April 12, 2021, 01:17:31 AM

Author Topic: Shaka Hislop Thread.  (Read 11497 times)

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Offline Flex

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Re: Shaka Hislop Thread.
« Reply #60 on: June 29, 2020, 04:08:55 AM »
Shaka: Troubling TTFA revelations don’t justify Fifa intervention—they challenge us to fix ourselves.
By Shaka Hislop (Wired868).


Well, this really has been a strange couple of weeks. I’ve found myself having in-depth conversations with some of my best and dearest friends regarding our football and the position we currently find ourselves in.

We really are up shit creek; and Fifa has snatched our paddles and are now trying to comfort us by insisting that this is their creek anyway.

It’s been a whirlwind few months. Back in November, I recorded an endorsement for the head of the United TTFA slate, William Wallace. Nothing necessarily new. In the last decade I’ve offered public and recorded statements of support for at least four of our head coaches, and one of our previous ministers of sport.

I’ve also spoken at the political launch event of yet another budding politician who went on to become minister of sport. I’ve phoned all three of the last TTFA presidents within days of their electoral wins to wish them good luck.

While the timing and use of video are firsts for me, I didn’t hesitate in endorsing Wallace. In all of my dealings with him as president of the SSFL, I found him honest and professional.

The revelations of the last few weeks have been disappointing and troubling though.

Within four months of Wallace’s tenure, even before the revelations of the last few weeks, Fifa felt it necessary to rescind their recognition of his title and impose a normalisation committee. I’ve already let my feelings be known about that.

Those feelings haven’t changed—so if you’re here hoping or expecting an apology for that, you’ll be disappointed.

Let me be clear, I don’t necessarily have an issue with the makeup of the normalisation committee. The head of the normalisation committee has been called to serve our game in a most unusual and unexpected circumstance. I applaud anyone who is willing to step up and do so, as long as their motivations are honest and efforts earnest—even if I continue to challenge the reasons for their appointment.

I have spoken to Mr Robert Hadad since his appointment and have no reason to question him. None. My biggest grievance through all of this continues to be with the reasons given for the imposing of a normalisation committee at this point.

Despite the after-the-fact justifications of the normalisation committee put forward in many of the comment sections, the reasons offered by FIFA themselves—via two sets of highly competent local law firms—fall desperately short of acceptable.

Keeping in mind that all of our football’s challenges are inherited, thanks to a former Fifa VP, those reasons would have justified the same at any point in the last ten years.

If Fifa were happy to allow previous administrations full terms in trying to arrest those issues, despite spiralling debt and a plummeting ranking, it’s a very tough sell to justify not letting this one get out of their blocks. An easier sell for FIFA to countries with a colonial past, who have been conditioned not to question.

If there is a silver lining to what I’ve witnessed over recent weeks, it’s that we are equipped with the checks and balances our football needs, they just have to be allowed to function properly and fully.

If you have a rogue president, there is an executive committee, a board, and a general membership who should act as guardians of the governance as guided by the constitution.

The investigative pieces as produced right here in Wired868, by SportsMax, the Express, the Guardian and the Newsday have shown that we have a media who are more than capable of ensuring transparency and exposing wrongdoing. And we have a fan base to hold them all to account.

For Fifa to leapfrog them all makes a mockery of those pillars, stripping them of their rights and responsibilities, and undermines our own sovereignty. The damage done will outlast the normalisation committee’s term by decades.

I don’t believe Wallace is corrupt or a thief, or necessarily rogue. Football is a venomous arena. It takes a steeled character to navigate and an even sharper tongue to dominate.

Wallace’s trusting nature has probably been his undoing. The recent revelations have exposed faults in our administrative protocols as well. Why does it only take one signature to execute deals such as the one with Avec, for the head coach, the ‘marketing agent’, and even the general secretary?

A remnant of that former Fifa VP’s era. Whatever comes of all of this, that needs to be addressed.

The gilt-edged promise of football administration is tempting. It has seen seemingly good people actively deal in rumour, misinformation and back-stabbing. It’ll take honest, intelligent, people of integrity for us to deliver on the promise of our local talent and fans’ hopes.

But we do have those people in our own midsts. We have to identify and support them.

