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Author Topic: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.  (Read 4003 times)

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Offline Deeks

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #30 on: February 14, 2021, 11:21:18 PM »
Jamaica has something that TT does not have its called democracy Eric Williams and the PNM regime destroyed democracy in TT it will take generations to fix until the people of TT change there way of thinking things will never run properly in TT.

Explain to us how Eric and PNM destroy democracy in TT. The fact is that there is different degrees of democracy. Democracy in TT is feisty and divisive due to the multi racial composition of the country. Each racial group want to take TT in a direction which suits their vision. JA is a predominantly Afro and culturally Afro-centric country. There are East Indian, Chinese and others in all walks of life there. But politically Afros dominate the country. Hence there is more conformity in the way JA think and do things. One thing I can say that the two major ethnic groups in TT have never fought pitch battles in the streets against one another. But I have doubts what could happen in the future. What we need to do is stop raising the ethnic and racial heat in the country. It easy to call for blood. But it hard to stop it when it begins to flow.
For democracy to work you need a strong opposition Eric Williams destroyed the opposition party in TT he created a 1 party system in TT he and his cronies was able to do what ever they want it was not until ANR Robinson and Basdeo Panday did democracy return to TT.

In a democracy it is the duty of the Opposition to be loyal, but it is not the duty of the ruling party to sustain or maintain the viability of the Opposition. In any event, the NAR would not have emerged had the decimation you have imagined been fully realized or achieved.
Had the 1970 coupe been successful TT would have been much better off today.

Really. Well, Had Abu succeeded in 1990, would TT be a better country ?

Offline Deeks

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #31 on: February 14, 2021, 11:36:16 PM »
The truth hurts and socialism sucks until the people of TT get rid of the PNM party they will never succeed on the international stage.

Who says socialism(govt programs don't work. The number 1 capitalist country in the world (US)  has various socialistic programs they implement when needed to help their citizens.  Read and educate yourself. Sorry for putting political stuff in this football thread.

http://www.milwaukeeindependent.com/syndicated/false-profits-farmers-despise-socialism-depend-tax-payer-funded-government-handouts/

Federal subsidies to the rescue

In 2018, the Trump administration created a subsidy program intended to mitigate farmers’ losses related to the trade war. Breaking from tradition, the administration let the U.S. Department of Agriculture spend the money without first getting approval from Congress.

Under the program, farmers and ranchers received $8.5 billion for 2018 losses and $14.3 billion for 2019. No trade-related subsidies have been distributed for 2020 except for the remaining third tranche of the 2019 payments.


As Trump put it during a recent rally in Iowa, “Some of the farmers were making more money the way I was doing it than working their asses off, all right? They were very, very happy.”

Since the costs of the program are financed by all taxpayers, states with large urban populations such as California, Texas and New York are footing the bill – and spending more money than they are getting in support. California farmers, for example, received just $106 million in payments – despite the $6 billion in losses – even as the state’s taxpayers contributed $2 billion to the program.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2021, 11:59:46 PM by Deeks »

Offline Deeks

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #32 on: February 14, 2021, 11:59:19 PM »
For democracy to work you need a strong opposition Eric Williams destroyed the opposition party in TT he created a 1 party system in TT he and his cronies was able to do what ever they want it was not until ANR Robinson and Basdeo Panday did democracy return to TT.

Eric Williams never destroyed the opposition. The opposition destroyed itself. Eric was able to keep the PNM in line. Very few deviated. Robinson disagreed with him, left and formed his own party. How is that Eric's fault. In TT you are free to form your own party, or join any party you want. The issue is, if your party can convince enough people to give your party the benefit of doubt. This has happened twice(Panday and Robbie) and (Kamala and her coalition, with Jack and Abdullah). What happened to them? They all fell out of favour with the voters. The US is the number 1 democracy and two parties vie for the spoils all the time. So I am asking you, why is TT not a democracy?
« Last Edit: February 15, 2021, 12:00:58 AM by Deeks »

Offline maxg

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #33 on: February 15, 2021, 12:58:22 AM »
Although it's not my intention to be part of the Hijack of this thread, I feel ppl need to understand perspective, respect, and history only then we can determine from where we come, understand where we are, and plot a course that we do not go full circle and repeat our mistakes.
This would be my last post on this subject. Moderators, I'm sorry.

add: Maybe through this, we will understand why certain coaches are so revered and our own are discarded with disdain, in spite of their successes. One mistake is just what our born Trinis need to be thrown out, whereas outside of TT, they themselves are promoted and themselves revered. We don't respect ourselves.

