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Offline Flex

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #60 on: August 28, 2020, 12:27:42 PM »
‘Who’s looking after players?!’ Hyland and Bateau on owed monies, Qatar 2022 and United TTFA/Fifa.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


Soca Warriors captain Khaleem Hyland and veteran defender Sheldon Bateau are urging stakeholders to remember the young men and women who play the game, as they pointed to the desperate financial state of many local-based players at present.

Former Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president David John-Williams left office without paying match fees for the Warriors’ last nine international outings, worth between US$300 and US$1,000 each.

It is the sort of money that anyone would miss, but the local-based players are especially vulnerable. Pro League salaries have dropped to between TT$3,000 and TT$6,000 per month at most clubs; and, even then, there is no guarantee that players would be paid at the end of the month.

The Covid-19 pandemic stopped the domestic game altogether, as the Pro League ended in March and most clubs did not even pay salaries that month. Local footballers have not earned a dollar since—with the exception of Terminix La Horquetta Rangers players and those fortunate enough to be employed as soldiers or police officers at Defence Force or Police FC.

Hyland, who plays for Al Faisaly FC in Saudi Arabia, said the Warriors are really hurting and pleaded with stakeholders to show more compassion towards the national athletes.

“This is a tough situation and it is worse for the players who are back home, as football hasn’t played there in a long time and the income is so small anyway,” Hyland told Wired868. “They have kids and families and it is unfair to the players at this point in time. I would just like and hope that the TTFA or the prime minister or sport minister can assist somehow with the national footballers.

“Most of the players are owed between seven to nine games, dating back to the St Vincent and the Grenadines friendly.”

As team captain—and without a functioning players’ association—Hyland represents the Warriors in negotiations with the local football president. It is a job that became so frustrating under John-Williams that the midfield workhorse gave up, and began to just rely on then coach Dennis Lawrence and team manager Richard Piper.

“For a long time, I would have conversations with John-Williams concerning the players’ money and he would give me promises and not keep it,” said Hyland. “Eventually I started going through Dennis and Piper. I like to deal straight up and I don’t like people who aren’t straight to me.

“It was unfair to the players knowing they are squeezing up in economy—which is not usual for our national players—and going all over the world playing games, and the TTFA is getting money for those games but then doing other things with the money and not paying the players.”

Since John-Williams was voted out of office on 24 November 2019, Fifa withheld its annual subvention to the TTFA. Relations between the two entities took a turn for the worse on 13 March, when the world governing body announced a normalisation committee on the twin island republic, which sought to bring the term of new president William Wallace to a premature end.

Wallace and his vice-presidents, who refer to their slate as the United TTFA, are contesting Fifa’s decision in the local High Court.

Hyland said the situation is frustrating, although he refused to point fingers at either Wallace or normalisation committee chairman Robert Hadad.

“It is difficult to blame Hadad or Wallace, as the money was owed before either of them even came on board,” said Hyland. “They have to patch up what was left there for them, so I am not blaming anyone. I just want the players to be paid.”

For national coaches, creditors and journalists, Hadad is so unreachable that he might as well be a ghost. Hyland had a better experience, although he said the normalisation committee boss explained that his actions are restricted by Fifa.

“I spoke to Hadad on the 14th and he said he is hoping that, if everything goes in his favour, he can move how he would like to; and he gave me his word that he will make the players a priority,” said Hyland. “I don’t want the players to get involved in the political thing that is going on with the United TTFA and Fifa. That is not our business.

“I know Mr Wallace personally, as he was the manager for our [national senior] team and I know he is someone who will fight to the end, because he used to fight for our rights and match fees under [then head coach] Stephen Hart. All I can do is wish him the best.”

Hyland, a former East Mucurapo Secondary schoolboy, admitted that the players are very concerned at the possibility of a Fifa ban, which would spell doom for their Qatar 2022 Fifa World Cup qualifying campaign.

Trinidad and Tobago are scheduled to host Guyana in their opening preliminary qualifier on 8 October. Both nations are in Group F along with Puerto Rico, Bahamas and St Kitts and Nevis. The group winner will advance to a two-legged play off for a shot at getting into the final eight team Concacaf qualifying round, with three and a half World Cup places at stake.

“I know if things go wrong and Fifa gives us a sanction, the players of Trinidad and Tobago will feel it,” said the 31 year old midfielder. “We have World Cup qualifiers very soon and hopefully we can put all this behind us and go out and represent our country. We are praying that Fifa sees this isn’t the players’ fault.

“If players don’t have this opportunity to live their dreams, who knows what they might turn to. People need national caps to go abroad and further their careers, so I hope Fifa doesn’t make the youths of tomorrow pay for what is going on today.”

Bateau, a Fatima College alumni who plays professionally for KV Mechelen in Belgium, was more outspoken over the current legal wrangling between Fifa and the TTFA.

Bateau represented Trinidad and Tobago at the South Korea 2007 Under-17 and Italy 2009 Under-20 World Cups—Hyland joined him at the latter—and is desperate for a chance to wear red, black and white at a senior Fifa World Cup.

“For me, it is a bit frightening because after personally working so hard and qualifying for two World Cups, the dream is to play in a senior World Cup,” said the 29 year old defender. “And to know we can lose that opportunity for things outside our control—if it comes to that and we actually get banned due to the actions of Wallace and [technical committee chairman Keith] Look Loy and the other people, it will be a bitter pill to swallow.”

Bateau is particularly upset over what he felt was a lack of communication by Wallace and his elected officers to the players.

“We know they will have their reasons for fighting Fifa but, for me, it looks a bit selfish, as the players are the ones who stand to lose the most,” said Bateau, “and you would expect there would have been some level of communication to see how we felt about it. I feel they didn’t do enough of that and they just made their decision.

“If we are banned, the players would feel it the most because this is the players’ bread and butter. For the local players, the goal is to get on the national team to be seen or earn a proper match fee to add to their small salaries.

