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Author Topic: Tobago News.  (Read 7714 times)

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Offline Socapro

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Re: Tobago gets billionaire visit
« Reply #30 on: October 17, 2015, 08:58:56 AM »
It 's clear that this is a painful subject for some, but it's reality for others. I won't press it as it will result in further childish name calling and others branding me racist (which is the norm here). Rather than see this as  a problem which  needs addressing. We talk about "Tourism" and we can't even get it right with local tourism.. forget the foreign market at this point.

And I'm the brainwashed idiot.
 

No one is branding you racist. We are simply describing what you are implying.
If that points to you sounding racist then you need to look in the mirror.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2015, 09:00:44 AM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline Deeks

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Re: Tobago gets billionaire visit
« Reply #31 on: October 17, 2015, 09:06:14 AM »
Forumites, we should not discount jumbie's account of his personal experience in Tobago. It is his experience. I have not been to Tobago in about 10 yrs. But in the early 70s, I spent memorable "august holidays" around Bacolet. That beach was mines. The people were nice. Yes they spoke different from Trinis.

But I remember some Tobagonian having a disdain for Trinis who came there with an attitude. I remember me and some PTSC buddies went there for a week, and we left Pigeon Point beach and was rushing to catch the bus back to Scarborough. The driver told us we had to get the sand of our feet. The Tobagonian in our group told the driver "Aye, we working PTSC". The driver put the bus in gear and left us standing right there.

We had to walk. On our we sat by the side of the road and again our Tobago member was trying to hitch a ride in a bare back state. A car was coming and it slow down and stopped. The driver, a proper and well driven man came a berated the group for " ole nigger behavior ". And promptly DEMANDED that our Tobago group member put back on his shirt. And in departing he advised us, when coming to Tobago, we should leave our Trinidadian attitude when the boat past Toco.

By the way, remember the bus driver who left us stranded? Well, made his trip and met us again. "Allyuh clean now, come in"
« Last Edit: October 17, 2015, 09:13:26 AM by Deeks »

Offline Socapro

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Re: Tobago gets billionaire visit
« Reply #32 on: October 17, 2015, 09:12:54 AM »
Forumites, we should not discount jumbie's account of his personal experience in Tobago. It is his experience. I have not been to Tobago in about 10 yrs. But in the early 70s, I spent memorable "august holidays" around Bacolet. That beach was mines. The people were nice. Yes they spoke different from Trinis.

But I remember some Tobagonian have a disdain for Trinis who came there with an attitude. I remember me and some PTSC buddies went there for a week and we left Pigeon Point beach and was rushing to catch the bus back to Scarborough. The driver told we had to get the sand of our feet. The Tobagonians in the group told the driver "Aye, we working PTSC". The driver put the bus in gear and left us standing right there".

We had to walk. On our we sat by the side of the road and again our Tobago member was trying to hitch a ride in a bare back state. A car was coming and it slow down and stopped. The driver, a proper and well driven man came a berated the group for " ole nigger behavior ". And promptly DEMANDED that our Tobago group member put back on his shirt. And in departing he advised us, when coming to Tobago, we should leave our Trinidadian attitude when the boat past Toco.

By the way, remember the bus driver who left us stranded? Well, made his trip and met us again. "Allyuh clean now, come in"

Nice story which seems to have more to do with Tobagonians having a bias against Trinidadians and even fellow Tobagonians with a bad attitude rather than having anything to do with nationality or one's race.

What I have observed over the years is that since Tobagonians have recognised that they have been earning a larger and larger share of their tourists dollars from visting Trinidadians is that their attitude towards visiting Trinidadians have generally improved a whole lot.

It is now at a stage where I generally find Tobagonians to be much friendlier than Trinidadians as someone who is a born Trinidadian. In fact Trinidadians can learn a lot from Tobagonians at this point about being more patriotic and protective towards our island.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2015, 09:38:10 AM by Socapro »
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Offline Sando prince

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Re: Tobago gets billionaire visit
« Reply #33 on: October 17, 2015, 09:17:07 AM »
Forumites, we should not discount jumbie's account of his personal experience in Tobago. It is his experience. I have not been to Tobago in about 10 yrs. But in the early 70s, I spent memorable "august holidays" around Bacolet. That beach was mines. The people were nice. Yes they spoke different from Trinis.

