the "nearly as many in finals" comment is misleading and reflect wrong thinking. If we have Bolt/Blake/Asafa in a 100m final and you have Bledman and RT, you think that is comparable?

As for 400m record, it would be far better by now if Bolt stuck to 400m, if Gonzalez was not so injury prone or if Blake and other sprinters took it it. Never mind that though, as we have a great wave coming up. When we had 3 class 2 boys running 44point at Champs 2013 and the 13 year Old Chris Walker from Cbar running 48 low, then we should not worry. Throw in Bann and Bloomfield and the future is bright. Oh and Forte may do 200m/400m combo too.

Jamaica has its needs and so does Trinidad, but one size does not fit all, as you say we have different population make-up but that should not be a disadvantage if you get the right talent from within the pool. So those of us who lived, grew up, trained, competed in its system, and for T&T would know best, thank you.

Just as you mention the what-ifs about the 400m, well what if Darrel Brown's mentor (Nestor Bown) a chain-smoking, UWI librarian who never ran a day in his life had not died just as DB was reaching his prime, being not-wisely persuaded to leave his charge and move to Auburn to seek "better horizons" in the US, then T&T should have won the gold in the 100 and 200 in the 2004 Olympics. But as much as we might extrapolate on DB or what Bolt or his partner woulda/coulda done in the 400m it did not happen, and will not happen (Bolt simply does not enjoy the 400m and I suspect knows he has limitations) in that last 100m as awesome as he is in up to the 300m.

Don't let hubris get to you, appreciate the supportive culture, coaching and talent you have, but don't think for a moment that the other islands can't produce athletes as spectacular, history has shown different. One of those 44 legs came from Delano Williams, and well Zharnel brush off most of that talent you just talk about in the 100m. Between the Guadeloupean hurdler and the sprinters from Barbados, Trinidad and the Cayman Islands the future is bright for the entire region.

Case in point neither Richard Thompson nor Deon Lendore made a significant dent in their Carifta or Penn Relays years, but they did and are more than making up for it, and as we have always argued and used in favor of or against points, all that junior talent does not filter to the top with early peaking, injuries, disinterest, burn out, etc.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 11:27:12 AM by STMB »

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http://www.carifta2014.fr/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/400m-20-ans-garcon.pdf

Saturday 19th April results
43rd CARIFTA GAMES 2014

Machel CEDENIO (TRI) 45.95 wins U-20 Boys 400M FINAL Carifta 2014
T&T's Asa GUEVARA places 3rd in 47.35

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/zWAbej3NnA0" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/zWAbej3NnA0</a>

400m /-20ans BOYS Finale 1 ŕ 19h 19
Rd.M: 43''87 LEWIS S. () 28/09/1988

Place Athlčte Club Fort De France le 19 avril 2014 Licence Cat. Dpt Lig. Perf. Pts

1 CEDENIO Machel (Tri) JU M Trinidad Et Tobago 45''95 N1 1115
2 ALLEN Nathon (Jam) ju M Jamaique 46''97 N2 1053
3 GUEVARA Asa (Tri) JU M Trinidad Et Tobago 47''35 N2 1030
4 HENRY Ivan (Jam) ju M Jamaique 47''36 N2 1029
5 CARTWRIGHT Janeko (Bah) JU M Bahamas 47''49 N2 1022
6 HERBET Khari (Ivb) JU M Iles Vierges Britanique 48''43 N3 967
7 PIERRE Jr. Kelson (Bah) JU M Bahamas 48''90 N4 940
8 PARRIS Brandon (Vin) JU M St Vincent &grenadine 49''43 N4 910
samedi 19 avril 2014 19h3

Video of the Boys U-20 400m Final featuring Cedenio winning gold just found and added.  :thumbsup:
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline willi

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Willi, ok you made your point. HPTC may not help us. But TF in TT need its own dedicated facility. Like the man explain above, the stadia home are multi purpose facilities and depending on who has "strings" with the govament, they does get priority. We have to take a different approach to improve our performance at the developmental level. Credence to JA, they have their solid foundation. Ours is made of sand. We have to put some concrete in ours.