“As one of the older guys in the game, I feel I can speak for the younger ones. This will damage players’ careers and it will have a huge negative effect on not only our generation but future generations.”

Hyland and Bateau both played as teenagers for San Juan Jabloteh, under current Men’s National Senior Team head coach Terry Fenwick, and are enthusiastic about the immediate future.

Still, the Warriors are coming off the worst run of result in the history of the TTFA. Bateau said the players must be the first to hold their hands up for their on-field performances. However, he suggested that many things worked against the squad during John-Williams’ tenure.

When ‘DJW’ was elected president in 2015, the National Senior Team had been quarterfinalists at successive Gold Cup tournaments and drew twice with Mexico and once with the United States in that same calendar year.

Bateau felt the instability that followed took its toll, along with the issues surrounding the domestic game—which went from being a seven month competition offering roughly TT$8,000 per month, to a four month event with less than half that salary.

“The last campaign had so much drama and chaos, with how they removed Stephen Hart and all the players coming in and out, that I believe we didn’t have a fair chance,” said Bateau. “Obviously with Dennis, the record wasn’t the best and as players we need to take some responsibility. I think the coach would also accept some responsibility.

“But I think the results came from the chaos behind the scenes, as there were a lot of things that were not in our favour. We have been fighting an uphill battle for years to put a positive face on the football, and now to come into this situation…”

Bateau pointed to the TTFA’s controversial Home of Football, which was spearheaded by John-Williams, as another example of how players are disregarded.

The defender has not visited the venue himself, but the reports from his teammates was that the venue is awful for multiple reasons.

“If you have players in a camp setting, you must have a games room—whether it is a table tennis board, a pool table, a big screen television where we can watch football together, and four or five tv screens with play stations,” said Bateau, who has 42 full senior international caps. “It cannot be designed as if you are in a prison. Yes, you have to be focused but you also need to relax. There isn’t even a conference room from what I understand, or a proper kitchen.

“When I played in Kazakhstan, we had a home of football, and of course past players like Kenwyne Jones know what a proper facility is supposed to have. John-Williams meant well but, if he had consulted with players, he would have had a better concept for what he was trying to do and would have designed a better venue, without necessarily spending more money.

“They need to better utilise the past players who have that experience and can help.”

Bateau criticised the standard of the local game too, which fails to provide national teams with the right structure.

“All the successful countries have a proper local league and I feel enough of our past players and presidents, who know that, do not put enough pressure on the Association and the government to make sure there is proper structure in place for us,” he said. “In other countries, no matter who comes or goes at the top, the structure is there. As a youth, we played football every Saturday and Sunday in the savannah whereas there doesn’t seem to be enough football for the youths anymore.

“Fenwick took me and [Ronald] Primus at 17 and 18 and we were the starting centre backs for Jabloteh. But nowadays, players are staying in the schools’ game until 19 or 20—whereas we have a 19 year old at Mechelen from Burkina Faso, Issa Kaboré, who just signed for Manchester City.”

Despite the problems, Bateau feels that, given the chance, the Warriors can get back on track for the 2022 campaign. Nine members of the current squad, including ace midfielder Kevin Molino and versatile defender Daneil Cyrus, played together in at least one youth World Cup and have enough experience at the top to face all comers.

“We have a generation of players who have been to at least one youth World Cup if not two and the core of the team has been together for a few years,” said Bateau. “And we have Terry Fenwick—a lot of us worked with him before and we were successful under him. With these things, I think we have a real good chance and we can do very well.

“With our full team and the right structure, I definitely think we can do something positive by getting into the [final Concacaf round]; and after that it is all about how badly we want it as a team.”

Hyland, who has 87 full senior international caps with four goals, will be competing in his fourth World Cup qualifying campaign—Fifa threats notwithstanding. After spending most of his professional career in Belgium, he is enjoying life in the Middle East and has a first hand view of the improvements there.

“It will be great for everyone to see the love that people on this side of the world have for the great game of football,” he said. “We hear a lot of the negatives but people don’t really see the great structure or understand how strong the leagues are here… It is something the outside world should see for themselves.

“I think the Qatar World Cup will be a great one and I hope I can achieve my dream by qualifying for it.”

Closer to home, Hyland wants to leave a lasting mark too.

“I want to play for as long as I can give back to my country and I want to help guide the younger ones and give them something [solid] to walk on,” he said. “I don’t want them to go through the struggles we went through as players… I think we have a lot of potential and quality and we need to guide the future players. We cannot just walk out and leave the younger ones to fend for themselves.

“I feel like the ones who played before us never put things in place to look after us. True, they qualified for a World Cup but we didn’t have a platform as players—or maybe with the blacklist [due to the infamous bonus dispute], they never got the chance.

“As a small country, we have so much talent in every category: sport, music, running, cricket, acting. We need to wake up and see the beauty and potential in our people and start building up each other instead of bringing down each other.

“[…] If we get together as one people and support each other, we will have a bright future.”

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Tallman

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #61 on: September 08, 2020, 10:53:51 AM »
Update on the Concacaf Qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022
Concacaf.com


Concacaf has held recent discussions with its member associations, FIFA and other stakeholders as the confederation continues to plan for the resumption of its competitions across the region.

Following those discussions, Concacaf and FIFA have jointly agreed that the Concacaf Qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 will not be played in the FIFA match windows of October or November 2020, and will instead begin with the first round in the FIFA match window of March 2021.

Many parts of the region continue to have very challenging public health situations, and that has been a key factor in this decision. Additionally, several countries across the confederation have travel restrictions and quarantine requirements, which would make international football involving 30 national teams extremely difficult.

Concacaf will now work with FIFA to finalize a new schedule, beginning with the first round in March 2021, which will be communicated in due course.
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Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #62 on: September 08, 2020, 02:51:45 PM »
Update on the Concacaf Qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022
Concacaf.com


Concacaf has held recent discussions with its member associations, FIFA and other stakeholders as the confederation continues to plan for the resumption of its competitions across the region.