But I remember some Tobagonian having a disdain for Trinis who came there with an attitude. I remember me and some PTSC buddies went there for a week, and we left Pigeon Point beach and was rushing to catch the bus back to Scarborough. The driver told us we had to get the sand of our feet. The Tobagonian in our group told the driver "Aye, we working PTSC". The driver put the bus in gear and left us standing right there.

We had to walk. On our we sat by the side of the road and again our Tobago member was trying to hitch a ride in a bare back state. A car was coming and it slow down and stopped. The driver, a proper and well driven man came a berated the group for " ole nigger behavior ". And promptly DEMANDED that our Tobago group member put back on his shirt. And in departing he advised us, when coming to Tobago, we should leave our Trinidadian attitude when the boat past Toco.

By the way, remember the bus driver who left us stranded? Well, made his trip and met us again. "Allyuh clean now, come in"

This was Jumbie's first comment. Seem as if he was expressing more than just a personal experience to me

first Indian (looking) to get good treatment in Bago. $$ talks!

Offline Socapro

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Re: Tobago gets billionaire visit
« Reply #34 on: October 17, 2015, 09:28:47 AM »
Forumites, we should not discount jumbie's account of his personal experience in Tobago. It is his experience. I have not been to Tobago in about 10 yrs. But in the early 70s, I spent memorable "august holidays" around Bacolet. That beach was mines. The people were nice. Yes they spoke different from Trinis.

But I remember some Tobagonian having a disdain for Trinis who came there with an attitude. I remember me and some PTSC buddies went there for a week, and we left Pigeon Point beach and was rushing to catch the bus back to Scarborough. The driver told us we had to get the sand of our feet. The Tobagonian in our group told the driver "Aye, we working PTSC". The driver put the bus in gear and left us standing right there.

We had to walk. On our we sat by the side of the road and again our Tobago member was trying to hitch a ride in a bare back state. A car was coming and it slow down and stopped. The driver, a proper and well driven man came a berated the group for " ole nigger behavior ". And promptly DEMANDED that our Tobago group member put back on his shirt. And in departing he advised us, when coming to Tobago, we should leave our Trinidadian attitude when the boat past Toco.

By the way, remember the bus driver who left us stranded? Well, made his trip and met us again. "Allyuh clean now, come in"

This was Jumbie's first comment. Seem as if he was expressing more than just a personal experience to me

first Indian (looking) to get good treatment in Bago. $$ talks!

As I said that is a very loaded statement bordering on trying to brand Tobago people as being racist against Indians.

No wonder Brownsugar reacted as she did.

first Indian (looking) to get good treatment in Bago. $$ talks!

From the heart of my Tobagonian bottom, you're a firetrucking idiot!!......

Jumbie cannot win this one. If he had any sense he would already have withdrawn his comment and apologized for trying to generally brand Tobago people as racist based on his own biased thinking.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2015, 09:42:34 AM by Socapro »
De higher a monkey climbs is de less his ass is on de line, if he works for FIFA that is! ;-)

Offline Bakes

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Re: Tobago gets billionaire visit
« Reply #35 on: October 17, 2015, 10:02:31 AM »
first Indian (looking) to get good treatment in Bago. $$ talks!

From the heart of my Tobagonian bottom, you're a firetrucking idiot!!......

And this is why you and I does get along, yuh not afraid to call bullshit for what it is.  I watching people give this man a pass for his clearly offensive statement against Tobagonians and just shaking my head.

Offline Bakes

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Re: Tobago gets billionaire visit
« Reply #36 on: October 17, 2015, 10:05:09 AM »
and you said.. "I personally know of Afro-Trinis who received shabby treatment in Tobgo simply because they were not viewed by the locals as having loads of money to spend."

so you're saying the people of Tobago are?

my experience is MINES! spin how ever you want.

Your experience is yours, but you didn't say "first Indian I know of who get good treatment in Tobago"... you made it broader than that by implying such a thing has never happened before, not just in your experience, but ever.  You are a f**king idiot... if nobody else have the guts to say it.

Offline Socapro

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Re: Tobago gets billionaire visit
« Reply #37 on: October 17, 2015, 10:09:27 AM »
and you said.. "I personally know of Afro-Trinis who received shabby treatment in Tobgo simply because they were not viewed by the locals as having loads of money to spend."

so you're saying the people of Tobago are?

my experience is MINES! spin how ever you want.