I can sometimes be a cynic, but my glass remains half full.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Tallman

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Dr Frederick and I - The relationship
« Reply #61 on: July 23, 2020, 06:58:57 PM »
Dr Frederick and I - The relationship
By Shaka Hislop (pushinglimits.net)


Dr Wayne Frederick and I have been best friends since we were teenagers. The best way I could narrow it down is I was 14 and he was 12 at the time. We just became best friends in CIC and to this day we have no idea why. We were both living in Diamond Vale but that’s all we had in common. He wasn’t a good footballer. He would tell you different but he wasn’t good at all. But we were friends.

To this day, and I say this unapologetically, I had no idea why other than the fact that we were young guys and we were friends. He was small. Wayne suffers with sickle cell so he was always very slight growing up but we just connected and shared dreams. Wayne has gone onto an incredible career himself.

Following our time at CIC I went onto Howard University. He skipped a year so he ended up a year behind me in school and then when he was trying to figure out his own path post St Mary’s College I told him Howard University was the perfect place. As a matter of fact I filled out his application form, paid the application fee and went and submitted it for him to get into Howard.

He came up on an advanced med degree as they call it. So at 16 he was doing both Undergraduate and Med School courses. Then at the time when he became a qualified surgeon, he was the youngest board certified surgeon in US history. So we shared time at Howard University and I then went off to England. He would come to see me play when I first got into the system at Reading FC and when I came back to the States we would catch up. He was a groomsman at my wedding and I was best man at his. We managed to share our successes and always kept in touch and abreast of each other's progress.

Strangely we speak in glowing terms when we have to speak individually about each other but when we are together it’s more difficult because we still act like 12 and 14 year-olds. It's the same to this day when I meet up with up the rest of the boys like Brian (Lara), Dwight (Yorke), Russell (Latapy and Stern John. While we are adults now we still find time to joke around or pull at each other just as we did when we were 12 or 13. It's just worth it being able to loosen the tie a little sometimes. But it’s fun and I think there is a bigger message here and I was actually speaking to Penny Commissiong about this recently. We were speaking about peers and the perception about peer pressure and it being a negative. If peer pressure is a negative or if it isn’t a positive then it’s most likely because you’ve got the wrong peers. So us as peers, we’ve been able to encourage and inspire each other despite our differences.

As I mentioned, we had no idea what brought us together as friends. I was playing sport and he was very bright. I wasn’t that academically accomplished both at my time at CIC and Howard University yet I was able to raise my game academically because of my association with Wayne and that has served me well to this day. I don’t think I could have achieved the things I eventually did academically without him as a friend and I probably couldn’t have achieved the things I did athletically without the likes of Dwight and Russell as my friends in that respect.

As much as I accept that people see my successes and the path I took during the course of my career, and of course the old cliches of me being a local icon or a role model, I just see myself as Shaka Hislop from Diamond Vale. And I made the most of my God-given talents. I made the most of lady luck shining on me and I got some breaks and I made the most of them. But I don’t see myself as being special. The message I’m trying to send here is that you don’t have to see yourself as special to chase those dreams, to have larger than life ambitions and to go after them. You just have to remain focused, have the right people around you and not get distracted. You have to have people who share your ambitions, who share your drive and who will support those dreams.

It doesn’t take an outstanding set of circumstances our outstanding ability. It just takes an outstanding effort in recognising who you are and what you want to be and recognising the challenges and in particular the opportunity and breaks when they do come.

We can use my example as I did. If you want to become a professional footballer and go onto play in Europe at the highest level, Secondary Schools football is as good a platform or foundation as there is. If you want to go on and become the next breakthrough surgeon, high school in Trinidad and Tobago is as good an academic foundation as any, especially coming from a small country.

Coming from a small country we tend to think that we don’t really  have the right infrastructure, the right support or the foundation that the others do, so therefore, chasing big dreams and big accomplishments is something for the Americans and the Europeans, that it's unique to them, and they are the only ones that have the right to it. And I say that is nonsense. We have all the tools right here in Trinidad and Tobago. It is about how we put our thoughts and abilities together to really endure everything that we will encounter during that journey. It is about pulling everything together and pushing limits in order to achieve what we are capable of.


The Howard University Board of Trustees announced on July 20th, 2020 that it has selected President Wayne A. I. Frederick, M.D., MBA to serve as the distinguished Charles R. Drew Endowed Chair of Surgery.  Dr. Frederick succeeds the late Dr. LaSalle D. Leffall, Jr. as the second person appointed to the prestigious position.

Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick was appointed the 17th President  of Howard University in 2014. He previously served as provost and chief  academic officer. A distinguished scholar and administrator, Dr.  Frederick has advanced Howard University’s commitment to student  opportunity, academic innovation, public service, and fiscal stability. 

Following his post-doctoral research and surgical oncology fellowships  at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Dr. Frederick  began his academic career as associate director of the Cancer Center at  the University of Connecticut. Upon his return to Howard University, his  academic positions included associate dean in the College of Medicine,  division chief in the Department of Surgery, director of the Cancer  Center and deputy provost for Health Sciences.  Dr. Frederick has received various awards honoring his scholarship and service.

Shaka Hislop who wrote this piece for Pushing Limits, is an ESPN Soccer analyst and standout former professional football (soccer) player who, as a dual national citizen, played for both England and his native Trinidad & Tobago, making history as the starting goalkeeper on the T&T national team’s first ever World Cup match in the 2006 FIFA World Cup in the historic 0-0 draw with Sweden in Dortmund. He was also the first member of the Trinidad & Tobago World Cup squad to be inducted into his country’s Sporting Hall of Fame.

Shaka played over 400 games in combined league and national team competition during his 15 year career. The vast majority was in the Premier League as a goalkeeper for Newcastle United, West Ham, Reading and Portsmouth. During his time at Newcastle United the team placed second in the Premier League for two successive seasons under Kevin Keegan’s first tenure. He received a FA Cup runners-up medal with West Ham when they lost to Liverpool in May 2006, less than a month before T&T's 2006 World Cup opener.
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Offline pull stones

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Re: Shaka Hislop Thread.
« Reply #62 on: July 24, 2020, 04:52:04 PM »
I promised my self to stay away from TT football if I am to maintain what ever is left of my good health. after following our football for so many years and gracefully having to endure the disappointments that followed, there has to be enormous medical implications involved for the stress we as dedicated TT football fans had to endure.

This roller coaster ride has taken its toll on countless fans over the years, those who decided to leave off their support for TT football entirely because of the constant revolving door of mismanagement and disappointment has left many of us very cynical.

it seem like problems abound all around, from the administration to the coaching staff and their woeful decision making to the local stake holders and their selfish ambitions, to the players and their shenanigans who refuse to take time to perfect their craft bringing the same lazy half hearted inept performance to the field, as well as the poor player selection leaving off the more promising prospects for the usual suspects, and now to the final straw where fifa has invited themselves the beat down to get theirs in, and all the ineptitude and willful neglect has culminating into one big poisonous mushroom cloud, and it’s too much to ignore.

I actually came here to congratulate shaka Hislop, the most up right of all our sports heroes, especially in the football arena. this man has never been contaminated by the local droppings that has been passing themselves off as football caretakers in this vine of a country where people who’s supposed to be caretakers of the sport has been nothing but neglectful and self serving.

shaka has also been savvy enough not to find himself entangled in the rope of success especially in the american sports media where I’ve seen so many bow down to the pressures of american bias, and has gracefully managed to keep his independence and integrity in tact despite the enormity of peer pressure. and I have to admit that he has once again managed to impress on those of us with integrity when him being solely the only soca warrior who has seen the fifa intervention for what us truly is and was not afraid to tell it lime it is. Kudos to you boss man, a real genuine class act.

Offline Tallman

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Re: Shaka Hislop Thread.
« Reply #63 on: December 05, 2020, 11:51:37 PM »
Ex-Newcastle star Shaka Hislop recalls vile abuse that sparked his anti-racism campaign
By Simon Bird (mirror.co.uk)


Shaka Hislop vividly recalls the youths emerging from the dark and hurling racist abuse as he filled up his car at a petrol station near St James’ Park.

It was 25 years ago this week. Kevin Keegan’s ‘Entertainers’ were heading for a 10-point Christmas lead in the Premier League and charming the ­nation with their football.

Hislop, despite being 6ft 4in, and having prepared mentally for the “macho” actions he would take if confronted, was “frozen with fear”.

He said: “When you are in front of it, you are scared, ­genuinely, for your life – no ­exaggeration. It is such a ­shuddering experience.

“Then, as they got closer, one recognised who I was, and they started singing my name and wanted ­autographs...”