Not because we disagree with a current system or process, we must disparage or disrespect the individual's accomplishments.
--------------------------------------------

Eric Williams and the Anticolonial Tradition
The Making of a Diasporan Intellectual
Maurice St. Pierre
 
New World Studies
Caribbean & African Literature

A leader in the social movement that achieved Trinidad and Tobago’s independence from Britain in 1962, Eric Williams (1911–1981) served as its first prime minister. Although much has been written about Williams as a historian and a politician, Maurice St. Pierre is the first to offer a full-length treatment of him as an intellectual. St. Pierre focuses on Williams's role not only in challenging the colonial exploitation of Trinbagonians but also in seeking to educate and mobilize them in an effort to generate a collective identity in the struggle for independence. Drawing on extensive archival research and using a conflated theoretical framework, the author offers a portrait of Williams that shows how his experiences in Trinidad, England, and America radicalized him and how his relationships with other Caribbean intellectuals—along with Aimé Césaire in Martinique, Juan Bosch in the Dominican Republic, George Lamming of Barbados, and Frantz Fanon from Martinique—enabled him to seize opportunities for social change and make a significant contribution to Caribbean epistemology.
https://www.upress.virginia.edu/title/4621
___________________________________

Eric's Curse Haunts Politicians
October 28, 2001
By Raffique Shah


THE alternative to the PNM in government, the late Dr Eric Williams boasted many years ago, is chaos. At the time, many of us laughed at the notion that the PNM was the only organised political party in the country, that there was no other group that was capable of building a political structure that could be democratic and could endure. Today, decades after he made that statement, we need to ponder on his psychic-like prediction. Or, if I may put it another way, we must examine the deficiencies of the politicians who followed Williams, all of whom seem to have deliberately set out to prove him a veritable prophet of doom.

I recall this often-quoted Williams statement against the backdrop of what's happening in the current political scenario, which can best be described as being close to chaotic. Indeed, ever since the PNM was almost annihilated in the 1986 general election, we have seen Eric's successors work hard to make the PNM look good. The NAR, an amalgam of disparate forces whose only goal was to remove the PNM from office, crashed in less than two years. True, the alliance-it was never really a party-boasted of lofty goals like "uniting our rainbow people", of fighting against corruption that had thrived under PNM rule, and of promoting good, democratic governance.

That close to 400,000 out of 577,000 who voted in that election believed in the ideals promoted by the NAR, said something about our people yearning for unity, for an end to the politics of race. Interestingly, the man who almost single-handedly dismantled the NAR was one Basdeo Panday. Because he could not have his way in the Cabinet, he took up his marbles, meaning most of the Indians who supported the alliance, and walked. The NAR soon crumbled, falling victim to an attempted coup and a return to racial polarisation. In the 1991 election, the party polled 127,000 votes, 25,000 less than Panday's newly formed UNC. But like the ONR in the 1981 election (that party attracted 91,000 votes to the ULF's 62,000), it failed to win a seat in Trinidad.

In rapid succession after that, we saw Eric's prediction come to pass. His own PNM, under the leadership of Patrick Manning, dismantled itself from government in less than four years after being returned to office. Which leads me to ask if Eric, in making his famous statement, had not meant, "After me (and not the PNM), it will be chaos." Manning made a number of blunders, and by the time he was forced into calling an early election in 1995, he had lost ground, and was ousted from power by a coalition between two enemies-of-yesterday, Ray Robinson and Panday. That sweetheart "contract" lasted as long as a sno-cone in the hot sun, and only the defection of Vincent Lasse and Rupert Griffith from the PNM saved Panday's neck.