Your experience is yours, but you didn't say "first Indian I know of who get good treatment in Tobago"... you made it broader than that by implying such a thing has never happened before, not just in your experience, but ever.  You are a f**king idiot... if nobody else have the guts to say it.
:beermug:
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Offline Flex

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Re: Tobago News.
« Reply #38 on: July 30, 2017, 03:20:58 AM »
Buccoo Estate acquired for $174 million
T&T Guardian Reports.


Government has purchased the controversial Buccoo Estate in Tobago, popularly known as No Man’s Land, for $174, 806,775 million.

The 398.42 acre property, which is listed as one of the CL Financial’s (CLF) assets, was sold earlier this year. Each acre was valued at US$65,000, bringing the total value of the secluded property to US$25,897,300.

In 2016, Clico carried on its balance sheet the value of the land at roughly $187 million. The transfer agreement was completed on March 2017.

However, at a press conference last week, Carlton Reis, who represents CL Financial shareholders under the group United Shareholders Ltd, had estimated the land at $500 million.

Clico Policyholders Group chairman Peter Permell, in a July 16 Sunday Guardian article, said a Project Rebirth report prepared by PricewaterhouseCoppers estimated the fair market value of the property at approximately $867 million.

The land will be offered to Sandals chairman Gordon “Butch” Stewart for the construction of two hotel resorts comprising 750 rooms.

Yesterday, Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley confirmed Government purchased the property at market value. He said an issue was raised recently about Government’s taking possession of the CLF assets, noting it was argued that what was on the books was not the real value and Government should have sought a valuation.

“But it was said that the lands we took in Tobago in lieu of the debt and set off against the debt might have been improperly done and the value might not have been established properly. Let me today put that to rest,” he said.

“The Government, quite properly, through the relevant authority in all of this, the board set off the monies owed for the value of those land. And the value was established by reputable independent valuators in Trinidad and Tobago. And that is the value at which the Government’s debt was reduced by virtue of the value of this land.”

The PM warned all those who have been saying the Government took possession of the land and paid “half X for it... nothing is further from the truth. The law requires that any disposal of assets under the Central Bank, as it is now holding assets for Clico…any disposal requires fair market value. And that is exactly what we got in that.

He said the valuation was based on an analysis of 100 per cent of the common stock of Occidental Investments Ltd and Oceanic Properties Ltd, owned by Clico.

Rowley said a lot of misinformation was being put out in the public domain by people who were unaware “but who are fuelling conspiracies and ascribing misconduct to the Government” was misleading.

“Those lands would have been acquired by the Government at full market value established by reputable valuators.”

Rowley left a copy of the valuation for the media’s perusal, but did not field questions about the land.


The Buccoo Estate in Tobago, popularly known as No Man's Land, which was purchased by government for $174, 806,775 million.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Flex

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Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #39 on: September 04, 2017, 12:02:40 PM »
Bridge to Tobago a good option
By Charles Kong Soo (Guardian).


Possible with China’s help, says ex-banker

With the current woes on the sea bridge between Trinidad and Tobago, coupled with a shaky air bridge which leaves Tobagonians and travellers alike marooned on a day to day basis, former Scotiabank managing director Richard Young says a bridge linking Toco to Tobago should be seriously considered and can be done without putting the country in debt.

During the run-up to the general elections on September 7, 2015, then prime minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar had suggested that a suspension bridge could be built from Toco to Tobago, but then Opposition Leader Dr Keith Rowley had countered that no amount of money in the western hemisphere and no engineering known to man could pay for or build such a bridge.

In recent times, however, Rowley has suggested that Government was now considering a port at Toco as another option to alleviating the issue. In fact, last week after Tobago House of Assemyl Minostiry leader Watson Duke staged his swim protest from Tobago to Trinidad, the PM noted that Duke’s journey had only bolstered Government’s argument for such a project.

But Young told the T&T Guardian that the real solution for the sea and air bridge woes was through a bridge, adding this feat can come from the East using Chinese technology, resources and funding.