I agree with you and THAT IS MY POINT. I believe di man (STMB) was conflating. TnT has many T&F problems. The solutions at the Jnr level are different to the solutions needed for the senior level.

Dedicated facilities is one thing, but coaching and competitive environment are more urgent at the Jnr level. For the Snr level, you need a transition strategy, that keeps athletes healthy, motivated and economically secure within reason.

STMB, nothing against you as I can feel your passion. Just suggesting that you dont need to reinvent the wheel and should not shy from taking good ideas from wherever. Just make sure to isolate the individual problems, so they can be addressed appropriately. Facility alone is not the cure all. Jamaica has faaar less facilities than TnT, but uses them much more efficiently.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2014, 06:56:23 AM by willi »

Offline willi

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HPTC wont help you with Carifta results. Try the other shortfalls you mentioned...dedicated Sports College, school based competitive system, etc.

If you think you see the best of Jamaica at Carifta, you are mistaken. They are Champs drained.
Besides, our system is only slightly less dysfuctional than yours!
Look at WY Champs last year. Jamaica topped the WORLD. HPTC didnt do that.

As for talent, you have a smaller population and 50% is Asian, so big sprint disadvantage there already. Having said that numbers dont tell all, as no country can get more than 3 athletes per event in the Olys anyway, so the "nearly as many in finals" comment is misleading and reflect wrong thinking. If we have Bolt/Blake/Asafa in a 100m final and you have Bledman and RT, you think that is comparable?

As for 400m record, it would be far better by now if Bolt stuck to 400m, if Gonzalez was not so injury prone or if Blake and other sprinters took it it. Never mind that though, as we have a great wave coming up. When we had 3 class 2 boys running 44point at Champs 2013 and the 13 year Old Chris Walker from Cbar running 48 low, then we should not worry. Throw in Bann and Bloomfield and the future is bright. Oh and Forte may do 200m/400m combo too.


Just as you mention the what-ifs about the 400m, well what if Darrel Brown's mentor (Nestor Bown) a chain-smoking, UWI librarian who never ran a day in his life had not died just as DB was reaching his prime, being not-wisely persuaded to leave his charge and move to Auburn to seek "better horizons" in the US, then T&T should have won the gold in the 100 and 200 in the 2004 Olympics. But as much as we might extrapolate on DB or what Bolt or his partner woulda/coulda done in the 400m it did not happen, and will not happen (Bolt simply does not enjoy the 400m and I suspect knows he has limitations) in that last 100m as awesome as he is in up to the 300m.

Don't let hubris get to you, appreciate the supportive culture, coaching and talent you have, but don't think for a moment that the other islands can't produce athletes as spectacular, history has shown different. One of those 44 legs came from Delano Williams, and well Zharnel brush off most of that talent you just talk about in the 100m. Between the Guadeloupean hurdler and the sprinters from Barbados, Trinidad and the Cayman Islands the future is bright for the entire region.

Case in point neither Richard Thompson nor Deon Lendore made a significant dent in their Carifta or Penn Relays years, but they did and are more than making up for it, and as we have always argued and used in favor of or against points, all that junior talent does not filter to the top with early peaking, injuries, disinterest, burn out, etc.

Hubris???
Hahahahahaha

You must think I am a waggonist? Go ask Flex. Its from 1997 that I set up the Carib T&F forum with his help. I know when we were happy for a single bronze. I am not waggonist chestbeater, rather a realist who knows what O'clock ah strike.

If Bolt dedicated himself to the 400m, the WR is gone, no question! Limitations? Do you know many SERIOUS knowledgable inside people think Bolt's best event could have been the 800m?

44point leg? You forgot that Super Donx ran that in Moscow last year as a schoolers, 44.00s leg to be exact? Our 400m problem has been nothing more tha 100meter-itis! That is where the money is and that is where they all gravitated to. LaShawn Merrit and I spoke about that a few years ago in Lausanne, and its the reason why he tried to bait Bolt to race him at 300m or 400m. The money currently follows Bolt and Merritt wisely wants a piece.