It could have been left there, banked as an awful memory. Instead, it was the start of a ­25-year mission. Show Racism The Red Card was founded and has reached a million kids. These days it is Raheem ­Sterling and Marcus Rashford who speak out and take actions to confront the political and ­humanitarian issues of the day. Back then, Hislop, from ­Trinidad and Tobago, was the footballer taking a stand – in a very lasting way.

He explained: “I was a black footballer worthy of the most vile racist abuse from 50 yards away, but worthy of having my name sung from 50ft away.

“I felt the need to do ­something. I understood how highly footballers were regarded about town and how that ­platform could be used to ­challenge the stereotypes and have a discussion about race.”

He joined forces with local campaigner Ged Grebby, now Show Racism The Red Card’s chief exec. “It started with school visits. My team-mate John Beresford joined me, and we talked of our experiences and what we had learned ­sharing dressing rooms with people from all over the world.”

Hislop will mark the ­anniversary on Wednesday after a tough year. The former Toon, West Ham and Portsmouth star is now a presenter for ESPN ­and lives in the US.

“I have gone through every emotion over the past year,” he said. “The George Floyd murder hung very heavily. When we got involved in this work, it’s a promise to our children to build a better world. I felt I had failed on my promise.

“Recently my friend Leroy Rosenior said to me, ‘Shaka, you can’t feel it like that. See this as a relay. We’re ­running the third leg. It is up to us to deliver the baton to our kids in the best position, and give them the courage and confidence to run the final leg’.

“That was empowering. It shed me of the guilt I was ­feeling. We went into Boston and joined a Black Lives Matter march. You see the youth and diversity of the crowd, and the energy, and that is when I recognised what Leroy was saying.

“It’s work that was started so long ago, generations, and ­continued through the abolition of slavery and the civil rights movement. In ­football, work that Viv ­Anderson, Laurie ­Cunningham and John Barnes all did. All they had to endure.”

At Christmas, 25 years ago, Newcastle were 10 points ahead at the top of the table. ­ Manchester United clawed it back to take the trophy. Hislop recalled: “It was an intoxicating time. At least something good came out of 1995, if not a ­trophy!

“I felt if you come up short, learn, you ­eventually win it. But the disappointment was soul-crushing.

“Then the club went public (on the stock ­exchange) to raise ­capital. Kevin Keegan was replaced in the fallout.

“Instead of building on that season, we fell off track and the club has not been able to ­recover since.”

But there are powerful words on how supportive his ­team-mates were, on and off the pitch, joining in his school visits about racism.

Hislop added: “We would go out regularly, as a team. Every single player, 30 strong, from Alan Shearer and Les ­Ferdinand, to the young lads who had signed first-year contracts. That was unifying and powerful.

“And my team-mates joined the SRTRC school visits, and helped make films.

“There was no more powerful experience I could have had as a young man of 25.”
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Offline Tallman

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Re: Shaka Hislop Thread.
« Reply #64 on: December 08, 2020, 06:56:25 PM »
Shaka Hislop exclusive interview: Fans booing players taking the knee was heartbreaking - but not surprising
By Simon Collings (Evening Standard)


Shaka Hislop reflects on the shocking scenes at Millwall and Colchester, pauses for a moment and then admits the fans’ reaction to players taking a knee didn’t surprise him.

The former West Ham goalkeeper was “heartbroken” to hear fans booing players supporting the Black Lives Matter movement at The Den and the JobServe Community Stadium.

But, having worked for 25 years with anti-racism education charity Show Racism the Red Card (SRTRC), he knows how much work remains in the fight to rid the game of inequality and racism.

“It was heartbreaking, but at the same time not really surprising,” he says.

“I say that disappointingly. I firmly believe in the work that has gone for generations, for centuries. I firmly believe in the work that will continue.

“I believe in this movement and the continued show of support by taking the knee. I think that opens up conversations about our experiences, about changes that have been made for so long before and what still needs to happen.

“But it also exposes a lot of ignorance around the issue, how inequality and racism has become a part of the fabric of our society today.”

For Hislop, education is the answer and it is why he works with SRTRC — Hislop helped found them in 1995 and they celebrate their 25th anniversary tomorrow. The charity’s work centres around educating people, mainly pupils in schools, about racism.

He was playing for Newcastle at the time of the launch and sent a £50 donation to now CEO and founder Ged Grebby after being racially abused while filling up his car at a petrol station.

