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Author Topic: Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" visits Gloria's in Crown Heights  (Read 5401 times)

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Offline Bakes

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<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/bEVuELyZ0lU" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/bEVuELyZ0lU</a>

Offline Peong

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Re: Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" visits Gloria's in Crown Heights
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2012, 11:18:18 PM »
Omar and Marlow yes. 

Offline Bakes

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Re: Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" visits Gloria's in Crown Heights
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2012, 01:58:07 PM »
Omar and Marlow yes. 

I wondering now if them West Indian.

EDIT: Just reading on Wiki that Williams (Omar) supposed to be half Bahamian.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2012, 02:00:51 PM by Bakes »

Offline soccerman

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Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown is must see TV in my household. This coming Sunday his show will be on Trinidad & Tobago on CNN at 9PM.

Offline soccerman

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Trailer
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/8BNVJOKE11U" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/8BNVJOKE11U</a>

Offline Brownsugar

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Anybody have video of the actual episode?  We couldn't watch it here in T&T due to broadcast restrictions.... :frustrated:
"...If yuh clothes tear up
Or yuh shoes burst off,
You could still jump up when music play.
Old lady, young baby, everybody could dingolay...
Dingolay, ay, ay, ay ay,
Dingolay ay, ay, ay..."

RIP Shadow....The legend will live on in music...

Offline soccerman

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They didn't show it due to the pedestrian attack in London on Sunday. I heard it will be shown this Sunday instead.

Offline soccerman

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https://explorepartsunknown.com/trinidad/the-perfect-day-in-port-of-spain/

The Perfect Day in Port of Spain
Author:Tishanna Williams Photographer:Kibwe Brathwaite Date : 14 June 2017

Trinidad’s “discovery” by Sir Christopher Columbus resulted in the genocide of its indigenous population and the formation of one of the world’s most important trade industries on the backs of enslaved Africans and indentured East Indians—all at the hands of Spanish, French, and English interlopers, whose cultural additions to the island are superseded only by the commingling of their DNA.

In its capital, Port of Spain, history lies apparent yet stifled under the gloss of fresh paint and hushed warnings to avoid the gritty East End, where the descendants of a displaced and disregarded slave society still reside in project buildings built over the barrack yards of their forefathers.

In his 1992 Nobel Prize speech, St. Lucian poet Sir Derek Walcott described Port of Spain as “a downtown babel of shop signs and streets, mongrelized, polyglot, a ferment without a history, like heaven.”

Yet this is where the only acoustic musical instrument invented in the 20th century was born. Port of Spain is magic and mayhem, pulsing to one discordant beat that somehow becomes lovelier when you let go of preconceived notions of music and just listen.

For it is, again in the words of Walcott, “a city ideal in its commercial and human proportions, where a citizen is a walker and not a pedestrian … how Athens may have been before it became a cultural echo.”

As with the greatness of Athens, a day can never be enough. But if you only had one, this is how you should spend it.
 


8:00am   

Brian Lara Promenade


Independence Square N
Get Directions   
One’s desire to walk the streets or Port of Spain languidly sightseeing is infused with the city’s undercurrent of urgency. In Port of Spain it’s easy to wonder, where do I start? The answer is, with some hot doubles. This perfect appetizer for what will be a spectacular breakfast or brunch is made of chickpeas stewed in yellow curry, sandwiched between two soft split-pea fritters, or bara, and topped with chutneys and sauces both savory and sweet made from mango, cucumber and coconut. Careful! The hot sauce lexicon is different on this island, so asking for a little pepper can still mean a burning mouth.



8:30am   

Woodford Square
Get Directions   
The philosophies and speeches that led to the nation’s independence in 1962 and the Black Power Revolution in the 1970s are a snapshot of the history of this plaza, constructed in the 1800s. Its use as a meeting spot for those seeking to engage with learned men earned it the moniker “The University of Woodford Square.” Stroll to its western gate and you will see the Red House, the original seat of Parliament and site of the 1903 Water Riots, which saw 16 people killed and the building burnt to the ground, along with many annals of the state’s political history. Now the square mainly sees a thoroughfare of persons on their way to somewhere else, but once upon a time, this was where giants spoke. Think Cyril Lionel Robert James, the historian and Afro-Trinidadian rights activist, and the country’s first prime minister, Dr. Eric Williams. Anyone with even a little imagination need only stand within the gates to feel the weight of their words—once radical, now commonplace.
 


