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Offline najee

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #180 on: June 21, 2016, 05:09:35 AM »
But, off the ball movement is fundamental. Did it skip a generation? Because I am certain it used to exist.

When were we using consistently off ball movement in the past? And to what extent? And who did it?

Maybe the little off ball movement we used to do has been supplanted by the more comprehensive practices of footballing nations today. And we have failed to adapt. I'm sure in the T&T teams of the 1960's and early 1970's could outmanouvre their U.S. or Mexican counterparts. Not today though.


Zando....in the 80's, 90's and 2000's that type of fundamental gone through just like that....so what SH does be saying with the local....okay guy's let's start from the beginning 1 oh 1 basic football......my problems will it ever change cause we getting lost in the shuffle at some level...and nobody ain't seeing that nobody look how long to now

Offline OutsideMan

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #181 on: June 21, 2016, 06:08:55 AM »
I wanted to add something else as well to what I mentioned above with regards to our teams lack of off the ball movement.  It's also that our teams don't utilize 'dummy-runs', and 'passing the ball in the space' (instead of directly to the man) enough when attempting to breach the opposing teams 18-yard box region.  Our style of play is one where for the most part our players stand and wait for the ball to be passed to directly to their feet, instead of the passer making a straight pass into the space, with the intended-target making a dummy-run diagonally behind the defender into the space to collect the pass.  This is something we seem to do extremely sparingly, and normally as if by accident, instead of with purpose.  This is something that a lot of bigger teams who man-to-man, don't have any more talent over T&T, do to us all the time at all levels. 

Not saying its a cure-all, but if we utilize plays like those at all levels of our football, it would make T&T a scary team to play against --- not just every few years.  Anyway, I hope the youths on the U-20 side develop their football mindset, strategy, tactics, and most importantly football IQ, over the next few months. 

Remember...the Lady Warriors began to play respectable football in late 2014, with the hiring of a good coach (Waldron) who instilled good tactical play, including dummy runs and off the ball movement etc, in their play.  We have the skills.  Win, lose, or draw, we just don't apply that abundance of skill to good tactical football consistently.   

Cheers to improvement and better things down the road with the teams at all levels. 

 
outsideman...isn't that the lack of coach skill level of the game....@every school and U15 and up...so you saying  kids playing smalgoel no coaching involved but some of the kids have that roar skill.....they join a club or team the coach see the skill set but don't know how to have these kids play with out the ball and pass into space.... these things are fundamental football @ the lowest level....you talking about culture of bad coaching to me of guys and girls coach who is mature of the game to instill these basic things....or they just don't know...my Trini brother I hope you understand what trying to say

@ najee --- I'll say something that a lot of people on here may not agree with, as far as the reason for T&T's footballers (at all levels) general lack of football IQ.  There are many T&T footballers with an ABUNDANCE of football IQ, but they don't end up playing pro football, or not even for the country.  Frankly, for the most part, the T&T footballers with the highest football IQ end up going to college to study medicine, engineering, law etc after their stint in the SSFL.  I saw this numerous times with the PRES Sando teams of the 1980s, among other SSFL teams out there.

Generally speaking, the footballers who pursue the game after SSFL just don't seem to really understand the game.  My apologies on any unintended offense caused for saying this, but some of the best football minds in T&T probably wear a white lab-coat every day at work.  Just saying.     
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #182 on: June 21, 2016, 06:42:53 AM »
So all we old men know that, every socawarrio.net know this, and up to now and historically the coaches and u20 players don't know or incapable of executing the required adjustments to develop basic team football ? I doubt that very much. If that is the case, then it is quite obvious the wrong ppl are being selected, including the coach, who learned nothing with his stint with national team, years coaching the game and touring other countries. Etc.. What I did see on the field last Thursday may have been fit young individuals, but could not be the 3 Rd best TT u 20 players, farless the best available. Without calling names, there were young men, who should not even be on the bench, farless on the field. Something very skewy with what I saw,
I observed some youths/guys in Mandela park playing small goal, definitely better, as far as ball control, runs, defensive coverage and vision, not many, but counted about 5 in 100 , that I would give a 2 no look. I cannot imagine what/who I would find if I scoured the whole country. Something wrong with where the selectees coming from, I am willing to bet, there is a lot of talent, not in the pro league clubs.