Speaking from his office at the T&T International Financial Centre (TTIFC) at the International Waterfront Centre, Port-of- Spain, Young highlighted China’s multi-billion-dollar One Belt One Road Initiative (OBOR).

The Belt and Road initiative was proposed by Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2013, when he visited T&T and offered concessionary loans to not only this country but other Caribbean nations totalling approximately US$3 billion.

OBOR aims to link Asia with Europe, Africa and other countries around the world along ancient land-based and maritime trade routes through various trade and infrastructure projects.

Bridge not an impossibility

Describing himself as a private citizen, Young said, “Building a bridge to Tobago along 19 miles is not an impossibility, the cost may be prohibitive in the region of US$1.5 billion.

“But the Chinese have the technology, they have built bridges, highways, airports, new cities, artificial islands and train systems in China and other countries.”

He added: “I have travelled on the Donghai Bridge leaving Shanghai, one of the longest cross-sea bridges in the world with a total length of 20.2 miles (32.5 kilometres) of a six-lane highway leading to the offshore Yangshan Deep-Water Port.

“The port has an LNG regasification plant, over 700 gantries, is still expanding and there were more than 20 wind turbines generating electricity.”

He said if such a bridge was built here there would also be the opportunity to start getting involved in renewable energy.

Young said the bridge to Tobago could be modelled after the $730 million four-lane 67.2-km-long North-South toll highway in Jamaica, which links the capital Kingston in the South with the tourist city of Ocho Rios in the North. That bridge was built and funded by a Chinese company, China Harbour Engineering Company (CHEC), and has reduced a two-hour drive by less than half. He said CHEC took all the financial risks and in return Jamaica gave it a 50-year concession to recover its costs, by awarding it land alongside the highway for the same period of time to develop for residential and commercial use through the establishment of a resort hotel. He said the T&T Government could enter into similar public-private partnerships (PPP) with Chinese companies and businesses for a win-win situation.

Young said such a project had the potential to create an improvement in productivity and provide a stimulant to the economy of Tobago.

He said given the extensive investments made by the Chinese government and businesses in Latin America and the Caribbean, it would be easy to convince them to invest in such a project if they were given an incentive.

However, Young said one of the conditions for the joint venture was that there should be some form of local content, and while T&T had very formidable construction companies they had to make sure there was efficiency, productivity and value for money.

Senior lecturer in transportation engineering in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at The University of the West Indies’ St Augustine campus, Dr Trevor Townsend, says the most feasible transport method to Tobago in the shortest time frame for implementation and lowest capital investment was currently the ferry.

Expert — Ferry still best option

He said the proposal to create a physical land bridge from Toco to Tobago would require major capital investment, incur recurring expenditure, operating costs and demand in service will have to be determined whether such a project was feasible in the medium to long term.

Townsend said T&T’s ferry problems were not an insurmountable challenge, noting other Caribbean islands operated ferries and this country had been operating a ferry service since the 1900s, noting the current woes were more of a planning and procurement issue.

However, he said questions had to be answered as to why the country was in a position of crisis scrambling to get a boat to operate.

When asked if large, amphibious military transport planes can be used in the air bridge, Townsend said the distance between Trinidad and Tobago was too short and the country was not going to get economies of operation out of the use of such aircraft.

Inter-island Trailers and Truckers’ Association Horace Amede said a bridge linking Toco to Tobago could be done, but the cost of maintenance and the toll to travel on it had to be considered.

Tobago Chamber of Commerce president Demi John Cruickshank meanwhile said during former prime minister Patrick Manning’s tenure a feasibility study was done on a bridge proposal. He said Tobago cannot afford another ferry fiasco to ever happen again and he would welcome all discussions for a solution to Tobago’s sea bridge woes.

Former transport minister John Humphrey meanwhile said a bridge won’t be worthwhile because of the country’s relatively small population.

Noting that the US now owed China more than US$1 trillion, he said he was involved in several mega-projects with investment from two Chinese banks but they had insisted on transparency when dealing with various T&T governments that came into power.

Humphrey said a port in Toco that would have increased production and development in the area was promised by the NAR government but never materialised.

He said a port was also being considered when Sadiq Baksh was works minister in the United National Congress under Basdeo Panday and was a feasible idea because when a road is built to Toco all the land adjacent to that road is usable and the road should be designed to accommodate a settlement.