9:00am   

Charlotte Street
Get Directions   
Charlotte Street is a weird and wonderful hybrid of a Chinatown, farmers market, and Brooklyn neighborhood. Destitute citizens performing menial tasks for vendors in exchange for a few dollars run past fashionable urban folks looking for the hottest styles, while housewives search Chinese variety stores for bargains. From Thursday to Sunday, market vendors shout out deals on fruits, spices, and veggies. Behind these stalls, narrow staircases lead into malls filled with so many hairdressers and nail technicians that the smell of acrylic can be overpowering. Although many advise staying away from this side of town in favor of more affluent neighborhoods, Charlotte Street is the closest a traveler may get to the pulse of Port of Spain.



10:00am   

National Museum & Art Gallery of Trinidad and Tobago


#117 Frederick Street
Get Directions   
Walk up the street to find the National Museum & Art Gallery of Trinidad and Tobago. It houses over 10,000 permanent items in various exhibitions on the country’s indigenous people, pre- and post-emancipation history, national festivals, and island life during World War II. Ask for exhibition curator Keomi Serrette, who will happily guide those interested through the fine-art galleries. No art aficionado should miss the impressive collection of works by world-renowned Trinidadian painter Michel Jean Cazabon.



11:30am   

Riley’s


#79a Ariapita Ave
 Woodbrook
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On your way to brunch, along the northwestern end of the Queen’s Park Savannah, you will pass seven elaborate colonial mansions. Dubbed “The Magnificent Seven,” the buildings include Queen’s Royal College, which boasts Nobel Laureate V.S. Naipaul as an alum, and Stollmeyer’s Castle, which is partly modeled on Scotland’s Balmoral Castle.

When you’ve got only 24 hours, it’s always a toss-up between doing it all and doing it right, especially when it comes to food. Riley’s may just be the best breakfast or brunch option if you want to experience it all at a reasonable price. The ambiance is cafe quaint, and the Local Sampler coconut bake, with sides of salt fish buljol, smoked herring, choka (fire-roasted tomato), and plantains, gives you a mix of island breakfast staples in portions that won’t force you into a late-morning nap.

Choka is a method of fire-roasting veggies introduced to the island’s gastronomic landscape by the arrival of indentured East Indian laborers in 1845.



12:15pm   

Cocobel


#37 Fitt St S
 Woodbrook
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A stone’s throw from Riley’s is Medulla Art Gallery. Within lies Cocobel—a boutique experience for any chocolate lover. In the early 20th century Trinidad was the third-biggest producer of cocoa in the world. Though this is no longer the case, the Trinitario cocoa bean is still among the world’s best and remains the main ingredient for some of the world’s fine-chocolate makers. Let architect–turned–chocolate artisan Isabel Brash walk you through her confections, which in true Trini style are infused with indigenous flavors like guava, sorrel, mango, chadon beni (a local herb similar to cilantro), and good ol’ Trini rum.



1:00pm   

Fondes Amandes


Fondes Amandes Hills
 St. Anns
Get Directions   
The buzz of city life may be quintessential Port of Spain, but one of the joys of being here is the ease of escaping the bustle of city life without leaving town. From the Royal Botanic Gardens of Trinidad and Tobago (one of the oldest gardens in the West Indies) to the Bamboo Cathedral in Chaguaramas, where long stalks of bamboo bend to form a nearly 1,000-foot arch, calm can be found within the chaos. If you only need a small recharge, these may be just what you need. If you’re seeking to connect with nature, however, head to Fondes Amandes, where Akilah Jaramogi heads the Community Reforestation Project. Take a tour of the forest and rivers while learning about herbs and medicines. Don’t forget to ask Jaramogi about her Merikin heritage. She’s a descendant of Pa Neezer, the greatest Obeah man (spiritualist) to ever live on the island.
 