Following those discussions, Concacaf and FIFA have jointly agreed that the Concacaf Qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 will not be played in the FIFA match windows of October or November 2020, and will instead begin with the first round in the FIFA match window of March 2021.

Many parts of the region continue to have very challenging public health situations, and that has been a key factor in this decision. Additionally, several countries across the confederation have travel restrictions and quarantine requirements, which would make international football involving 30 national teams extremely difficult.

Concacaf will now work with FIFA to finalize a new schedule, beginning with the first round in March 2021, which will be communicated in due course.

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Offline SUPA

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #63 on: September 08, 2020, 07:31:51 PM »
Greetings to one and all. Y'all know we don't post anymore. Just take ah read as ah guess and then we bounce. We know this is a football thread, but fork eight, we too over joyed about we Miami Heat victory over the Bucks and heading to Eastern conference finals. The wife, kids, myself, brother-in-law and de crew, we are so happy for our Heat team. Go Heat. HIGHLY BLESSED.
RIP Micahel Jackson.

Money doh change we, we are de money changer. But fool if yuh dis, it will surely be danger. Large up de Enterprise and Alliance every time. KROSS KROSS.

Offline Flex

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #64 on: September 09, 2020, 12:14:22 AM »
Postponed qualifiers bring disappointment, understanding.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


On Tuesday, the FIFA/CONCACAF World Cup qualifiers which were scheduled to starts in October was postponed but the decision was met with a great sigh of disappointment but also understanding.

In a release mere weeks before the start of the action, said: "CONCACAF held recent discussions with its Member Associations, FIFA and other stakeholders as the Confederation continued to plan for the resumption of its competitions across the region. Following those discussions, CONCACAF and FIFA have jointly agreed that the CONCACAF Qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 will not be played in the FIFA match windows of October or November 2020, and will instead begin with the first round in the FIFA match window of March 2021."

It added, "Many parts of the region continue to have very challenging public health situations, and that has been a key factor in this decision. Additionally, several countries across the confederation have travel restrictions and quarantine requirements, which would make international football involving 30 national teams extremely difficult."

This means that the players and their staff will have to wait a while longer to begin action. T&T's senior national team manager Basil Thompson told Guardian Media Sports on Tuesday that the players were obviously disappointed, as they were eager to put into action what they have been working on since June.

"I think the staff of the team are also disappointed since they too wanted to see their work being executed. However though, we are all very much in agreement with the decision, since the health of the players and all involved are of paramount importance," Thompson explained.

The Soca Warriors were scheduled to begin their Group F campaign with a clash with regional neighbours Guyana on October 8. The other teams in that group are St Kitts/Nevis, Bahamas and Puerto Rico. Only the winner will advance from the group.

National coach Terry Fenwick had painted a picture of gloom when the draw was made on August 20, lamenting on the team's dire financial position which was due mainly to the ongoing feud between the United T&T Football Association and the sport's world governing body- FIFA, over the FIFA's appointment of a Normalisation Committee to manage TT's football.

However, Thompson, dismissed those concerns, saying the normalisation committee, which is being headed by businessman Robert Hadad, has taken care of all the team's financial concerns, thereby putting the players in a state of readiness. He said another matter of salaries for coaches could soon be taken care of as Hadad is set to meet to discuss this with the coaches of the national teams.

Thompson said, "Other concerns such as outstanding match fees for players, I cannot speak on because I do not know."

According to Thompson, the T&T team was set to be boosted by the return of several players from abroad, but this now is uncertain.

Concacaf will now work with FIFA to finalise a new schedule, beginning with the First Round in March 2021, which will be communicated in due course.

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Offline Deeks

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #65 on: September 09, 2020, 04:49:57 PM »
I think it is a good thing!

Offline Tallman

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T&T footballers expect challenges ahead of qualifiers
« Reply #66 on: November 21, 2020, 10:07:25 AM »
T&T footballers expect challenges ahead of qualifiers
By Narissa Fraser (T&T Newsday)


NATIONAL footballers Robert Primus, Radanfah Abu Bakr and Marvin Phillip say while they are relieved FIFA has lifted its suspension of the T&T Football Association (TTFA), there lies some inevitable challenges ahead of the qualifiers for the 2021 CONCACAF Gold Cup and 2022 FIFA World Cup.

But through teamwork, they said, the challenges can be overcome.

The TTFA was banned on September 24 as its ousted executive, led by William Wallace, refused to drop a legal challenge against FIFA from the local court.

The ousted executive (United TTFA) had challenged FIFA’s decision to remove it and appoint a normalisation committee, headed by Robert Hadad, to run T&T football. FIFA lifted this ban on Thursday.

But with the T&T Pro League and Super League on hold due to covid19, and with training being inconsistent with constantly changing lockdown measures, locally-based players may have to jump straight into the forthcoming qualifiers.

On Friday, men’s national team coach Terry Fenwick told Newsday he was hoping to get permission to host “at least three” friendlies before the end of the year to help prepare the team. But there is still the possibility his proposal may not be approved by the government.

World Cup qualifiers begin in March and Gold Cup qualifiers begin in July.

Defenders Abu Bakr and Primus compete in the Hero I-League in India.

On March 13, the All India Football Federation (AIFF) had initially suspended the league until March 31 owing to the covid19 pandemic. But as lockdown measures began being implemented in the country, the remaining league matches were cancelled and table-toppers Mohun Bagan were crowned champions.

Abu Bakr and Primus, play for Churchill Brothers FC and Phillip is a goalkeeper for Neroca FC.

Should the national team go directly into qualifiers only having trained among themselves, Abu Bakr said it would be difficult.

“But one thing these unprecedented times have taught us, is to improvise,” he said, “So we must do the next best thing. Training has already resumed, which is positive.

“Having a few local/regional friendly games is crucial to achieve the match sharpness that would be needed going into those games. The revised qualifying formats for the Gold Cup and World Cup are unforgiving, so there isn’t much room for error.”