Grebby was working with Youth against Racism in Europe and Hislop reached out to him in the wake of his own experience, which had a defining impact on him.

“Three youths came walking over the hill, shouting racist abuse at me,” Hislop recalls. “Then as they got closer, one recognised who I was and they started to chant my name, asking if they could come over for autographs.

On the pitch, Hislop doesn’t recall directly suffering racist abuse, but he has painful memories of fearing for his wife Desha at matches.

“She was there and exposed to it — and that was frightening to me,” he says. “But how do I tell my wife, who wants to come and see me play, not too?

“But I am standing on the field and I am worried about her safety. I am concerned and you really don’t breathe out until pretty much after the game when you can get on the bus to call and make sure she’s okay.”

It is clear those memories remain strong and clear in Hislop’s mind, but equally so does his belief that racism can be eradicated. He admits, though, that this year has tested his beliefs — particularly after the death of George Floyd in the US.

The 46-year-old suffered a cardiac arrest after a police officer knelt on his neck for nine and a half minutes after he had been arrested, and his death rocked Hislop, who felt he had failed his children by not delivering a better world through his work with SRTRC.

The 51-year-old confesses he was in a “really dark place”, until fellow ex professional Leroy Rosenior spoke to him.

“Leroy said to me: ‘You have to see this as a relay. The early legs were run for generations — from slavery, post colonisation and through the Civil Rights Movement. We have run our leg and it is now our responsibility to hand that baton to our kids to continue this fight — and to finish it’.

“That was empowering and I can’t thank Leroy enough.”

Hislop is more determined than ever to make a difference through SRTRC and he is convinced football can be a force for change, even after last weekend’s events.

“I have always felt football is the perfect vehicle to challenge these issues, to be that example,” he says.

“That’s what you saw from Colchester’s chairman [Robbie Cowling, who condemned fans who booed]. Despite what happened before, he set the example for that club and he set an example for so many.

“Players have shown the way forward and credit to those players at Millwall that continue to take the knee [the team will link arms with QPR tonight and the players will hold an anti-racism banner].

“But until every aspect of our game looks and feels like our high streets, until the diversity in football matches the diversity of our high streets, I don’t think we can truly claim success.”
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Offline Tallman

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Re: Shaka Hislop Thread.
« Reply #65 on: January 05, 2021, 06:10:28 PM »
As you seek success, "be fearless in your chase." In this talk, Shaka Hislop reminds us that culture, identity, and community are powerful weapons in our journey to success. Success is yours to define. Look around and harness the resources you have it is all you need to define your success. Neil Shaka Hislop is currently the soccer analyst and commentator for ESPN. When off the air, he is a founder/patron and Honorary President of the UK’s anti-racism educational charity ‘Show Racism the Red Card’. In 2019 he founded the Second Half Sport Foundation which collects second-hand and used soccer equipment for distribution and use by the TT Police Service in their kids and community outreach programs in some of T&T’s most at-risk communities. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/jTmMxSyvx58" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/jTmMxSyvx58</a>
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Offline Flex

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Re: Shaka Hislop Thread.
« Reply #66 on: January 08, 2021, 02:33:06 AM »
Flashback: 2006 W/Cup star Shaka Hislop: ‘It’s hard for me to say how I’d want to be remembered…’
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


The following article, written by Lasana Liburd, was first published in the Trinidad Express on 15 February 2007:

For arguably the first time since Brazilian football legend, Pelé, put on a New York Cosmos shirt, the United States has turned its attention towards its own domestic league—after news that England and Real Madrid star David Beckham had signed for Los Angeles Galaxy in the US Major League Soccer (MLS) competition.

Already, ‘Becks’ has appeared on popular mainstream television show, ‘Good Morning America’, and is being wooed by Hollywood celebrities like Tom Cruise and Sylvester Stallone, while everyone from Oprah Winfrey to Jay Leno has mentioned ‘soccer’ in the past month.

In Dallas, Texas , a 37-year-old Trinidad and Tobago goalkeeper is enjoying a more low-keyed preparation for the 2007 MLS season.

Shaka Hislop, whose unassuming nature is the perfect flip-side to ‘Beckham-mania’, might not get a mention if he turned up on Hollywood Boulevard but the two share one unmistakable similarity this year. Both men are desperate to defeat time, if only a little longer.

While Beckham, 31, must match his pre-Galaxy hype in the full glare of the media, Hislop is his own harshest critic as he prepares to enchant the US soccer purists.