Today, six years after he had brokered a deal that saw him achieve his life-long ambition of becoming Prime Minister of the country, Panday's party is in shambles and his future in politics looks grim. Over the next few days, he'll be fighting to retain the UNC's name and symbol. In the meantime, some of his key ministers are literally fighting over the allocation of ETP (formerly URP) 10-day jobs, proving what political observers had known for quite some time. The ETP, like all its predecessor programmes in which patronage is dished out, is a potent political tool over which ministers will trade blows if they feel short-changed. And with an old brawler and boxing promoter like Arnim Smith sitting atop this manure heap, Panday could well end up pulling larger crowds at his free-fist-fights.

In the meantime, rumblings in the ranks of the PNM are threatening to undermine the core support of the party. The perception among the party's 270,000-odd supporters is that the delay in confirming Colm Imbert for Diego Martin East and Fitzgerald Hinds for Laventille, is linked to differences between Manning and Keith Rowley (who, incidentally, was confirmed as the candidate for Diego Martin West). So once more, even as the PNM is being offered power on a platter, there seem to be people in the party who are working overtime to ensure that its already disgruntled supporters stay away from the polls. And while, thus far, there have been no defections from the Ramesh Maharaj camp, power is yet another potent weapon in Panday's arsenal that could make the morally weak buckle at the knees.

Back in 1958, after only two years in power, Williams told PNMites: "We have to build our party organisation from the bottom up. We have to reorganise our system of education so that, through the party, it penetrates into the deepest masses of the people." Without doubt, Williams failed in his mission to build the well-structured party he had envisioned in those early days. Until the day he died, he had himself used power and patronage to perpetuate PNM's domination of local politics. But at least there was something the PNM had that other parties did not, and this came from work done by committed party activists who ensured that constituency groups and other organs of the party functioned.

In the run-up to the 1976 election, Williams had branded several of his sitting MPs "millstones", and when they were nominated, he had the nominations returned to the respective groups, asking them to find new candidates. The constituency groups bucked Williams, insisting that their nominees be accepted (a point Manning should note very carefully). The great Williams, a small-time dictator in his own way, bowed to the will of the party. The five men were returned to office, although Williams snubbed them thereafter.

On the eve of what will be the 11th general election since Williams entered the political arena in 1956, we are sitting on the edge of a political precipice. And it's all because no one or no group has taken the time to properly structure a party. Today, Panday holds what he has dubbed "an assembly" of his party, which he intends to expel Ramesh and company from the UNC. That "assembly", however, is really a free-for-all, a crowd that will have some legitimate members, but many more freeloaders who ride with the political wind. It's the political tragedy of our time that almost 50 years after Williams put his curse on those who opposed the PNM, no one has proved him wrong. And the irony of it all is that only Manning has the power to so do.

http://www.trinicenter.com/Raffique/2001/Oct/282001.htm

http://www.trinicenter.com/Raffique/

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
More readings from a Raffique Shah perspective 1970
https://www.guardian.co.tt/news/shah-recalls-role-in-revolution-6.2.1101556.6a43492c4a
http://www.trinicenter.com/1970/
http://www.trinicenter.com/Raffique/indianleaders.htm
General current reading blogs by Shah
https://www.trinidadandtobagonews.com/blog/?tag=raffique-shah
----------------------------------------------
Critique of Shah

https://icdn.today/dr-eric-williams-to-raffique-shah-i-am-not-going-to-have-a-mutineer-for-my-opposition-leader/

« Last Edit: February 15, 2021, 01:15:40 AM by maxg »

Offline ffisback

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #34 on: February 15, 2021, 01:35:57 AM »
For democracy to work you need a strong opposition Eric Williams destroyed the opposition party in TT he created a 1 party system in TT he and his cronies was able to do what ever they want it was not until ANR Robinson and Basdeo Panday did democracy return to TT.

Eric Williams never destroyed the opposition. The opposition destroyed itself. Eric was able to keep the PNM in line. Very few deviated. Robinson disagreed with him, left and formed his own party. How is that Eric's fault. In TT you are free to form your own party, or join any party you want. The issue is, if your party can convince enough people to give your party the benefit of doubt. This has happened twice(Panday and Robbie) and (Kamala and her coalition, with Jack and Abdullah). What happened to them? They all fell out of favour with the voters. The US is the number 1 democracy and two parties vie for the spoils all the time. So I am asking you, why is TT not a democracy?
Anyone who thinks Eric Williams did not destroy democracy in TT is living in denial once Eric Williams got Rudranath Capildeo a job in England he had gotten rid of the only leader in the country that had the ability to stop him from doing what he wanted Eric Williams now had control of the house and there was nobody to stop him he basically sabotage the opposition  party democracy was over in TT until Anr Robinson and Basdeo Panday was able to form a strong opposition party to stop the PNM party them other partys was just making up numbers them elections in TT use to be rig.