Some might say this is where yuh might be treading in quicksand. To what extent is that environment transferable ... especially if it involves plucking 18 year olds off the street and into the cauldron of organized, international football?

How would you respond to that?

(By the way, I suspect you are correct regarding talented players not being in the Pro League. Probably each Pro League player knows at least one such player).
« Last Edit: June 21, 2016, 06:47:39 AM by asylumseeker »
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #183 on: June 21, 2016, 07:10:05 AM »
But, off the ball movement is fundamental. Did it skip a generation? Because I am certain it used to exist.

When were we using consistently off ball movement in the past? And to what extent? And who did it?

Maybe the little off ball movement we used to do has been supplanted by the more comprehensive practices of footballing nations today. And we have failed to adapt. I'm sure in the T&T teams of the 1960's and early 1970's could outmanouvre their U.S. or Mexican counterparts. Not today though.



That was more autobiographic reflection than anything else.  :)

Then I remembered some other episodes. Allyuh probably right.

What am I thinking of? Some of our players have a skewed understanding of "let the ball do the work" and of "the ball travels faster than the player".

Couple things.

Yesterday a footballing mind shared this: There can be no anticipation without concentration.

What do you mean by the comment in bold?
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline Tobago28

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Re: 2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup held in South Korea
« Reply #184 on: June 21, 2016, 08:06:39 AM »
For U20 young men, I was surprised to see the team playing a 4-14-1 formation, why not play a 4-3-3 with the triangle forward to cover the concern of central defense. Considering the short time for preparation this would have been the best tactical option.
I am not sure they posses a central midfielder who is strong enough going both ways. Until they do they will have to keep a specialized defensive midfielder.
I agree the current selection pool may not have had; however I think with Anthony Herbert being available for central defense or midfield; Keston Julien returning to play left back allowing Powder to play either right back which he did for U17 or holding midfield which he has done for Red Bulls. Powder is an excellent passer with both feet, will move ball fast without excessive touches and reliable tackler, Josh Burnett will also be available from the last U17 team and can play defensive midfield.

I am excited about our chances especially since we are benefiting from improved play at goalkeeper. The key will be preparation, I can only hope the TTFA is working on that now.

Offline Mose

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #185 on: June 21, 2016, 08:11:35 AM »
But, off the ball movement is fundamental. Did it skip a generation? Because I am certain it used to exist.

When were we using consistently off ball movement in the past? And to what extent? And who did it?

Maybe the little off ball movement we used to do has been supplanted by the more comprehensive practices of footballing nations today. And we have failed to adapt. I'm sure in the T&T teams of the 1960's and early 1970's could outmanouvre their U.S. or Mexican counterparts. Not today though.

I don't know that it was used consistently but I do remember the coaches of Fatima youth teams trying to teach it back in the 80's.
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Offline Deeks

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #186 on: June 21, 2016, 10:11:30 AM »
There are many T&T footballers with an ABUNDANCE of football IQ, but they don't end up playing pro football, or not even for the country.  Frankly, for the most part, the T&T footballers with the highest football IQ end up going to college to study medicine, engineering, law etc after their stint in the SSFL.  I saw this numerous times with the PRES Sando teams of the 1980s, among other SSFL teams out there.

This does not happen in TT alone. I am almost sure this happens world wide.

Offline ZANDOLIE

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #187 on: June 21, 2016, 10:30:34 AM »
But, off the ball movement is fundamental. Did it skip a generation? Because I am certain it used to exist.

When were we using consistently off ball movement in the past? And to what extent? And who did it?

Maybe the little off ball movement we used to do has been supplanted by the more comprehensive practices of footballing nations today. And we have failed to adapt. I'm sure in the T&T teams of the 1960's and early 1970's could outmanouvre their U.S. or Mexican counterparts. Not today though.