He said he is relieved the drama between the TTFA and FIFA is finally over, but added, “Unfortunately, the inevitable consequence was yet another display of how institutions such as FIFA ruthlessly guard their power structures.

“The priority should now be on the most important stakeholders in the game, the players, and ensure that they are given the best possible preparation to enable them to perform well in the upcoming games.”

Primus told Newsday he feels “very happy and excited” the ban was lifted, “so we can get our football under way.

“It’s been a while since we played or even trained (consistently) so this is good news for all the players.”

He said times have been particularly difficult for the local-based players

“...Not having a league going on for them to play or participate in or even getting a salary. We are professional footballers so this is how we make our money,” he said.

Primus added, “It’s going to be very difficult going into these qualifiers without having played a season before so it’s very difficult for them, but we will get the work in together.”

Phillip said he is “definitely happy” the ban has been lifted.“And I’m not only glad for the senior men’s team but also the women and the youngsters who could come back out and get the opportunity to show their talent and go after their dreams and goals again.”

He agreed with the other two players that tough times lie ahead.

“The local-based players haven’t been playing (competitive) football for months and they won’t be anytime soon. So the onus is on the players to put in that work and be up to a certain level of match fitness.”
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Offline Tallman

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Warriors open against Guyana on March 25th
« Reply #67 on: December 05, 2020, 01:27:46 PM »
Warriors open against Guyana on March 25th
T&T Guardian


National men’s senior football coach Terry Fenwick can feel a bit of relief finally knowing the dates of his team’s first phase on the road to the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar.

On Friday, Concacaf confirmed the schedule for the eagerly anticipated regional qualifiers for the World Cup. This after FIFA, the sport’s governing body, announced that certain international match windows will be extended to enable Confederations to schedule triple-match dates. This is due to the challenges faced by global football due to COVID-19, in particular for those regions where several 2020 FIFA international match windows were suspended.

In Concacaf’s case, FIFA’s decision means the Confederation can schedule three matches in each of the September and October 2021 and January and March 2022 FIFA international match windows.

This will enable Concacaf to begin its eight-team Final Round of the Concacaf Qualifiers in September 2021, following a First Round played in March and June 2021 and a Second Round in June 2021 (June 2021 includes two FIFA international match windows).

On learning, the Warriors’ opening match is at home to Guyana on March 25, Fenwick said: “It’s a bit of important information for us at this stage as it relates to the schedule of the World Cup qualifiers. We knew the teams before but now we know exactly what we’re going to face.

“Being at home in the opening game is good and we will prepare as best as possible for this first game against Guyana which we know has a bit of history with T&T and will certainly be no pushovers. Matter of fact, no team will be a walkover in these qualifiers.”

The draw for the Concacaf Qualifiers for FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 took place in August 2020 and with the certainty provided by FIFA’s decision regarding the triple-windows, Concacaf can now confirm the schedule.

The First Round will be played between the Concacaf Member Associations ranked 6-35 based on the FIFA Men’s Ranking as of July 16, 2020.

Fenwick continued: “With this schedule before us now it tells you how important it was for us to have gotten the suspension lifted and having the Normalisation Committee in charge of our football.

“I know for a fact that chairman Robert Hadad and the rest of the Normalisation Committee are at work and are putting things together for us to be able to breathe a bit easier and for all the right conditions to be in place for our teams. I’m grateful that we’d been able to restart training last month and now we can look forward to executing our plans ahead of March.”

The FIFA Council also voted that the 2021 Club World Cup will be hosted by Japan in late 2021 with seven teams. A Major League Soccer (MLS) team has never advanced to that tournament, though four remain in contention when the Concacaf Champions League returns to action December 15 with Atlanta United, LAFC, New York City FC and the Montreal Impact all competing.

The 2021 Club World Cup ensures there will be two editions held within the same calendar year, since this year’s tournament is being held February 1-11, 2021 in Qatar. The reigning Club World Cup champion is Liverpool, snapping a streak of three straight titles by Real Madrid.
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Offline Flex

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #68 on: January 09, 2021, 04:55:55 AM »
Morris sees uphill task for T&T in World Cup qualifiers.
By Nigel Simon (T&T Guardian).


Former national men’s football team captain and Futsal team coach Clayton “JB” Morris says this country faces a difficult task to qualify for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar.

T&T under the guidance of new head coach, former England World Cup player, Terry Fenwick will begin its revised Concacaf qualifiers on March 25 at home to neighbours Guayana in Group F of the preliminary round.

The 2006 Germany World Cup qualifiers, T&T will also face St Kitts & Nevis, Puerto Rico, and The Bahamas from which only the group winners will advance to the next phase of qualification where a possible clash with El Salvador awaits for a spot in the ten-team.

In addition to El Salvador, the other teams in Pool A are Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada, Montserrat and US Virgin Islands.

Each team in the six preliminary groups will play every other team in their group once, playing a total of four matches; two home and two away.

These games will be played in the FIFA match windows of March 2021 and the first FIFA match Window of June 2021.

At the end of the First Round, the six group winners will progress to the Second Round, with the winner of A meeting the winner of F in a home and away direct elimination format, from which the winner progresses to the Final Round where Concacaf’s top five nations, Mexico, USA, Costa Rica, Jamaica and Honduras respectively, all advance based on their world rankings.

Looking ahead of the National Team World Cup qualifying campaign, Morris the new T&T Super League president and cooach of the University of T&T (UTT) painted a difficult picture for coach Fenwick, who previously led local clubs San Juan Jabloteh and Central FC to domestic league and regional cup triumphs.

Morris told Guardian Media Sports that, “To be honest putting myself in the national senior team coach position, I really don’t envy him because it's really a challenging time you know as the covid-19 brought about a change in that we have to get accustom to the new norm and football is a team sport and looking at it, the players who are training now I really not sure if those players will make up the bulk of the team going into the first World Cup game because the level as we know in football, you could train how much you train but if you are not playing then you won't really know where you are and how far you have to go."