But Humphrey said a land bridge spanning from Toco to Tobago was not feasible. He said while in Jamaica you may have a lot of traffic to support the cost of that highway built by the Chinese there, you will not get that volume of traffic in T&T to justify financing such an expensive project.

Humphrey said plans were presented to the People’s Partnership government and prime minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar at the beginning of her term.

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Offline Deeks

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #40 on: September 05, 2017, 09:33:30 AM »
If they can't manage the Caroni bridge or maintain the dry river, they go build a bridge from toco t o s'boro?

Offline Deeks

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #41 on: September 05, 2017, 09:55:57 AM »
Most feasible to me is a port at Toco. It should be supplemented by 2 roads. The existing road should be widened to accommodate the expected traffic. A toll road from Grande to Toco should also be built. Something like the NJ turnpike. The cost of this project maybe quarter of the price of the road from Toco to S'boro.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2017, 09:59:12 AM by Deeks »

Offline Brownsugar

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #42 on: September 10, 2017, 07:50:46 AM »
Most feasible to me is a port at Toco. It should be supplemented by 2 roads. The existing road should be widened to accommodate the expected traffic. A toll road from Grande to Toco should also be built. Something like the NJ turnpike. The cost of this project maybe quarter of the price of the road from Toco to S'boro.

There is a plan to build a highway to Toco.......
"...If yuh clothes tear up
Or yuh shoes burst off,
You could still jump up when music play.
Old lady, young baby, everybody could dingolay...
Dingolay, ay, ay, ay ay,
Dingolay ay, ay, ay..."

RIP Shadow....The legend will live on in music...

Offline Deeks

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #43 on: September 10, 2017, 12:36:30 PM »
Most feasible to me is a port at Toco. It should be supplemented by 2 roads. The existing road should be widened to accommodate the expected traffic. A toll road from Grande to Toco should also be built. Something like the NJ turnpike. The cost of this project maybe quarter of the price of the road from Toco to S'boro.

There is a plan to build a highway to Toco.......

From Grande, l presume!

Offline Brownsugar

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #44 on: September 10, 2017, 01:08:03 PM »
Most feasible to me is a port at Toco. It should be supplemented by 2 roads. The existing road should be widened to accommodate the expected traffic. A toll road from Grande to Toco should also be built. Something like the NJ turnpike. The cost of this project maybe quarter of the price of the road from Toco to S'boro.

There is a plan to build a highway to Toco.......

From Grande, l presume!
Yup....that's the plan if I'm not mistaken....

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

"...If yuh clothes tear up
Or yuh shoes burst off,
You could still jump up when music play.
Old lady, young baby, everybody could dingolay...
Dingolay, ay, ay, ay ay,
Dingolay ay, ay, ay..."

RIP Shadow....The legend will live on in music...

Offline pull stones

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #45 on: September 10, 2017, 03:15:41 PM »
thus guy us a moron. you can't build a bridge in deep water the Japanese have tried and failed. last election Kamla spoke about building a bridge to tobago and it was scuffed at because of the depth of waters between the islands its simply a bad idea.

Offline Jumbie

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #46 on: September 11, 2017, 09:36:49 AM »
how deep is the water?

Offline Deeks

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #47 on: September 11, 2017, 04:54:30 PM »
how deep is the water?

Jumble, I honestly don't know. You know the bridge could well be built, but think about the operational and maintenance costs of the bridge. You know we have a good reputation when it comes to maintenance. The govt can't even manage wasa, ttech, petrotrin, cal, schools and civil servants, etc. Right now only China can build and maintain a structure like that.

Offline Jumbie

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #48 on: September 11, 2017, 09:15:30 PM »
Was just curious about the depth since it was mentioned that it's too deep. Fully agree with you Deeks (management, maintenance etc).


Offline maxg

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #49 on: September 12, 2017, 11:59:36 PM »
Was just curious about the depth since it was mentioned that it's too deep. Fully agree with you Deeks (management, maintenance etc).


http://www.fishtrack.com/fishing-charts/trinidad-and-tobago_100102

Offline Brownsugar

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #50 on: October 02, 2017, 06:46:57 AM »
Most feasible to me is a port at Toco. It should be supplemented by 2 roads. The existing road should be widened to accommodate the expected traffic. A toll road from Grande to Toco should also be built. Something like the NJ turnpike. The cost of this project maybe quarter of the price of the road from Toco to S'boro.