Zando....in the 80's, 90's and 2000's that type of fundamental gone through just like that....so what SH does be saying with the local....okay guy's let's start from the beginning 1 oh 1 basic football......my problems will it ever change cause we getting lost in the shuffle at some level...and nobody ain't seeing that nobody look how long to now

lost in the shuffle is correct. we have a professional football league (that is relatively successful in the region), but our football system is for all intents and purposes is amateur. there is a disconnect there.
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Offline OutsideMan

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #188 on: June 21, 2016, 10:30:57 AM »
There are many T&T footballers with an ABUNDANCE of football IQ, but they don't end up playing pro football, or not even for the country.  Frankly, for the most part, the T&T footballers with the highest football IQ end up going to college to study medicine, engineering, law etc after their stint in the SSFL.  I saw this numerous times with the PRES Sando teams of the 1980s, among other SSFL teams out there.

This does not happen in TT alone. I am almost sure this happens world wide.

@ Deeks --- I hear you, but it happens more-so in T&T, because money-wise there isn't much of a future in the local pro-league teams.  It's not a good thing or a bad thing --- it's simply indicative of the economic reality.  A player who has the chance to further their studies and secure their career prospects in the future, may find that it makes more sense to attend university, vs playing for relatively almost nothing in the T&T pro-league.

And yes, I'm sure the same thing happens in Aruba and Belize as well....but I'm more-so comparing T&T with countries that have well developed professional-leagues where players can earn life-changing sums. 
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Offline ZANDOLIE

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #189 on: June 21, 2016, 10:41:26 AM »
But, off the ball movement is fundamental. Did it skip a generation? Because I am certain it used to exist.

When were we using consistently off ball movement in the past? And to what extent? And who did it?

Maybe the little off ball movement we used to do has been supplanted by the more comprehensive practices of footballing nations today. And we have failed to adapt. I'm sure in the T&T teams of the 1960's and early 1970's could outmanouvre their U.S. or Mexican counterparts. Not today though.

I don't know that it was used consistently but I do remember the coaches of Fatima youth teams trying to teach it back in the 80's.


so if a fatima youth coach sees fit to teach it in the 1980's, why 30 years later the same problems apparently being ignored by so-called professional coaches of today?



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Offline Sando prince

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #190 on: June 21, 2016, 11:43:36 AM »
But, off the ball movement is fundamental. Did it skip a generation? Because I am certain it used to exist.

When were we using consistently off ball movement in the past? And to what extent? And who did it?

Maybe the little off ball movement we used to do has been supplanted by the more comprehensive practices of footballing nations today. And we have failed to adapt. I'm sure in the T&T teams of the 1960's and early 1970's could outmanouvre their U.S. or Mexican counterparts. Not today though.


Zando....in the 80's, 90's and 2000's that type of fundamental gone through just like that....so what SH does be saying with the local....okay guy's let's start from the beginning 1 oh 1 basic football......my problems will it ever change cause we getting lost in the shuffle at some level...and nobody ain't seeing that nobody look how long to now

lost in the shuffle is correct. we have a professional football league (that is relatively successful in the region), but our football system is for all intents and purposes is amateur. there is a disconnect there.

Wait! we have a professional league that is successful in a region that is far behind other leagues in Central American and North America. Hence why our clubs are consistently not even close when competing against clubs outside of the region. It is important to keep this in perspective when engaging in this type of discussion.

Offline Tobago28

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #191 on: June 21, 2016, 11:54:50 AM »
There are many T&T footballers with an ABUNDANCE of football IQ, but they don't end up playing pro football, or not even for the country.  Frankly, for the most part, the T&T footballers with the highest football IQ end up going to college to study medicine, engineering, law etc after their stint in the SSFL.  I saw this numerous times with the PRES Sando teams of the 1980s, among other SSFL teams out there.

This does not happen in TT alone. I am almost sure this happens world wide.

I am shocked to read this comment as it suggests that national footballers lack higher IQ's than those footballers that depart for medicine, law or engineering. Their are two fundamental problems with this statement: 1. It lacks any quantitative evidence that academic IQ translates to football IQ and 2. It presumes that IQ test are measure of intelligence.