The former Newcastle and West Ham custodian arrived in Dallas, last summer, on the wave of an eye catching show at the 2006 World Cup but managed just four appearances with ten goals conceded as Dallas clinched the Western Division but was eliminated in the Play Offs.

“I am disappointed with my own performance in the latter half of (last) season,” said Hislop, “but I had played for 18 months straight and, at 37, it was too much to ask of me physically. I needed a break.”

If a mediocre MLS debut, coupled with Beckham’s impending arrival, means that Hislop starts 2007 outside the media spotlight, he would not be any worse for the wear. Picture a typical shrug of the shoulders and his trademark ‘no worries’ retort.

“I am always happy to go about my business quietly,” said Hislop. “We started pre-season training [last week] and I am feeling good and really looking forward to this year. There will be a lot more focus on the MLS with ‘Becks’ here but that is better for all of us.”

Beckham and Hislop know each other well and crossed swords as recently as last June in Germany.

Beckham traveled across Europe at the helm of an English team which declared itself a World Cup title contender. Hislop landed in Germany as back-up to Gillingham custodian Kelvin Jack, a relatively obscure name on the international scene.

For a few days, though, Hislop upstaged Beckham as the Soca Warriors held Sweden to a historic goalless draw and then threatened to repeat the feat against England—before falling, in controversial fashion, to two late goals.

Hislop’s performance on Trinidad and Tobago’s opening encounter drew generous praise from Sweden and Inter Milan star Zlatan Ibrahimovic although the former St Mary’s College student did not know he would play until ten minutes before kick off.

In practice sessions leading up to the match, Hislop seemed to have even fallen behind Walsall goalkeeper Clayton Ince in the pecking order.

“I left the team hotel on the afternoon of the game thinking I was number three,” said Hislop. “But, for me, Germany was about a lot more than just playing football. It was about being Trinbagonian and being a part of Trinidad and Tobago ’s first appearance on such a famous stage.

“It was just minutes before kick off that Kelvin told me he couldn’t make it and [coach] Leo [Beenhakker] said ‘get ready’. I had ten minutes to prepare and it probably suited me best because it meant there were no pre-match nerves or sleepless nights, which sometimes affect you before big games.”

Hislop described the Sweden fixture as ‘the proudest moment’ of his life as a player and a person. He paid special credit, though, to Jack who tearfully accepted that he was not fully fit and allowed Hislop the chance to shine.

“I have always said after that Kelvin’s decision was the bravest I ever saw anyone make in football,” said Hislop. “Kelvin was number one from as soon as Leo took over and I do not think we would have qualified if not for him. I knew I was [in Germany] as number two to support his confidence and help him prepare and I took my role very seriously.

“Kelvin is a strong fellah and very strong willed and, although everyone knew he was struggling [with a knee injury], I always thought he would pull through in the end. But I was quietly preparing myself just in case.”

If Hislop now seems as far removed as possible from his heroics in Dortmund, this has as much to do with the peculiar relations between the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation (T&TFF) and its World Cup stars as it does his new home address.

After 24 appearances at senior international level, eight years’ service, seven clean sheets, two Concacaf Gold Cup tournaments and one World Cup, Hislop’s journey to retirement passed without so much as a polite parting message from the T&TFF.

Apart from a cursory word about the now infamous World Cup bonus offer, new head coach Wim Rijsbergen never explained—as a mark of respect—why Hislop was no longer needed while the T&TFF failed to thank him for his services or offer him the fitting farewell received by former stand-outs like David Nakhid and Russell Latapy.

“People have come up to me [since the World Cup] and suggested that they would support the idea of a testimonial match,” he said. “But it is not something I really deliberated on. It suits me either way.”

He had more to say on the present stand-off between the World Cup players and the administration but again preferred to take a conciliatory approach.

“It is disappointing,” said Hislop, “but I think a lot of people are making more out of it than they should. It is just a disagreement and, for a long time, I have been saying that we need a PFA (players’ football association) to deal with things like this because it is not a job for players.

“These types of disagreements happen all the time in football and are dealt with quietly and professionally behind closed doors. But a lot of people in [local] football have continually fought against a footballers union and have to take responsibility for what happened.

“This whole matter should be sorted out; or I hope it is sorted out. But this dispute should set a precedent and be used as a benchmark for the set up of a players’ union.”