There is a plan to build a highway to Toco.......

From Grande, l presume!
Uuuuuuummmmm.....ah think so....

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

"...If yuh clothes tear up
Or yuh shoes burst off,
You could still jump up when music play.
Old lady, young baby, everybody could dingolay...
Dingolay, ay, ay, ay ay,
Dingolay ay, ay, ay..."

RIP Shadow....The legend will live on in music...

Offline Flex

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #51 on: October 18, 2017, 08:45:25 AM »
China unveils US$15Bn mega bridge
T&T Guardian Reports
By AKASH SAMAROO.


Engineering marvel could be answer to domestic travel woes in T&T

The idea of building a bridge over the Caribbean Sea to connect Trinidad with Tobago is not a new one.

However, it may not be one that the current administration is troubling itself with at the moment.

As Opposition Leader in 2015, Dr Keith Rowley said no amount of money in the Western Hemisphere and no engineering known to man could pay for or build such a bridge which would have to at least be 30 kilometres long.

Two years later, the Chinese Government is mere months away from opening such an engineering marvel in the Eastern Hemisphere. It’s called the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge.

The 55-kilometre roadway, reportedly the longest in the world, will connect three areas which were previously accessed by ferries, cutting down transportation time significantly.

In fact, according to Chinese officials, the journey between Zhuhai and Hong Kong will now be 30 minutes compared to the three hours it took by ferry. Construction started in 2009 over the Ling Ting Sea.

Guardian Media was given a tour of the yet to be opened causeway and officials were asked: “Can this be built over the Caribbean Sea?’”

While officials said they were unaware of the exact specifications of the water’s activity in that area they believe it can be done.

The officials also pointed out that the asphalt used to construct the roadway came from the Pitch Lake in Trinidad.

The project did come at a high price—around US$15 billion.

T&T could access some funding from the Chinese Government itself for a project of that magnitude. At a press conference in Guangdong Province, China’s strongest economic area, Deputy Director General of the Guangdong Department of Commerce, Wang Tao said one of the province’s proposals for strengthening ties with Latin America and the Caribbean would be to give more support from national funds for infrastructural development.

While he could not give an exact figure of how much funds are in that reserve he did say funding would be in the form of credit from China’s National Development Bank or its Import Export Bank.

A more precise figure was given by the Chinese President Xi Xinping, in 2013 when as part of his One Belt One Road Initiative, he announced that up to US$3 billion was available to Latin America and the Caribbean for projects like this.

The bridge will also be a toll road and those funds are expected to be used for maintenance.

There have been counter-arguments for such a project. Former Transport Minister John Humphrey told the T&T Guardian last month that a bridge would not be worthwhile because of the country’s small population while senior lecturer in transportation engineering in the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at the University of the West Indies’ St Augustine campus, Dr Trevor Townsend said it would require major capital investment and incur high recurring expenditure.

Both believed a ferry service was still the best option.

If T&T does decide to look into this option, it would be a costly venture that would require several years and immense manpower. However, given the inconsistencies with the existing ferry service on the seabridge, the answer in fixing the connection between two close land masses might lie in the Far East.


Hong Kong -Zhuhai- Macao Bridge Photo by:Xinhua News Agency

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Offline Deeks

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #52 on: October 18, 2017, 11:33:21 AM »
Impressive. Very impressive. But a ferry from Toco to S'Boro is the best option.

Offline Bourbon

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #53 on: October 18, 2017, 12:15:20 PM »
I would be skeptical about a bridge for the simple reason that it requires long term planning...maturity and foresight.
That Chinese bridge started in 2009....basically straddling two elections and potentially two governments. AT 15 Billion the funding would either need to be in the form of a loan and such...and depending on who did it and when.....would have another  set of row.