4:00pm   

All Stars Pan Yard


46-48 Duke Street
Get Directions   
At All Stars Pan Yard there is a pan man tuning his instruments while others train young players, and pan’s old guard recount their exploits. Sip a rum and Coke while getting an education in steel pan. The pan man is a warrior of national history. In this part of town, “behind the bridge,” deadly fights occurred between rival bands. Some of those maintain yards today and are sought after worldwide for performances and lectures on the instrument.



6:00pm   

Ariapita Avenue


Woodbrook
Get Directions   
The art of hanging-out, or “liming,” is a serious pursuit for Trinidadians, so you’ll find almost as many bars as businesses in the city. If the party scene isn’t your style, dinner and a show is an equally good idea. Enjoy a meal at Drink! Wine Bar; then go to a production at one of the many theaters, or hear up-and-coming artists debut at Kaiso Blues Cafe, on Woodford Street.

If you’re into nightlife, the liming continues at Frankie’s, where people from all walks of life mingle and down beers on the pavement to the sounds of soca—a modern offshoot of calypso—and dancehall. Walk down Ariapita Avenue and you’ll see this ritual happening everywhere. Hungry? No worries—this is street food central. Doubles, gyros, roasted corn, tacos, New York–style pizza, and burgers are available alongside gourmet restaurants.


 
10:00pm   

Murray Street


Woodbrook
Get Directions   



3:00   

Port of Spain

Turn up Murray Street, known as a red-light district, and enter The Big Black Box, where DJ Rawkus’ event “Throwback and Wine” mixes vintage calypso with new-age soca. Old or young, you will dance until you sweat at this party, so be prepared. Ask around and you may find celebs like Wendell Manwarren, a protégé of Derek Walcott and one of the owners of the space, or local celebrities, dancing away with drink in hand.

All that’s left to do when you are exhausted but happy is have the perfect rest. After a perfect day in Port of Spain, you will need it.

Offline Flex

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The Best Lines From Anthony Bourdain ‘Parts Unknown’ in Trinidad
“The food is the glue that binds the society together.”
by Whitney Filloon (Express).


On the latest episode of Parts Unknown, Anthony Bourdain sets sail for the Caribbean to scope out the island nation of Trinidad and Tobago. It’s a land of contrasts, and the episode opens by showing its two disparate but very much connected landscapes: the tranquil beaches complete with crashing waves and the crowded, bustling city accompanied by a chorus of car horns.

Bourdain’s professed fear of dancing in public keeps him away from massive parties like Mardi Gras in New Orleans or Trinidad’s own Carnival, so before the festivities begin, he heads out to explore Trinidad’s street food scene and discover the meaning of “liming” (hanging out) and “whining” (a particularly hippy style of dancing). But as Bourdain points out, the locals’ penchant for good times and celebration somewhat seems at odds with the nation’s dark history of colonialism, slavery, indentured servitude, and political violence.

An island nation just off the coast of Venezuela, it’s been colonized by the Spaniards, the Dutch, the French, and the British, with an economy built on sugar plantations and slavery and, later, oil. Beyond the economy, though, the oil industry had a bigger cultural effect on Trinidad: After the ruling British banned traditional drums made of animal skins, people improvised with steel oil drums and the sound has become an iconic part of Trinidadian music.

Here now, the 11 best lines from Parts Unknown’s Trinidad episode:

1.) Bourdain on the lay of the land: “There’s Trinidad, and Tobago: One country, two very different islands, two very different places. One island is what you expected when you arrive wearing flip-flops and a Hawaiian shirt, all greased up with cocoa butter; the other ain’t about that at all.”

2.) Bourdain on the biggest tourist draw: “Many visitors come to Trinidad for one thing and one thing only: Carnival, which locals say is the biggest party on Earth, a pre-Lenten festival of costumes, food, copious drinking, and the kind of dancing you better be good at before trying in public.”

3.) Bourdain on the diversity of Trinidad: “The faces you see in the streets are African, Indian, Chinese, Middle Eastern in features, and every shade of mix in between. This patchwork of ethnic identities and colors is a direct legacy of Trinidad’s colonial past.”

4.) Bourdain on a local legend in the steelpan music scene: “Boogsie composes his pieces by layering different types of drums on top of each other. The engine room, made of unpitched percussion, lays down the groove. Next a section of six bass pans drops a bass line. The guitar and cello pans add harmonies that sound kind of like strumming. And the front line pans play the melody. The result: a symphonic wall of sound.”