He added, "So I think it's going to be a really uphill battle for us to say we can really qualify, but again at the same time, I think the other teams will be in a similar position. The only advantage I think that the coaches in those other teams may have is training because as I said I don’t feel the players in the squad now will make up the bulk of the team, so then we will be going with players who may be training outside but football is a team sport and chemistry and without practicing and playing games together that is a challenge."

« Last Edit: January 09, 2021, 05:11:41 AM by Flex »
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Offline Deeks

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #69 on: January 09, 2021, 05:24:58 AM »
See you in 2026!

Offline ABTrini

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #70 on: January 09, 2021, 02:42:01 PM »
See you in 2026!

This is not a rocket science revelation- unless we restructure our approach to team selection,  create a local competitive structure leading up to identification of talent, instill a competitive process for foreign based players to earn and demonstrate justifiable reason to be on the team and not just a given that they could be a walk on.

Need to be a revamp -  national zonal programs and refocus them as developmental programs that could feed into a national team Not as some regional league beneath the pro league-

Put a structured program in place that all lead up to national program. Have regional/ zonal national competitions- North south east west Tobago combine teams in competitive playoffs.
WC -qualifications is a process not having local sessions with some players and then wait for availability of foreign players then have a hastily put together camp and go for it!!!!

This is not a sustainable system  for ongoing  success to WC qualification with the limited talent pool we have.

Offline Tallman

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #71 on: January 11, 2021, 08:15:50 PM »
WATCH: Men's Senior Team continue World Cup qualifying preparations

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/waJZ-5Zq2bc" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/waJZ-5Zq2bc</a>
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Offline Flex

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #72 on: January 30, 2021, 04:09:47 PM »
‘Don’t treat us like a scrape-up side’; Joevin and Hyland discuss wish-list for W/Cup campaign, a tough 2020, and USA challenge.
By Lasana Liburd (Wired868).


Trinidad and Tobago Men’s National Senior Team head coach Terry Fenwick is expected to name his squad tomorrow to face the United States in a friendly match on 31 January in Orlando.

Two names that are sure to be absent from his list are Fenwick’s most high-profiled players at present: the US Major League Soccer (MLS) duo of 30-year-old attacking midfielder Kevin Molino and 29-year-old winger Joevin Jones.

Jones, who finished the 2020 season as MLS Cup runner-up and Western Conference champion, said he and Molino were initially allowed a vacation by Fenwick, only to be belatedly invited to join the Soca Warriors training squad for the game.

The two players are well into their off-season and preparing to swap clubs. Jones said the timing did not feel right.

“Before we came home, Fenwick said he would give us some time to spend with our families,” Jones told Wired868. “He then asked us to join the team for the game; but right now I am waiting to hear where I may need to go [to sign my next professional contract].

“I told him I would sit out this one but I will be ready for the World Cup qualifiers.”

The upcoming friendly falls outside the Fifa international match window and, as such, clubs are not obligated to release players to be involved.

Molino recently agreed a move from Minnesota United to MLS Cup winners, Columbus Crew, while Jones’ future is also in flux, as he weighs up a new offer from Sounders and proposals from other teams.

Jones hinted that an intense outing against the United States offered more cons than pros. But he remains committed to the Warriors.

“My brother (Alvin Jones) says everything is running smooth in training and it’s going nice for now,” said Jones. “So after the trip, I will ask how things went.”

Jones admitted that he felt the Warriors’ choice of sparring partner is, to be diplomatic, a brave one. Although US coach Gregg Berhalter could not select his full squad, he still has a fully professional roster with experienced players like forward Jozy Altidore, winger Paul Arriola and defenders Aaron Long and Walker Zimmerman.

In contrast, at least half of Fenwick’s training team have little to no experience of top flight senior football—whether for club or country.

“My opinion is that it is a death trap,” said Jones. “We don’t have our full squad and America is in camp training with guys who are MLS players that play week in and week out. When last did some of our players have a good 90 minutes?

“Those practice matches [that the team played over the last two months] are not intense or physical or challenging. So they can’t prepare you for this. For me, I think that was a bad game to choose.

“[…] I know football is funny and you never, never know; because it is played on the day. But on paper, we are not ready for this game as yet.”

It is not a case of ‘us’ and ‘them’, though. Jones sees himself as an elder statesman of the national team now. He will be 30 on 3 August and gave the impression of a man who is considering his legacy.

For players within solid football programmes, the dream is about winning trophies and starring on the big stage. It says something that in Trinidad and Tobago—a country that played in one senior Fifa World Cup and five World Youth Cups (four boys and one girls competition)—the players aim significantly lower.

Jones, who made his first international outing in 2010, just wants to join a national team camp that looks and feels as though it is about serious business.

“We want better uniforms to train in, we want to feel like we are a part of a national team and not a ‘scrape-up side’ with players training in different pants and socks,” he said. “We want togetherness and a professional approach with things running smooth off and on the field, so we don’t have to worry about payments and stuff. We want to be able to go into games worry free.

“This [dream] isn’t for us—Kevin [Molino] and I maybe have three or four years left—but this is for the future. This is for the younger guys. We want them to feel that this is a national team and [it is something special]; and have that motivation to train harder to keep their spot.”

National players have often been provided with a single kit as hotel wear for team camps. It means that they were asked to wear the same jersey and pants at every meal and team meeting for four or five days straight.

It is unsanitary at best.

Jones also knows the benefit of efficient travel arrangements. In the MLS, teams often fly commercial over long distances and management does everything possible to lessen the ‘wear and tear’.

“Sometimes there are direct flights available and the TTFA will book a cheaper flight with two or three stops,” said Jones. “And even then, they wouldn’t do the little things that can make it more comfortable for you. Even if they can’t do first class, at least get you a window or aisle seat, or try for less time at the airport.

“Sometimes guys have to spend 13 or 14 hours at the airport and they don’t even give you money to spend the night in a hotel. We want our management to be more respectful to the players than that, and more professional.”