Offline pull stones

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #35 on: February 15, 2021, 02:22:07 AM »
For the love of cornmeal deeks, why do you waste precious time with this troll? this bloke is never here to share and bond, but rather to annoy and distract. go through all his threads and show me one time where he ever vibes with the forum. From observing this bloke he strikes me as a pest who enjoys ruffling feathers with his only reason for being here is to fish hoping to catch fool so he could waste your time with foolish banter. good luck mate. i for one would never waste my time with argumentative miserable folks.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2021, 12:20:19 PM by pull stones »

Offline Deeks

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #36 on: February 15, 2021, 08:46:46 AM »
okay, pullstones. I done with the politics. But we should pressure the govt to help the FA to form a bubble like what they did for cricket. It is only right and fair because this is for the TT NATIONAL team.

Offline pull stones

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #37 on: February 15, 2021, 12:31:18 PM »
okay, pullstones. I done with the politics. But we should pressure the govt to help the FA to form a bubble like what they did for cricket. It is only right and fair because this is for the TT NATIONAL team.
I don’t mind politics mate, it’s the rubbish topics that goes no where that throws me in a pile. take for instance the controversial chap and this ffisback bloke, these two nutters will take up a couple of pages saying the same thing over and over again if you allow them, then after all is said and done you’re totally drained because they stay hard on their point of view never relenting an inch, and in the end you’ve learned absolutely nothing from engaging them but instead they leave scratching your head. no thanks mate, I’m here for the vibes and the opportunity to learn something new.

Offline Deeks

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #38 on: February 15, 2021, 12:40:16 PM »
okay, pullstones. I done with the politics. But we should pressure the govt to help the FA to form a bubble like what they did for cricket. It is only right and fair because this is for the TT NATIONAL team.
I don’t mind politics mate, it’s the rubbish topics that goes no where that throws me in a pile. take for instance the controversial chap and this ffisback bloke, these two nutters will take up a couple of pages saying the same thing over and over again if you allow them, then after all is said and done you’re totally drained because they stay hard on their point of view never relenting an inch, and in the end you’ve learned absolutely nothing from engaging them but instead they leave scratching your head. no thanks mate, I’m here for the vibes and the opportunity to learn something new.

Cool, Breds!

Offline pull stones

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #39 on: February 15, 2021, 12:49:42 PM »
okay, pullstones. I done with the politics. But we should pressure the govt to help the FA to form a bubble like what they did for cricket. It is only right and fair because this is for the TT NATIONAL team.
I don’t mind politics mate, it’s the rubbish topics that goes no where that throws me in a pile. take for instance the controversial chap and this ffisback bloke, these two nutters will take up a couple of pages saying the same thing over and over again if you allow them, then after all is said and done you’re totally drained because they stay hard on their point of view never relenting an inch, and in the end you’ve learned absolutely nothing from engaging them and you’re left scratching your head. no thanks mate, I’m here for the vibes and the opportunity to learn something new.

Cool, Breds!

Offline ffisback

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #40 on: February 15, 2021, 02:54:51 PM »
Although it's not my intention to be part of the Hijack of this thread, I feel ppl need to understand perspective, respect, and history only then we can determine from where we come, understand where we are, and plot a course that we do not go full circle and repeat our mistakes.
This would be my last post on this subject. Moderators, I'm sorry.

add: Maybe through this, we will understand why certain coaches are so revered and our own are discarded with disdain, in spite of their successes. One mistake is just what our born Trinis need to be thrown out, whereas outside of TT, they themselves are promoted and themselves revered. We don't respect ourselves.