5.) Bourdain on the traditional Trinidadian dish that is doubles, a messy but popular snack: “Doubles are a Caribbean take on the Indian chana bhatura, two floppy tender pieces of soft Indian-style bread loaded with a wet heap of curried chickpeas, pepper sauce, and mango.”

6.) As one of the episode’s featured Trinidadians explains, “The food is the glue that binds the society together.”

7.) Bourdain on the stark contrast between Trinidad’s haves and have-nots: “It ain’t all good for everybody here by a long shot. Trinidad, with a population of only 1.3 million people, had 463 murders last year, giving Port of Spain a higher per capita murder rate than Detroit, Oakland, or Chicago.”

8.) Bourdain on the persistence of long-held cultural traditions such as calinda, a type of Caribbean martial art: “Trinidad, it should be pointed out right now before you start packing your Speedo and your cocoa butter, is an industrial island. And, like so many places, industrialization is changing the landscape here. But some things persist, remain, echo from all the way back then.”

9) Bourdain on how Trinidadian food evolved: “As in Brazil and the Deep South, African slaves were given little to work with when it came time for the meal. More often than not, if they wanted meat, they had to make do with what the slave masters did not want: a tongue here, a cow foot there. Here as elsewhere, they figured out how to make something tender and delicious from whatever there was, like souse — pig foot is pickled in chadon beni, onions and hot peppers and then topped off with cucumbers.”

10) Bourdain on the other side of the nation: “30 miles east of Trinidad, its sister island Tobago. A whole different vibe around here, more like what you hope for when you waddle away from the buffet on the S.S. Norwalk cruise ship. Lazy beach days, boat drinks, villas, all set to a Calypso beat.”

11) Bourdain’s final thoughts: “No island in the sun is paradise on earth, however it might look from the concrete blocks, glass cubicles, or wood boxes we may live in. And all the dancing and music and great food in the world can never hold together, by itself, what would keep us apart. What might look like a utopian stew of ethnicities and cultures living together under swaying palms is of course a far more complicated matter. But Trinidad has done better than most and in proud and unique style.”

Explore Parts Unknown

All Coverage of Parts Unknown

All Coverage of Anthony Bourdain





The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline Jumbie

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if you're interested in the T&T episode https://youtu.be/Yq_gXXSRo1M


Offline Flex

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Re: Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" visits Gloria's in Crown Heights
« Reply #10 on: June 28, 2017, 12:33:17 AM »
TT I’M SORRY
By DARCEL CHOY (Newsday)


FOLLOWING calls to boycott his businesses over statements he made on Anthony Bourdain’s ‘Parts Unknown’ cable television series, business magnate and chairman of Global Brands Group of Companies Mario Sabga-Aboud yesterday issued a public apology.

In a segment of the show, which was aired on CNN last Sunday, Bourdain sat down with the Sabga-Aboud family at their home in Bayshore, Westmoorings where he was told by (Mario) Sabga-Aboud that while the Syrian/Lebanese community is the smallest ethnic group in the country, it is the most powerful.

In a statement addressed to his ‘fellow citizens’, Sabga-Aboud yesterday described his words as “careless” as he ended up misrepresenting himself and his values.

“I have never taken for granted the blessing to be a born and bred Trinbagonian.

I am and have always been humbled by the opportunities and support I have received in my over 30 years in business in TT. Over these many years, I have met with many people across the wider society who in one way or another have positively impacted and enriched my life. This is testament to the amazing people of this country and as a Trinbagonian, I cherish that and I offer my deepest apologies to anyone whom I offended.” “I always treat with appreciation, love and respect the members of my staff, many of whom are like my family because they have been with me for over 25 and 30 years and are fundamentally the reason for my accomplishments.

This was a regrettable moment where my excitement led me to misrepresent myself as boastful instead of proud. Though I cannot retract my words, I hope that you all recognise my remorse and accept my sincere apology,” he said.

At that same dinner, businessman Peter George told Bourdain that one measure of concern they had is that at one time there used to be a huge middle class, which he said, was a sort of a security or buffer for any possible conflict between, ‘the haves and the have nots.’ “But now that’s eroding and they are getting poorer, so they started to get angry,” George said.