The latter, ignores that most educators today ignore IQ test as a measure of intelligence as it has consistently not proven to be a reliable predictive measure for success. One of the key reasons is that IQ test tend to favor people who find the easy answer, IQ test ignore rational and irrational thinking required in real world decision making. This might explain why as a country we can't fix our problems but that's another matter.

The former, lacks quantitative evidence that national athletes lack IQ, on the contrary I can find a high percentage of highly educated national athletes relative to the general population. In addition, because you have academic ability doesn't mean you have football IQ. Are you suggesting because you book smart your football smart? Where is the evidence? Sadly, looking at the administration of sports in TnT the opposite might be true.??

I had the pleasure of speaking with a world class footballer who had NOT gone to college, but spoke French, Italian and Spanish though he came from a small village in english speaking West Africa. He had multiple businesses on multiple continents that he managed. I asked him how he did this with out a formal education.  He said the mental and emotional intelligence to run at top speed, avoid 3 or five human beings, then pass a ball 40 yards to your team mate feet calculating distance, time, space, wind in a split second conditioned his mind for decision making under pressure. He said we all have 2 legs, we all train, we all have technique; its the mind that separates us. He felt it was an advantage to him because most people under estimate his intelligence so he enters negotiations with an advantage of knowing how is opposition is thinking about him.





Offline ZANDOLIE

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #192 on: June 21, 2016, 11:55:55 AM »
But, off the ball movement is fundamental. Did it skip a generation? Because I am certain it used to exist.

When were we using consistently off ball movement in the past? And to what extent? And who did it?

Maybe the little off ball movement we used to do has been supplanted by the more comprehensive practices of footballing nations today. And we have failed to adapt. I'm sure in the T&T teams of the 1960's and early 1970's could outmanouvre their U.S. or Mexican counterparts. Not today though.



But, off the ball movement is fundamental. Did it skip a generation? Because I am certain it used to exist.

When were we using consistently off ball movement in the past? And to what extent? And who did it?

Maybe the little off ball movement we used to do has been supplanted by the more comprehensive practices of footballing nations today. And we have failed to adapt. I'm sure in the T&T teams of the 1960's and early 1970's could outmanouvre their U.S. or Mexican counterparts. Not today though.



Couple things.

Yesterday a footballing mind shared this: There can be no anticipation without concentration.

What do you mean by the comment in bold?

Couple things.

Yesterday a footballing mind shared this: There can be no anticipation without concentration.

What do you mean by the comment in bold?


There is a more attention paid to this aspect of the game in terms of which players are looked at, time spent on player development, emphasis on teamwork, tactics, player roles etc. T&T teams are invariably seen as 'physical'. I have heard that a lot especially from Central American coaches who have done their homework on us. What remains unspoken is that we are 'simple' and therefore an easy lock to pick.

Lets face it. Most of our coaches, DPL players and TTFA administrators are amateurs dressed with the responsibilities and expectations of professionals. And we cannot adapt because institutional dependence whether FIFA or government, means nobody takes ownership.


Under the Jack Warner model football (that still persists today) has become overly institutionalized. A few years ago I asked if T&T football would enjoy a resurgence if the TTFF constitution was rewritten to allow for a more decentralized football structure. I thought a less FIFA-dependent structure would drive asutonomy, creativity, competition and innovation. The success of Central FC and football academy's run by certain posters etc can attest to what can be acheved without institutional money.
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Offline Mad Scorpion a/k/a Big Bo$$

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #193 on: June 21, 2016, 12:35:56 PM »
There are many T&T footballers with an ABUNDANCE of football IQ, but they don't end up playing pro football, or not even for the country.  Frankly, for the most part, the T&T footballers with the highest football IQ end up going to college to study medicine, engineering, law etc after their stint in the SSFL.  I saw this numerous times with the PRES Sando teams of the 1980s, among other SSFL teams out there.

This does not happen in TT alone. I am almost sure this happens world wide.