Not because we disagree with a current system or process, we must disparage or disrespect the individual's accomplishments.
--------------------------------------------

Eric Williams and the Anticolonial Tradition
The Making of a Diasporan Intellectual
Maurice St. Pierre
 
New World Studies
Caribbean & African Literature

A leader in the social movement that achieved Trinidad and Tobago’s independence from Britain in 1962, Eric Williams (1911–1981) served as its first prime minister. Although much has been written about Williams as a historian and a politician, Maurice St. Pierre is the first to offer a full-length treatment of him as an intellectual. St. Pierre focuses on Williams's role not only in challenging the colonial exploitation of Trinbagonians but also in seeking to educate and mobilize them in an effort to generate a collective identity in the struggle for independence. Drawing on extensive archival research and using a conflated theoretical framework, the author offers a portrait of Williams that shows how his experiences in Trinidad, England, and America radicalized him and how his relationships with other Caribbean intellectuals—along with Aimé Césaire in Martinique, Juan Bosch in the Dominican Republic, George Lamming of Barbados, and Frantz Fanon from Martinique—enabled him to seize opportunities for social change and make a significant contribution to Caribbean epistemology.
https://www.upress.virginia.edu/title/4621
___________________________________

Eric's Curse Haunts Politicians
October 28, 2001
By Raffique Shah


THE alternative to the PNM in government, the late Dr Eric Williams boasted many years ago, is chaos. At the time, many of us laughed at the notion that the PNM was the only organised political party in the country, that there was no other group that was capable of building a political structure that could be democratic and could endure. Today, decades after he made that statement, we need to ponder on his psychic-like prediction. Or, if I may put it another way, we must examine the deficiencies of the politicians who followed Williams, all of whom seem to have deliberately set out to prove him a veritable prophet of doom.

I recall this often-quoted Williams statement against the backdrop of what's happening in the current political scenario, which can best be described as being close to chaotic. Indeed, ever since the PNM was almost annihilated in the 1986 general election, we have seen Eric's successors work hard to make the PNM look good. The NAR, an amalgam of disparate forces whose only goal was to remove the PNM from office, crashed in less than two years. True, the alliance-it was never really a party-boasted of lofty goals like "uniting our rainbow people", of fighting against corruption that had thrived under PNM rule, and of promoting good, democratic governance.

That close to 400,000 out of 577,000 who voted in that election believed in the ideals promoted by the NAR, said something about our people yearning for unity, for an end to the politics of race. Interestingly, the man who almost single-handedly dismantled the NAR was one Basdeo Panday. Because he could not have his way in the Cabinet, he took up his marbles, meaning most of the Indians who supported the alliance, and walked. The NAR soon crumbled, falling victim to an attempted coup and a return to racial polarisation. In the 1991 election, the party polled 127,000 votes, 25,000 less than Panday's newly formed UNC. But like the ONR in the 1981 election (that party attracted 91,000 votes to the ULF's 62,000), it failed to win a seat in Trinidad.

In rapid succession after that, we saw Eric's prediction come to pass. His own PNM, under the leadership of Patrick Manning, dismantled itself from government in less than four years after being returned to office. Which leads me to ask if Eric, in making his famous statement, had not meant, "After me (and not the PNM), it will be chaos." Manning made a number of blunders, and by the time he was forced into calling an early election in 1995, he had lost ground, and was ousted from power by a coalition between two enemies-of-yesterday, Ray Robinson and Panday. That sweetheart "contract" lasted as long as a sno-cone in the hot sun, and only the defection of Vincent Lasse and Rupert Griffith from the PNM saved Panday's neck.

Today, six years after he had brokered a deal that saw him achieve his life-long ambition of becoming Prime Minister of the country, Panday's party is in shambles and his future in politics looks grim. Over the next few days, he'll be fighting to retain the UNC's name and symbol. In the meantime, some of his key ministers are literally fighting over the allocation of ETP (formerly URP) 10-day jobs, proving what political observers had known for quite some time. The ETP, like all its predecessor programmes in which patronage is dished out, is a potent political tool over which ministers will trade blows if they feel short-changed. And with an old brawler and boxing promoter like Arnim Smith sitting atop this manure heap, Panday could well end up pulling larger crowds at his free-fist-fights.