It was these statements which caused an uproar among citizens with many taking to social media to express their anger.

One man even held a protest yesterday in front of Rituals, a business owned by Sabga- Aboud on Maraval Road. Ian Smart called on citizens to boycott the business following Sabga-Aboud’s statements aired for all the world to hear on Bourdain’s programme.

Former Arima Mayor Ghassan Youseph, in a Facebook post, said there was a bit of “showing off” in that segment with the Sabga-Abouds and he felt that apologies were in order. “The way they said what they said is a disservice to the rest of us,” Youseph said. He added though that people need to be careful not to target a community of 5,000 in a country of 1.3 million.

Downtown Owners and Merchants Association (DOMA) President Gregory Aboud also joined in the discussion saying what was said did not represent anything his parents and grandparents taught him. “We share space in our country with many others and true power is the recognition of the rights and needs of everyone else. Being proud of our accomplishments need not be accompanied by boasts of power especially in an environment where so much suspicion and innuendo exists,” Aboud said.

Poet and artiste Muhammed Muwakil, who was also featured in the show, said the comments kept him awake. “The man spoke his truth, he spoke plainly...but I was really taken aback by his description of the middle class as, ‘a security’. I say to you sir that where I come from we have not a moment for anything other than love itself. So let this meet you with such dispensation.

“I want you to know that it is more than within your scope and ability to change the situations about which you lament.

And as you rise, so will we all. My hope is that you and others of your ilk recognize that you have as much a role to play as we, the powerful, in making this a safe country for all of us,” Muwakil said.

The show officially aired on Sunday on CNN, but citizens got an opportunity to watch it online a week early. A link from 13th Street Promotions to the 42-minute production appeared on Facebook on June 20 and quickly went viral. The video has had more than 500,000 views and more than 21,000 shares.

Bourdain who visited this country in January met with many people including choreographer La Shaun Prescott.

He spent time at Phase II’s panyard in Woodbrook with its arranger Len ‘Boogsie’ Sharpe and pan historian Kim Johnson.

Bourdain also met with the former TT High Commissioner to India Chandradath Singh and his family at Caura River as well as Calypso Queen of the World, Calypso Rose (McCartha Linda Sandy- Lewis)

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Offline soccerman

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Re: Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" visits Gloria's in Crown Heights
« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2017, 06:33:40 PM »
Saw it a week later, I thought he did a good job on the episode. I was reading how some ppl were upset that he didn't cover this or showcase that but the man can't cover everything and he tailored it how he saw fit. I never thought of it before but his question regarding if our liming and party culture acts as a mask of bigger societal issues had me thinking :thinking:

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Re: Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" visits Gloria's in Crown Heights
« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2018, 05:00:40 AM »
CNN's Anthony Bourdain dead at 61
By Brian Stelter, CNN


New York (CNN)In death, as in life, Anthony Bourdain brought us closer together.

On his award-winning series, "Parts Unknown," Bourdain brought the world home to CNN viewers. Through the simple act of sharing meals, he showcased both the extraordinary diversity of cultures and cuisines, yet how much we all have in common.

Tragically, he proved this again on Friday. Bourdain's death shook television viewers around the world. The most common sentiment: "I feel like I've lost a friend."

Bourdain was a larger-than-life figure -- a gifted chef and storyteller who used his books and shows to explore culture, cuisine and the human condition.

"Tony was a symphony," his friend and fellow chef Andrew Zimmern said Friday.

The news of Bourdain's death was met by profound sadness within CNN, where "Parts Unknown" has aired for the past five years. In an email to employees, the network's president, Jeff Zucker, remembered him as an "exceptional talent."

"Tony will be greatly missed not only for his work but also for the passion with which he did it," Zucker wrote.

CNN said Bourdain was in France working on an upcoming episode of his award-winning CNN series, "Parts Unknown." His close friend Eric Ripert, the French chef, found Bourdain unresponsive in his hotel room Friday morning. He was 61 and took his own life.