Team captain Khaleem Hyland, 31, agrees with Jones. At present, Hyland plays professionally in Saudi Arabia and it takes him at least 24 hours to get to Trinidad via London.

“The length of time you stay in the airport is very important when you are competing at international level,” said Hyland. “We are one of the few teams who still have these long [stop-overs] when travelling to games.”

Hyland also hopes for better team camps for the squad, as he noted the lack of amenities at the Home of Football in Couva.

“As a national team, we have a so-called Home of Football but no gym or gym instructor, and things like a hot tub and ice bath—which are very important for recovery and strength training,” said Hyland. “Things like a table tennis board and video games help in team bonding and give you something to do on camp and most teams outside know this.

“[…] Still, I am in contact with [normalisation committee chairman Robert] Hadad and he has the same ideas. I know we need to give him time. Rome cannot be built in one day, but I hope for the future generation all of these things are installed.”

Jones secured another Western Conference honour in 2020, as Sounders edged Molino’s employers in the conference final. But they were routed 3-0 in the MLS Cup final on 12 December. (Jones, Molino and Hyland grew up in Carenage and are all former Mucurapo Senior Comprehensives students.)

It means Jones, a gifted, versatile left footed player, has two MLS Cup titles and two runners-up medals to go with four Western Conference trophies.

He admits though that it was hardest season; and his worst. His daughter, Joneeka, was born on 7 July 2019; but she and his live-in girlfriend, Tamika, were denied a visa to join him in the United States.

The Covid-19 pandemic meant he was stuck at home in Seattle without his loved ones, who remained in Trinidad.

“The club’s Covid protocols were really serious, and we couldn’t even go to eating places—we were only allowed to go to the grocery,” said Jones. “Then we would be testing every other day and we were training without even knowing for sure when the league was going to restart.

“It was a challenging, roller-coaster year, especially in terms of my personal life. Most of the Trinidad and Tobago players don’t have their family with them and at times like that, with the Covid, you want your family nearby and they are far away. My daughter was a year and some months old and I couldn’t see her.”

Jones then had a ligament injury followed by an ankle injury, which robbed him of over two months of playing time in total. On his return to the first team, coach Brian Schmetzer assigned him to the right flank, as opposed to his usual spot on the left. The results were not spectacular.

“It is the poorest season I ever had in my career,” said Jones. “First, I was picking up injuries. Then when I was playing, I just wasn’t clicking and I wasn’t consistent.

“[…] The team was winning when I came back and I think the coach didn’t really want to change things, so he put me on the right and asked me to tuck in more and give them an extra man in the midfield.

“I tried to do it but I didn’t think it was playing to my strengths, which is running at people and bringing in crosses.”

Jones is weighing up his next professional move at present.

“You never know what the future holds but God is working,” he said. “For me, I am willing to go where ever I would be comfortable playing and where my family would be safe.

“I have now won two MLS Cup finals and lost two, and won four Western cups. There are guys playing their whole lives here who never won as much.

“I can look back and say I won titles in Finland [with HJK Helsinki], Trinidad and Tobago [with W Connection], and America. That is a plus for me.”

He wants to succeed in the red, black and white gear too. But he is just as anxious to make a difference by pushing for improvements for players.

Hyland feels the same way. He just signed a two-year deal in Saudi Arabia, where he has played professionally since 2017—after nine years in Belgium. But health concerns for his father-in-law separated him from his wife, Cherise Baird-Hyland, and daughter, Kaylee Grace Hyland, for much of 2020.

“My father-in-law had a stroke and my wife is the one who helps take care of him,” said Hyland. “So it would be difficult for her to stay here and do that because he needs assistance. My daughter also moved from school in Belgium to Trinidad, and we don’t want to keep moving her from school to school to follow me.

“I don’t have so many years left in my career, so hopefully I will reunite with them sooner rather than later.”

Hyland also had his injury problems last year. A scan after a knock in training with Al-Batin revealed that he had been playing with a broken bone in his right instep for years.

“Apparently it first happened while I was at [Belgian top flight club] Genk [between 2011 to 2015],” he said. “[…] The doctor said it should be one month before I restart training, but I was playing games again within three weeks. I don’t think it was a risk.

“The doctor said I would get slight discomfort for months but it is not enough of a problem for me to stop. The problem is already removed.”

Discomfort and arduous flight notwithstanding, Hyland looks forward to rejoining the Warriors for the Qatar campaign. He is one of several players in the current national pool who represented Trinidad and Tobago at the Egypt 2009 Under-20 World Cup, along with: Sheldon Bateau, Daneil Cyrus, Curtis Gonzales, Leston Paul, Mekeil Williams, Aubrey David, Marcus Joseph, Sean De Silva, Glenroy Samuel, Robert Primus, Jean-Luc Rochford, and Molino.

It remains uncertain how many of them will get a chance under Fenwick.

“My goal is to help as much as I can, give back to the national team with my experience and also lead from in front,” said Hyland. “I think we have a good group of players, who know and love and respect each other. And hopefully that can take us to where we want to be.”

Hyland is involved in negotiations with the normalisation committee, on behalf of the current players, for match fees and per diem for their trip to Orlando. They hope to reach an understanding before the boys step on to the plane.

Again, he complimented Hadad and the normalisation committee for their approach to talks so far.

“I wish the team best of luck against the USA,” said Hyland. “It will not be an easy game, [as] the team is now forming and it is Terry’s first game. They just have to work hard, give their best and enjoy it. At the end of the day, everything is in God’s hands.”

(Career by numbers)

Khaleem Hyland

Caps: 78 starts, 9 substitute appearances, 4 goals. (Ejected once as substitute against Cuba, so not given a cap.)

Last goal: Scored with a shot from outside the box in a 2-1 World Cup qualifying win away to Guatemala on 13 November 2015.

Highlights: Helped Trinidad and Tobago to the Concacaf Gold Cup quarterfinal round in 2013 and 2015, and played in the Egypt 2009 Under-20 World Cup. His two World Cup qualifying goals puts him level with Andy Aleong, Leo ‘Twinkle Toes’ Brewster, Philbert Jones and ‘Marvellous’ Marvin Faustin.