If it is done then it absolutely has to be a toll bridge. Then the water is another issue....I've heard the sea floor is another concern due to the plate margins.
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Offline Deeks

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #54 on: October 18, 2017, 05:11:12 PM »
I presume that is 15 billion US. That is a lot of money. There are so many things that can be done with that kind of money, especially right now. The Chinese can do anything(beneficial or not) because it is a totalitarian country. Look at the opposition to the rapid rail in TT. Granted the PNM screwed that up themselves.  In China, is off with your head, if you oppose govt policy. But it is damn impressive, I must say. But getting back to the ferry from Toco to S'Boro. 30 mins at least in good weather using a fast ferry. Building roads to Toco, a new port in Toco , improving the port in S'Boro, and acquiring 4 fast ferry may cost, maybe a, 2 to 3 billion. I think I am going overbudget here.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2017, 05:24:44 PM by Deeks »

Offline soccerman

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Re: Bridge to Tobago a good option
« Reply #55 on: October 18, 2017, 08:39:09 PM »
I think our population is too small for that type of infrastructure, how many people will use it on a daily basis where we the revenue from the tolls will be worthwhile? Like Deeks said for that significant cost and state of the economy, there's a lot more pressing areas we can invest in.

Offline Flex

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Re: Tobago News.
« Reply #56 on: March 23, 2018, 09:25:38 AM »
Cabinet gives green light for new $500 million Tobago airport terminal
cnc3.co.tt


Finance Minister Clm Imbert has announced that the Cabinet has agreed to begin the construction of a new terminal building for the ANR Robinson Airport in Tobago, by the end of this year.

It's expected to cost $500 million, but the acquisition of property is not included in that figure.

He made the announcement at today's post-Cabinet media conference.

While the current terminal building is located at the start of the runway, the new terminal will be located at the end of the runway.

Minister Imbert told the media that a new road will be built to connect Shirvan Road to the Claude Noel highway, to allow for easy access to all.

Work will also be done to ensure that the airport can access wide-bodied aircraft.

The construction will be done via a Build-Own-Lease-Transfer (BOLT) arrangement.

Minister Imbert said the deadline for awarding the contract will be around August 2018 and the construction must begin by the end of 2018.

The new airport terminal is expected to be completed before the end of the year 2019.

"We expect when this is finished, something long overdue in Tobago for many years will become a reality," the minister said.

"So many years, so many governments have spoken about a new terminal for Tobago. Well, this govt is going to do it," he ended.

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Offline Flex

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Re: Tobago News.
« Reply #57 on: March 24, 2018, 04:43:30 AM »
Seabridge woes cost Tobago businesses $750m.
By Rosemarie Sant (Guardian).


In the past year, Tobago businesses have suffered over $750 million in losses and the country has spent millions of dollars to fix the seabridge problem. But as of today the crisis continues and now, businesses are saying without a Government bailout or some sort of assistance there is no hope of recovery.

Business owners in Tobago yesterday told the T&T Guardian they now face the opposite problem to what they did in the period May to July last year. Back then they had problems getting goods to stock their shelves and some shelves were empty, but today they say their shelves are stocked “but the customers are just not there.”

Supermarket owners said “goods are now expiring on our hands.” In addition, they say it now makes no sense stocking freezers with meats and other cold products and warehouses are stocked with goods that are not being sold.

Business owners said the estimated $750 million in losses excludes businesses forced to close their doors or repossessed by the banks.

Scores of workers have also been sent home and with a growing unemployment and crime on the island, business owners say the time has come for Government “to step up to the plate.”

Several business owners said they are hoping Government will come up with a “viable bailout plan and get us back our credit rating because they have destroyed our credit rating.” They are advocating “compensation for losses suffered,” because they claim the banks are not extending any facilities to the business community and people continue to get foreclosure notices. They added that their credit rating is gone, they are “no longer bankable,” they are now experiencing a credit crunch and things continue to “look bleak because the economy has totally contracted.”

Even the conglomerates are affected.

ANSA McAL Group of Companies deputy chairman Andrew Sabga told the group’s annual stockbrokers meeting on Thursday, “The big problem is demand has significantly curbed because people are having problems getting to and from Tobago.”

Sabga said a “large portion of the consumption is tourists and non-Tobagonian arrivals.”

But despite the losses suffered by the Tobago business community, Tobago East Member of Parliament Ayanna Webster-Roy insisted in Parliament that all was well.

However, bed and breakfast owners say their businesses have declined and Hotel and Tourism Association president Chris James says Tobago had suffered massively and he expects the low occupancy levels which have plagued the island’s hotel sector to continue.