I am shocked to read this comment as it suggests that national footballers lack higher IQ's than those footballers that depart for medicine, law or engineering. Their are two fundamental problems with this statement: 1. It lacks any quantitative evidence that academic IQ translates to football IQ and 2. It presumes that IQ test are measure of intelligence.

The latter, ignores that most educators today ignore IQ test as a measure of intelligence as it has consistently not proven to be a reliable predictive measure for success. One of the key reasons is that IQ test tend to favor people who find the easy answer, IQ test ignore rational and irrational thinking required in real world decision making. This might explain why as a country we can't fix our problems but that's another matter.

The former, lacks quantitative evidence that national athletes lack IQ, on the contrary I can find a high percentage of highly educated national athletes relative to the general population. In addition, because you have academic ability doesn't mean you have football IQ. Are you suggesting because you book smart your football smart? Where is the evidence? Sadly, looking at the administration of sports in TnT the opposite might be true.??

I had the pleasure of speaking with a world class footballer who had NOT gone to college, but spoke French, Italian and Spanish though he came from a small village in english speaking West Africa. He had multiple businesses on multiple continents that he managed. I asked him how he did this with out a formal education.  He said the mental and emotional intelligence to run at top speed, avoid 3 or five human beings, then pass a ball 40 yards to your team mate feet calculating distance, time, space, wind in a split second conditioned his mind for decision making under pressure. He said we all have 2 legs, we all train, we all have technique; its the mind that separates us. He felt it was an advantage to him because most people under estimate his intelligence so he enters negotiations with an advantage of knowing how is opposition is thinking about him.

You rell confuse up de man statement.  Simply put he stated that he believes the smartest footballers either never played pro league/ international or have opted for higher education and careers after SSFL.  How IQ test and all ah dat get in de talks? lol

Offline ZANDOLIE

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #194 on: June 21, 2016, 12:55:15 PM »
But, off the ball movement is fundamental. Did it skip a generation? Because I am certain it used to exist.

When were we using consistently off ball movement in the past? And to what extent? And who did it?

Maybe the little off ball movement we used to do has been supplanted by the more comprehensive practices of footballing nations today. And we have failed to adapt. I'm sure in the T&T teams of the 1960's and early 1970's could outmanouvre their U.S. or Mexican counterparts. Not today though.


Zando....in the 80's, 90's and 2000's that type of fundamental gone through just like that....so what SH does be saying with the local....okay guy's let's start from the beginning 1 oh 1 basic football......my problems will it ever change cause we getting lost in the shuffle at some level...and nobody ain't seeing that nobody look how long to now

lost in the shuffle is correct. we have a professional football league (that is relatively successful in the region), but our football system is for all intents and purposes is amateur. there is a disconnect there.

Wait! we have a professional league that is successful in a region that is far behind other leagues in Central American and North America. Hence why our clubs are consistently not even close when competing against clubs outside of the region. It is important to keep this in perspective when engaging in this type of discussion.


Sando the point is that we are professional in name only. In Mexico, Honduras, Panaman, Costa Rica, Guatemala the players coaches and teams are exposed to risk. Those leagues all have a sytem of promotion and relegation. They are acutely aware that If they don't do well they loose money and opportunity. In contrast take Peter Granville Tobago United side that was in the pro-league for years. They permanetly occupied the basement of the league but could not be relegated. They played some of the worse football I have ever seen, and from what i understand left out some of the best players from Tobago.  Take from that what you will
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Offline Deeks

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #195 on: June 21, 2016, 12:55:55 PM »
The success of Central FC and football academy's run by certain posters etc can attest to what can be acheved without institutional money

That is yet to a total success. When is comes to Caribbean football, it has worked for the clubs, Connection and most recently Central. But after that they have not had the consistent success as Sarprissa, Montagua. These are Central American clubs. But it is difficult to gauge our players. Some individuals go to the MLS and play well, but can't translate that form for the national team.  Then we start cussing the players and the local coaches. My theory is that the national coach don't get enough time with team. Brazil and them can get their team ready in 5 days. Trini can't.  We have a dysfunctional national association which is unable to put on a consistent six weeks program for one national team, far less 6.