Joevin Jones

Caps: 67 starts, 10 substitute appearances, 8 goals.

Last goal: Scored from the penalty spot away to Martinique, as T&T fought back to pull off a 1-1 tie on 6 September 2019.

Highlights: Helped Trinidad and Tobago to the Concacaf Gold Cup quarterfinal round in 2013 and 2015. Has three World Cup qualifying goals, which is as many as Everald ‘Gally’ Cummings, Cornell Glen, Leonson Lewis, and Kerry Jamerson.

Kevin Molino

Caps: 41 starts, 9 substitute appearances, 21 goals.

Last goal: Scored the opener in 2-2 Concacaf Nations League draw with Martinique at the Hasely Crawford Stadium on 10 September 2019.

Highlights: Helped Trinidad and Tobago to the Concacaf Gold Cup quarterfinal round in 2013 and played in the Korea Republic 2007 Under-17 World Cup and Egypt 2009 Under-20 World Cup tournaments. His four World Cup qualifying goals put him level with Hutson ‘Barber’ Charles and Lester Peltier.

Editor’s Note: Trinidad and Tobago’s record scorer in World Cup qualifying competitions is Stern John with 20 goals.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline pull stones

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #73 on: January 30, 2021, 11:29:06 PM »
I’m so glad that we have a whole new crop of foreign based players to pick up the slack, all we need now is an organized federation to keep them happy and by avoiding the silly money games with players and coaches. I had to watch for years these trinbago born players sabotaging the team when they don’t like a coach, playing half hearted and running to the media to complain for every little thing, when these same players are being treated like kings in foreign leagues.

renown Players like Messi neymar and Ronaldo come home to play for their respective countries and endure the same lack of facilities and amenities but endure for love of country, and put out their best performances surpassing the efforts they make for their clubs all for the love of country.

I’ve watched jovin, cato and cyrus play like they didn’t care to be there, players tackling half heartedly and escorting attackers to their 18 yard box where dim wit marvin was waiting all the way out off his line giving attackers so much angles to score. In addition these lads are indisciplined and could poison your dressing room with their malcontent attitudes and longing to flout the rules, like molino and mikel williams with their boat ride escapades.

Terry needs to be careful with those old lads, and if I was him I would have moved on totally, let the kids show them how football is played, the same way they beat the USA without jovin, kenwin, bateau, mikel and Kevin molino. time to rid of these boys terry and start afresh.


Offline Deeks

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #74 on: January 31, 2021, 09:29:34 AM »
I beg to differ with Molino. He was recovering from his ACL injuries. In the Gold Cup he was half fit and still looked better than most players on our squad.

Offline Flex

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #75 on: February 25, 2021, 02:18:30 AM »
Report: More than 6,500 migrant workers have died during Qatar's World Cup prep
By Jason Owens
Yahoo Sports.


More than 6,500 migrant workers have died in Qatar amid the nation's preparation to host the 2022 World Cup, The Guardian reports.

The report cites government data from the home nations of migrant workers, including India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. The data have been compiled since Qatar was awarded the World Cup in 2010, working out to an average of 12 deaths per week, according to the report.

FIFA awarded the World Cup to Qatar despite widespread concerns over human rights violations and treatment of migrant workers. Amnesty International has since documented conditions of workers being "exploited" and "subjected to forced labor."

"They can’t change jobs, they can’t leave the country, and they often wait months to get paid," a report from the human rights organization states.

Guardian estimate: Actual death toll 'considerably higher'

According to The Guardian, 2,711 workers from India, 1,641 from Nepal, 1,018 from Bangladesh, 824 from Pakistan and 557 from Sri Lanka have died working in Qatar since 2010. The Guardian estimates that the actual death toll of migrant workers is "considerably higher" since the data it cites is limited to the listed countries.

The nation with a population of less than 3 million is depending on 2 million migrant workers to man its labor force. The Philippines and Kenya are among other nations to send migrant workers to Qatar, according to the report.

The listed causes of death include electrocution, blunt injuries due to a fall from height and suicide. Most of the deaths are listed as "natural" while citing heart or respiratory failure, according to the report.

Daytime temperatures in Qatar can approach 120 degrees during the summer. Normally played in the summer, Qatar's World Cup will be held in November and December because of the oppressive heat.

Massive nationwide construction project, including a new city

Nick McGeehan of labor rights organization FairSquare Projects told The Guardian that World Cup construction accounts for much of the death toll.

“A very significant proportion of the migrant workers who have died since 2011 were only in the country because Qatar won the right to host the World Cup,” he said.

Qatar has built or is building seven new stadiums in addition to significant infrastructure upgrades, including roadways, hotels and an airport in preparation to host the World Cup. The opening and closing matches will be held at Lusail Iconic Stadium in Lusail, a city being built from the ground up ahead of the World Cup.

atar: Death toll within 'expected range'

Qatar's government didn't dispute The Guardian's findings and characterized the death toll as "expected" in a statement to publication.

“The mortality rate among these communities is within the expected range for the size and demographics of the population," the statement read. "However, every lost life is a tragedy, and no effort is spared in trying to prevent every death in our country."

FIFA also provided a statement to The Guardian.

“With the very stringent health and safety measures on site … the frequency of accidents on FIFA World Cup construction sites has been low when compared to other major construction projects around the world,” the statement reads, per The Guardian.

FIFA did not provide The Guardian with data to back up its claim.

Why do workers risk these conditions?

According to Amnesty International, migrant workers seek employment in Qatar to escape poverty and unemployment at home. It describes dirty living conditions with eight workers living in a single room once they arrive. Workers are sometimes promised one salary only to be provided a lower wage once they arrive.

The group spoke to workers who agreed to anywhere from $500 to $4,300 in recruitment fees to agents that left them in debt before they began working in Qatar.