Newly-appointed Tobago Chamber chairman Claude Benoit said he was saddened by the situation, noting it had destroyed the confidence of people in Tobago.

“There is no credibility, people are not even thinking of coming to Tobago because they don’t know how they will get back and vice versa. The question is how long will it take to build back confidence in the system that they have destroyed? That is the main issue,” Benoit said.

Benoit said restoring confidence in the Tobago economy is “what will start to spur the economy for things to start happening. It is very serious and when you listen to others who say there are no problems in Tobago I don’t know.”

He said the Chamber had agreed to set up a team with the Tobago House of Assembly to help address the problems faced by the business community on the island. A report presented by economist Vanus James, he said, recommended that “we work with the THA and talk to the Minister of Finance to come up with the necessary funding to help the businesses.”

With banks no longer assisting businesses, he admitted there is an “urgency to the situation.”

As to the T&T Spirit not returning to the seabridge as promised yesterday, Benoit said he found it “alarming.”

“We are just hoping that those who are responsible just do their work and do it well so it could save the island going further down. Because can you imagine this now being Easter, this is one of the biggest holidays for the island and we don’t have a ferry to bring people here? It’s a very sad situation.”

Owner of Penny Savers Supermarkets Lloyd Warner said as a citizen, what has happened in the last year with the seabridge is an “insult for every Tobagonian, that’s an insult as far as I am concerned, treating people like this.”

He said the pain of what has happened is “so severe” that it needs to be dealt with immediately, “because I personally cannot look further than what is happening right now. Because that is the main thing.”

Warner said the seabridge was the “lifeline for Tobago, it is like someone telling you they will block off your nose and tell you to breathe, it is the main thing that is life.”

Responding to Webster-Roy’s position that no one in Tobago is suffering, Warner said, “Because we don’t protest by burning tyres and saying enough is enough, that says we are not suffering?”

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Offline maxg

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Re: Tobago News.
« Reply #58 on: May 23, 2018, 11:25:06 PM »
I need a quick Geography or Nautical lesson please. Or maybe I miss some info.

"THE Galleons Passage made it through the Panama Canal yesterday and began heading for Santiago de Cuba, but with heavy rainclouds hanging over it and fears that it might get caught smack bang in the middle of a developing storm in the Caribbean Sea.......Satellite tracking saw the boat at 6.30 am yesterday exiting the canal, then moving along the coast of Cacique, Colombia. It will sail for the next four days to get to Santiago, on the southeastern coast of Cuba.
.....
The Meteorological Office at Piarco confirmed the pattern of what is described as “bad weather” when the Galleons Passage passes between Jamaica and Haiti en route to Santiago de Cuba. However, it said there was a likelihood of the wind blowing northwards and the boat is likely to avoid most of the weather systems
"

This boat come thru the Panama Canal.Along the coast of Colombia (where is Cacique anyway). Heading to Trinidad & Tobago. Why is it sailing North, past Jamaica to Cuba ? Instead of North East then east to T&T ? Is the next stop New York ?

Offline Brownsugar

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Re: Tobago News.
« Reply #59 on: May 24, 2018, 05:28:23 AM »
I need a quick Geography or Nautical lesson please. Or maybe I miss some info.

"THE Galleons Passage made it through the Panama Canal yesterday and began heading for Santiago de Cuba, but with heavy rainclouds hanging over it and fears that it might get caught smack bang in the middle of a developing storm in the Caribbean Sea.......Satellite tracking saw the boat at 6.30 am yesterday exiting the canal, then moving along the coast of Cacique, Colombia. It will sail for the next four days to get to Santiago, on the southeastern coast of Cuba.
.....
The Meteorological Office at Piarco confirmed the pattern of what is described as “bad weather” when the Galleons Passage passes between Jamaica and Haiti en route to Santiago de Cuba. However, it said there was a likelihood of the wind blowing northwards and the boat is likely to avoid most of the weather systems
"

This boat come thru the Panama Canal.Along the coast of Colombia (where is Cacique anyway). Heading to Trinidad & Tobago. Why is it sailing North, past Jamaica to Cuba ? Instead of North East then east to T&T ? Is the next stop New York ?

The ferry is due to undertake some work in Cuba before reaching here.  Not sure why Cuba was chosen to undertake the work but that's what was stated by the Ministry.   
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