Offline ZANDOLIE

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #196 on: June 21, 2016, 01:20:38 PM »
The success of Central FC and football academy's run by certain posters etc can attest to what can be acheved without institutional money

That is yet to a total success. When is comes to Caribbean football, it has worked for the clubs, Connection and most recently Central. But after that they have not had the consistent success as Sarprissa, Montagua. These are Central American clubs. But it is difficult to gauge our players. Some individuals go to the MLS and play well, but can't translate that form for the national team.  Then we start cussing the players and the local coaches. My theory is that the national coach don't get enough time with team. Brazil and them can get their team ready in 5 days. Trini can't.  We have a dysfunctional national association which is unable to put on a consistent six weeks program for one national team, far less 6.

i'm simply offering rudimentary evidence that once inefficiencies are addressed the gap can close quite nicely. CFC is not even six years old. how can they be expected to complete with saprissa and communicaciones, clubs that date back to the 1930's?

i'm not cussing local coaches, just saying lets recognize they are really only amateurs gifted/cursed with professional designation. by the time our players get to coach hart or coach williams they have 6-8 years of substandard coaching further burdened by lack of exposure.

how many times have you heard of a trialist coming home with their tail between their legs, surprised at the speed of play. and these are usually our top prospects.
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Offline Mose

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #197 on: June 21, 2016, 03:02:56 PM »
But, off the ball movement is fundamental. Did it skip a generation? Because I am certain it used to exist.

When were we using consistently off ball movement in the past? And to what extent? And who did it?

Maybe the little off ball movement we used to do has been supplanted by the more comprehensive practices of footballing nations today. And we have failed to adapt. I'm sure in the T&T teams of the 1960's and early 1970's could outmanouvre their U.S. or Mexican counterparts. Not today though.

I don't know that it was used consistently but I do remember the coaches of Fatima youth teams trying to teach it back in the 80's.


so if a fatima youth coach sees fit to teach it in the 1980's, why 30 years later the same problems apparently being ignored by so-called professional coaches of today?


Pure conjecture on my part: Maybe the issue is the players as opposed to the coaches, in that the coaches are having so much difficulty in getting the players to trust one another enough to make the runs that they can't get past the most rudimentary aspects of off the ball movement e.g. player with the ball makes a pass and continues his run in anticipation of the return as opposed to a players not directly involved in the play making runs to draw away defenders and/or offer options to the player on the ball. Just a thought.
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Offline OutsideMan

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #198 on: June 21, 2016, 05:21:57 PM »
There are many T&T footballers with an ABUNDANCE of football IQ, but they don't end up playing pro football, or not even for the country.  Frankly, for the most part, the T&T footballers with the highest football IQ end up going to college to study medicine, engineering, law etc after their stint in the SSFL.  I saw this numerous times with the PRES Sando teams of the 1980s, among other SSFL teams out there.

This does not happen in TT alone. I am almost sure this happens world wide.

I am shocked to read this comment as it suggests that national footballers lack higher IQ's than those footballers that depart for medicine, law or engineering. Their are two fundamental problems with this statement: 1. It lacks any quantitative evidence that academic IQ translates to football IQ and 2. It presumes that IQ test are measure of intelligence.

The latter, ignores that most educators today ignore IQ test as a measure of intelligence as it has consistently not proven to be a reliable predictive measure for success. One of the key reasons is that IQ test tend to favor people who find the easy answer, IQ test ignore rational and irrational thinking required in real world decision making. This might explain why as a country we can't fix our problems but that's another matter.

The former, lacks quantitative evidence that national athletes lack IQ, on the contrary I can find a high percentage of highly educated national athletes relative to the general population. In addition, because you have academic ability doesn't mean you have football IQ. Are you suggesting because you book smart your football smart? Where is the evidence? Sadly, looking at the administration of sports in TnT the opposite might be true.??