Workers walk toward the construction site of the Lusail stadium which will be build for the upcoming 2022 FIFA World Cup during a stadium tour in Doha, Qatar, Dec. 20, 2019. (REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Deeks

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #76 on: February 25, 2021, 06:22:19 AM »
If this is true and I believe most of it is true, it is real sad, very sad. For the game we love, WE indirectly have "blood on our hands". But to to be honest, if I or some of us were born it that situation, we would have done the same thing to raise our family out of poverty. RIP and condolences to the work and to their families.

Offline Deeks

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #77 on: March 03, 2021, 06:25:18 PM »

Jamaica plot audacious move to call-up TEN English stars, including Michail Antonio, Demarai Gray, Max Aarons and
 Nathan Redmond ahead of next year's World Cup - and eight
 of them have already applied for their Jamaican passports!



https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-9321995/Jamaica-plot-call-10-English-stars-including-Michail-Antonio-Demarai-Gray-Aarons.html#reader-comments


Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #78 on: March 25, 2021, 04:47:31 AM »
« Last Edit: March 25, 2021, 04:52:13 AM by asylumseeker »
There is a direct line between historical exploitation and the ongoing commercialization of and profiting from images of dead Black people, over which their descendants often have little control, few claims, and few rights. --- Latria Graham, The Dark Underside of Representations of Slavery.

Offline Trini _2026

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Re: CONCACAF News Thread
« Reply #79 on: March 25, 2021, 12:12:44 PM »
I see jamaica is giving the USA a good game  and they are playing with 6 new english born players who tappa never saw before against a better usa team.    they down 1-0 but a good game
tappa is taking the risk of startiung 6 new player he never sw before omg .... and leave the locals on the bench ,,,
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/sh8SeGmzai4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/sh8SeGmzai4</a>

Offline Deeks

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Re: CONCACAF News Thread
« Reply #80 on: March 25, 2021, 02:52:03 PM »
I saw the JA-USA game. 4-1. I think JA played well. I was impressed with the way they kept their form in defence. The US dominated and could have score more but the JA team held firm. The only thing I will say about their foreign born and ours, is the quality is in their favour. I think all JA players are from England and play in a better league than ours.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
« Reply #81 on: March 25, 2021, 02:53:08 PM »
Germany dominating Iceland. 2-0. Iceland putting up stiff resistance.

Offline maxg

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Re: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
« Reply #82 on: March 25, 2021, 03:09:44 PM »
The difference with the JA English and us is “we go beat dem”. Until such time that they prove me wrong. Hopefully much later than sooner.  :laugh:

Offline pull stones

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Re: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
« Reply #83 on: March 25, 2021, 03:10:28 PM »
Haiti v belize is on according to livescore.com and they are in the 5” of the game 0-0

Offline pull stones

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Re: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
« Reply #84 on: March 25, 2021, 03:31:22 PM »
I don’t know if we ever give the United states mentality any thought, but from what I have observed they harp on things and live for revenge when things are not that serious. losing out on that last world cup seriously took a chunk out of their ass and they obviously wants to send a message to all concacaf that they will never allow that to happen again.

as it stands they got their revenge and more than their pound of flesh back from us with two devastating defeats, or should i say drobbing in the extreme. we in the Caribbean really needs to cater for our sports by partnering with Europe to get academies and proper development programs and leagues, because the United states and Mexico will dominate the two spots in concacaf, and the rest of us have to fight for scraps, the one and a half spot, and that could never be fair.

I believe CFU should be separated and be our own confederation since concacaf and Africa is the only confederations that have to go through rounds of qualification. they need to give CFU 2 spots and central and North America two spots since we have 35 countries compared to their 10. we will never grow as a region joined to this crazy absurd arrangement.

Offline gawd on pitch

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Re: Re: CONCACAF News Thread
« Reply #85 on: March 25, 2021, 07:44:24 PM »
I watching Panama vs Barbados. 77th minute 0-0. Panama is HOME. .

Latapy might pull off the result of the night. Bim players playing their heart out. This is probably the best I have seen Bim play.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #86 on: March 26, 2021, 05:14:15 AM »


Only ONE goal scored among the losing teams.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2021, 05:17:34 AM by asylumseeker »
There is a direct line between historical exploitation and the ongoing commercialization of and profiting from images of dead Black people, over which their descendants often have little control, few claims, and few rights. --- Latria Graham, The Dark Underside of Representations of Slavery.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #87 on: March 26, 2021, 05:36:25 AM »
I watching Panama vs Barbados. 77th minute 0-0. Panama is HOME. .

Latapy might pull off the result of the night. Bim players playing their heart out. This is probably the best I have seen Bim play.

Highlights of Panama vs Barbados.
There is a direct line between historical exploitation and the ongoing commercialization of and profiting from images of dead Black people, over which their descendants often have little control, few claims, and few rights. --- Latria Graham, The Dark Underside of Representations of Slavery.

Offline pull stones

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #88 on: March 26, 2021, 06:42:14 AM »
I watching Panama vs Barbados. 77th minute 0-0. Panama is HOME. .

Latapy might pull off the result of the night. Bim players playing their heart out. This is probably the best I have seen Bim play.

Highlights of Panama vs Barbados.
can you please post some TT guyana highlights mate? even the full game will be most welcome.  thanks.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: 2022 FIFA World Cup Thread
« Reply #89 on: March 26, 2021, 07:01:53 AM »
I watching Panama vs Barbados. 77th minute 0-0. Panama is HOME. .

Latapy might pull off the result of the night. Bim players playing their heart out. This is probably the best I have seen Bim play.

Highlights of Panama vs Barbados.
can you please post some TT guyana highlights mate? even the full game will be most welcome.  thanks.

Hold this for now.

And this.

Also this.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2021, 07:13:29 AM by asylumseeker »
There is a direct line between historical exploitation and the ongoing commercialization of and profiting from images of dead Black people, over which their descendants often have little control, few claims, and few rights. --- Latria Graham, The Dark Underside of Representations of Slavery.