"Anthony was my best friend," Ripert tweeted. "An exceptional human being, so inspiring & generous. One of the great storytellers who connected w so many. I pray he is at peace from the bottom of my heart. My love and prayers are also w his family, friends and loved ones."

Anthony was my best friend. An exceptional human being, so inspiring & generous. One of the great storytellers who connected w so many. I pray he is at peace from the bottom of my heart. My love & prayers are also w his family, friends and loved ones. pic.twitter.com/LbIeZK14ia
— Eric Riper


Viewers felt connected to Bourdain through his fearless travels, his restless spirit and his magical way with words.

"His talents never ceased to amaze us and we will miss him very much," CNN said in a statement. "Our thoughts and prayers are with his daughter and family at this incredibly difficult time."

CNN's chief international correspondent, Christiane Amanpour, called Bourdain a "giant talent."

"My heart breaks for Tony Bourdain," she wrote on Twitter. "May he rest in peace now."

    My heart breaks for Tony Bourdain. May he rest in peace now. He was a friend, a collaborator, and family. A huge personality, a giant talent, a unique voice, and deeply, deeply human. My heart goes out to his daughter and family, and his longtime partners and friends at ZPZ.
    — Christiane Amanpour (@camanpour) June 8, 2018


President Donald Trump extended his condolences to Bourdain's family on Friday morning. "I enjoyed his show," Trump said. "He was quite a character."

Former President Barack Obama recalled a meal he shared with Bourdain in Vietnam while Obama was on a trip through Asia in 2016 -- an encounter captured in a "Parts Unknown" episode that year.

"'Low plastic stool, cheap but delicious noodles, cold Hanoi beer.' This is how I'll remember Tony," Obama posted to Twitter on Friday. "He taught us about food -- but more importantly, about its ability to bring us together. To make us a little less afraid of the unknown. We'll miss him."

    "Low plastic stool, cheap but delicious noodles, cold Hanoi beer." This is how I'll remember Tony. He taught us about food — but more importantly, about its ability to bring us together. To make us a little less afraid of the unknown. We'll miss him. pic.twitter.com/orEXIaEMZM
    — Barack Obama (@BarackObama) June 8, 2018


For the past year, Bourdain had been dating Italian actress Asia Argento. She remembered Bourdain as someone who "gave all of himself in everything that he did."

Last year, he advocated for Argento as she went public with accusations against disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein. "He was my love, my rock, my protector. I am beyond devastated."

Bourdain's death came days after fashion designer Kate Spade died in a suicide at her Manhattan apartment.

Suicide is a growing problem in the United States. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a survey Thursday showing suicide rates increased by 25% across the country over nearly two decades ending in 2016. Twenty-five states experienced a rise in suicides by more than 30%, the government report finds.

'The Elvis of bad boy chefs'

Bourdain was a master of his crafts -- first in the kitchen and then in the media. Through his TV shows and books, he helped audiences think differently about food, travel and themselves. He advocated for marginalized populations and campaigned for safer working conditions for restaurant staffs.

Anthony Bourdain shone a different light on the Middle East | Was a voice for the underdog.

Along the way, he received practically every award the industry has to offer.

In 2013, Peabody Award judges honored Bourdain and "Parts Unknown" for "expanding our palates and horizons in equal measure."

"He's irreverent, honest, curious, never condescending, never obsequious," the judges said. "People open up to him and, in doing so, often reveal more about their hometowns or homelands than a traditional reporter could hope to document."

The Smithsonian once called him "the original rock star" of the culinary world, "the Elvis of bad boy chefs." His shows took him to more than 100 countries and three networks.

While accepting the Peabody award in 2013, Bourdain described how he approached his work.

Explore "Parts Unknown": Everywhere he traveled

"We ask very simple questions: What makes you happy? What do you eat? What do you like to cook? And everywhere in the world we go and ask these very simple questions," he said. "We tend to get some really astonishing answers."

Friends and acquaintances remembered Bourdain's curiosity for the world's variety of cultures and cuisine rubbing off on them.

His good friend Michael Ruhlman said he was stunned by news of the suicide.

"The last I knew, he was in love. He was happy," Ruhlman told CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360." "He said, 'Love abounds' -- some of the last words he said to me."