In the meantime, rumblings in the ranks of the PNM are threatening to undermine the core support of the party. The perception among the party's 270,000-odd supporters is that the delay in confirming Colm Imbert for Diego Martin East and Fitzgerald Hinds for Laventille, is linked to differences between Manning and Keith Rowley (who, incidentally, was confirmed as the candidate for Diego Martin West). So once more, even as the PNM is being offered power on a platter, there seem to be people in the party who are working overtime to ensure that its already disgruntled supporters stay away from the polls. And while, thus far, there have been no defections from the Ramesh Maharaj camp, power is yet another potent weapon in Panday's arsenal that could make the morally weak buckle at the knees.

Back in 1958, after only two years in power, Williams told PNMites: "We have to build our party organisation from the bottom up. We have to reorganise our system of education so that, through the party, it penetrates into the deepest masses of the people." Without doubt, Williams failed in his mission to build the well-structured party he had envisioned in those early days. Until the day he died, he had himself used power and patronage to perpetuate PNM's domination of local politics. But at least there was something the PNM had that other parties did not, and this came from work done by committed party activists who ensured that constituency groups and other organs of the party functioned.

In the run-up to the 1976 election, Williams had branded several of his sitting MPs "millstones", and when they were nominated, he had the nominations returned to the respective groups, asking them to find new candidates. The constituency groups bucked Williams, insisting that their nominees be accepted (a point Manning should note very carefully). The great Williams, a small-time dictator in his own way, bowed to the will of the party. The five men were returned to office, although Williams snubbed them thereafter.

On the eve of what will be the 11th general election since Williams entered the political arena in 1956, we are sitting on the edge of a political precipice. And it's all because no one or no group has taken the time to properly structure a party. Today, Panday holds what he has dubbed "an assembly" of his party, which he intends to expel Ramesh and company from the UNC. That "assembly", however, is really a free-for-all, a crowd that will have some legitimate members, but many more freeloaders who ride with the political wind. It's the political tragedy of our time that almost 50 years after Williams put his curse on those who opposed the PNM, no one has proved him wrong. And the irony of it all is that only Manning has the power to so do.

http://www.trinicenter.com/Raffique/2001/Oct/282001.htm

http://www.trinicenter.com/Raffique/

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
More readings from a Raffique Shah perspective 1970
https://www.guardian.co.tt/news/shah-recalls-role-in-revolution-6.2.1101556.6a43492c4a
http://www.trinicenter.com/1970/
http://www.trinicenter.com/Raffique/indianleaders.htm
General current reading blogs by Shah
https://www.trinidadandtobagonews.com/blog/?tag=raffique-shah
----------------------------------------------
Critique of Shah

https://icdn.today/dr-eric-williams-to-raffique-shah-i-am-not-going-to-have-a-mutineer-for-my-opposition-leader/
Raffique Shah was the last great army general TT ever had these people had the vision to see what was going on in TT and to make a stand its unfortunate that the people of TT was sleeping and is still sleeping.

Offline Storeboy

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #41 on: February 16, 2021, 10:21:04 AM »
quote author=ffisback link=topic=66779.msg997591#msg997591 date=1613422491]
----------------------------------------------
Critique of Shah

https://icdn.today/dr-eric-williams-to-raffique-shah-i-am-not-going-to-have-a-mutineer-for-my-opposition-leader/
Raffique Shah was the last great army general TT ever had these people had the vision to see what was going on in TT and to make a stand its unfortunate that the people of TT was sleeping and is still sleeping.
[/quote]
Correection: Raffique Shah's highest rank was Lieutenant.
Never, never, ever give up! Go T&T Warriors!

Offline ABTrini

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Re: Terry Fenwick have a lot of INSTANT options, he needs the support.
« Reply #42 on: February 17, 2021, 02:31:12 PM »
quote author=ffisback link=topic=66779.msg997591#msg997591 date=1613422491]
----------------------------------------------
Critique of Shah

https://icdn.today/dr-eric-williams-to-raffique-shah-i-am-not-going-to-have-a-mutineer-for-my-opposition-leader/
Raffique Shah was the last great army general TT ever had these people had the vision to see what was going on in TT and to make a stand its unfortunate that the people of TT was sleeping and is still sleeping.
Correection: Raffique Shah's highest rank was Lieutenant. As a lieutenant in the Trinidad and Tobago Regiment, he led an army mutiny in 1970
[/quote]
Yuh joking right? The last great------ yuh really need to qualify  greatness.

 

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