Now, I am not foolish enuff to think that Jamaica has all the talent in the caribbean, as Jehue/Kirani/KAB/RT/Walcott/Braithwaite/Kim/etc have all had good to great transitions to the senior level. At the same time, I urge you to recoil from going to the other extreme to say we all have the same quantity of talent. The evidence is NOT there. Jamaica has 50% of the Anglo-Caribbean population and most of that with West African sprint genes, so we do seem to have a natural numerical advantage. Even with that, we wont have a monopoly, but we currently seem to be nurturing the harnessed talent better than most, despite domestic dysfunctionality.

Finally, Zharnell is a pro at Racers and barely beat Minzie at Champs, coming from behind. He is the best at the moment for his age level and is a pet of Mills, but he cant touch the train-line of seniors above him, including Forte/Skeene/Delano/Murphy/Todd/Livermore/Harvey/Young/ etc who will peak later this year. I dont even put Dexter Lee in bunch, and we all know about Carter/Bolt/Blake/Ashmeade/Weir/Frater/Asafa and a few others who have escaped my memory now.

Point is, its hard for everyone transitioning to a stocked senior level, so attention to detail is critical at this juncture.

BTW, I want to reiterate that I respect you as a fan of this sport, so dont take any disagreement as more than that. I read your posts and take them seriously.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2014, 07:19:54 AM by willi »

Offline Socapro

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Carifta Games  – Young Ones
Age is just a number

By Elmo of Caribbean Track & Field Forum
Wed Apr 23, 2014 19:56


One of the drawbacks of the age change from U17 to U18, is that the young (13-15) talent is lost among the 16 and 17 year olds who dominate the U18 group. But there are a few who still manage to shine brightly. Considering that they all have TWO or THREE more years as youths, one can expect some serious fireworks at the next games.

Of course, I am familiar with the Jamaican youngsters, but Scorpion King, Socapro, Stunna, Choko, etc..please add some names.

Kimone Shaw (Jam - 14 yrs old) - Placing: U18 girls 100M gold
Last year as a 13 yr old, Kimone won the Class 4 100M in an unbelievable 11.75. This year as a 14 year old, she won the U18 100M at the Carifta trials in 11.55, but was a shadow of herself at champs, finishing fourth in the CIII 100M. But Kimone was again in fine form at the Carifta Games, running a blistering 11.42 (+3.3) and winning the U18 gold medal. Although the U20 girls race was run in +5.1w, only Jonelle Smith ran faster than Kimone’s 11.44.

Jamal Walton (Cayman - 15 yrs old) - Placing: U18 boys 400m bronze
The Cayman island youth won the bronze medal in the U18 400M, running 47.74, a time that would usually win the U17 400M at the Carifta games. He also placed fourth in the 200M, where he ran 21.64. That is certainly not too shabby for a 15 yr old representing Cayman.

Jevaughn Matherson (Jam - 15 yrs old) - Placing: U18 Boys 200M silver
15 year old Matherson took on his older competitors in the 200M and won the silver medal, running a very fast 21.13. Of course at his high school championships he recorded 20.9 over the same distance. The versatile youth has also recorded 10.37 over the 100M, the second fastest time ever by a 15 yr old.

Adell Colthrust (T&T – 14 yr old) - Placing: U18 Boys 100M fourth place
This 14 year old youth (born in 2000)made a serious impression a few years ago in the C.U.T. meet in Jamaica when he blew away some of Jamaica’s top age group sprinters. This year, he placed fourth in the original U18 100M races, running 10.57, a very fast time for a 14 yr old (CIII) boy.

Lamara Distin (Jam - 14 yr old) - Placing: U18 girls High jump Gold
What a season Distin has been having. This 14 yr old won the high jump at her trials in a 1.71M PR. At champs she placed second to new record holder Shian Salmon (another 14 yr old who was left at home who jumped 1.78M). At the Carifta games in very windy conditions, Distin won Jamaica’s first gold medal at the games with a 1.68M leap.

Just a pity the ages have changed. These youngsters would have been much more visible.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2014, 10:37:28 AM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline Socapro

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De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

 

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