Hislop again raised the question of a players’ union when the Warriors returned from Germany and pointed out that Pro League chairman, Larry Romany, and chief executive officer, Dexter Skeene, pledged their support for the idea, which was ‘a big step in the right direction’.

Unfortunately, his career does not afford him the time to help, at present, but he is interested in playing a role after his retirement. Hislop, who holds a Howard degree in mechanical engineering, would be tipped to have as much success in that profession as he has enjoyed on the field.

Once Britain’s most expensive goalkeeper, when he joined Newcastle in a ₤1.75 million (TT$21.3 million) move from Reading in 1995, Hislop is easily the most famous Trinidad and Tobago player of all time between the uprights.

Former England international, David Seaman, famously signed autographs as ‘Safe Hands’ during his pomp but Hislop made no attempt to influence how others remember him.

“It is tough to say [how I would like to be remembered],” said Hislop. “I remember as a boy, Bobby De Gale, was my hero and I would go sit behind the goal in Diamond Vale and watch him save. To this day, I maintain that [former national and Defence Force goalkeeper] Ross Russell is the most talented goalkeeper that I have ever worked with.

“Those goalkeepers are barely known outside Trinidad and Tobago but had a major impact on my professional level. So [out of respect for them], it is hard for me to say how I would want to be remembered.”

Hislop’s legacy appeared to have gone largely unnoticed by the T&TFF but the six foot four custodian is a celebrated figure outside his homeland.

In April 2005, Hislop was awarded the England Players Football Association (PFA) Special Merit Award for his services to football.

To put this gong into context, the previous recipient was England ’s all-time leading scorer and ex-Manchester United legend, Bobby Charlton, while Hislop is the only the second foreign recipient of the prize since the great Pelé.

Beckham, as it were, is not the only international star in the MLS who is following the footsteps of arguably the world’s greatest player.

Naturally, Hislop’s route is less photographed.

Last December, the former US All-American student athlete stopped off at Washington DC to receive the inaugural ‘Caribbean Pathfinder Award’, which was offered by Rumors Events in honour of his ‘exemplary life’ and ‘distinctive contribution to the Caribbean community’.

Hislop, who is also the co-founder and the first Hall of Fame inductee in renowned British anti-racism group, Show Racism The Red Card, confessed that he was as proud of his mark off the field as his achievements on it.

But he has one final nut to crack.

“The MLS is definitely a higher standard than I was expecting,” said Hislop. “I think it would be unfair to compare it to the British leagues, which is a lot faster and more physical.

“But the MLS does have a lot of different styles [of play] because the US, by its very nature, attracts people from all over the world, which gives it a certain uniqueness. It is a growing game but clearly it has the ability to attract top players.”

Hislop is one such top player. Beckham had better watch out.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Tallman

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Re: Shaka Hislop Thread.
« Reply #67 on: February 04, 2021, 04:16:55 PM »
Wired868 launches its first podcast, The Burdie & Barney Show, with a special guest: ESPN analyst and former England Premier League goalkeeper and Trinidad and Tobago 2006 World Cup star Shaka Hislop!

Listen to the extended B&B pilot as Hislop reveals why he turned down Manchester United, players’ rights in the Caribbean, the day that then West Ham manager Harry Redknapp laid down the law, and what Russell Latapy’s career owes to a certain former Fatima College right back!
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: Shaka Hislop Thread.
« Reply #68 on: February 04, 2021, 07:04:56 PM »
Wired868 launches its first podcast, The Burdie & Barney Show, with a special guest: ESPN analyst and former England Premier League goalkeeper and Trinidad and Tobago 2006 World Cup star Shaka Hislop!

Listen to the extended B&B pilot as Hislop reveals why he turned down Manchester United, players’ rights in the Caribbean, the day that then West Ham manager Harry Redknapp laid down the law, and what Russell Latapy’s career owes to a certain former Fatima College right back!

I started listening to this last week but didn't have the time to dedicate to the full episode, but returned to it today when I saw the upcoming episode previewed.

Good production. Two comments and experiences come to mind. Will share one and leave the comment about Spain for another time.

A comment was made about 8 year olds and documentation of play. There is generally an exception to almost every rule. The case of Uruguay stands out. Some time back I posted snippets about my experiences there and alluded to the intensity in that age group. Unlike anything else I've seen. View these videos. One is from 2014 and the other is from a few weeks ago. Note that these kids are playing (Richard G) and note the calibre. I am yet to see another country with football as democratic and omnipresent as it is in Uruguay.