I had the pleasure of speaking with a world class footballer who had NOT gone to college, but spoke French, Italian and Spanish though he came from a small village in english speaking West Africa. He had multiple businesses on multiple continents that he managed. I asked him how he did this with out a formal education.  He said the mental and emotional intelligence to run at top speed, avoid 3 or five human beings, then pass a ball 40 yards to your team mate feet calculating distance, time, space, wind in a split second conditioned his mind for decision making under pressure. He said we all have 2 legs, we all train, we all have technique; its the mind that separates us. He felt it was an advantage to him because most people under estimate his intelligence so he enters negotiations with an advantage of knowing how is opposition is thinking about him.






@ Tobago28 --- I'm actually not shocked that you missed the point of the post.  Because I never said or referred to "academic IQ".  I (and others on this forum) was referring to "FOOTBALL IQ".

However, the point I made about players with high FOOTBALL IQ in T&T, not pursuing football after their SSFL playing days, and instead choosing to pursue Academic Degrees, is a valid point.  Again --- this has nothing to do with academics.  The point made is that the high FOOTBALL IQ players seem to be lost to the player pool in T&T, as for the most part they don't pursue the game any further after the SSFL. 

I hope you understand and appreciate the fact that I just fully negated that post of yours where you exclaimed your shock at my post.   

You're welcome.  :devil:
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Offline palos

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #199 on: June 21, 2016, 05:36:29 PM »
Quote
He said the mental and emotional intelligence to run at top speed, avoid 3 or five human beings, then pass a ball 40 yards to your team mate feet calculating distance, time, space, wind in a split second conditioned his mind for decision making under pressure.

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Offline ZANDOLIE

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #200 on: June 21, 2016, 07:03:28 PM »
But, off the ball movement is fundamental. Did it skip a generation? Because I am certain it used to exist.

When were we using consistently off ball movement in the past? And to what extent? And who did it?

Maybe the little off ball movement we used to do has been supplanted by the more comprehensive practices of footballing nations today. And we have failed to adapt. I'm sure in the T&T teams of the 1960's and early 1970's could outmanouvre their U.S. or Mexican counterparts. Not today though.

I don't know that it was used consistently but I do remember the coaches of Fatima youth teams trying to teach it back in the 80's.


so if a fatima youth coach sees fit to teach it in the 1980's, why 30 years later the same problems apparently being ignored by so-called professional coaches of today?


Pure conjecture on my part: Maybe the issue is the players as opposed to the coaches, in that the coaches are having so much difficulty in getting the players to trust one another enough to make the runs that they can't get past the most rudimentary aspects of off the ball movement e.g. player with the ball makes a pass and continues his run in anticipation of the return as opposed to a players not directly involved in the play making runs to draw away defenders and/or offer options to the player on the ball. Just a thought.

so if a fatima youth coach sees fit to teach it in the 1980's, why 30 years later the same problems apparently being ignored by so-called professional coaches of today?


Pure conjecture on my part: Maybe the issue is the players as opposed to the coaches, in that the coaches are having so much difficulty in getting the players to trust one another enough to make the runs that they can't get past the most rudimentary aspects of off the ball movement e.g. player with the ball makes a pass and continues his run in anticipation of the return as opposed to a players not directly involved in the play making runs to draw away defenders and/or offer options to the player on the ball. Just a thought.

i think that could be part of it. imo t&t seem to need a large number of tough games to gel as a team. one of the best ideas ever put forward by jack warner was to let the 2009 U-20 team play in the nation super league instead of disbanding. they started off at the bottom of the table but by the time the season was over they were league champions. coach vranes credited their performance at the 2009 U-20 world cup partly because that playing time in the super league gelled them. then they got playing time against big teams like nigeria and brazil gally had the strike for extended periods and look at the result. so you could very well be correct in that t&t players initially have difficulty gelling as a unit.