Ruhlman said Bourdain was much more sensitive than people realized, but that sensitivity coupled with Bourdain's bravado made him a great storyteller.

Ruhlman and chef James Syhabout both said that when people found out they knew Bourdain, they would ask what he really was like.

Exactly like he was on camera, they said.

"And that's the beauty of him," Syhabout told CNN's "Erin Burnett OutFront." "He's unapologetically honest. ... It all gives us courage to be ourselves and be individuals and that's what really radiates from him."

Chef and writer Edward Lee, who hosted a season of a show produced by Bourdain, looked back at their time working together and wrote that "Tony gave us a world that we didn't know we needed."

Others who fondly recalled their interactions with Bourdain included chef Gordon Ramsay, who said Bourdain "brought the world into our homes and inspired so many people to explore cultures and cities through their food."

From 'happy dishwasher' to addiction to fame

Bourdain grew up in Leonia, New Jersey, and started working in kitchens in his teens -- including on Massachusetts' Cape Cod during the summer.

"I was a happy dishwasher," he said in a 2016 interview on NPR's "Fresh Air." "I jokingly say that I learned every important lesson, all the most important lessons of my life, as a dishwasher."

It was during those early jobs, he said, that he began using drugs, eventually developing a heroin addiction and other problems that he later said should have killed him in his 20s. He often talked of his addiction later in life.

"Somebody who wakes up in the morning and their first order of business is (to) get heroin -- I know what that's like," Bourdain said in a 2014 "Parts Unknown" episode highlighting an opioid crisis in Massachusetts.

After spending two years at New York's Vassar College, he dropped out and enrolled in culinary school. He spent years as a line cook and sous chef at restaurants in the Northeast before becoming executive chef at Manhattan's Brasserie Les Halles.

A different passion -- his writing -- helped put him on the map by his early 40s.

Inside Anthony Bourdain's globe-trotting career

He published two suspense novels before drawing widespread public attention with his 1999 New Yorker article, "Don't Eat Before Reading This." The article was about the secrets of kitchen life and shady characters he encountered along the way.

"In America, the professional kitchen is the last refuge of the misfit. It's a place for people with bad pasts to find a new family," he wrote.

The article morphed into a best-selling book in 2000, "Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly," which was translated into more than two dozen languages.

"When the book came out, it very quickly transformed my life -- I mean, changed everything," he told NPR.

Bourdain found himself on a path to international stardom. First, he hosted "A Cook's Tour" on the Food Network, then moved to the Travel Channel with "Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations," a breakout hit that earned two Emmy Awards and more than a dozen nominations.

Opinion: Anthony Bourdain saw the humanity in all of us

In 2013, both Bourdain and CNN took a risk by bringing him to a network still best known for breaking news and headlines. Bourdain quickly became one of its principal faces and a linchpin of its prime-time schedule.

Season 11 of "Parts Unknown" premiered last month on CNN, with destinations including Uruguay, Armenia and West Virginia. The series has been honored with five Emmys.

In his final weeks, Bourdain said he was especially looking forward to an episode about Hong Kong, which aired Sunday.

He called it a "dream show" in which he linked up with longtime Hong Kong resident and cinematographer Christopher Doyle.

"The idea was just to interview him and maybe get him to hold a camera. He ended up being director of photography for the entire episode," Bourdain told CNN in April. "For me it was like asking Joe DiMaggio to, you know, sign my baseball and instead he joined my Little League team for the whole season."

He helped a kid fighting leukemia make his culinary dream trip

The show's website on Friday posted an homage to Bourdain featuring one of his many oft-repeated quotations -- one that seemed to embody his philosophy: "If I'm an advocate for anything, it's to move. As far as you can, as much as you can. Across the ocean, or simply across the river. Walk in someone else's shoes or at least eat their food."


Anthony Bourdain on January 4, 2017, in Port of Spain, Trinidad

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

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Re: Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" visits Gloria's in Crown Heights
« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2018, 08:00:20 AM »
RIP Anthony Bourdain, you will be missed. Seemed like he had the ultimate dream job in traveling the world, meeting people, learning about their cultures, way of life and of course trying their foods, all in a down to earth, friendly and honest manner. You never know about the demons even the most successful people are sometimes dealing with.

 

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