Anyhow, I raise that because of the discussion. I know of a very, very, very good coach who is a documenting machine in this age group. He documents and that information becomes useful down the road. Three, four, five years later. A cumulation of info exists about each player as the player moves up the ladder. Documentation is a function of knowing what to document.

Ignore the language, take in the scene or maybe subtitles if that helps.

https://cnnespanol.cnn.com/video/baby-futbol-menores-uruguay-pkg-dario-klein/

3 million population; 65,000 playing in these age groups 6-13 each weekend and 600 clubs across the country. Emphasis: win.


<a href="https://youtube.com/v/c2L6fZqFPaY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://youtube.com/v/c2L6fZqFPaY</a>

« Last Edit: February 04, 2021, 07:06:53 PM by asylumseeker »
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Offline Flex

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Re: Shaka Hislop Thread.
« Reply #69 on: February 24, 2021, 02:12:23 AM »
Hislop wants grit, determination of T&T football.
By Walter Alibey (T&T Guardian).


The intricacies of T&T's preparation ahead of the opening World Cup qualifier against Guyana on March 25 in the Dominican Republic is having little to no effect on former national goalkeeper, now ESPN football analyst Shaka Hislop.

The former St Mary's graduate who has stood between the uprights for the Soca Warriors for more than two World Cup Qualifiers, told Guardian Media Sports in an interview on Tuesday that he is eager to see a performance that says that T&T football has found its resilience once more.

Local football has been hard-hit by improper preparation that stems from a persistent coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, which has hampered the Normalisation Committee to secure warm-up matches, and has prevented T&T from gaining home advantage against the Guyanese on March 25.

Hislop, who played at the 2006 World Cup in Germany said he has been disheartened by the negative reactions to the series of set-backs in the World Cup campaign to date, most of which have questioned the ability of the team to earn a qualifying berth, without a ball being kicked.

The normalisation committee, being led by businessman Robert Hadad announced on Saturday that the T&T vs Guyana World Cup match was moved from T&T and will now be played in the Dominican Republic, a decision that came after sports and community development minister Shamfa Cudjoe told the public that the home-match would not get the approval of the government and the Ministry of Health, if the country's international players, who are expected in for the match, were not subjected to a mandatory quarantine period.

Shaka, a former English Premier League custodian with West Ham United said it is from these challenges that the country's footballers can capitalise.

"It's giving us an opportunity to prove to ourselves that we can adjust, we can adapt whatever the circumstance. For me, the kind of excuse-making and finger-pointing that is happening now, before we've kicked a single ball, points to a lot more than just the Normalisation Committee or the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Sports and the T&T Football Association, not being in sync. We have got to take these punches and roll with them. To see how we've reacted is a little disappointing to me, looking in from the outside," Hislop said.

Shaka, who celebrated his 52nd birthday on Monday and who is very outspoken on T&T football further stated: "I hope to see a performance and a result to show that our football has found its resilience again. After the disappointment of 2019 and those disappointing results, we need to show that we can bounce back. We needed to show that we're able to raise our game against both lesser and better opposition, that we're prepared to roll our sleeves up and fight and grind results out in a way that I don't think we've done since the US qualifier for Russia 2018."

The T&T footballers resumed training for this country's 2022 Qatar World Cup final on February 17 with a 23-player training squad under coach Terry Fenwick after the team's 7-0 drubbing in a friendly international match against the USA on January 31 in the USA.

The Soca Warriors opening match against Guyana will be played at a neutral venue in the Dominican Republic which do not have COVID-19 quarantine protocols.

Following the Guyana match, the Soca Warriors will play their next two matches away to Puerto Rico on March 28 and then the Bahamas on April 5. They will complete the group phase with a match against St Kitts/Nevis on April 8 at home, needing to top the group to be able to advance.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Tallman

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Re: Shaka Hislop Thread.
« Reply #70 on: March 22, 2021, 05:09:14 AM »
WATCH: Shaka Hislop calls for UEFA to take meaningful action on racial abuse. He shares his thoughts on Glen Kamara's claims of racial abuse during Rangers' match vs. Slavia Prague.
The Conquering Lion of Judah shall break every chain.