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Offline maxg

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #201 on: June 21, 2016, 07:06:04 PM »
@seeker, just mean no stone unturned ..this crop tries their best, but surely not the best..finding 1 diamond amongst many stones would still enrich us

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2016 CFU Men's U-20 Qualifiers Thread
« Reply #202 on: June 21, 2016, 09:01:39 PM »
@seeker, just mean no stone unturned ..this crop tries their best, but surely not the best..finding 1 diamond amongst many stones would still enrich us

Unstructured talent ID: a pre-August 31, 1962 issue that is still thriving.
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline Storeboy

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Re: 2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup held in South Korea
« Reply #203 on: June 23, 2016, 08:50:38 AM »
Most of all, these guys need to play together often so they learn to play as a cohesive team...friendlies, friendlies, friendlies! We can't continue to runaround int he park, saying we training and not getting regular games. That is a major problem with all our teams, men and women, seniors and juniors.
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Offline Deeks

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Re: 2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup held in South Korea
« Reply #204 on: June 23, 2016, 08:54:07 AM »
Most of all, these guys need to play together often so they learn to play as a cohesive team...friendlies, friendlies, friendlies! We can't continue to runaround int he park, saying we training and not getting regular games. That is a major problem with all our teams, men and women, seniors and juniors.

You making too much "cents", Breds!!

Offline Tobago28

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Re: 2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup held in South Korea
« Reply #205 on: June 23, 2016, 02:42:51 PM »
Most of all, these guys need to play together often so they learn to play as a cohesive team...friendlies, friendlies, friendlies! We can't continue to runaround int he park, saying we training and not getting regular games. That is a major problem with all our teams, men and women, seniors and juniors.

You making too much "cents", Breds!!

That is the preparation I am talking about. Is it that difficult for us to take the young men to Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Northern Brazil, Panama and/or Costa Rica for friendlies? Piroque coming from Venezuela, why we can't take a small flight with a group of boys there. The cost can not be that high considering Venezuelan economy but I have not done any research so I guessing here.

Offline Mose

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Re: 2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup held in South Korea
« Reply #206 on: June 23, 2016, 02:46:25 PM »
Most of all, these guys need to play together often so they learn to play as a cohesive team...friendlies, friendlies, friendlies! We can't continue to runaround int he park, saying we training and not getting regular games. That is a major problem with all our teams, men and women, seniors and juniors.

You making too much "cents", Breds!!

That is the preparation I am talking about. Is it that difficult for us to take the young men to Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Northern Brazil, Panama and/or Costa Rica for friendlies? Piroque coming from Venezuela, why we can't take a small flight with a group of boys there. The cost can not be that high considering Venezuelan economy but I have not done any research so I guessing here.

Cost is not the only issue. You have to consider whether or not the other parties (Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, etc) are interested and available. Also, the transport cost is not the only cost to consider.
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Offline Tobago28

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Re: 2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup held in South Korea
« Reply #207 on: June 23, 2016, 02:59:08 PM »
Mose

I realize travel, lodging, food, transport, visa's(where necessary) etc., are significant costs as well as getting all the players together from clubs local and foreign as well as college/univeristy at the same time is a logistical challenge but as everyone on the forum says its what's needed. We went Columbia in the past not sure how, but maybe we can connect to existing tournaments in those countries and get an invite. Just suggesting we have to be creative to get the young men the experiences for a real shot at South Korea.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup held in South Korea
« Reply #208 on: June 23, 2016, 03:24:13 PM »
First they need a real shot in Curacao. And nothing, NOTHING ... should stop the powers that be from fielding the best squad.

And from NOW we should be compiling data about our opponents. All of them.

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, the outgoing president of Croatia, said corruption was so embedded in her country that at school children who cheated in tests were celebrated as “heroes”. A recent Eurobarometer survey found that a majority of Croatians felt affected by corruption.

Sound familiar, T&T?

Offline Tobago28

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Re: 2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup held in South Korea
« Reply #209 on: June 23, 2016, 08:53:58 PM »
GROUP B
October 22-26
Winner Group 2---------Trinidad and Tobago
Winner Group 3---------Haiti most likely
3rd   Best Runner-up--- Cuba or Domincan Republic as of now
Best Runner-up---------St. Lucia as of now

We have to wait until July 3rd to know the CFU Final Groups for A & B. One thing is for sure we can not take Dominican Republic lightly or anyone for that matter